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Learn Mandarin and buy Bitcoins (0)

turkeyfeathers (843622) | about 3 years ago | (#36689274)

It's the future!

Re:Learn Mandarin and buy Bitcoins (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689362)

Turns out those fucking look-alike chinks have some business acumen after all! Shit.

This firmly establishes they are not mindlessly destructive like niggers. No, they are competitively destructive more like Jews.

If you want to easily piss one off, ask him to open his eyes. They love that.

Re:Learn Mandarin and don't fall for scams (0)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 3 years ago | (#36689574)

Stop perpetuating the Bitcoin scam please.

Re:Learn Mandarin and don't fall for scams (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689704)

I'm pretty sure that the GP is being sarcastic, brah.

OOH ! MR. KOTTER!! I KNOW WHY!! (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689790)

Cause chink chicks dig Makers?

Re:Learn Mandarin and buy Bitcoins (5, Insightful)

Roachie (2180772) | about 3 years ago | (#36689588)

Yea, I remember this kind talk about the Japanese back in the 1980s( yea I'm old, get off my lawn ). Ooooh, better learn Japanese if you want to succeed in business, Ooooh, they are going to take over the world with their mysterious asian cunning, that us round-eyes will never be able to match.

Glad I could put it into perspective for you. My work is done here.

Re:Learn Mandarin and buy Bitcoins (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about 3 years ago | (#36689774)

Glad I could put it into perspective for you. My work is done here.

Can I go back to playing Okami on my Wii connected to my Sony TV that I brought home in my Toyota minivan?

Or Not (5, Insightful)

Aranykai (1053846) | about 3 years ago | (#36689288)

China is poised to become the worlds largest non-native English speaking population in the world. They are learning English at a much faster rate than any Americans can learn Chinese.

Re:Or Not (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689334)

Nip nang chong, ching chang chong. Fuck chinks, pakis, curry niggers, sand niggers, etc.

Re: Nice troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689404)

n/t

Re:Or Not (-1, Troll)

aekafan (1690920) | about 3 years ago | (#36689490)

You forgot one: fuck racist whitebread idiot trolls

Re:Or Not (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689702)

You forgot one: fuck racist whitebread idiot trolls

And fuck the oversensitive assholes who respond to it just like the troll wanted them to. Don't leave them out. They're part of the problem.

Quit feeding trolls and they starve. Show them how offended you are and they get their jollies. Got it?

Re:Or Not (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689762)

tl;dr

Joss Whedon (Firefly) disagrees with you (5, Interesting)

tomhudson (43916) | about 3 years ago | (#36689502)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firefly_(TV_series) [wikipedia.org]

Firefly takes place in a multi-cultural future, primarily a fusion of Occidental and Chinese cultures, where there is a significant division between the rich and poor. As a result of the Sino-American Alliance, Mandarin Chinese is a common second language; it is used in advertisements, and characters in the show frequently use Chinese words and curses. According to the DVD commentary on the episode "Serenity", this was explained as being the result of China and the United States being the two superpowers that expanded into space.

Life imitates art, or as is often the case, sci-fi is "Future History".

Re:Joss Whedon (Firefly) disagrees with you (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689626)

Yes. We should all learn the future history lessons of a cult TV show practically designed to be a nerd meme and catchphrase factory that couldn't survive one season. Do you realize how fucked up the world's politics would truly be if we treated every one-season wonder as a new earth-shattering philosophy?

Ironic and perhaps hypocritical, though, that my philosophy also comes from a cult TV show: "Just repeat to yourself, it's just a show, I should really just relax".

Re:Joss Whedon (Firefly) disagrees with you (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689686)

Ignore him, tomhudson is a known Level-III Space Nutter and as such, has less familiarity with reality than a '60s hippie on acid. Now dreams, fantasies, delusions and outright lies, *those* he knows!

