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LulzSec Suspect Arrested By UK Police

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the lulz-till-it-isn't dept.

Security 361

An anonymous reader writes "The UK's Police Computer e-Crime Unit (PCeU) has arrested a 19-year-old man in Wickford, Essex, in connection with the series of LulzSec attacks against organizations including the CIA, PBS and Sony. The man, who has been arrested under the Computer Misuse and Fraud Act, has had his house searched and a significant amount of material taken away by police for forensic examination. The PCeU worked with local Essex police and the FBI on the investigation."

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361 comments

It's prison time (1, Interesting)

cgeys (2240696) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511194)

With all the high profile attacks and leaking private info of companies then attacking FBI and other law enforcement agencies I bet his looking for a lifetime sentence. Serves him right.

Re:It's prison time (5, Informative)

Bob Gelumph (715872) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511226)

How about some due process, first?

Re:It's prison time (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511294)

It's lulzier without it.

Re:It's prison time (5, Funny)

WiglyWorm (1139035) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511324)

Sounds like you hate America, son.

Re:It's prison time (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511514)

This isn't in America you nationalistic prick. Sounds like you hate reading, son.

Re:It's prison time (1)

SilentStaid (1474575) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511882)

Whoosh.

Re:It's prison time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511690)

Just to be clear, you ARE referring to the country thats trying to apply due process in civilian courts to "enemy combatants" captured in the field, right?

Re:It's prison time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511382)

Due process? it's England, you are guilty until you've served 17 years, then you get a pardon.

Re:It's prison time (2)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511712)

(+1, Judiciary)

Re:It's prison time (3, Interesting)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511482)

How about some due process, first?

They've been arrested. The public is watching. There will be a trial. How much more due process do you think a criminal deserves? These guys aren't going to some secret military prison to be tortured because their second cousin twice removed once had a bad thought about his government...

Re:It's prison time (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511518)

You're missing the point. The parent is criticising the grand parent for automatically labelling him as guilty and already saying what his sentence is, before any due process has taken place..

Re:It's prison time (5, Funny)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511550)

You're missing the point. The parent is criticising the grand parent for automatically labelling him as guilty and already saying what his sentence is, before any due process has taken place..

Yeah. On the internet, we call that 'tuesday'.

Re:It's prison time (1)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511730)

Doesn't mean it's the way it should be.

Re:It's prison time (0)

JamesP (688957) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511506)

I agree

Except he should be covered in tar and feathers.

It's lulzier that way

Re:It's prison time (1)

Lysander7 (2085382) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511532)

What due process?

Re:It's prison time (1, Flamebait)

DickBreath (207180) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511552)

Due process?

Please discontinue your wrong thinking immediately.

Remain calm, and stay where you are. A government re-education technician will be along momentarily to assist you.

Re:It's prison time (1)

adolf (21054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511254)

With all the high profile attacks and leaking private info of companies then attacking FBI and other law enforcement agencies I bet his looking for a lifetime sentence. Serves him right.

You mean, like Federal pound-me-in-the-ass prison [youtube.com] ?

(Did anyone else notice that the end of that Youtube URL ends in "FuCK0"? Lulz.)

Re:It's prison time (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511456)

I always wonder if that joke was intended to bother people rather than amuse them.

I mean, is prison rape really the most hilarious rape?

Re:It's prison time (1)

Luckyo (1726890) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511752)

In before prison slut walks.

Re:It's prison time (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511262)

Give me a break. If it is THAT vulnerable where a hacker can access a system then they are going after the wrong person. It isn't like this guy is in the country. You can't just go after anybody you please. It isn't reasonable. They can't catch guys operating out of North Korea, Sudan, Iran, or Cuba. There should be standards that developers have to live up to or I should say the products. If they don't then the companies selling said products should be the ones held liable. Yes- it means increased costs. That is what would be reasonable. Just because you catch a handful of the people who can exploit these systems because those systems are so easy to exploit does not fix the problem. It is stupid to go after the very people who are finding the holes rather than fixing the damm holes.

