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LSD Alleviates 'Suicide Headaches'

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the why-do-you-say-even dept.

Medicine 272

sciencehabit writes "Patients suffering from the agony of cluster headaches will take anything to dull the pain, even LSD, it turns out. Results from a pilot study reveal that six patients treated with 2-bromo-LSD, a nonhallucinogenic analog of LSD, showed a significant reduction in cluster headaches per day; some were free of the attacks for weeks or months. And some of these patients are still reporting significant relief more than a year after they were treated with the compound." I'm told, by people with reason to know, that the hallucinogenic variety has the same effect on cluster headaches.

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House, MD. (1)

paultag (1284116) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593248)

Saw it on House, so it must be true!

Re:House, MD. (2)

ehrichweiss (706417) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593440)

They use ergotamine tartrate for migraines and from ergotamine you can easily derive lysergic acid.. The link is pretty clear...lysergic acid .

On top of this, I think I remember a similar study in "LSD: A Total Study" which was published a LONG time ago. I think they determined that LSD at 1/10th of a psychedelic dosage(about 10 micrograms) would perform as a great analgesic for migraines, and analesics were what Hofmann was looking for originally.

Question: Who can tell me what the "S" in LSD actually stands for?
Difficulty: No search engines... You either know this or you're guessing.

Re:House, MD. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593532)

Saure - which is French for 'acid', and I just know this.

Re:House, MD. (4, Informative)

yarnosh (2055818) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593534)

"Sauer." It is German for "acid." LSD is a German acronym.

Re:House, MD. (1)

ehrichweiss (706417) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593568)

And we have a winner! You win +1 internetz.

Re:House, MD. (5, Funny)

yarnosh (2055818) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593656)

There's nothing like 3 years of high school German and 5 years of taking LSD to round out an education.

Re:House, MD. (1)

istartedi (132515) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594036)

Dude. I'm making that a QOTD [twitter.com] .

Re:House, MD. (0)

dirty_ghost (1673990) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594764)

i am hoping your sig is deliberately misspelled. the phrase is "for all intents and purposes"

Re:House, MD. (1)

rainmouse (1784278) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594066)

technically its initialisation and not an acronym, as LSD is not pronounced as a word.

Re:House, MD. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594286)

"Sauer." It is German for "acid." LSD is a German acronym.

Almost correct ... "sauer" means "acidic"; the "S" in LSD stands for "Säure" (acid).

Re:House, MD. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594372)

Actually, it stands for "säure" - LSD stands for LysergSäureDiethylamid (capitalization added for emphasis). It means acid either way, though.

Re:House, MD. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594722)

Actually, it is Säure, not sauer. Sauer means sour. Säure means acid in German.

Re:House, MD. (2)

Montezumaa (1674080) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593482)

Actually, in that episode, Dr. House used psilocybin mushrooms("magic mushrooms") to alleviate the problems from the supposed cluster headaches(though it turned out to be juvenile hemochromatosis). The episode in question in s03e23, titled "The Jerk". In another episode(s02e12, titled "Distractions"), Dr. House induced a migraine headache in himself, and "short-circuited" the headache with LSD. Migraine headaches and cluster headaches are different, with cluster headaches being described as just about the worst pain a person can experience.

I actually suffer from migraines(as first diagnosed), but they have been reduced in frequency and pain through the use of fentanyl patches(though the patches were prescribed for the chronic pain I suffer, aside from the headaches). My pain clinic doctor thought I might have been experiencing cluster headaches, due to the pain, secondary symptoms, and duration, but I have never taken the time to be properly diagnosed(no insurance sucks, though I doubt I suffer from cluster headaches).

Re:House, MD. (4, Funny)

davester666 (731373) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593524)

> The episode in question in s03e23, titled "The Jerk".

Shouldn't EVERY episode of House be titled "The Jerk"? Or was this referring to someone besides House?

Re:House, MD. (2)

pjbgravely (751384) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593618)

Cluster headaches are a boring pain, usually behind one eye, but can also radiate to the ear or jaw. The hallmark of the pain is hard to stand or sit still and laying down is impossible. A migraine as you probably know is a pounding pain, that movement, light and sound makes worse.

