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Canada Rolls Out Plastic Money

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the made-from-flattened-hockey-pucks dept.

The Almighty Buck 444

markian writes "Canada is set to switch to new banknotes that last 2.5 times longer than paper money. High-tech features include metallic imagery in a transparent area, raised ink, transparent text, and hidden numbers. 'If you look through the frosted maple leaf emblem at a single-point light source and hold it close to your eye, you'll see a hidden circle of numbers that match the face value of the note.' The Bank of Canada has more information on the subject. Now if we can just get rid of the penny..."

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444 comments

2.5 times! (1)

cheeks5965 (1682996) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521188)

At first I read that the notes were 2.5 times longer than paper money, as in ~15 inches. talk about a wad of cash!

Re:2.5 times! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521592)

At first I read that the notes were 2.5 times longer than paper money

That's because you're stupid.

Nothing new here (5, Informative)

HappyClown (668699) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521212)

Australia has had polymer banknotes [wikipedia.org] since 1988, and in fact it's an Australian company that will be supplying these notes to Canada. Polymer banknotes have been used to varying degrees in 27 countries prior to Canada.

Re:Nothing new here (2)

mark-t (151149) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521328)

it's an Australian company that will be supplying these notes to Canada

Please clarify your source for this. It was my understanding that these new bills are going to be produced entirely by the Canadian Mint.

Re:Nothing new here (2)

HappyClown (668699) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521372)

Apologies, it seems it''s not the actual notes being supplied by an Australian company but the polypropylene substrate used in the manufacturing process. My source? The article itself.

Re:Nothing new here (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521514)

I hope you can respect that I was a little surprised by your previous wording, and could not figure out where you had seen it.

Re:Nothing new here (2)

HappyClown (668699) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521642)

Yes sorry, my bad. Here's some more detail I found about the materials and manufacturing of these notes, taken from this PDF [polymernotes.org]

"A contract for the supply of polymer material and associated security features was negotiated with Note Printing Australia (NPA), a wholly owned subsidiary of the Reserve Bank of Australia. The Bank has collaborated with the Reserve Bank to ensure that the supply of material and access to intellectual property are assured. The substrate itself will be supplied to NPA by the Australian company, Securency International, and the notes will be printed in Canada by two private sector security printers, Canadian Bank Note Company, Limited and BA International Inc., both based in Ottawa"

Re:Nothing new here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521388)

The blank polymer will be made by the australian company. They will be printed on at the Canadian Mint using the technology pioneered by the australians.

Re:Nothing new here (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521454)

Nobody cares. This story isn't about dick measuring on who did what first.

Re:Nothing new here (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521524)

Brazil also uses plastic money for some denominations for a while already (I believe close to 10 years).

Re:Nothing new here (1)

Abreu (173023) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521598)

We have those two here in Mexico for the $20 and $50 peso bills (the lowest paper denominations)

They do not last a lot longer than the paper ones, they are more resistant when they are new, but if you get a tiny tear on it it will come apart in a second.

News to me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521214)

Canada still uses paper notes?!

Re:News to me (1)

donaldm (919619) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521384)

Canada still uses paper notes?!

"The USA and many countries world wide still uses paper notes" - There that fixed it :)

!paper (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521538)

Except US notes aren't really paper.

Re:!paper (1)

zill (1690130) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521644)

Paper:
a (1) : a felted sheet of usually vegetable fibers laid down on a fine screen from a water suspension (2) : a similar sheet of other material (as plastic)

Cotton fibers are still "vegetable fibers", so yes, US notes are made of paper.

Been using it for years (3, Interesting)

nfras (313241) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521258)

Came to Australia in 1998 and thought the polymer notes looked like Monopoly money. Having used it for a while it's so much better than the paper stuff. Hardly ever tears, is easy to see how much you have in your wallet just by opening it. Stands out from a wad of receipts.
Whenever I have to go the US I hate having to use those crappy bits of toilet paper that feel like they been stuck to some homeless guy's arse since 1973.

Re:Been using it for years (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521332)

Being able to easily recognise money is a feature unique to every currency except the dollar.

I mean it's no wonder you hate coins so much - they're virtually identical. And you actually have to read the notes to see what they are... Madness!

Re:Been using it for years (2)

Kittenman (971447) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521436)

Whenever I have to go the US I hate having to use those crappy bits of toilet paper that feel like they been stuck to some homeless guy's arse since 1973.

Nicely put

Re:Been using it for years (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521568)

My only beef with them is that some idiots like to fold them 7 times to make them fit inside their purse. They then stay scrunched up when you put them in the till. I worked at a servo for a few years and I *HATED* those people. I also agree that US money is horrible, though the paper notes in Switzerland tend to be quite nice (I think the locals must iron them).