Re:It's prison time (5, Insightful)

cgeys (2240696) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511288)

Yeah, you try breaking in to a house and after that try to explain it with "well, they should had armored their door and made better locks".

Re:It's prison time (2)

EdZ (755139) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511856)

Closer would be placing your money in a bank, then later finding out - after the bank has been robbed and your money stolen - that their vault door was just painted onto a bit of plywood leant against the wall.

Re:It's prison time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511330)

Three countries you mentioned, North Korea, Sudan, and Cuba, are mostly running TRS-80s on 300 baud. There are actual countries with actual pipes that are doing damage.

Re:It's prison time (1)

rbrausse (1319883) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511630)

the big tube to Cuba will be launched in July [google.com] , the group FidelSec is surely in ramp-up preparations

Re:It's prison time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511332)

You're right--you can't go after anyone you please. You can, however, go after people who illegally hack private networks, steal private information, expose thousands of private persons to harm by distributing said information, and are residing in countries where law enforcement will support you. Hackers need to be aware of this.

-fearsomepirate

Re:It's prison time (1)

AJH16 (940784) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511836)

Better idea, nothing says you can't blame BOTH!

Re:It's prison time (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511316)

anonesc esc
"The good news everybody: Ryan has little to do with #LulzSec besides running IRC. All 6 members of @LulzSec are fine and safe." #AntiSec

Lifetime sentence for ru

Re:It's prison time (2)

norriefc (1998536) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511370)

With all the high profile attacks and leaking private info of companies then attacking FBI and other law enforcement agencies I bet his looking for a lifetime sentence. Serves him right.

This is the UK. Should he be someone from lulzsec and if they have a decent amount of evidence to prove he was a main player I'd say he'll get 2-3 years max and likely out in 12-18 months for good behaviour

Re:It's prison time (2)

dkf (304284) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511614)

This is the UK. Should he be someone from lulzsec and if they have a decent amount of evidence to prove he was a main player I'd say he'll get 2-3 years max and likely out in 12-18 months for good behaviour

At that sentence length, no. Maximum 1/3 off for good behaviour once the sentence is over 2 years long.

Re:It's prison time (2)

sseaman (931799) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511380)

A lifetime sentence for what? Was any demonstrable harm done?

If the allegations are true he engaged in criminal activity, no doubt, but let's not lump him in with war criminals.

moron (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511386)

so you think, a random 19 year old guy actually can have a major hand in hacking of high profile, high security targets. not unreachable, untouchable circles in russia, china, but, a 19 year old random youth from britain. you are unable to realize 'arrests have to be made' in order to save face in these situations, and random pimpleface kid goes to prison for that.

morons like you make the world go haywire. thank you for your existence.

Re:moron (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511462)

Wha? I was coding games on my own when I was 12. Anyone who's actually interested could easily be a decent blackhat by 19.

Re:moron (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511886)

You seriously think it's someone operating from Russia or China, and not just some kid doing this stuff as a lark? Have you read any of lulzsec's communiques? I'm not surprised the kid is 19 at all.

By the time I was 19, I had run my own news website, I'd coded simple computer games, I was regularly reading things like alt.2600, etc. Now I'm NOT a hacker and I've never been one, but I could have EASILY decided to go that route at 19.

Kevin Mitnick was hacking computers for example at 16 years old.

And finally if being 19 precluded you from being a hacker then we wouldn't even have the movie War Games.

More likely a couple of days in a police station (1)

biodata (1981610) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511504)

I doubt he will ever be convicted of anything, unless he makes some kind of confession. That isn't the point. The point is to have a splash in the newspapers soon after the attack. This is an information war, not a real one, and noone wants to start filling up prisons with skiddies, even if they could prove anything beyond reasonable doubt.

Re:It's prison time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511810)

Nah, a lifetime sentence isn't necessary, just a few large cocks in the ass over the course of a couple years. I hope he remembers the "lulz" as he's getting his fudge packed.