A CH will start suddenly, will last a standard amount of time depending on the person, and leave suddenly. They usually happen at the same times every day and strike while the sufferer is sleeping. I do know people who have had remission while using fentanyl patches, even though most other narcotics are a trigger due to their vascular relaxing properties.

I hope you don't have CH but if you do get worse, there are treatments that can be done without insurance like welding oxygen and LSA/LSD.

Re:House, MD. (1)

freedumb2000 (966222) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593620)

I am just curious: you have no health insurance? Where I live, I am actually required by law to have health insurance. I have not had health insurance for a while even so and I had to pay quite a bit of money to get back in.

Re:House, MD. (1)

koreaman (835838) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593786)

That's pretty common in the developing world, and in the United States. GP probably comes from one of those two (likely the former, since this is Slashdot)

Re:House, MD. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594002)

In the United States, health insurance companies can deny you a health insurance policy for any reason they want. I would love to have health insurance, but it seems that -- because I have a history of headaches, of all things -- it isn't available to me at any cost. I've been denied by every health insurer that does business in our state.

Re:House, MD. (1)

freedumb2000 (966222) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594178)

My stomach cringes when I hear that. Here, the insurer is not even allowed to request information like that to sign you up. It is too bad that health care reform failed, again, recently. If I am not mistaken, this was one of the issues to be be reformed.

Re:House, MD. (3, Insightful)

cas2000 (148703) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594498)

no insurance sucks,

I bet you're glad that you were saved from the government death lists :(

Re:House, MD. (1)

MaskedSlacker (911878) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594486)

First thing I thought of when I saw the headline.

catnip santa claus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593254)

alexander shulgin

Confirmed. (5, Funny)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593258)

Yes, I can tell you from personal experience that LSD does indeed (at least for me) help knock back "cluster" headaches. The only real problem for me was the ensuing giant insects.

Re:Confirmed. (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593726)

I found covering the walls and floor with sticky paper helps with the giant insects. Unfortunately several of my rather large stuck house guests insist on watching Fox News. I had to give it up because watching Fox News on acid really makes me paranoid.

"An update", turns out it wasn't the acid or the 6' cockroaches making me paranoid it was Fox News. That was a relief.

Re:Confirmed. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593796)

Might want to have that Fox News derangement syndrome looked at.

Re:Confirmed. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594296)

Might want to have that Fox News derangement syndrome looked at.

Yes, because any disagreement or realization that something is totally screwed up is a "derangement syndrome". Perhaps you should get that "reality derangement syndrome" looked at.

Re:Confirmed. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593942)

You jest, but one of my favorite LSD hallucinations was a ten foot tall space praying mantis that descended from the clouds and spoke with me for a half an hour in the field that looks into the "Horseshoe" football stadium at Ohio State University. It was made of smoke.

Re:Confirmed. (1)

secretsquirel (805445) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594278)

+1

Re:Confirmed. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594058)

The trick is to set a emotionally positive mood. Imagine it like a huge feedback loop that starts right when it kicks in.
Whatever was dominant in your head, even when you were unaware of it because it was repressed, will come out and define your trip.

That's why it's very dangerous for people with big problems. It may become so strong that it permanently changes things you *didn't* want changed.

Apparently, the "learning rate" also rises dramatically, meaning you can pick up new stuff faster, but old stuff also gets lost faster as a logical consequence. I've never taken it though, so I don't know myself. (But I have more than two friends who shared their experiences.)

I can imagine good sex being beyond epic on LSD. Not that I would get any chance to sex in the first place, though. ;)

Re:Confirmed. (1)

JordanL (886154) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594092)

Was that a reference to Naked Lunch?

++otto (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593262)

i don't get why they call them fingers.. I mean, I've never seen them fing. Oh wait, there they go.

./ editors hoping for "five nines" (0)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593268)

This story begs for a rewite... could we at least have a hyperlink for science habit? Anybody check his user number? Timothy claims he has unknown sources... or hiding his own job-disqualifying problems?

Re:./ editors hoping for "five nines" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593358)

LSD is not job-disqualifying,
Standard drug tests won't even test for it.