Re:Been using it for years (4, Funny)

ezzthetic (976321) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521590)

There's a big problem with polymer notes that should have been forseen by the Mint. You can't light a cigar with a hundred dollar bill without passing out from the fumes.

Re:Been using it for years (0)

JustOK (667959) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521614)

Whenever I have to go the US I hate having to use those crappy bits of toilet paper that feel like they been stuck to some homeless guy's arse since 1973.

You've felt alot of toilet paper like that before? What an interesting thing to do. Was it intentional? Part of an advanced degree in comparative paper texture? Bet there's a good story behind it.

Reminds me of the guy with "ass pennies". Every penny he got, he stuck up his ass. Then, whenever he saw someone with a penny, he could say that there was a chance that penny had been up his ass.

Re:Been using it for years (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521924)

No polymer has withstood the US note test for durability.

The US doesn't use paper, it's a cloth and it has withstood the test of time and abuse better than any other currency.

US redesign project (1)

Michael Wardle (50363) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521262)

Some interesting suggestions for new US banknotes: Dollar ReDe$ign Project [posterous.com]

Re:US redesign project (2, Interesting)

Michael Wardle (50363) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521428)

Canada still has a penny too? (2)

TheRealQuestor (1750940) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521266)

man I feel the pain. Costs like 1.6 cents [as of 2009 and according wikipedia 1.79 cents per penny last year] just to make one penny and they SUCK. 99% of the time I just tell whatever cashier/staff keep the pennies. Keeps em out of my pocket/change jar and might help the next bloke who is a penny short :)

Re:Canada still has a penny too? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521630)

It cost 1.7 cents to make, but that's a one time cost. The penny is a penny hundreds of thousands of times.

And getting rid of the penny will have some negative global effects on the value of the dollar. They market may very well see it as a devaluation. If it does, you're boned, and there is no way to know ahead of time.

Re:Canada still has a penny too? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521766)

Don't worry about 'printing' (or letting the fed magic them into existence) trillions that won't cause devaluation, worry about getting rid of the penny.

We are boned, we just don't know when.

The only hope we have is the Euro is even more boned (which is pretty much a given). Then capital flight from Europe might keep the dollar afloat, _might_.

Re:Canada still has a penny too? (1)

Volante3192 (953645) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521784)

The penny has a smaller purchasing power than the half-cent did when it was phased out...in the late 1800s.

Honestly, competent financiers would see us ditching the penny as a step forward...we'd stop stamping out millions of them a year. Check that, four billion pennies were stamped in 2011. If pennies are so resilient why do we have to keep making so many?

Re:Canada still has a penny too? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521648)

It costs more than a penny to make a penny, but I'd wager it costs a lot less than twenty bucks to print a twenty, so I'm not sure how that's a concern.

The general uselessness of the things (except as slingshot ammo, etc) is valid, though. Seriously, fuck pennies.

Re:Canada still has a penny too? (2)

labnet (457441) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521908)

Australia got rid of 1c and 2c coins 20 years ago.
Hopefully the 5c will go as well some time.

You're already making more progress... (3, Informative)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521284)

Canada dumped the dollar bill in favor of coins of the same denomination. We talk about it in the US - just like we said back in the 60s that we would switch to the metric system - and never actually do it.

Re:You're already making more progress... (1)

HappyClown (668699) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521482)

Dumped... quite literally! According to the Bank of Canada [bankofcanada.ca], worn out banknotes are put into landfill: "At the time of the study, the Bank of Canada had not chosen a specific end-of-life scenario for polymer bank notes. So, for the sake of modeling, the end-of-life treatment currently in use (landfill) for our cotton-based paper notes was assumed."

I don't suppose anyone happens to know where? :)

Re:You're already making more progress... (1)

zill (1690130) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521670)

worn out banknotes are put into landfill

Do they shred them first? Or should I go get my shovel now?

Re:You're already making more progress... (1)

Michael Wardle (50363) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521526)

A big advantage of $1 and $2 being bills is you can get away with carrying only a money clip. And a lot of wallets don't have coin pouches either.

In Australia, where we have $1 and $2 coins, the coins add considerably to the thickness and weight of my wallet. And there are many vending machines that only accept coins, so you have to carry $5-$10 in change to be safe. With a $1 bill, vending machines would only need to accept notes, and should accept higher denominations too.

Re:You're already making more progress... (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521646)

With a $1 bill, vending machines would only need to accept notes, and should accept higher denominations too.

Street parking meters. Too many of them, won't happen soon.