1 down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511218)

3 to replace him

fuck yeah

Re:1 down (1)

smelch (1988698) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511450)

That's the idea, but really it doesn't work that way for this kind of hacking any more than it works for carjacking. In this case, one down is probably 100 less who think they'll get away with it. I mean, it's not like they're freedom fighters being stepped on by the government. They're class A jackholes, being jackholes. Watching the class clown get sent to the office where he is butt-raped by the principal probably doesn't inspire lots of others to take up the mantle and carry on the cause of lulz.

It must be Tuesday (4, Insightful)

cultiv8 (1660093) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511220)

It's important to note at this point that it has not been confirmed that the arrested man is suspected of being involved with LulzSec by the authorities. But many observers are speculating that that could be the case.

So this "news" article is nothing but speculation?

Re:It must be Tuesday (2)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511272)

So this "news" article is nothing but speculation?

In the dark ages before the internet, when dinosaurs ruled the earth and grammar nazis were kept caged in cellars underneath college english departments, journalists learned to never directly state the person was guilty. Guidelines were developed to prevent over-zealous lawyers from destroying the freedom of the press through endless lawsuits. So, in the event of a crime, we are not allowed to refer to it as "your" crime, merely "a" crime.

Re:It must be Tuesday (1)

M. Baranczak (726671) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511664)

This is true. But the "some observers say" thing should set off anybody's bullshit detector. Who the hell are those observers? Are they people who actually have inside knowledge of the case? Random Slashdot posters? The journalist's drinking buddies?

Re:It must be Tuesday (4, Informative)

rapiddescent (572442) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511308)

in other news, the usually vocal Lulzsec twitter feed [twitter.com] stopped at the same time as the arrest.

Re:It must be Tuesday (1)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511558)

he shoulda used 8 proxies

Re:It must be Tuesday (1)

Teknikal69 (1769274) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511884)

Unless he was unknowingly the first proxy/bounce in the chain.

Bit early to think he is guilty but I fear they may need a scapegoat anyway.

Lulzsec twitter feed stopped at time of arrest (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511644)

"norendition Lara Fist RT @anonesc v @KforKallisti "Ryan has little to do with #LulzSec besides running IRC. All 6 members of @LulzSec are fine & safe." #AntiSec 7 minutes ago" link [twitter.com]

"Ryan Cleary, an alleged member of the hacking group behind the claim, LulzSec, was arrested in Essex this morning by specialist cyber crime officers from Scotland Yard." link [telegraph.co.uk]

Given the ease with which they traced him, I can't help wondering if LulzSec is overrated and the security expertise of the PCeU is over rated. What the security people don't seem to understand is that groups like LulzSec are not formal organizations like PCeU but more a loose collection of individuals drawn together through a shared ideology. As such there is no command-and-control structure to take out. As someone once wrote - you can't fight an idea.

Re:It must be Tuesday (3, Insightful)

Rijnzael (1294596) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511646)

So they went after the LulzSec mouthpiece instead of after someone involved with their illicit activities. Certainly the weakest link in the chain, but I wonder realistically how much this will limit LulzSec.

Re:It must be Tuesday (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511758)

Depends on how much the guy knew about the other members. Remember a couple weeks ago, when the FBI said that 25% of hackers caught end up turning, and Kevin Mitnik said "25%? No, it's much higher!"

its back (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511868)

the twitter feed is back...

Re:It must be Tuesday (1)

jon_doh2.0 (2097642) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511310)

He has been arrested.

Re:It must be Tuesday (0)

rbrausse (1319883) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511398)

according to the BBC [bbc.co.uk] Scotland Yard didn't comment on any LulzSec connection but that the arrest was "pre-planned [and] intelligence-led".

imo a Lulz-triggered raid is possible but unlikely related to the DDOS of the SOCA homepage - somehow I don't think that a multi-agency-operation can be executed within 1 day

Re:It must be Tuesday (1)

jonbryce (703250) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511474)

Given that the FBI were involved, it is more likely in response to one of their earlier US attacks, such as senate.gov

Re:It must be Tuesday (2)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511520)

...somehow I don't think that a multi-agency-operation can be executed within 1 day

If you show your ass to authorities on six different continents, it goes without saying they're going to feel a lot more generous about cooperating in capturing you.

lulz? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511222)

lulz?

