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Spanish Surgeon Performs First Synthetic Organ Transplant

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the bet-they're-delicious dept.

Biotech 91

Bob the Super Hamste writes "The BBC is reporting that surgeons in Sweden have transplanted a synthetic windpipe into a patient. The synthetic windpipe was grown from a scaffolding and coated with the patients own stem cells. The scaffolding was made using 3D images of the patient's own windpipe. The new windpipe was made by scientists in London."

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Big Deal (1)

zedmelon (583487) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685204)

Fergie has had an artificial windpipe for years...

Re:Big Deal (1)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685314)

I doubt that is the only artificial thing she has.

Re:Big Deal (1)

ISoldat53 (977164) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685448)

My Grandmother has a cedar chest.

Re:Big Deal (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685664)

What knockers!

Oh, thank you, doctor...

Well, thats nothing (-1, Troll)

serieoftubes (2351956) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685258)

How about an camera [aeonity.com] implanted into one's head?
Or a USB [thoughts.com] stick implanted instead of missing finger..

Re:Well, thats nothing (1)

logjon (1411219) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685344)

goatse

Re:Well, thats nothing (1)

Daetrin (576516) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685450)

The usual connotation (though not denotation) of "synthetic" is "an artificially made substance/thing that closely mimics a natural occurring substance/thing." Thus synthetic fiber [wikipedia.org] , synthetic oil [wikipedia.org] , and now synthetic organs.

I can't think of what the technical term would be for the things you're citing (cybernetic implants?) but that's not what's being discussed here. One is trying to restore lost functionality by duplicating lost or damaged parts of the body and the other is trying to add entirely new functionality by adding bits that never existed before.

Well thats a... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36685272)

Breath of fresh air

Re:Well thats a... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36685318)

Well that's a ... <dons sunglasses> ... breath of fresh air. Yeeeaaaah. FTFY

Not the first by 5 years (3, Interesting)

toppavak (943659) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685308)

Anthony Atala's group, now at Wake Forest University, have grown implanted bladders grown in the same fashion. In fact, it was Atala's group that was one of the leading pioneers of the technique (I believe Robert Langer's group at MIT also had done some seminal work in this area). http://articles.cnn.com/2006-04-03/health/engineered.organs_1_bladder-cells-spina-bifida?_s=PM:HEALTH [cnn.com]

Re:Not the first by 5 years (1)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685518)

Yeah, that is what I was thinking. But it IS the first windpipe is it not?

The biggest thing to note about growing these "artificial" parts is that if the organ being replaced has a complex vain system, you cannot grow or replace it.
Hopefully this will be resolved in the future so we can live to 150.

Re:Not the first by 5 years (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685540)

Why is vanity an issue? Are these synthetic organs less ascetically pleasing?

I would be more worried about the circulatory system of such organs.

Re:Not the first by 5 years (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36685788)

Asceticism may be pleasing to some, but I'm a man of earthly joys.

I would be more worried about the aesthetics of an artificial organ.

Re:Not the first by 5 years (1)

toppavak (943659) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685598)

Actually it is possible to produce highly vascularized tissue. The trick is to use the decellularized collagen matrix from a donor organ (either taken from an animal or from a cadaver) which can then be re-seeded with the patient's own cells and implanted. Atala's group has done this with livers (although not re-implanted yet) and has made proof-of-concepts with kidneys (by using a stack of 2d tissues rather than attempting to engineer the complete 3d structure)

Re:Not the first by 5 years (1)

corran__horn (178058) | more than 3 years ago | (#36690528)

The difference in this case is the use of stem cells to replace known bad cells. The Atala group used differentiated cells, which is of more limited use when dealing with potentially cancerous organ tissues.

Re:Not the first by 5 years (1)

IronicToo (514475) | more than 3 years ago | (#36699736)

If you RTFA, second sentence: "The surgery marks the first time a trachea grown from a patient’s stem cells and seeded onto a synthetic, rather than a donor, structure has been transplanted in a human." and the fifth sentence: "We talked to Dr. Anthony Atala, a pioneer in the field who in 1999 transplanted the first of several synthetic bladders into young people with bladder disease."

Re:Not the first by 5 years (1)

IronicToo (514475) | more than 3 years ago | (#36699760)

Ok, I messed that up. The above quotes were from here: http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-trachea-transplant-stem-cell-20110708,0,2121263.story [latimes.com] I had too many of the same story open at the same time. I do recommend the above story for more info on how the fits in with previous work.

Huge (4, Insightful)

Telvin_3d (855514) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685338)

As I write this, the only comments posted so far are the usual sarcastic quips. But this is huge. Beyond huge.