Re:./ editors hoping for "five nines" (1)

LostCluster (625375) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593372)

Good use of the AC account... because bragging about it in a published web forum is job-disqualifying.

Re:./ editors hoping for "five nines" (3, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594072)

This story begs for a rewite... could we at least have a hyperlink for science habit? Anybody check his user number? Timothy claims he has unknown sources... or hiding his own job-disqualifying problems?

You do realize that Timothy's last name is Leary, right? He's writing based on first-hand knowledge.

Barbiturates work too (3, Informative)

gstrickler (920733) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593290)

Dr prescribed phrenilin (butalbital + acetaminophen) for mine.

Re:Barbiturates work too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593768)

No thanks! They alter the personality in a way that is unacceptable for me.
This may be a personal thing, depending on what I value about me, but to me there is no worse thought than "you" being dead, while some weird "you" runs around doing stuff against what you would want. (Like alienating your friends, or supporting your enemy.)
It's way, waaay worse than death. Like some (possessed) super-zombie.

As usual, Americans ignore the Cause of migraines. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594382)

Can't trust statistics anymore, because the same companies that sell the pharmaceutical periphernalia are the one's controlling the polls.

When you re-calibrate your pain thresh-hold using drugs, the cause of the migraine is still there. What is causing that sharp throbbing pain? Why mask the pain and go about your daily life like nothing is wrong with you? So many want free medical, but it turns out that they don't know what is making them ill in these ways: they justify that free medical should accompany their right to be alive and making all these bad lifestyle decisions that cause these so-called "mysterious" health problems.

You just can't seem to troubleshoot any of these illnesses in the United States anymore, because there is so-much bullshit going around that it's easier to dispense pain-killers and watch everyone fall apart. Americans want free education too, so here's one for starters: don't drink the tap water, don't give birth in hospitals, eat only green herbal food that you hydroponically grow yourself in your domicile, monitor your bodily PH level (saliva=blood=spinal) to be certain it doesn't dip under 7 (cancer 7), avoid dairy, avoid USDA anima flesh, avoid processed sugars, avoid processed grains, avoid processed salts.

What have you got to lose other than a normal diet, but a checklist to troublshoot what could be inducing all the illness?

Re:As usual, Americans ignore the Cause of migrain (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594724)

Nice rant. Might have made more sense if you hadn't chosen to troll about a condition the causes of which are unknown. Triggers != Causes.

2/10. Try harder next time.

Re:Barbiturates work too (1)

geminidomino (614729) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594664)

Really? My doc prescribed me Fioricet (Same thing, plus caffeine) for my migraines. Doesn't even put a dent in them... Nasty as it is, the best way I've found to deal with them is to lie in a scalding bath until I puke, then immediately take an Aleve liqui-gel.

Oddly, the puking part is not optional for the treatment to work...

Re:Barbiturates work too (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594742)

Ask for Propanolol. That decreased the frequency of my migraine attacks by half. The attacks I do get seem to be less horrible aswell.
Do often get the aura effects without an actual migraine now though (very blurry vision in my right eye only.)

Curious... (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593300)

From descriptions of the condition, it would seem to me that drugs substantially nastier and more dangerous than mere LSD would likely be quite well accepted if they demonstrated efficacy. Not being Schedule I would certainly be a convenient feature of the new compound; but even standard LSD would seem to be considerably less disabling(and rather more pleasant) than the alternative...

Re:Curious... (2)

AtrN (87501) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593576)

We're already taking the drugs "far nastier and more dangerous than mere LSD". A lot of the time they don't work and they don't work the same across all sufferers. I'm only a episodic cluster head (a lucky one) but the side effects of the meds that work for me and can stop an attack cluster are such that I prefer to ride it out without them. More info at clusterheadaches.com [clusterheadaches.com]

Back to its roots (1)

neurosine (549673) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593316)

I believe Hoffman was developing a headache cure when he stumbled upon LSD. Once he tried batch 25, he sort of digressed, understandably.