Opening arguments (5, Funny)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511228)

Opening arguments next month:

Judge: "Can the defendant please state, for the record, why they felt it was necessary to take down several high-profile website, costing those companies hundreds of thousands in lost income, cleanup costs, and angry support calls?"

Defendant's Lawyer: "Ah, your honor, let the record show... they did it for the 'lulz'".

Judge: "I see. Well, in the spirit of their crime, sentencing will be 'for the lulz'."

Re:Opening arguments (3, Funny)

txmcse (937355) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511284)

Oh, that would be great! Let's hope the judge works in "the oceans", "aiming the guns", "butthurt", and "the long arm of the lulz" :)

Re:Opening arguments (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511306)

Oh, that would be great! Let's hope the judge works in "the oceans", "aiming the guns", "butthurt", and "the long arm of the lulz" :)

Plenty of aiming the guns, butthurt, and long arms where they're heading, that's for sure...

Re:Opening arguments (4, Funny)

DamienRBlack (1165691) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511304)

Judge: "You are sentenced to 1337 years."

Re:Opening arguments (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511346)

Judge: "You are sentenced to 1337 years."

Yeah, the extra 1,300 years is because that monacle-clad man sexually assaulted nyan cat. Poor kitty...

Re:Opening arguments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511738)

In case you havent noticed, its a monocle clad penis.

Re:Opening arguments (1)

JamesP (688957) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511530)

'Yo're sentenced to 100 years!'

'Huh?!?'

'In binary'

'Hell yeah!'

Re:Opening arguments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511608)

The problem with that kind of joke is that you can't say it out loud.

Re:Opening arguments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511624)

' and fined 0xBADA55 GBP.'

FTFY

Re:Opening arguments (1)

crow_t_robot (528562) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511328)

In their defense, if this person is convicted on the crimes sentencing will be much lighter than if he had done it for some more nefarious reason like financial gain...see: sentence mitigation.

Re:Opening arguments (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511444)

In their defense, if this person is convicted on the crimes sentencing will be much lighter than if he had done it for some more nefarious reason like financial gain...see: sentence mitigation.

I have a lot more compassion for someone who is hungry, poor, or in financial difficulty committing a crime out of desperation than those who do it for shits and giggles. Especially first time offenders; This is why the sentencing for prostitution, petty theft, etc., is relatively light (I didn't say it was a slap on the wrist, just that they won't be getting 30 years in the electric chair like these asshats). Most judges, contrary to popular opinion, want to make the community a better place and understand the difference between kids who need to be taught some manners, those who are hard on their luck, and those that are motivated by greed and a callous disregard for their fellow humans.

Re:Opening arguments (2)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511490)

Ah, justice, that thing you get when the judge likes you.

Re:Opening arguments (1)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511578)

Ah, justice, that thing you get when the judge likes you.

And when the judge doesn't, we can look to our endless appeals system.

Re:Opening arguments (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511574)

A lot of them are like this. However, because judges are elected in some areas, a judge must have some convictions to tout to the press that he or she is "hard on crime".

And the easiest people to lock up that will not be appealing the verdicts... people who can't afford a defense attorney. Where I live, I've seen people locked up for 8-10 just for one joint. Why? When they were tackled by the local police, the joint flew out of their hand, so they were arrested for trying to destroy/conceal evidence.

Yes, there are plenty good judges out there. However, with a private prison system needing warm bodies to lock up (and fund more lobbyists to demand longer sentences), it is no wonder why there are cases popping up about judges getting quiet payments per person convicted. (Google "Mark Ciavarella") for one of these cases.

So, it isn't expected to find someone arrested for a petty crime to get a whopping sentence, or even felonies tacked on... it means money.

Re:Opening arguments (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511638)

Yeah... that would be called "motive", and is (at least in the US) a huge factor in what charges are being faced, and in how someone is sentenced.

I'm fairly sure the UK has similar modifiers.

Re:Opening arguments (1)

madhatter256 (443326) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511442)

Lawyer: "Implying my client is guilty."

