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Bug With "Singing Penis" Is World's Loudest

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the animal-idol dept.

Idle 117

sciencehabit writes "The world's loudest animal relative to its size has been revealed to be a tiny bug with a big organ. The water boatman, Micronecta scholtzi, rattles its penis along grooves in its abdomen to produce a chattering song—that registers at 99.2 decibels—about the volume of a loud orchestra heard from the front row. Even though the water boatman does its 'singing' from the bottom of rivers to attract mates, humans walking along the riverbank can clearly hear it. The area along its abdomen that the bug uses to make the noise is only about the width of a human hair, and researchers aren't sure exactly how it produces so loud a song."

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Your mom. (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637570)

Tries to sing with my penis in her mouth but all that comes out is muffled noise, well I mean until I blow my load down her throat.

Re:Your mom. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637620)

Dad?

Re:Your mom. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36638128)

No, I'm your uncle Jim.

Re:Your mom. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36638826)

But now that you're older I think it's ok to finally tell you that I probably am your father..

"Singing Penis" (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637714)

I though the description referred to an error in a sound driver in a Linux release named "Singing Penis."

Amazing (2)

reeno49 (1558221) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637582)

I wonder if it takes requests.

Re:Amazing (3, Funny)

Bieeanda (961632) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637860)

"You didn't think I asked for a twelve inch pianist, did you?"

Re:Amazing (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637898)

They tweet their weiners, but don't have to resign...

Re:Amazing (1)

bar-agent (698856) | more than 3 years ago | (#36639408)

Just goes to show. It isn't the size of the ship, but the motion in the ocean.

Dude's got a built-in vibrator that he can play like a master.

Re:Amazing (1)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 3 years ago | (#36639116)

"You didn't think I asked for a twelve inch pianist, did you?"

Dang! And spent the last of my mod points earlier today.

Well done, my friend. Stay thirsty.

**Slow Clap**

Re:Amazing (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638140)

I wonder if it takes requests.

Get me drunk enough and I'll do my penis karaoke.

Re:Amazing - More importantly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36638340)

"about the width of a human hair"
But how many library of congresses can fit on it's penis?

Queue the puns. (1)

zooblethorpe (686757) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637586)

What a dick.

What a knob.

What a todger.

What a ...

Cheers,

Related disturbing trivia (4, Informative)

zooblethorpe (686757) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637644)

I found that the bug's Wikipedia page [wikipedia.org] contains the following disturbing gem (bolding mine):

M. scholtzi is easily differentiated from other species in this genus by the twisted left paramere of the male genitalia, (see Traumatic insemination [wikipedia.org] ) the short pronotum [wikipedia.org] and a distinctive dark pattern on the head.

I thought getting your schwartz twisted was a bad thing, but apparently this little feller has capitalized on it to develop a whole range of antisocial hobbies. Who knew.

Cheers,

Re:Related disturbing trivia (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638052)

Ah Slashdot. News for Nerds. Bugs that Chatter.

Re:Related disturbing trivia (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36638294)

I found that the bug's Wikipedia page [wikipedia.org] contains the following disturbing gem (bolding mine):

M. scholtzi is easily differentiated from other species in this genus by the twisted left paramere of the male genitalia, (see Traumatic insemination [wikipedia.org] ) the short pronotum [wikipedia.org] and a distinctive dark pattern on the head.

I thought getting your schwartz twisted was a bad thing, but apparently this little feller has capitalized on it to develop a whole range of antisocial hobbies. Who knew.

Cheers,

i think that you meant schwanz and not schwartz.....

Re:Related disturbing trivia (1)

theArtificial (613980) | more than 3 years ago | (#36639038)

Not sure if you're trolling but it's a reference from a movie called "Space Balls" which is full of many amusing scenes and quotes [imdb.com] .

Re:Related disturbing trivia (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 3 years ago | (#36640152)

Yes but schwanz means tail or colloquially penis in German..

Re:Related disturbing trivia (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36638882)

Holy. Fucking. Cow.

That shit is fucked up.

Re:Queue the puns. (4, Funny)

zill (1690130) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637772)

Queue the puns

Puns don't need to be in FIFO order.

Re:Queue the puns. (1)

gknoy (899301) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638094)

You just about made me spit out my soda, sir. Well played!

Re:Queue the puns. (1)

maxume (22995) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638954)

He even typed it with his penis.