Re:Back to its roots (3, Informative)

sg_oneill (159032) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593366)

Yep. LSD is synthesized and is structurally similar to Ergotamine, which is a treatment for migranes. Hoffman was studying derivatives from ergotamine, one can safely presume he was trying to work out what about ergotamines structure causes the migrane relief, either to create a better drug, or to avoid some of the nastier side effects of ergotamine which unfortunately can be pretty savage.

Re:Back to its roots (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594000)

In his own book "LSD, My problem Child" available online, he says it was research into the use of ergotamines for childbirth pains, and an attempt to isolate a substance that caused the pain relief without the nasty side effects of ... well, death.

Or IIRC anyway. It's well worth a read if you have a few hours to fill.

Salvia D. (0)

Slur (61510) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593332)

Salvia Divinorum is an amazing compound too. Personality transcending, in lesser amounts simply anti-depressant, breaks through everyday fears and anxieties, not personality-distoriting in lesser quantities. Definitely a plant that should be widely cultivated, examined, and discussed among the psychonautic consciousness-expanding netliterati. The survival of the human mind may depend on it.

Re:Salvia D. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593370)

Hi there. We were talking about medical problems, like severe cluster headaches. That's cool that you like taking Salvia, but how does that relate to the topic at hand?

Re:Salvia D. (1)

dimovich (1526925) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593542)

Well, he specified that "[...] in lesser amounts simply anti-depressant, breaks through everyday fears and anxieties [...]". So I think it's pretty relevant to our discussion.

Re:Salvia D. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594110)

Are cluster headaches due to everyday fears and anxieties?

Re:Salvia D. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594166)

Not to mention as a k-opioid antagonist it does wonders for permanent removal of opiate cravings with large enough doses. Not as well as ibogaine, but close. And given that for some reason there is no ibogaine research or clinics in the US, but you can still acquire salvia D. in many places, its better than nothing.
 
  Though back on subject of LSD, first they start conducting human trials on LSD for the terminally ill, and now this. Its nice to see it being used again. Back in the day my grandfather used both LSD and MDMA in his psychiatric practice, and marveled at how much good these drugs did when administered well. You would destroy dams holding back valuable information. In weeks you could make the progress of several years with conventional techniques for some situations. Especially PTSD.

Re:Salvia D. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593384)

Definitely a plant that should be widely cultivated, examined, and discussed among the psychonautic consciousness-expanding netliterati. The survival of the human mind may depend on it.

Dudeman, I think you need to lay off the salvia. I'm high as fuck right now and even I can tell you're wacky.

Re:Salvia D. (1)

yarnosh (2055818) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593480)

Done salvia twice. Wouldn't do it a third time. The only way I can describe it is being swept under a rug with no hope of anyone ever finding me again. Also, the idea of being a dried piece of gum on the bottom of someone's shoe comes to mind. Oh, and make sure you have someone to take the pipe out of your hand.

Re:Salvia D. (1)

DNS-and-BIND (461968) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594042)

Anyone who describes himself as "psychonautic consciousness-expanding netliterati" needs to be sterilized. Have you reproduced yet? We can only hope not.

Re:Salvia D. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594098)

At least he's not an asshole like you.

Ergot Alkaloids... (2)

grigs (856548) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593354)

...have long been used to treat migraines long before the so-called "triptans". Not surprising that LSD would work on cluster headaches (even though they are a slightly different pathology). Yes, a drug that vasoconstrict cant alleviate the pain brought on by vasodilation.

I'm no doctor... (1)

devphaeton (695736) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593362)

But I'm pretty sure I forgot about any sensations of my body when my bedroom stretched out and became a rollercoaster.