Lulz (-1, Redundant)

psychobudgie (1416459) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511234)

:p

Wait. Is he a suspect or not? (4, Informative)

chemicaldave (1776600) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511236)

It's important to note at this point that it has not been confirmed that the arrested man is suspected of being involved with LulzSec by the authorities. But many observers are speculating that that could be the case.

How can you go from that to "Lulzsec suspect arrested?"

Re:Wait. Is he a suspect or not? (4, Funny)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511278)

It's important to note at this point that it has not been confirmed that the arrested man is suspected of being involved with LulzSec by the authorities. But many observers are speculating that that could be the case.

How can you go from that to "Lulzsec suspect arrested?"

This is Slashdot

Re:Wait. Is he a suspect or not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511750)

No, TFA headlined Lulzsec suspect was arrested, and then in the body of the article said he wasn't confirmed as being affiliated with Lulzsec. It's a shitty article, or rather, a shitty blog post.

Re:Wait. Is he a suspect or not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511326)

It's important to note at this point that it has not been confirmed that the arrested man is suspected of being involved with LulzSec by the authorities. But many observers are speculating that that could be the case.

How can you go from that to "Lulzsec suspect arrested?"

Quite easily, since that's a question. The real question is how did they go from that to the statement "Lulzsec suspect arrested"?

For those not getting it. This is a post demonstrating why American-style quotation sucks ass.

Re:Wait. Is he a suspect or not? (1)

Tim C (15259) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511430)

So, putting the question mark (which is part of the sentence as a whole) inside the quotation marks (thus making it part of what is being quoted) is correct American English grammar?

Madness.

Re:Wait. Is he a suspect or not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511492)

Netcraft confirms it. It must be true.

Re:Wait. Is he a suspect or not? (1)

thePowerOfGrayskull (905905) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511808)

Two simple keystrokes, are you ready? Here they are:

/.

Good. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511342)

If he's been actively involved with their recent doings, good. They're punks. They don't stand for "improving security," they stand for Fuck You, and they're punks.

The PCeU was assisted by the FBI (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511396)

"The PCeU was assisted by officers from Essex Police and have been working in co-operation with the FBI" link [platformnation.com]

When this place stop being a real Country?

Re:The PCeU was assisted by the FBI (2)

jonbryce (703250) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511538)

1. Someone attacks senate.gov "for teh lulz"
2. FBI investigates and discovers it is coming from an English IP address
3. They ask Scotland Yard for help, and trace it to someone in Ess*x
4. Ess*x Police get the appropriate wiretap warrants, and move in while he is in the middle of attacking soca.gov.uk, again "for teh lulz"

Pretty normal cross-border crime investigation

Re:The PCeU was assisted by the FBI (2)

rbrausse (1319883) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511756)

[...] Ess*x
Ess*x[...]

lolwhut? What the hell is wrong with writing Essex? Let's meet in Fucking to drink one [or more] pints of Fucking Hell [www.rnw.nl] - maybe afterwards you're more relaxed about funny geographical names

Part of the observation team? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511420)

This guy seems to have been part of the process.

https://twitter.com/#!/awallaceuk

Re:Part of the observation team? (1)

biodata (1981610) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511566)

Looks like a wannabee spook telling stories

Also, UK 2011 Census *possibly* hacked (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511440)

Pastebin [pastebin.com] , HackerNews thread. [ycombinator.com]

"Possibly" since this is not confirmed by their official twitter yet.

I'm hoping that this isn't true, there's enough info in there like DoB and national insurance number to pose a significant identity theft risk, but given our government's track record it's totally believable that it might be ...

Way to spoil a potential opportunity. (2)

Lysander7 (2085382) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511466)

What I don't get is why is this shit always publicized? Instead of waving their dicks around every time a dumb fuck is caught, it'd make more sense to use that caught individual to provide new leads, and catch as many as possible before the rest of the organization goes further into hiding. Seems to me they're doing it purely for PR, rather than because it's their damn job.