Re:You're already making more progress... (1)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521584)

I do believe that all products in the USA are legally obligated to show weights, etc. using the metric system, and with few small town exceptions, in fact do so. All medical and scientific systems are 100% metric. All cars have "standard" and metric options for displays Celsius is problematic because the degrees are too large, thus not really a better system, and is actually separate from the metric system anyway, so I wouldn't count that fact.

Day to day commerce and every day users in the USA just don't use it. The US could pass a law tomorrow requiring every business use metric for products, and it would actually cause very little disruption, we are already doing it, but putting the metric data in the fine print. Of course, if you DID make it the law, there is a particular political group that would go ape shit and call it socialist. In reality, we need to go cold turkey into the metric system, if only so we have a better position in the global market.

Re:You're already making more progress... (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521654)

Yeah, we can switch now and industry would save money.
However, you can thank Reagan for killing the program to get everyone switched. I mean, he had to cut something to hide his tax hike.

Re:You're already making more progress... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521870)

Translating a unit like 2 cups into 0.473176473 liters is not the same thing as remaking the product in a logical metric unit, 0.5L.

this is the problem. Instead of using metric, we just converted our values to insane decimal values in metric units, losing all benefits of the metric system.

Technically, Canada hasn't used paper money ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521302)

... for years.

Current bills are printed on a custom fabric that in many ways resembles paper. But it's not paper... it's just very very thin cloth.

Technically, it's still paper ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521420)

... for years.

Current bills are printed on a custom fabric that in many ways resembles paper. But it's not paper... it's just very very thin cloth.

While it may contain fibers other than traditional wood pulp, it's still paper.

Cloth is a weaving of thread. Paper is a pressing of pulp.

Cotton fiber or not, our money is still made from paper.

It is still infinitely inflatable ... (1)

triclipse (702209) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521306)

... and thus a tool for the consolidation of wealth to those with the power to inflate, and the power to spend the newly inflated currency at pre-inflation prices.

Re:It is still infinitely inflatable ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521738)

Oh fuck off crybaby.

Now id we could just get rid of... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521320)

fiat money.

I know it! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521800)

Lets go back to hauling around buckets of gold, or barter. Much more convenient than this "money".

How do they hold up in a dryer? (1)

millisa (151093) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521394)

Even though they've been around for years in Australia, this is the first I've heard of polymer notes. I tried looking through the Canadian info sites where they pumped how good it was for the environment, recyclable, holds up longer, yadda yadda . . . I missed where it showed how the notes held up against routine extremes (most notably for me, the clothes dryer . . .)

As someone who has 1 in 5 dollars that are downey-fresh, how do they hold to the cotton dry cycle?

Re:How do they hold up in a strip club? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521462)

More importantly. How well do they sit in a G-String?

Re:How do they hold up in a strip club? (1)

millisa (151093) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521606)

According to this wiki [wikipedia.org] they are more durable, harder to tear, more resistant to folding, more resistant to soil, waterproof (and washing machine proof), easier to machine process, and are shreddable and recyclable at the end of their useful lives. (bold emphasis mine). From the other links I've found, they hold up poorly in the dryer on high heat. On the plus side, it sounds as if they can be sanitized in the dishwasher . . .

Re:How do they hold up in a dryer? (2)

Tacticus.v1 (1102137) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521582)

My last wallet went through the wash and dryer a number of times

The (au) notes certainly held up significantly better than everything else in the wallet (bloody drivers license and library card)

Re:How do they hold up in a dryer? (1)

Trentus (1017602) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521624)

In my experience, the Australian notes have gone through the dryer and come out without any noticeable damage. They don't hold up so well to ironing though... I was putting some fundraiser money I'd collected into an envelope and my OCD side got the better of me... wanted to flatten out a terribly crumpled $5 note so that it would sit nicely in the envelope. I put the iron on a low setting, and went to work, only to find my $5 not ending up a good 10% or so smaller than the others...

Re:How do they hold up in a dryer? (2)

Annirak (181684) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521652)

If your dryer gets over 130C, you've got bigger problems than melted money.

Canada’s new notes are being printed on Guardian®, a biaxial-oriented polypropylene substrate manufactured by Securency International of Australia.

refs: banknote design [bankofcanada.ca]
Polypropylene properties [wikipedia.org]

Re:How do they hold up in a dryer? (2)

snookums (48954) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521686)

I think they go through a regular dryer just fine. I seem to recall putting some through mine without a problem. At higher temperatures they shrink like those cereal-box novelties. I have a friend with a miniature $5 note that was in the pocket when he ironed his shirt.