Re:Joss Whedon (Firefly) disagrees with you (2, Funny)

gstoltz (2041362) | about 3 years ago | (#36689732)

Dreams are synthesis, synthesis is reality, reality is a continual experience of misapprehention on the part of the human species. Outright lies are despicable when propagated against better knowledge. Unfortunately the necessity of belonging usually trumps the quest for truth. And whilst closer approximations to descriptive truth might win in the long term (wishful thinking) knowledge and expression will remain sorely incomplete. Therefore i`ll take my dish of dreams, fantasies and delusions. Whilst sprinkling them with as much consentual truth about the universe as our current expressions are capable of embodying.

Re:Joss Whedon (Firefly) disagrees with you (3, Interesting)

gstoltz (2041362) | about 3 years ago | (#36689652)

Apropos Scifi. Philip K. Dick`s novels are turned into movies. John Brunners books are turned into reality. (Its a misquote, but heck, it works.) Other than that, i`d say that nothing is closer to truth about the world than old Frederick Pohl/Cyril Kornbluth novels. But i try to be strange. My working strategy is to view scifi as contemporary, not futuristic. Whatever was conceptualizable when the writers wrote it was also happening then, maybe they didn`t notice, yet they did.

And I'm learning Chinese, said Werner Von Braun (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689290)

That Was The Week That Was

Re:And I'm learning Chinese, said Werner Von Braun (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 3 years ago | (#36689844)

I guess there are a couple of mods old enough to understand that. Let's all meet for shuffleboard!

Largest economy? (5, Interesting)

the linux geek (799780) | about 3 years ago | (#36689296)

What remote evidence is there that the PRC will ever be the world's largest economy? They're displaying symptoms characteristic with a bubble, and their GDP is only roughly half of that of the US. Or is massive growth going to continue forever, just like it was going to for Japan and South Korea?

Re:Largest economy? (5, Informative)

Mashiki (184564) | about 3 years ago | (#36689328)

None. 10-15 years and China will be experiencing what Europe and the US are. Slowing economy, high local debt and foreign debt. China is the hot shit right now, but most if it's GDP is coming from local manufacturing where the party is throwing money hand over fist for them to spend on things like...ghost cities, and all that.

And there's no real shortage of news stories about the number of cities with no one to next to no one in them. Here's a good one by SBS [youtube.com] . The real problem is china is still operating on a 3 tier structure for economics, and the poor bastards at the bottom are still at the very bottom eeking out life as dirt farmers.

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689458)

I'm curious what the 3rd tier is. I get the dirt poor and I get the city workers but I don't know what the 3rd one is.

Re:Largest economy? (1)

errhuman (2226852) | about 3 years ago | (#36689730)

Ultra-rich oligarchs?

Re:Largest economy? (4, Interesting)

dgatwood (11270) | about 3 years ago | (#36689772)

I'm assuming it's as described in 1984:

Inner party
Outer party
Proles

You have the inner party—the upper crust, the rich, the members of the party in power. Then you have the people who work for them—the factory workers, and so on. Finally, you have the people outside the cities.

Re:Largest economy? (1)

Evets (629327) | about 3 years ago | (#36689680)

That was eye opening.

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689746)

Please tell me you don't believe everything you read on slashdot.

Re:Largest economy? (1)

Dozy Lizard (1708728) | about 3 years ago | (#36689840)

China's growth rate can't continue forever. But, China only needs a per capita GDP of 1/4 of the US GDP per capita to be "the worlds largest economy". There is a strong possibility (but of course no guarantee) that they will continue to have rapid growth until at least that point.

Re:Largest economy? (2)

Maniacal (12626) | about 3 years ago | (#36689330)

Exactly. Everything I'm reading says they are dangerously close to bursting. I'm not an economics guy so I have to rely on the "experts" but it doesn't sound good. Plus, their GDP is artificially inflated with these building projects they're doing. Google "Chinese ghost cities" and take a look. Strange stuff going on over there.