I don't know what to say (2)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593420)

I do not suffer from cluster headaches and can't imagine that I'd want to. If they're difficult to alleviate then I honestly feel sorry for those people and can understand doing whatever it takes to alleviate them or find comfort. Even though I do not suffer from cluster headaches I do think I can empathise with those that do, in a kind of tangential way. I take Venlafaxine (Effexor) 300mg per day. This drug is not addictive apparently (semantic smoke and mirrors I reckon because I cannot cease taking it). Anyway, I do take my dose. The problem is that I have "electric shocks" even if I miss the dose by an hour or so. I also get the "electric shocks" towards the end of every day and the basically incapacitate me. I've seen MANY doctors who don't even believe that they exist. I've even had one psychiatrist suggest that I am schizophrenic and that the "electric shocks" are some kind of delusion. I am not schizophrenic, by the way, and the "electric shocks" are not imagined. The medical profession really starts to need listening to their patients! These shocks that I am talking about are not, currently, measurable so therefore they do not exist according to most "doctors" and psychologists and psychiatrists and researchers that I've spoken to. At the same time the cannot suggest a way to get off the "non-addictive" drug they put me on. Can't get withdrawal symptoms from a non-addictive drug so they label it "discontinuation syndrome". Semantic bullshit in other words.

Anyway, the above relates to TFA because I can't see the medical profession accepting this treatment. Perhaps they don't even believe it exists.

Re:I don't know what to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593446)

I'm pretty sure cluster headaches are MRI-showable or something. You probably need to get some stupid ten million dollar machine to show brain activity when you experience your "feels like a shock" sensation, then they'd all believe you. :/

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593458)

Adding to my above comment, every single doctor except my current one has suggested to increase the dose to avoid the end of day electric shock sessions. When does that end. Every year they'd increase the dose to alleviate the so-called non-existent electric shocks (which is why I am on 300mg not 75mg). I finally had enough. If the trend continued I'd be doubling my dose every year until I was taking 3.14kg of the drug everyday just to manage the side-effects and STILL not be able to stop taking it and making it HARDER every iteration TO stop taking it. Fortunately I found that a doctor who suggested diazepam and I have that every afternoon when the shocks start. It'd be better not to have any drugs at all though.

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

kdekabalist (1369793) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593714)

The electric shock sensations sound like neuropathy, which SSRI's are a commonly prescribed for. I have tried SSRI's (effexor) TCA's (amitryptiline )and opiates (codeine) to alleviate mine, but have currently settled on gabapentin as being the most effective with the least side effects.

Re:I don't know what to say (2)

muridae (966931) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594184)

There's a reason that stuff gets called side-effexor. That electric shock thing is something I have felt too; I got it as withdraw pain from various SSRIs. I thought it was a pretty recognized side effect of most SSRIs. Getting the pain was, in my case, plenty of reason to switch medications since it meant I was some how going through withdrawal daily. Extended release pills can help, if you can take them.

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593500)

At least in Finland "electric shock"-kind of side-effects when starting or ending an SSRI drug treatment is well acknowledged by medical professionals. My ex had them both when starting and ending taking fluoxetine.

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

pjbgravely (751384) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593526)

Sorry to hear you are getting screwed by the doctors. You are going to have to take this into your own hands, and try to get yourself off the drug. Is there any way you can take a few weeks off? You standard detoxifying methods might make if faster.

I do have CH and most of us have learned that the docs will only do so much. We need to take care of ourselves. We take 1/3 shots of imitrex as the full migraine shot doesn't work well. Sufferers have developed an oxygen mask because they existing ones did not work well. Some have used an illegal drug as a preventative, while using low doses to not get the high.

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

AlexiaDeath (1616055) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594686)

As someone who pulled a mildly warm turkey off Effexor... Don't suggest that to someone on this drug. For me the flu like symptoms and mood swings lasted for about 4 days, vivid dreams for 2 weeks and the "shocks"/brain freezes about a month. And I took a very small dose whenever things got too bad for the first 4 days. there is only one right way to get off it and that's gradually reducing the dose. Everything else requires a babysitter. And whatever the reason for taking the meds... It will come crashing back.

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

AlexiaDeath (1616055) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594716)

Just to explain. Problem with this drug isn't that it doesnt leave the system. Problem is, that it is leaving way too quickly and brain doesn't really cope well with that.

Re:I don't know what to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593670)

My I suggest the book, "Prozac Backlash." Google: "Prozac Backlash Effexor" for some relevant information. One of my friends is a psychiatrist; he used to be chief psychiatrist for a County in Ohio. He told me one of the biggest problems he has is getting patients who have been prescribed psychiatric medications by General Practitioners who don't really understand the medications and the varied effects they can have.