The most annoying tendency is for the notes not to lie flat. The first generation of $5 notes were particularly bad. I was working in retail just after they were introduced and it was a real chore to keep them from curling up in the till and escaping from under the spring clip thingy. The technology has improved a lot, but they're still a bit curly.

As to the commenter below asking about the g-string issue, if you roll them length-wise they'll stay straight, but the corners and edges can be quite sharp and scratchy, so the ladies (and, one presumes, gentlemen in the appropriate establishments) probably prefer their tips on the stage, not in the undies.

Re:How do they hold up in a dryer? (3, Funny)

HornWumpus (783565) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521822)

They all prefer their tips on the stage.

Tough titty for them.

I'll continue to ice down a bunch of coins then drop them into her g-string while pretending to slip a dollar bill in. They love that.

What is This "money" of Which You Speak? (1)

rueger (210566) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521406)

It's become more and more common for me to go days and weeks with no cash whatsoever in my pocket. Credit and Debit will cover nearly everything that I need or want,

I now look back fondly on the days of yore when I would have been embarrassed to use a card to pay for a cup of coffee. Now it's the norm, even though I know that I've pretty much wiped out the retailer profit margin with service charges. (Admittedly at Starbucks or McDonalds that's a selling point...)

Re:What is This "money" of Which You Speak? (1)

Sir_Sri (199544) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521516)

what about your own service charges? I'm in canada, and more than a handful of transactions in a month and they want to start dinging me money to use debit or a credit card.

I also don't particularly like the idea that both my spending history is available for minor stuff, and that a power or networking failure is going to prevent me buying lunch. I don't particularly like my debit or credit card being swiped here there and everywhere, because the more you use it, the more likely someone is going to clone it. Sketchy gas stations are the worst but I wouldn't trust a lot of places with either a debit, or credit card if I can avoid it.

Re:What is This "money" of Which You Speak? (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521600)

Switch banks. Be sure to tell them the reason when you do. If enough people leave for that reason, they will change their policies simply to remain competitive.

Re:What is This "money" of Which You Speak? (1)

denobug (753200) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521634)

what about your own service charges? I'm in canada, and more than a handful of transactions in a month and they want to start dinging me money to use debit or a credit card.

In US we don't have service charge for the most part, although some small shops try to enforce minimum to use the credit card for a transaction.

Re:What is This "money" of Which You Speak? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521678)

I've never even heard of that. I suspect American would go ape shit is the banks here started doing that.

A charge every time I use my card? Insanity.

Re:What is This "money" of Which You Speak? (1)

pokerdad (1124121) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521896)

I'm in Canada too. I don't know about the other banks, but TD's infinity account has no transaction fees. I've have one for so long it blows me away when someone complains about transaction fees.

Re:What is This "money" of Which You Speak? (1)

rtaylor (70602) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521586)

Fees might be higher but employee theft, incorrect change issues, robbery, till counts, reduces trips to the bank for rolls of coin, insurance costs, etc. are all easier and reduces costs significantly.

Over the long haul, particularly if you consolidate transactions (swipe card 10 times over a week, company makes a single transaction for the total), cards are quite a bit cheaper. Particularly if you can eliminate cash entirely, hook directly into accounting, and ditch the employee taking the order by replacing them with a touch screen.

Key in order, swipe card, drive through to the next window.

Re:What is This "money" of Which You Speak? (2)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521698)

The problem with consolidation is there isn't verification. So someone could swipe an invalid card and you wouldn't not it until you did the consolidation.

We had similar problem here in Oregon. The parking machines would bundle all the transaction and send them off at midnight. People knew about it and would use blanks or expired cards.

backing (1)

paltemalte (767772) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521458)

How about we worry less what the money is made of, and more about what's backing the money? Call me paranoid but government fiat seems a little untrustworthy to me.

Re:backing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521542)

How about we worry less what the money is made of, and more about what's backing the money? Call me paranoid but government fiat seems a little untrustworthy to me.

ok. you're paranoid.

i only take payment in ox now. when financial armageddon comes everyone will want ox, oh and bitcoins of course.
yup, ox and bitcoins and virgins - i'm going to be rich..

Re:backing (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521730)

yup, ox and bitcoins and virgins - i'm going to be rich..

I deal in camels. Oh, and my advice... get rid of virgins, they tend to loose their value quite fast.

Re:backing (2)

Guy Harris (3803) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521558)

Call me paranoid but government fiat seems a little untrustworthy to me.

Actually, Fiat [fiat.com] aren't state-owned, and I have the impression they've improved reliability a lot since the "Fix It Again, Tony" days.

Re:backing (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521736)

The money is backed by people giving it value, nothing more. Just as if we used Gold. If people didn't think Gold was worthwhile, it would be useless.