Re:Way to spoil a potential opportunity. (1)

biodata (1981610) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511580)

The main point is to have something to announce so they don't look like dicks for being hacked. They don't care about the hack per se, just being made to look stupid, and similarly they don't care if he is guilty or ever charged with anyhting as long as they can announce an arrest.

Re:Way to spoil a potential opportunity. (1)

Xest (935314) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511598)

Or because their own site was taken down last night, and, well, they decided a "Hey, look how quickly we can respond!" PR opportunity is better than sitting and waiting to catch the rest.

Re:Way to spoil a potential opportunity. (2)

arkenian (1560563) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511832)

Its publicized because its pretty much illegal to arrest someone secretly -- one of those things in place to prevent police abuse of power. Arrest reports are public records. At that point you can try to slip it in to the daily feed, but its generally easier to just issue a press release in a high profile case. In this case, however, it looks like they didn't do that. They just arrested the guy and haven't talked yet about the details.

Re:Way to spoil a potential opportunity. (2)

Lysander7 (2085382) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511876)

True, but not so if it's an issue regarding National Security, and given the court's recent stance on cyberterrorism being "an act of war", they could very easily manipulate this to be such a case so they won't have to immediately disclose anything.

Will the police get any evidence? (1)

BillKaos (657870) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511496)

has had his house searched and a significant amount of material taken away by police for forensic examination

Frankly, I can't imagine that even the less prepared script kiddie wouldn't keep all their hacking data inside a TrueCrypt partition allowing him to claim plausible deniability.

That, an open wifi, then claim "it came that way, or I couldn't make my netbook connect, so I had to open it".

Given those basic security measures, what evidence could the police use to incriminate him? Video/screen surveillance? I can't think of any other way.

Re:Will the police get any evidence? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511632)

"I can't think of any other way."

Who knows then - if you're lucky, you might actually learn something.

nah... probably not.

Re:Will the police get any evidence? (2)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511728)

It's the UK. Surely having a TrueCrypt partition is a slam-dunk jail sentence under http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/23/section/49 [legislation.gov.uk]

After all they can keep asking for the key to the hidden partition they "know" is there and when you refuse to provide them (because there is no hidden partition) you get 2 years in jail (5 if they can make it look terrorism related)...

Suspect is not "Mastermind" (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511612)

I know it makes for boring news but apparently Ryan Cleary did nothing except host the IRC where lulzsec had a channel.

In all seriousness (1, Troll)

sqrt(2) (786011) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511658)

I truly think that Lulzsec is doing good work, and they should be applauded for their efforts. I really hope this kid was using strong encryption and covering his tracks enough to provide a credible legal defense, although considering he was caught probably not. What they are doing is a good thing, there needs to be a force in the world working to encourage better security practices--there wasn't previously to a sufficient degree, nothing like this. My data is safer because of the heightened vigilance they cause, and I am thankful for and always amused at their exploits.

Re:In all seriousness (2, Interesting)

Lysander7 (2085382) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511694)

Sure, and I think people should fly planes into buildings to demonstrate the lack of airport security.

Re:In all seriousness (1)

sqrt(2) (786011) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511784)

If you can't see the difference in those two scenarios then you're beyond my help. Sorry.

Re:In all seriousness (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511802)

Your data wouldn't be safe if some of it was part of what they've leaked/acquired though, would it?

No it bloody well wouldn't, and you'd be angry then too.

People that write crap code are going to continue to write crap code.

If they did what I think they did... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511668)

...they just arrested someone from anonops, who might have an idea who the lulzsec people were (as they're the ones who published his dox) but wasn't part of it. The guy I'm talking about initials would be R.C.

Alive & well by the sounds of it (1)

norriefc (1998536) | more than 3 years ago | (#36511754)

[quote]LulzSec The Lulz Boat Seems the glorious leader of LulzSec got arrested, it's all over now... wait... we're all still here! Which poor bastard did they take down?[/quote] From twitter @ 5 minutes ago

Re:Alive & well by the sounds of it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511822)

Glad to hear

man? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36511792)

A 19 year old *man*? I'm pretty sure such a thing doesn't exist.

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