For the first time, an artificially produced cloned organ has been created and transplanted. Someone has received an organ that has zero chance of rejection and will heal to a completely natural state.

I give it less than a decade before more complex organs like hearts or kidneys are transplanted for the first time.

Re:Huge (1)

Aladrin (926209) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685384)

I suppose all those clone movies were for nothing, then. Not much point in raising a full clone when you can just grow the part you need at will.

Of course, this won't help for emergencies, but if someone has the time to spare, this is a much better option than a donated organ.

Re:Huge (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36685510)

"Emergencies" is open-ended. The patient in TFA had a relatively slow but still dire emergency, and he was helped in a timeframe doctors would consider "lightning speed" - growing a heretofore irreplaceable part in two weeks.

How many people could be treated if a new irreplaceble organ of their own tissue could be made for them in, say, one month's time? The benefits would almost outstrip the imagination.

Re:Huge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36685750)

You'd be surprised how well it will work in emergencies... given some refinement, of course. The thing is, almost any portion of your body that suffers damage by trauma can be artificially sustained in a hospital setting for a very long time. It's well within our medical technology to remove your brain from your skull, and keep your body alive for at least a week afterwards.

So what that really means is that, if you get in a car accident, and crush your liver, you just have to live in the hospital on life support gear while they whip up your new liver. Course, it would be about 10005040230406045% better if you had a cache of fetal stem cells from your birth, but I'm aware that isn't exactly common practice yet.

Re:Huge (3, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685778)

Actually it might.
They can build the structure ahead of time, and then when needed put your cells onto the stricture.

I suspect there will be a time when you can have your critical organ on 'standby'. At my age, I would love to hae a second heart ready to replace my older one. I read a paper where they where discussing the possible of creating a heart this way, and then having it put inside you along with your other heart to take over.

It was high level musing..but high level musing by people that know all the details.

Re:Huge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36686196)

Imagine a beowulf cluster of that!

Re:Huge (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36686396)

I suspect there will be a time when you can have your critical organ on 'standby'.

Well, I realize you're a bit older, but I, for one, always have my critical organ on standby.

Re:Huge (1)

lsatenstein (949458) | more than 3 years ago | (#36693348)

Will I and my family be able to live perpetually? Is there going to be a way to take my 70+ year brain and revitalize the short-term (scratchpad) memory.

Re:Huge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36691254)

There's a huge point in growing a full clone. You have all the spare parts at a moments notice.

Re:Huge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36698684)

As a smoker, I fully support this assertion. (ooo new lungs?)

Re:Huge (1)

xMrFishx (1956084) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685414)

Yeah this is massive. I remember watching a Horizon (BBC) episode on growing hearts from scaffold and stem-cell and having them function. It was beyond amazing. This is exactly where the money needs to go. Growing organs, if it beats graft-vs-host is one of the biggest potential ways forward.

Re:Huge (1)

demonlapin (527802) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685496)

It's not really a cloned organ. It's a stem-cell-coated scaffolding of one of the body's least metabolically active tissues. It's a lot closer to a rod in your leg than to a functioning heart.

Re:Huge (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685796)

It's huge fro a rejection stand point, the after organ transplant procedure is pretty nasty. All that would go away.

Re:Huge (1)

demonlapin (527802) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687348)

The body doesn't reject titanium, either. I'm not saying this isn't a great thing - it is. But this is grown on a glass scaffolding, which could still serve as a nidus for infection, and it doesn't get us closer to real artificial organs.

Re:Huge (1)

tarius8105 (683929) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687412)

Yes but there are other applications that this would be better suited. You could grow new arteries for bypass patients, instead of having to harvest from other parts of the body. That alone would allow people with clogged arteries the ability to be able to do strenuous activity. Eventually they will be able to do more complex but this is a huge milestone.

Re:Huge (1)

demonlapin (527802) | more than 3 years ago | (#36689934)

Coronary grafts would be especially bad for this, as glass (which is used for the scaffold) has properties that render it highly unsuitable for use as an arterial graft. Arteries are muscular vessels and depend on the elasticity this grants to provide smooth delivery of blood rather than jackhammering it into distal vessels. You'll need a non-rejected elastic substrate that can handle systemic arterial pressures for ten years just to match the statistical performance of vein grafts.

Re:Huge (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685600)

But this is huge. Beyond huge.

If you're talking about the costs to the patient, sure. I doubt it will be covered by medicaid...

Re:Huge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36685682)

But this is huge. Beyond huge.