Re:Largest economy? (5, Informative)

hawguy (1600213) | about 3 years ago | (#36689478)

Exactly. Everything I'm reading says they are dangerously close to bursting. I'm not an economics guy so I have to rely on the "experts" but it doesn't sound good. Plus, their GDP is artificially inflated with these building projects they're doing. Google "Chinese ghost cities" and take a look. Strange stuff going on over there.

Here's a few articles predicting trouble in the Chinese economy:

http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/175179/20110706/china-economic-bubble-housing-bubble-job-growth-asia-bubble-china-interest-rates-recession-inflation.htm [ibtimes.com]
http://www.businessinsider.com/china-economy-hard-landing-bumpy-landing-soft-landing-and-what-landing-2011-7 [businessinsider.com]
http://www.csmonitor.com/Commentary/Opinion/2010/0316/China-the-coming-costs-of-a-superbubble [csmonitor.com]

But we shouldn't be too happy to see their economy stumble -- a major failing in China will have serious economic impacts throughout the world.

Re:Largest economy? (5, Interesting)

PhreakOfTime (588141) | about 3 years ago | (#36689484)

Not that you don't bring up some good points but consider this slightly re-worded sentence you wrote;

Everything I'm reading in English says they are dangerously close to bursting

Some of their other infrastructure is coming in the form of high speed rail, with many parts of it functioning already. Rail links to the rest of Europe are already planned and being built. While there may be ghost cities right now, the 'plan' is to have the infrastructure in place for the hordes coming in from the rural areas, to avoid such nasty things like 'tin shack villages' and overcrowding becoming commonplace, like many other countries have experienced when population growth far exceeded the ability of local infrastructure to be built.

I think it is hard for many westerners to really understand what is going on in many parts of China. The growth that was once limited to coastal cities, is spreading into more central locations of the country, to take advantage of the population distribution. Human rights, and pollution controls aside(and those really are BIG things to us, and rightfully so), they are absolutely doing almost a perfect job of bringing their country into a more-than-modern era.

As far as them 'busting'. The likelihood of that happening is much smaller than it was here, or in any of the problem EU countries like greece, portugal, iceland, and italy. Why? They actually have rather sane lending policies when it comes to housing. I have been hearing the line that there is a bubble in China for just about a decade now, mainly from westerners who think that their lending practices closely match ours(they don't), and just by looking at the growth similarities, a parallel is able to be drawn to our meteoric rise, and subsequent fall(it isn't) in real estate.

It has been about 5 years since I looked when I last heard this same 'rumor' of a bubble going around since I really looked at the financial requirements and legal framework, and I do imagine some of that has changed(possibly the restriction on second homes was lifted in that time, Im not sure), but there are a LOT of reasons why what appears to be a bubble in China, is only a buibble when looked at through the experience of western eyes. I won't say something stupid like 'it's different this time', but there are serious structural and behavioral differences that make a comparison between our two economies incredibly hard to do without spending a large portion of your waking hours immersing yourself in the differences between the frameworks of the two systems.

End result, learn Chinese. Worst case, you expand your knowledge. Best case, you(more likely your children) don't become a slave.

Re:Largest economy? (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about 3 years ago | (#36689584)

While there may be ghost cities right now, the 'plan' is to have the infrastructure in place for the hordes coming in from the rural areas,

As far as them 'busting'. The likelihood of that happening is much smaller than it was here, or in any of the problem EU countries like greece, portugal, iceland, and italy. Why? They actually have rather sane lending policies when it comes to housing.

I'm not sure how to reconcile those two statements - how can you build ghost towns that no one lives in and still have sane lending policies? In the USA, towns are built by developers, who borrow money from the bank to purchase land and for construction costs. Who's paying for all of those ghost towns, and how long do they expect it to take before there are buyers?