Gold is just a metal. It has no real intrinsic value. You can't eat it, live under it, and cloth in it. Everything else is just a means of common agreement that allows us to easily acquire the thing we need... and want.

So far, government controlled money has been the most stable in the world. Yeah ups and downs, but overall and long term it keeps on going.

Get rid of the penny? pff (1)

Tolkien (664315) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521500)

I personally don't see the appeal of getting rid of the penny. My guess is retailers and so forth will simply price things such that you'll always have to give slightly more so that they can get the extra nickel out of you instead of leaving it at a price where customers would be at an advantage. To those who say "so? it's just a nickel!", count to 100 and see how many times you said a multiple of 5. Adds up quick doesn't it?

Re:Get rid of the penny? pff (4, Informative)

Michael Wardle (50363) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521576)

Doubtful. A lot of prices end in .99 not because that's the store's actual cost, but because apparently many customers think 4.99 is $4, not $5.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Psychological_pricing [wikipedia.org]

Australia got rid of the 1c coin years ago. Prices that used to end in .99 now end in .95, not .00.

Re:Get rid of the penny? pff (1)

Tolkien (664315) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521692)

Doubtful. A lot of prices end in .99 not because that's the store's actual cost, but because apparently many customers think 4.99 is $4, not $5.

Psychological pricing [wikipedia.org]

I know about that, I've always wondered where companies find these foolish customers.

Australia got rid of the 1c coin years ago. Prices that used to end in .99 now end in .95, not .00.

Interesting, I didn't know that.

Re:Get rid of the penny? pff (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521774)

yep. That's why I have taught my kids to round up. Now when the see a price in the store, they say, it's 5 bucks. They know the trick.

Re:Get rid of the penny? pff (2)

evenmoreconfused (451154) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521716)

No. At least not necessarily so.

If they do it in the same way as e.g. the (pre-Euro) Netherlands, the prices don't change at all. It's only rounded when you pay, and it's the total purchase amount that gets rounded up or down, not each item. So if you buy one carton of milk, it's $0.98, and you have to pay $1.00 -- thus they get 2 cents. But if you buy two, it's 1.96, and you pay $1.95 -- and you get a penny. So the most you can win or lose is two cents per store you visit, and even with clever pricing on the store's part, it often works in your favor anyway.

Anyway, it's only on cash transactions, as debit and credit transactions are still always done to the penny. How many of those do you actually make in a day?

Re:Get rid of the penny? pff (2)

Chuck Chunder (21021) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521770)

Swedish rounding [wikipedia.org] is a reasonable solution for this. It is applied to the total cost of a single order and only applied to cash sales. Rounding up might still happen more often on average due to people buying single items but a (literally) penny pinching customer could also "game" the system by paying cash in the round down instances and by credit/debit card when the amount would otherwise be rounded up.

Dropping 1 and 2c coins went down fairly well her in Australia from what I recall.

BitCoin? (1)

bigsexyjoe (581721) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521566)

Slashdot hasn't posted it's daily Bitcoin story yet. If Canada switched to Bitcoin, that would be a story!

Re:BitCoin? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521786)

If Canada switch to bitcoin is would serve to be on the front of /. ...and every other news organization.

Single Point Light Source (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521596)

I can just imagine a bunch of kids pointing laser pointers through the notes into their eyes trying to see the numbers

Keep an eye out (1)

Scotty L (1873912) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521612)

I remember when it was introduced here in Oz, in 1988, and they first stocked the ATM's. Some of them were issuing 2 or 3 times the amount you asked for because the notes were heating up inside the mechanism and sticking together!

About time, now when will the U.S. wake up? (1)

rAiNsT0rm (877553) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521662)

I love travelling to countries with plastic notes. No worries about getting them wet (if you are at a beach, etc.) No tearing issues, they last longer... and they can be made from partial or fully recycled plastic. I would even be OK with coins eventually being modified to some sort of cheaper substance. I think we have all moved away from the days of needing to think our currency itself has value or importance. Hell, most of us use a small plastic rectangle for almost everything everyday.

"Innovative" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521768)

For something Australia has been doing since 1988?

Add Gold (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36521808)

We should make a plastic bill with X thousandth (x based on denomination) of an once of gold in the middle. That would be hard to counterfeit.

Hmmm.... (1)

mark-t (151149) | more than 2 years ago | (#36521874)

It occurs to me that the chief reason that Canada dropped the 1 and 2 dollar bills in favor of coins was related to longevity. Since these plastic bills last so much longer than paper, can we please get our $1 and $2 bills back?
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