If you're talking about the costs to the patient, sure. I doubt it will be covered by medicaid...

Only in America, dear... Many of us don't have to pay for your medicaid. Especially not in Sweden, where the surgery took place.

Re:Huge (1)

Mister Whirly (964219) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685826)

Yes because somehow magically in other countries, citizens don't foot the bill for socialized medicine. If you really think Swedes "don't have to pay for" their health care, you are being seriously naive. Not getting a direct bill for something is not the same thing as not ever paying for it indirectly.

Re:Huge (4, Informative)

Telvin_3d (855514) | more than 3 years ago | (#36686082)

Yeah, but it's a much smaller bill. Turns out that any level of 'government inefficiency' is a drop in the bucket beside the waste of having every company involved take its 50% off the top, plus executive salaries, plus lack of preventative medicine because that is an 'expense'.

Here is an excellent graphic from National Geographic [ngm.com] comparing spending to life expectancy. Despite having worse outcomes than almost every nation on the chart, the US is spending so much more that they had to be placed outside the graph. In fact, most industrialized nations are spending less than half as much as the US for better outcomes. The only countries with worse outcomes are spending less than a quarter as much per person as the US does.

So while the citizens as the United States of America may not be able to afford it, I suspect the rest of the world will do just fine.

And that assumes that this causes a net rise in health costs. My guess is that, when all is said and done, replacing damaged organs will prove much cheaper than long term treatment and complications do now.

Re:Huge (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 3 years ago | (#36686616)

that is an awesome chart - thanks.

Re:Huge (1)

t2t10 (1909766) | more than 3 years ago | (#36688512)

Actually, the US has better outcomes for medical care than other nations; lower life expectancy is due to more obesity and heart disease, plus some other factors. Insufficient preventive medicine isn't due to cost or lack of coverage either for most people, it's a choice for most people (a stupid one but still a choice).

And the rest of the world isn't "doing just fine". Most countries in the world can't even spend close to what either the US or Europe are spending.

And long term, people are deeply concerned about spiraling health care costs and health care insolvency in Europe as well, with nobody having a good solution. The US is just ahead of the curve.

Re:Huge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36688496)

As the Partner of a Patient with Kidney failure, the costs are pretty insignificant I think
The costs involved in providing Kidney Dyalysis to a patient is Huge considering everything involved, Machine, supplies, Staffing, Building / infrastructure, Research, Medicines. etc

If I ( or the health funds) could spend 100K to build a kidney fro her that woud still be FAR cheaper than continual Treatment, with the added Benefit of better health and life for her.

Re:Huge (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36685672)

I give it less than a decade before more complex organs like hearts or kidneys are transplanted for the first time.

Ummm... we've been transplanting hearts and kidneys for decades...

Correct terminology IMO would be implanted. If you transplant a tree you dig it up and move from one spot in the ground to another. The windpipe didn't come from another body it came from the labratory.

Maybe. (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685772)

Don't get me wrong, being able to build new organs and implant them is great.

But that doesn't mean the new organs will last, or work perfectly. We need to check back in a few years to see how the patient did.

Re:Maybe. (2)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#36690476)

There are plenty of concerns, but given the alternative was death, it's not at all a bad risk. Even if the organs did turn out not to last long, they would at least be a good bridge to transplant.

Re:Huge (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36686560)

I give it less than a decade before more complex organs like hearts or kidneys are transplanted for the first time.

Too bad it will take until the year 2368 before bodyparts like the spinal column... (http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Worf#Ailments_and_injuries http://memory-alpha.org/wiki/Toby_Russell)

Re:Huge (2)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687040)

For the first time, an artificially produced cloned organ has been created and transplanted.

No. They've been doing this with cloned bladders for close to a decade. The only new aspect to this is that they created the scaffold from 3D scans of the patient's own organ.

Re:Huge (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36687142)

I wonder if the 3D scan of the replacement organ could be scaled, ie organ made larger. I wonder how long before we get spam emails relating to such stem cell therapy...

Re:Huge (1)

EdZ (755139) | more than 3 years ago | (#36689368)

And we hadn't even got to the stage of harvesting organs from criminals yet. Take that, Niven!

Re:Huge (1)

IrquiM (471313) | more than 3 years ago | (#36691766)

Dude - China!

Re:Huge (1)

Confusador (1783468) | more than 3 years ago | (#36690444)

How sad is it that I see this huge advancement and think, "Boy, that sounds expensive." *sigh* Such is life in modern America.

Hmmm... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36685342)

Wouldn't that be an "implant"? I mean, they're not taking it from someone else, are they..?