Empty housing quickly degrades, in the USA, vacant houses are often stripped for recyclable materials, but I'm not sure how much of a problem that is in China - a few military guards with machine guns that may take care of that problem. But even without vandals, housing degrades without care and maintenance - mold can set in, roofs can leak, pipes can break, etc.

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689644)

Real estate in china is a hedge against inflation just like it is in the US. All of those worthless USD are being traded in for Real Estate while the PRC is still stupid enough to pay a premium for them.

Re:Largest economy? (4, Interesting)

PhreakOfTime (588141) | about 3 years ago | (#36689764)

In a way, the US is. China has the ability to artificially peg is currency in a way that is more beneficial to them, than it is to the people lending them money. No other major world economy enjoys this benefit, and they are taking full advantage of it.

As to the problem of empty buildings, many of the empty buildings are nothing more than concrete shells waiting to have the final build out done. The manpower needed to clean any needed upkeep greatly dwarfs the manpower needed to build it. It is far better to have the infrastructure already in place and clean it, than not to have it in place and then have to deal with things like ghettos, and unbalanced infrastructure needs. Once you fall behind in that respect, the cost to bring an area 'back' to where you want it to be is many orders of magnitude greater than the initial outlay.

Want to see some large vacant areas right here in the US? Visit the large 'Manhattan West' development in Las Vegas. It is almost completely empty. That is just one of many developments. Who pays for it? Well, the bank writes it off against their loan-loss reserves, and then gets to spread that loss out to offset any profits over the next x number of years.

banking is a little strange when you fully bury your nose in it, and many, MANY things are almost counter-intuitive if its not your usual line of work. Even when it was involved in my normal line of work, there were still some areas that defied my understanding..Either way, Im not anywhere near that field anymore, and couldn't be happier about that.

As I said, I am not an expert nor am I silly enough to say this will al just somehow work out great for China. But if I had to put money on them, I would be leaning more to it working out for them as a whole. Mainly because they will do whatever is needed to accomplish that. And that involves some rather ugly things that would never be allowed to happen in a western-style democracy without heads literally rolling. Our banking system shenanigans would have ended with state sponsored beheadings in public, and China is also able to very specifically adjust its currency peg in a way that will soften the blow to them more than any other economy would be able to. This has some downsides, and I think one of the major risks is that they get too accustomed to this setup, and push it right to the edge-conditions, leaving them just as vulnerable as their western counterparts. However, they are not near that point... yet.

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689846)

> Rail links to the rest of Europe are already planned and being built.
Through where? Russia, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India? And that's just the first layer of countries on the Chinese side of a China-to-Europe rail.

> While there may be ghost cities right now, the 'plan' is to have the infrastructure in place for the hordes coming in from the rural areas
That's a nice spin you've invented out of thin air. That's not what's actually happening though. Watch the videos others are posting about the ghost cities. The excess capacity isn't "middle class" kind of stuff.

> The growth that was once limited to coastal cities, is spreading into more central locations of the country
This statement is not borne out by the evidence. Sorry. The interior still has massive problems (remember the articles about the three month long traffic jam that happens every year?). The ghost cities aren't deep into the interior, either.

> sane lending policies when it comes to housing.
Uh... no. The main difference is that in China, it's the contractors getting the loans to build up, under heavy government urging and influence. The government wants to keep those yearly GDP increases high. That's also why the empty buildings are relatively upscale, since the contractors are in it for the money and the upscale buildings are worth more towards that GDP increase quota. But it's still an incredibly huge bubble. Instead of individuals defaulting and private banks left holding the bag, it'll be contractors defaulting and 'private' government owned banks left holding the bag. And since the general population has been using real estate as much as an investment as for actual housing - literally over 50% of purchases are now for investment purposes (which again contributes to the buildings standing empty) - the individuals in on the market are still going to get shafted when bubble bursts. Both the ones that actually had money and invested it, and the ones that looked like solid loan candidates and bought on 'solid' credit, will be screwed; the former lose most of their investment, the latter are underwater on the loans anyway. This is true whether it's a US/euro style crash, or whether it's through rapid inflation; the banks (a.k.a the government), contractors, investors, homeowners... all screwed.