Re:Queue the puns. (1)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637822)

Obviously, this bug never heard that it can make you go blind.

Re:Queue the puns. (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638866)

How do you know that this bug is not already blind and relies on other senses :)

Re:Queue the puns. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637904)

"Que" the puns.

Re:Queue the puns. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637926)

"Cue" the idiots who can't spell.

Re:Queue the puns. (1)

zooblethorpe (686757) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637996)

"Queue" the idiots who can spell, but wind up using the wrong homophone.

(NB: I include myself in the lineup here.)

Re:Queue the puns. (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638464)

Indeed.... because in this case, both cue and queue would be grammatically correct... though usually cue would be the one you'd use, as in it is their cue to begin, rather than they are forming a queue. /pedant off.

Re:Queue the puns. (1)

Barny (103770) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638234)

Okay, here goes...

... researchers aren't sure exactly how it produces so loud a song.

Answer: Like a BOSS

obvious (2)

ArrowBay (2326316) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637606)

"Honey, let's make beautiful music together... I'm tired of making it on my own!"

Over compensating. (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637612)

The area along its abdomen that the bug uses to make the noise is only about the width of a human hair, and researchers aren't sure exactly how it produces so loud a song

It's probably -because- it's only the width of a hair that the bug makes such loud noises. If mine were the size of a hair, I'd probably be pretty upset and yell pretty loudly too.

Re:Over compensating. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637636)

It's the size of it, it's what you do with it.

Re:Over compensating. (2)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637808)

. If mine were the size of a hair, I'd probably be pretty upset and yell pretty loudly too.

Not if you were the size of this critter. Then your dick would be as long as your leg. :P

so small, yet so loud (4, Informative)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637642)

Micronecta scholtzi are freshwater insects measuring just 2mm that are common across Europe. ...
On average, the songs of M. scholtzi reached 78.9 decibels, comparable to a passing freight train. ...
"If you scale the sound level they produce against their body size, Micronecta scholtzi are the loudest animals on Earth," said Dr Windmill. ...
To produce the intense sound, the water boatmen "stridulate" by rubbing a ridge on their penis across the ridged surface of their abdomen. ...
"Males try to compete to have access to females and then try to produce a song as loud as possible potentially scrambling the song of competitors." ...
What makes M. scholtzi extraordinary is that the area they use to create sound only measures about 50 micrometres across, roughly the width of a human hair. ...

btw, here is the picture of the little bugger. [wikipedia.org]

Re:so small, yet so loud (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638170)

"stridulate"

Vocabulary word of the day.

"Stridulation". I like it.

Re:so small, yet so loud (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638200)

That's when you use the loudest loudspeaker that there is (tweeter in this case,) and send a picture of an erection to various females, hoping for ... well, something.

Re:so small, yet so loud (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638912)

(tweeter in this case,)

Mine is more like a woofer, if you catch my drift.

and send a picture of an erection to various females, hoping for ... well, something.

It could have been worse. Something like "2 Congressmen, 1 Cup".

Re:so small, yet so loud (1)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638786)

Proper vocabulary lists should always be accompanied with example usage, eg

"Hey, PopeRatzo, don't stridulate so much, or your voice will get louder."

Re:so small, yet so loud (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638910)

What I find really curious here is there anything we can learn from this?

For instance, Velcro was invented by investigating a rather simple phenomenon in nature and then using material sciences to recreate it.

These seem to be extremely small areas measured in millimeters and the actual effective area in micrometers. Could we learn from this to create sound producing products that can produce extremely loud sounds yet be hundreds of times smaller than any current technology we have.

Penis jokes aside, there are some very interesting observations here that might have practical applications.

News for nerds, stuff that... gets hard. (4, Funny)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637660)

Has slashdot descended so far that news for nerds is now "animal makes noise with its dick"? Really now...

Re:News for nerds, stuff that... gets hard. (3, Funny)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637708)

Isn't that the same as open source news?

Re:News for nerds, stuff that... gets hard. (1)

Jeng (926980) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637758)

Sounds like a piece of trivia a nerd might tell me.

Re:News for nerds, stuff that... gets hard. (3, Insightful)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637764)

Well, there are biology nerds. I happen to be one of them. While I don't particularly agree with the presentation of the story, the factoid itself is of interest to me. A weird evolutionary path. Fascinating.