Re:I don't know what to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593788)

I had the "electric shock" feeling, too, coming off of Paxil. Alcohol is the only thing I trust, nowadays.. it's been around so long that you at least know it's not going to screw up your mind like this synthetic stuff.

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593898)

I had the "electric shock" feeling, too, coming off of Paxil. Alcohol is the only thing I trust, nowadays.. it's been around so long that you at least know it's not going to screw up your mind like this synthetic stuff.

I am not sure if your comment is a jest or not. But that's pretty much a good idea. I can stop the electric shocks by getting blind drunk. The other option, since the medical profession (at least here in Australia) does not recognise the side-effect, is to jump of a fucking cliff :)

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

stephanruby (542433) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594094)

Were your doctors idiots? A very superficial google search confirms that this kind of symptom does exist for this type of medication. If I were you, my next step would be to go to a Medical/Biology University library, and have the librarians help find you actual peer reviewed Medical Journals that talk about it. If the doctors are not going to look this up, and let's face it, they can't look up everything on every topic, there is just too much research to go through it all, you'll just have to do it yourself.

Re:I don't know what to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594332)

I agree, I had this side effect trying to get off this medication and that was with a controlled slow decrease in dosage. The side effect was referenced in Wikipedia - I don't have a medical library around here :)

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

Psychotria (953670) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594530)

Were they idiots? I am not sure. But they sure as hell don't recognise it as something to worry about. Maybe I will follow your recommendation and try and do this myself, but it does make me very angry.

I managed to remove a patient from Effexor safely. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594306)

ie we moved the patient to Prozac first and then gradually detitrated her from the Prozac , this reduces the discontinuation syndrome to a whisper in her case..

Discontinuation syndrome is tolerated as it encourages patients to take their meds.. assholes!!!

the psychiatrists know of this effect when they prescribe Effexor.. fucking bastards

Tricyclics and SSRIs both exhibit this effect to a greater or lesser degree ,

          AC

             

Re:I don't know what to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594490)

I felt the brain zaps too on Effexor. I was able to slowly reduce the dosage, and over the course of a week stopped. I wouldn't recommend it, but you will have to endure the brain zaps when you come off of it for a few days one way or another.

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594572)

I am in constant pain due to Reiter's Syndrome and am one of the people whose bloodwork and x-rays look normal, so I can understand your position. However, there is always some kind of physical evidence, in my case the fact that my joints don't move normally and feel stiff. If you get these shocks but there is no physiological aspect to them then I think you have to seriously consider that they might be psychological.

The mind is very powerful when it comes to deluding itself, and since it seems to be affected by the medication you take it may simply be that your body reacts badly to it. Medicines work differently for different people. Discontinuation syndrome is a the sort of thing you get if you go from four cups of coffee a day to none overnight, annoying and bothersome but far from the severity of actual withdrawal.

Re:I don't know what to say (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594608)

This is a well know side effect of this drug. I'm also stuck on it due to them. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SSRI_discontinuation_syndrome [wikipedia.org]

Re:I don't know what to say (1)

AlexiaDeath (1616055) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594710)

Been there, done that. Just don't quit on your own. I did. It was an experience to say the least. If you get shocks now... Quitting will be horror. Get your doc to subscribe you smaller doses to be taken more frequently or just take a wet finger full off a capsule when you get the shocks. It should take them right away. The med has 9h half life. Your dosage is probably not staying as stable as it should.

P.S Im not a doctor, just someone who has been there and walked the mile. And at that time the med saved my life. But getting your head sorted has a better potential of success in the long term. Therapy FTW.

Mormonism cures headaches? (2)

Smurf (7981) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593426)

Gosh! For a few seconds I got a dyslexia attack and thought that the Church of the LDS was now falling in line with the tele-evangelists.

Furthermore, it didn't seem so surprising to me that "patients suffering from the agony of cluster headaches will take anything to dull the pain," even turn to religion. Only the next sentence clued me in.

Re:Mormonism cures headaches? (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593888)

That only cures headaches caused by coffee. Unless you get them from coke, too, then you're screwed.