> only a buibble when looked at through the experience of western eyes
Oddly enough, people who've lived a bubble before are better able to recognize one than people whose personal best interests are supported by denying the one they're actively pumping larger...

Re:Largest economy? (2)

Dynedain (141758) | about 3 years ago | (#36689358)

Japan and South Korea have populations substantially smaller than the US.

China on the other hand, has a population roughly 1.5 times the US. The US has 9 cities larger than 1 million people, China has 160.

China's population is waking up and rapidly transitioning from the mostly rural poor to modern "western" lifestyles. Even as China starts dropping in competitiveness on the world market, their domestic market is rapidly grown and still has a lot of room to spare.

Re:Largest economy? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689422)

Wikipedia says Chinese population is about 1,35 billion and USA has 311 million.

Re:Largest economy? (2)

Relic of the Future (118669) | about 3 years ago | (#36689436)

"China on the other hand, has a population roughly 1.5 times the US."

Not even close. Try "more than 4 times".

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689364)

It is simple, they manufacture things.This is exactly what originally made Amercia great. The two economies that are doing great these days are China and Germany. We have idiots, who belive that it was a mistake to save GM and Chrysler and good thing to save banks. Good luck with that attitude.

JAM

Re:Largest economy? (2)

the linux geek (799780) | about 3 years ago | (#36689500)

The US is the largest manufacturer in the world.

Re:Largest economy? (1)

jacekm (895699) | about 3 years ago | (#36689690)

That's the same statistics they are using to prove that we are getting better, our healthcare is the "best in the world" and our schools are great. Go to Wallmart and try to find that US made stuff. Open your computer and find out what exactly was made in USA. You will be lucky to find out a single chip made here. Yes, we still make few passenger jets, some machines and some military hardware. The rest of what we make nobody is really interested in buying, lo tech cheap stuff. The largest exporters in the world are China and Germany, not USA. Even the stuff we make is more often now made using foregin components and tools. When it comes to high tech USA is even shrinking faster. Have you seen US made high end camera, home theatre, TV set or car these days? We used to manufacture things that were leading edge, world was dreaming of. Not anymore. With the few exceptions we make stuff that nobody wants outside US.

JAM

Re:Largest economy? (1)

the linux geek (799780) | about 3 years ago | (#36689738)

Most (or at least many) Japanese cars are actually manufactured in the United States. My Accord was made in Ohio.

Re:Largest economy? (1)

vux984 (928602) | about 3 years ago | (#36689804)

Most (or at least many) Japanese cars are actually manufactured in the United States.

I think a lot of assembly is done here. -- there are all kinds of tax and related incentives and so forth for doing it here. (1)

I'm curious how much of the actual component work is done here.

(1) -- VWs made in Mexico benefit from NAFTA, while those from Germany are still subject to import duties... at least in Canada., for example.

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689820)

GM should have gone bankrupt. Should not have been saved. They are incompetent and will go down just like Chrysler went down for a second time and now Fiat owns them. Would be better to start a new car company from scratch then to have a fuck up company like GM. I think right now they again have too many trucks in inventory. WTF how many times are we supposed to bail out these ass holes?

Largest Population (1)

Nukedoom (1776114) | about 3 years ago | (#36689372)

Well, if you wanted to learn a language with the largest number of speakers, Mandarin Chinese would be your best bet.

Re:Largest Population (1)

O('_')O_Bush (1162487) | about 3 years ago | (#36689524)

Where did you hear that? Mandarin might have the most native speakers, but English is still estimated to be the most common language in the world. That is, most people that natively speak other languages know English as a secondary. That isn't true for Mandarin and will likely never be unless China reverses its population control policies and doubles in population size.