Re:Hmmm... (1)

taiwanjohn (103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685516)

Good point. I think the reasoning is that it's a replacement of an existing organ, whereas an "implant" would be something added to the original.

Re:Hmmm... (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687100)

They're taking cells from his nose, and putting them into his neck. Sounds like a transplant to me.

Re:Hmmm... (1)

layer3switch (783864) | more than 3 years ago | (#36689826)

and 3D image of African patient's windpipe...

Spanish surgeon? (0)

homey of my owney (975234) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685368)

No, Spanish patient, Swedish surgeon. Did you even read TFA?

Re:Spanish surgeon? (3, Informative)

demonlapin (527802) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685476)

Professor Paolo Macchiarini from Spain led the pioneering surgery

the 36-year-old African patient, Andemariam Teklesenbet Beyene

Did you?

Re:Spanish surgeon? (3, Informative)

jittles (1613415) | more than 3 years ago | (#36686132)

A Spanish surgeon in a Swedish facility with a British organ for an African patient. Now that is Globalization!

Re:Spanish surgeon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36686392)

And not only that! Support for the organ will be outsourced to a call center in India, and soon you'll be able to buy cheap knockoffs from China!

Re:Spanish surgeon? (1)

Zaatxe (939368) | more than 3 years ago | (#36692730)

A Spanish surgeon in a Swedish facility with a British organ for an African patient. Now that is Globalization!

You forgot to mention that the spanish surgeon has a obvious italian name...

It seems he's actually Italian (1)

luca (6883) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687210)

Now it says "Professor Paolo Macchiarini from Italy". According to wikipedia [wikipedia.org] he's Italian but he works in Barcelona, hence the confusion.

Re:Spanish surgeon? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36691606)

They have corrected this. It now says italian.

Windpipe? (1)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685486)

So, is it a Wurlitzer?

THREE YEARS OLD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36685522)

Come on, surely this story broke THREE YEARS ago:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/health/7735696.stm

Easyjet got in trouble, because they refused to carry the organ after saying they would take it (or something like that), forcing the doctors that made it to switch to a private plane.

Re:THREE YEARS OLD (1)

tom17 (659054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36686026)

The one three years used a donor trachea - they washed away the donor cells leaving just the scaffold.

With this one, the scaffold was created artificially from a 3D model of the patients original one.

Similar, but quite a big difference, though the difference is only in the scaffold.

Building on the work of others (1)

djlemma (1053860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36685634)

This story seemed like a dupe of this one from last year:
Child Receives Trachea Grown From Own Stem Cells [slashdot.org]
But it seems that instead of taking a donor trachea and using it for the "scaffold," they built their own, no donor at all.. Pretty amazing.

Re:Building on the work of others (1)

luca (6883) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687246)

Actually it was the same doctor.

mod 3own (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36686028)

Problems 7hat I've Cycle; take a Fact: *BSD IS A

Upcoming spam email... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36686058)

Grow a larger penis in days!

This was in Spain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36686102)

So this should be available in the United States in about 500 years, then? Seriously, we're just _now_ getting artificial discs for spinal injuries. They've been available in the EU for years.

Define "synthetic" (1)

LionMage (318500) | more than 3 years ago | (#36686426)

Someone already brought up the artificially grown bladder, which was covered earlier this year, so this surgery already seems dubious as a "first synthetic organ" transplant. The BBC article title says first synthetic windpipe, but the subtitle says first synthetic organ. I call shenanigans (and suspect a bit of nationalism at work).

However, what about the Jarvik artificial hearts? Those were developed and transplanted years ago. Don't those qualify as synthetic organs, since they are artificial yet perform a similar function to a real heart?

Other more important words (1)

curio_city (1972556) | more than 3 years ago | (#36686766)

The Jarvik hearts are not custom-printed to be structurally identical to the patient's, but we can call them synthetic organs. The artificially grown bladders are made from the patient's (already differentiated) cells, but they are not custom printed either (they're bladders, they don't need to be).

These windpipes are both custom printed to match the structure of the patient's original windpipe, and are made with the patient's stem cells.

Synthetic is not the most salient descriptor, but none of the other factors make this a distinct first.

Implant, not transplant (1)

WebManWalking (1225366) | more than 3 years ago | (#36686508)

Transplants come from someone else.

Re:Implant, not transplant (1)

sourcerror (1718066) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687260)

If it doesn't make your boobs bigger, it's a transplant.

Re:Implant, not transplant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36690034)

It is an implant. Like the one that makes your penis bigger.

Re:Implant, not transplant (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#36690550)

Technically, it's a replant.