Known? (1)

NoAkai (2036200) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593434)

I thought this had been known for quite a while? I remember seeing something about it in a documentary once. On a related note, I cannot see any logical reason why LSD should be illegal.

Re:Known? (1)

http (589131) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593606)

One of the side effects of knowing you can't totally trust your physical perceptions for twelve hours (hence the importance of guides and saferooms) is a state of mind conducive to questioning assumptions about other perceptions as well, e.g. social cues/mores.
It's illegal because The Establishment can't afford to have genuine free thinking about some topics, and especially about The Establishment.

Re:Known? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594512)

Automatically seeing the worst possible motives for the actions of government is not free thought any more than uncritical obedience is. Playing spot-the-conspiracy doesn't mean you're standing out from the herd.

The reason that nobody wants to legalise LSD is mostly just because there's no compelling reason to change things. Making a change would be risking a lot of political support for only very minor gains. The reason it was originally made illegal was a combination of pattern matching "drugs r bad" thinking and confusing results on tests of side effects. Incompetence, not malicious conspiracy.

Re:Known? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593852)

if it wasn't illegal someone might get high on LSD and accidentally the whole establishment

On a related note (1)

Normal Dan (1053064) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593468)

Has anyone else been experiencing more/stronger headaches lately? I've been having a lot more lately, and it seems I've notice other people with them as well (more than usual).

Re:On a related note (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593540)

not at all. and I am living in the missouri river basin that is about to flood. I should be stressing a lot more.

Re:On a related note (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593782)

Yes. My cluster headaches has been stable for 20 years. 2011 has been very atypical, and seems to get worse from week to week. I have no idea why. Your question indicates some kind of external influence. No idea as to what that may be either. I live in Northern Europe.

Re:On a related note (1)

AtrN (87501) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593988)

Southern hemisphere here. Left side episodic cluster head of about 17 years. I sense no difference this year. My other pretty regular run of winter clusters seem to have come a little early this year. But they're milder.

Re:On a related note (1)

stephanruby (542433) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594174)

No, not me, and not anyone around me (at least I don't think).

There must be a cluster of headache sufferers where you live. Either that, or there may be an abnormal number of red cars driving around your area. Personally, I find that seeing red cars gives me headaches, but thankfully I've been lucky, I haven't seen many red cars lately.

What about you? May be, you should keep a car color journal or something, and report back here in a couple of days.

Balanced activity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593550)

Halucination menas les inhibition. It allows associaitions to change within the brain so the activity becomes more balanced. That stops headaches.

Not even news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593612)

This is not news, it has been known for a long time and has been published in PubMed for years now. It even got an episode on House "The Jerk".

Re:Not even news... (1)

G-forze (1169271) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593736)

It even got an episode on House "The Jerk".

That was shrooms.

Not news (1)

DarkIye (875062) | more than 3 years ago | (#36593794)

Nor regarding the shrooms.

Re:Not news (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594200)

Exactly, mushrooms are natural products that most probably can help cluster headaches.
Shame on "science" for not studying in more details the effects of mushrooms on headaches.
Only a handful articles are available.

Mushrooms (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36593964)

I heard that they did the same thing a long time ago.
Don't panic, it's organic!

I hate drug addicts (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594300)

This is what I hate about them. We have real, legit, scientific news about how a non-hallucinogenic form of LSD cures headaches. That's great. Good news for everybody.

Now cue the moron dopers who have to make this their case for legalizing hallucinogenic LSD and making sure every man, woman, and child on the planet is high as a kite and tripping balls 24/7. Way to miss the point you fucking hippies.

Bromo-LSD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36594440)

LSD have been used since the 60s. Its side-effects are well-known and they aren't so worrying compared to most of the other drugs available for treating migraines.
2-Bromo-LSD is a new substance, its side-effects aren't well-known, so if I had migraines, I'd stick to LSD.
The worse that you could get from LSD was a difficult experience that are frightening but they can also be enlightening.

Old news (1)

UbuntuniX (1126607) | more than 3 years ago | (#36594646)

This has been known for a very long time. Seriously?
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