Re:Largest Population (1)

Nukedoom (1776114) | about 3 years ago | (#36689558)

Really? I didn't realize English was a necessary secondary language for most other countries. I was thinking the language with the most users would also be the most common one.

Re:Largest Population (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689830)

Really? I didn't realize English was a necessary secondary language for most other countries. I was thinking the language with the most users would also be the most common one.

Really.

Your hypothesis is well laid out, but it presumes that global structures were always static. They were not. There wasn't one watershed year where everyone agreed to pick one common language.

Through colonization, various wars (it helped that most of the English-speaking powers managed to be on the other side of a channel or ocean during said wars) and economic win at the right point in history, the English-speaking world ended up dominant just as new technologies (airplane) and political paradigms (free trade, globalization). Other nations and peoples joined this bloc and learned English not just to appease the native speakers, but to work with the non-native speakers who joined up just before and also learned English.

Net result: The English speaking world had such a large critical mass that when China opened up in the 70s, it was in no position to be making demands.

As globalization took hold piece by piece, new peoples learned the language that is being spoken by Those In The Know: English. In this case, Those In The Know

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689384)

well, coming as it is from make magazine, one might consider that

        the cheapest contract manufacturers for assembled boards are in china

        the cheapest parts distributors are in china

        the best place to get specialty led products is china

        the best place to get volume sheet metal production is china

        the best place to get injection molding is china ...

i've tried to learn mandarin and i dont have the time or the patience. but the overall size of their economy isn't very relevant

Exactly: Chinese don't buy their own products. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689402)

Chinese people don't buy the technology they manufacture in their own company, because China is an off-shoring region for corporations to cheat the local populations where they departed from to sell at lower prices.

China is worse than a bubble: it's a boat dock in a desert: corporations are all going to depart back to their origins and take the tools and jobs with them. At-least America has trees and rivers in their desert, but China is a over-population nightmare that the United States is trying to aleviate at the moment. Ever hear of a Technology Zone? Well if you didn't, then look-up the 1st 50'square-mile "self sustaining" city that a Chinese Government corporation is building south of Boise IDAHO: 1 of 4 to migrate Chinese factory workers and jobs onto America behind the backs of US taxpayers that were sold-out. China would rather find loopholes to move these corporations back *near* America in a legal void rather than the corporations leave China, so they ship Chinese communists onto America to work for these corporations.

Re:Largest economy? (1)

Chicken_Kickers (1062164) | about 3 years ago | (#36689410)

You Westerners are still in denial. Whether you like it or not, the balance of economic and political power is shifting to rapidly developing countries like China and India. No country will forever be "the richest". Your current experience proves this. Prosperity is like a wheel. Sometimes you are on top but almost certainly you won't stay there forever. Now its China's turn. Remember this the next time your nation arrogantly beat its chest about being the "sole superpower" and throw its weight around. What "remote evidence"?. China has the largest population in the world. If it chooses to, it can focus its economy inward and still come out on top. While the U.S. is busy invading countries, China has made strategic moves in Asia and Africa. Bubble? Sure the pace will slow down, but it will still grow none the less.

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689492)

While the U.S. is busy invading countries, China has made strategic moves in Asia and Africa.

Speaking as an American, I admired the Chinese for doing that without firing a shot.

We are stupid.

Re:Largest economy? (1)

Niris (1443675) | about 3 years ago | (#36689496)

*India has the worlds largest population.

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689628)

According to whom? Wikipedia says differently. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689808)

My penis has it's own area code.

Re:Largest economy? (1)

the linux geek (799780) | about 3 years ago | (#36689572)

What about the PRC's massive (and almost entirely self-inflicted) demographic issues? How will this glorious, invincible, socialist juggernaut keep growing 8% a year when half the population is over 60?

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689464)

Additional factors will keep it questionable for a while: Internal social, political and environmental issues, exporting poor products made of questionable material, monetary policies to keep the renminbi artifically low, etc.

Re:Largest economy? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689562)

What's more, India will soon overtake China in population.