Re:News for nerds, stuff that... gets hard. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36639494)

Factoid means "resembling a fact but not factual"

Re:News for nerds, stuff that... gets hard. (2)

ciaohound (118419) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637780)

Slashdotters might find it inspirational. If a bug can find a use for its penis, there's hope for the rest of us.

Re:News for nerds, stuff that... gets hard. (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638072)

Slashdotters might find it inspirational. If a bug can find a use for its penis, there's hope for the rest of us.

The insect in question is using it's penis to procreate. Just like the rest of the animal kingdom

Your turn...

Re:News for nerds, stuff that... gets hard. (1)

M8e (1008767) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638146)

I don't think he will turn. You would just sniff his butt.

Re:News for nerds, stuff that... gets hard. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36638302)

You're a poster on Slashdot, what would you know about procreating?

Your turn.

Nothing new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637840)

This is even worse than that article on the Shrieking Titmouse.

Re:News for nerds, stuff that... gets hard. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36638626)

We finally found something that can drown out your queef

I can answer that one (1)

fragfoo (2018548) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637662)

The area along its abdomen that the bug uses to make the noise is only about the width of a human hair, and researchers aren't sure exactly how it produces so loud a song.

A horny bug, it will make it work.

It has to.

So the bugs are doing 2 Live Crew? (3, Funny)

Chas (5144) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637664)

{Son} Dad? What're those bugs singing for?
{Dad} They're rap fans.
{Son} Huh?
{Dad} 2 Live Crew fans actually.
{Son} 2 Live WHO? Dad? What're the damn bugs singin' about?
{Dad} Their song is the bug version of "We Want Some Pussy"
{Son} Oh.

Acoustic Levitation (1)

Nethemas the Great (909900) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637684)

Phallus jokes aside. It would be great to understand how this works. We've somewhat recently started looking more closely at the notion of acoustic levitation [livescience.com] for solving all manner of problems. Particularly containerless manufacturing. It's been suggested based upon various ancient texts that this may well have been the means by which so many of these massive megaliths far exceeding modern engineering capabilities were transported and placed. The ability for something so small to produce such a relatively massive acoustic pressure definitely helps bolster the case.

Megaliths not so very mysterious. (4, Informative)

zooblethorpe (686757) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637778)

While acoustic levitation is certainly an interesting phenomenon, I wouldn't get too confused about ancient monuments and ancient texts -- basic applied physics is all we need to understand how to move multi-ton blocks of stone with nothing but manpower.

By way of reference, have a look at Wally Wallington's website [theforgott...nology.com] -- not joking, the guy shows some very convincing demonstrations of how a single human can move 20-ton chunks of concrete (concrete being easier to obtain than stone, but functionally similar).

Cheers,

Re:Acoustic Levitation (1)

mark_reh (2015546) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637792)

It's also been suggested (and believed by many with soft minds) that ancient aliens built the pyramids.

Video or it didn't happen.

Re:Acoustic Levitation (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638488)

Well, I do have all 10 seasons of SG1, as well as both of the movies, and the original movie that launched it all on DVD....

(which, sadly, is probably proof for some people....)

Re:Acoustic Levitation (1)

hamburgler007 (1420537) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637804)

I'm all for exploring the science, but I think it is silly to elude ourselves into thinking that ancient megaliths were erected using technology that we are only currently beginning to understand. It is much more reasonable to attribute the construction of those structures with a basic understanding of geometry and a shitload of slaves and time.

Re:Acoustic Levitation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36639078)

It would be silly delude ourselves into thinking it's the only, or in this case even best, explanation. It's equally silly to rule it out in general on the basis that we only just now understand it. That our technology evolved one path first doesn't preclude someone else having evolved along another path first; it's not as if acoustic levitation actually depends on electronics or even heat engines, merely that we discovered it after them. Serendipitous discovery is not implausible; while a theoretical understanding certainly requires the calculus, the same applies to innumerable other inventions that were used by empirical understanding.

Remember the Antikythera mechanism had differential gearing, not reinvented in the West before 1720. Someone anywhere from the 17th century onward would have felt perfectly justified in attributing ancient navigation and astronomy entirely to manually computed tables, and considered the suggestion they had analog computers beyond the astrolabe that we were "only currently beginning to understand" so much rubbish. But thanks to one lucky discovery and a whole lot of reverse engineering, we now know they'd have been completely wrong.

Now what DOES make sonic levitation a poor explanation is that the energy required increases with the mass you're levitating, and for a cavity with an arbitrary q, power to sustain the field scales with the energy; the sheer power requirements seem more implausible than simply moving the rocks.