Spanish surgeon? holy crap! (1)

greywire (78262) | more than 3 years ago | (#36686516)

You are all missing the important point here, as illustrated in the title of this article.

A *spanish* surgeon did this.

I mean, it is the first word and all.

Re:Spanish surgeon? holy crap! (1)

Veritech_Ace (870333) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687008)

Yeah, my first reaction to the headline was "Who gives a shit where the surgeon was born?". I have to wonder how this fact, insignificant with respect to the rest of the story, was promoted to the title. "World Ends Today, Starting With Spain" - who cares where it starts?

Re:Spanish surgeon? holy crap! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36692014)

Yeah, my first reaction to the headline was "Who gives a shit where the surgeon was born?". I have to wonder how this fact, insignificant with respect to the rest of the story, was promoted to the title. "World Ends Today, Starting With Spain" - who cares where it starts?

Yeah, but if this was done in America, the /. headline would be "American Hero Surgeon performs first synthetic American organ transplant for America....................... and Freedom"

Re:Spanish surgeon? holy crap! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36691680)

Not to dismiss the spanish surgeons (we have some of the best in the world in its fields) but this one is Italian.
Just a mistake in the BBC page that seems already corrected. ;)

Impossible (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36686598)

Shawn Hannity tells me nightly of the horrors of socialized medicine, so I choose not to believe this happened in Europe
 
Having it done at the Mayo clinic is more comforting to my worldview, so that must be where it happened..

Re:Impossible (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687158)

The Mayo Clinic... Isn't that the quality control lab at Hellmans?

Waiting for my vagina... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36686714)

This kind of news is absolutely huge for a TG girl.
In a few years time, it might become possible to get a complete vagina/womb/ovaries set even if you were not born a genetic female.
Totally awesome...

Re:Waiting for my vagina... (1)

surveyork (1505897) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687334)

I've sometimes wondered about this possibility too. I'm no transgender, but I'm human and can empathize with their plight (if not completely understand what they feel). No more need for surgical "hacks" to try to mend nature. This opens the possibility of a streamlined "patch/tweak/upgrade" :) I hope you get your own vagina as soon as possible! Also, I hope more complex organs can be made soon too. This thought is purely egotistical: you never know when you'll get a cancer or lose a limb.

Re:Waiting for my vagina... (1)

godel_56 (1287256) | more than 3 years ago | (#36689654)

This kind of news is absolutely huge for a TG girl. In a few years time, it might become possible to get a complete vagina/womb/ovaries set even if you were not born a genetic female. Totally awesome...

Vagina/womb perhaps, but ovaries are a big ask. You should have saved some sperm for later if you wanted children that were genetically your own.

Re:Waiting for my vagina... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36690892)

> Vagina/womb perhaps, but ovaries are a big ask.

Please elaborate on how it is more difficult.

> You should have saved some sperm for later if you wanted children that were genetically your own.

Better: I transitioned after having children.

I think it was an Italian surgeon. (1)

surveyork (1505897) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687182)

I did read TFA:

"Professor Paolo Macchiarini from Italy led the pioneering surgery, which took place at the Karolinska University Hospital."

The only reference to Spain I saw:

"Professor Macchiarini already has 10 other windpipe transplants under his belt - most notably the world's first tissue-engineered tracheal transplant in 2008 on 30-year-old Spanish woman Claudia Costillo"

Not to diminish Spanish doctors, just pointing out what I think is an error in the title.

Spanish or Sweedish or Italian (1)

gubers33 (1302099) | more than 3 years ago | (#36687936)

The title of the Slashdot article says Spanish, then in the article is says Swedish then if you click on the actual link it is an Italian professor. I just want some clarification here since it is stating so many different nationalities I want to know who did it so I can get mine.

cancer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36689304)

I wonder how these stem cells will differentiate into one type of cell and stay that way so you don't get crazy throat cancer later on?

Also, when can they grow me a new uterus?

Italian surgeon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36690882)

where does the article ever mention Spain? It says he is from Italy. Talk about getting facts wrong.

And not a Spaniard was to seen... (1)

Dean Edmonds (189342) | more than 3 years ago | (#36691866)

Italian surgeon. African patient (studying in Iceland). English technology. Operation took place in Sweden.

I guess the poster of the article can be given for the error in the subject line. With such an international cast it's hard to believe that a Spaniard wasn't involved *somewhere*.

Awesome (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 3 years ago | (#36693316)

Hopefully the technique used to grow the windpipe will be useable by other organs too, for those replacements...and be free of anti rejection drugs as a whole!

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