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689676)

you're an idiot. a real knee biter.

Re:Largest economy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689806)

Or you might add the US.

Here's why (5)

wsxyz (543068) | about 3 years ago | (#36689342)

It's important to learn Chinese so that when you are doing business with Chinese people in English, you can understand what they are saying about you behind your back, cause that's what people do when they speak foreign languages.

Re:Here's why (5, Insightful)

rastilin (752802) | about 3 years ago | (#36689356)

Funny, but often true. It's useful knowing enough to know what your translators are actually telling them you said.

Re:Here's why (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689376)

They will simply codeswitch into dialects so as to throw off those who have learned. After all, everyone else on the planet are merely big nosed barbarians.

Re:Here's why (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | about 3 years ago | (#36689530)

Why would you let them know you know Chinese?

Re:Here's why (1)

Jimbookis (517778) | about 3 years ago | (#36689438)

That's fine, but if they are aware you speak Mandarin they'll just use their regional language or dialect and once again become unintelligible. My German friend will use his thick Schwebian dialect when he doesn't want a Hoch Deutsch speaker to understand what he's saying.

Re:Here's why (2)

Tablizer (95088) | about 3 years ago | (#36689602)

[...to know what names they are calling you] That's fine, but if they are aware you speak Mandarin they'll just use their regional language or dialect and once again become unintelligible.

Like that Louisiana fellow who said I had the "hoppin's of a blue-tailed swamp vermit". I think it was an insult, but who knows.

Re:Here's why (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 3 years ago | (#36689586)

Can you understaaaaaand the words comin outta my mouth?

I wouldn't (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689352)

have anything made there.

As someone who fits in this demographic (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 3 years ago | (#36689398)

why? So I can save a few bucks on some shit PCB's while giving the knockoff capital of the world the blueprints?
Maybe its just me, but that sounds pretty fucking dumb

I hope they do what America was too afraid to do (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689406)

I hope those Chinese fucks man up and put every fucking muslim in a mass grave.
 
Fuck Mohammad, Fuck Allah, FUCK ISLAM!!!!! No good fucking devils fucking the Europeans in the ass.

Re:I hope they do what America was too afraid to d (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689462)

Why would a country that doesn't have either a historic animosity, or religious animosity try to wipe out a faith?

Re:I hope they do what America was too afraid to d (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689554)

Why would a country that doesn't have either a historic animosity, or religious animosity try to wipe out a faith?

Such a country would not, of course. China, on the other hand...

Re:I hope they do what America was too afraid to d (2)

Sicily1918 (912141) | about 3 years ago | (#36689560)

You're kidding, right? Look up Uighurs if you want one example...

Re:I hope they do what America was too afraid to d (1)

RobertinXinyang (1001181) | about 3 years ago | (#36689760)

China has a very large Muslim population. Every town I have lived in has had at lest one, and often several mosques. China includes Islam prominently when identifying its nations religions.

"Chinese citizens enjoy full religious freedom. China is not only a large country in terms of population, it is also a major country in terms of religion, with schools of Buddhism, Taoism, Islam, Catholicism, Protestantism and others, and a total of 100 million religious adherents among a national population of 1.2 billion." http://www.china-embassy.org/eng/zt/zjxy/t36496.htm [china-embassy.org]

Amen (1)

Trip6 (1184883) | about 3 years ago | (#36689442)

Absolutely true. To deny this is to not understand that the shift to offshore manufacturing isn't in its early or even mid stages - it has happened.

Re:Amen (2)

pudge (3605) | about 3 years ago | (#36689520)

Absolutely false. The benefit of me learning Chinese, compared to the benefit of using that time to read about math, science, history, and so on ... it's a no-brainer. There's no good reason for me to spend my time learning Chinese, as opposed to doing something else, unless it's something I simply WANT to do.