Re:Acoustic Levitation (1)

Tasha26 (1613349) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637828)

You mean like in X-Men: First Class... the flying-levitation scene in the movie did not impress me at all. I think the US Army will adapt the findings to manufacture crowd control sonic guns.

Re:Acoustic Levitation (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638534)

Where on earth did you get the idea that the megaliths and pyramids are beyond modern engineering? They're beyond the engineering that we presumed people in that era had, and they're beyond the engineering we were using until about the renaissance, but we could quite easily build the pyramids or the sphynx or stonehenge again using modern engineering and construction methods.

A great deal of knowledge was lost when the Roman empire collapsed, but most of it has been rediscovered and surpassed a long time ago. It's a mystery (sort of) how they were built, but the biggest mystery is where the materials came from, not how they were put together, and there are some very plausible explanations for how the ancients managed to move the materials around, either by barge, or cart, or a combination.

Re:Acoustic Levitation (1)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 3 years ago | (#36640214)

We could build pyramids but it would be fucking expensive. I guess that's why the pharaohs built the things though.

Re:Acoustic Levitation (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36638632)

There are many things wrong with assuming the ancients didn't use basic applied physics and raw manpower to move large objects, and assuming something that crazy, but I will put all of the technical and social problems to the side for now, and focus on something else: The sociology of the situation. We know that the societies used manpower and basic applied physics such as lever systems and pulley systems to create such enormous constructions because as the societies collapsed and fell apart, or their production abilities sharply fell in times of crop failure, we know that there is a direct correlation between manpower and size of creations. Just look at easter island, after the society collapsed their primary source of certain goods they no longer had the manpower to make and put more heads in place. They were still able to show Erik the Red how to do it centuries later, but they didn't make more of them because they were too labor intensive and they lacked the food. If they had been created with low energy means, they would not have stopped just because their crops weren't growing as well or they ran out of trees or something similar.

Re:Acoustic Levitation (1)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638782)

Phallus jokes aside. It would be great to understand how this works. We've somewhat recently started looking more closely at the notion of acoustic levitation [livescience.com] for solving all manner of problems. Particularly containerless manufacturing. It's been suggested based upon various ancient texts that this may well have been the means by which so many of these massive megaliths far exceeding modern engineering capabilities were transported and placed. The ability for something so small to produce such a relatively massive acoustic pressure definitely helps bolster the case.

The bug does not use wings. It props itself up on three legs (a tripod), points its propulsion unit at the ground, and levitates.

congressman waterstrider (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637692)

More wang for your fuck? Imagine how loud the honeymoon is.

In the mammalian world... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637720)

That award goes to John Meyer.

Singing Penis? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637746)

Isn't that Justin Beiber?

I'll be in the rest room (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637786)

I have to try something out...

At what distance? (3, Informative)

l00sr (266426) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637798)

Decibel figures are meaningless without knowing the distance of the observer to the bug's penis. For all we know, the scientist jammed the bug's willy into his/her ear, in which case the sound could obviously be perceived much louder than an orchestra from the front row!

Re:At what distance? (1)

SquirrelDeth (1972694) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638482)

If I could get a million dollar grant i would stick a bug penis in my ear.

Re:At what distance? (1)

pegasustonans (589396) | more than 3 years ago | (#36639006)

Decibel figures are meaningless without knowing the distance of the observer to the bug's penis. For all we know, the scientist jammed the bug's willy into his/her ear , in which case the sound could obviously be perceived much louder than an orchestra from the front row!

Pics or it didn't happen.

Re:At what distance? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36639580)

"No".

The original story is from the EU. There, the reference sound pressure for auditory "decibels" is typically 20 micropascals, originally measured as "the softest sound you can actually hear".

"Distance" is irrelevant. Putting the microphone at the source of the sound is a legitimate way to measuer the maximum loudness, loudness is measured in auditory pressure, not power devlivered. A larger sound source would deliver more overall energy to the environment, and due to more planar propagation is likely to be louder at a distance, but maximum loudness is stell measured right at the sound source.

Re:At what distance? (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 3 years ago | (#36639726)

Also decibel is logarithmic and size is not. Not sure if they calculated that as well. The blue whale produces 188dB.

Re:At what distance? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36640408)

dbm would be much better, but TFA says you can hear them while walking, and they stay at the bottom of the river, so I guess they actually are pretty loud.

again, this is probably just poor report, any scientists knows the difference between db and dbm...

World records (-1, Offtopic)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637826)

There's a category in the Guiness World Records on "Loudest singing Penis"? Who is competing in that category? There's a lot of actors, and Democrats, but I don't think they are what I'd call singers.

Isn't it obvious? (1)

Bieeanda (961632) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637838)

Given the proportion of prong to bug, that noise you're hearing is sheer pride.

Organ grinder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637872)

Big deal. I can do that.

So a bug says to the TSA... (1)

Cytlid (95255) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637886)

... Dude, don't listen to my junk.

lucky bug (1)

FudRucker (866063) | more than 3 years ago | (#36637930)

i wish my penis could sing

In related news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36637974)

...Justin Bieber concert cancelled due to noise concerns.

Singing PENIS (1)

PenisLands (930247) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638008)

Heh heh. PENIS. BIG PENIS. Big with "singing PENIS" is world's loudest.

PENIS FOREVER!!! !!! !!!

rename (1)

walmass (67905) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638036)

I think they made a mistake with the name, it should be Meganecta Schlongi.

Heard on the radio (NPR) today: (1)

walmass (67905) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638054)

The pink conch has a penis half its body length and mates for hours. When it is having sex eels and lobsters may eat it's dick but no problem--it will grow a new one in a few months

Re:Heard on the radio (NPR) today: (1)

mcavic (2007672) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638792)

A few months? That sounds like a problem to me.

That's not a bug. (2)

John R. Isidore (2330334) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638082)

It's a feature. :)

Slashdot...where are you? (2)

happyfeet2000 (1208074) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638136)

For a moment I thought I was in reddit. I'm looking for any connection in this article to a technical subject, any, well, I guess I'm losing my sense of humor.

Re:Slashdot...where are you? (1)

Lord Lode (1290856) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638166)

Well, to make it technical, this could be interesting for speaker technology. Imagine cellphones producing loud quality music with a deep bass!

Re:Slashdot...where are you? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36638936)

Not to mention speakers shaped like big wobbly dicks.

99.2 decibels! (1, Redundant)

blair1q (305137) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638138)

That's nothing.

I once knew a Congressman whose penis was so loud that just one tweet from it echoed for weeks until it made his career explode...

Produces So Loud A Song? I Know Why (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638284)

Because if you rattled your penis that way, you'd scream just a loud as a Boat, man.

A Useful Comment in a Sea of Lameness (1)

The Hatchet (1766306) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638604)

How about studying the bug to figure out how to use the effect to make super effective speakers and sound equipment? That makes a lot more sense than the endless jokes about penises, what, are you all sexually repressed teenagers or something?

Re:A Useful Comment in a Sea of Lameness (1)

dominious (1077089) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638690)

what, are you all sexually repressed teenagers or something?

Four words: /.

Re:A Useful Comment in a Sea of Lameness (1)

Thing 1 (178996) | more than 3 years ago | (#36639080)

Nice first sentence; I tagged this "speakertech".

any others? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36638798)

worlds loudest singing penis? i dont know of any others...

It's not how loud you sing... (1)

Rollgunner (630808) | more than 3 years ago | (#36638930)

It's whether or not you can hit all the notes in the right order... Sheesh.

Far more likely explanation (1)

Dachannien (617929) | more than 3 years ago | (#36639008)

I think it's a lot more likely that the penis isn't making the noise at all. Yes, it's doing what they say it's doing, but the noise actually comes from the bug's screaming, either in sheer ecstasy or excruciating pain.

World's Loudest What? (1)

Bob9113 (14996) | more than 3 years ago | (#36639548)

'Bug With "Singing Penis" Is World's Loudest'

Assuming the article subject is grammatically correct, this must be the world's loudest bug. Given the propensity for phrase structure errors on this site, however, I am left wondering if this is the world's loudest bug, or the world's loudest singing penis.

Well, if no one is going to say it, I will... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36639646)

This gives a new meaning to "horny".... or to toots one's horn.

Music sooththe save beast (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36640096)

No wonder they are so happy and calm

Figured it ou (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36640184)

Its clearly doing this with the help of KYOJI (tinyurl.com/thehelpofkyoji)

Reinforcing Waves (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36640460)

It doesn't have to move very far to make the sound, so maybe it moves at exactly the right speed to creative positive addition of successive waves, creating amplification.

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  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>