I mean honestly ... this guy is smart, and he says it's going to take him more than two years of ALL his free time, and a total of about 5 years, to become fluent. If he wants to do that, great! But for every "maker" (what a stupid term!) to do that, my goodness ... just think of all the things that could be created in those thousands upon thousands of hours.

It's nonsensical on its face.

Surely, some people would benefit from it ... but I suspect it would only be those who would already be inclined to want to.

Re:Amen (1)

ptorrone (638660) | about 3 years ago | (#36689758)

hey pudge, i specifically mean "makers who run businesses" - which a lot of the makers who read MAKE tend to be, or want to become. it's been handy for me and if you look at all the companies i point to: sparkfun, tv-b-gone (cornfield), adafruit, EMSL, etc, etc - they're all visiting china at least once a year. these are the prolific makers that are at every maker faire and are the centers of many diy communities. my article is describing what has already happened, it's not futuristic at all :)

1980s all over again (5, Interesting)

Bloodwine77 (913355) | about 3 years ago | (#36689444)

I remember the 1980s when everybody said that you'll need to learn Japanese. In popular culture the Japanese were shown as our future overlords.

Re:1980s all over again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689470)

Well at least the characters will be (mostly) the same, so you won't have wasted all that effort.

Re:1980s all over again (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | about 3 years ago | (#36689498)

yea along with "We will still be a country of innovators" right after the Taiwanese started doing mass production of our products, then proceeded to clone them

Re:1980s all over again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689508)

Hey, I did that.

And, no I never really used my Japanese.

As for the other comment that the characters are mostly the same... well, you only need to know 2000 to barely read a newspaper in Japan, but you need at least 6000 to get the same level of comprehension in China. Japan has phonetic alphabets as well as Kanji.

Re:1980s all over again (2)

Tumbleweed (3706) | about 3 years ago | (#36689650)

I remember the 1980s when everybody said that you'll need to learn Japanese. In popular culture the Japanese were shown as our future overlords.

When in reality, it's only the cafe maids singing "Moe" songs who control us. And don't mind. :)

Whilst on the topic of things Japanese, I just watched 'Yukikaze" - a very nicely done anime!

Re:1980s all over again (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689722)

You will never have sex with a girl.

Re:1980s all over again (3, Interesting)

Tumbleweed (3706) | about 3 years ago | (#36689754)

Ha, too late!

Re:1980s all over again (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689710)

I for one welcomed our Japaneses Overlords.

Sorry (1)

ddd0004 (1984672) | about 3 years ago | (#36689446)

I already bought Rosetta Stone - Klingon edition to try to fit in on slashdot.

How about reading? (1)

trytoguess (875793) | about 3 years ago | (#36689482)

So, while I'm at it, should I learn how to read traditional, or simplified Chinese?

Re:How about reading? (1)

diakka (2281) | about 3 years ago | (#36689550)

Depends on your goal and circumstances. If your goal is to be conversant, I would say go with simplified, unless you plan to live in a country where traditional is used heavily. If your goal is to be fluent, that is a very very long road, so to study both forms requires less than 5% additional effort if you do it the right way.

Re:How about reading? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | about 3 years ago | (#36689612)

Simplified Chinese is more common, at least judging by what my Chinese friends write (I have been trying to learn how to read and write Mandarin for a few months, and my friends have been helpful).

OP has it all wrong. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689510)

They can learn English if they want to keep up with me.

I claim disability (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689518)

I have a very hard time with new spoken languages. This is a diagnosed disability: auditory comprehension learning disorder.

Will there be accommodations or will I and people like me be tossed aside?

NO! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689522)

Learn Esperanto!

Growing up (1)

Roachie (2180772) | about 3 years ago | (#36689528)

My dad owned the same electric can opener my whole life, which is to say it over 30 years old.
My dad owned the same clothes dryer my whole life, which is to say it over 30 years old.

I cant find an electric can opener that lasts 6 months.

Therefore I say:
The Chinese need to learn to make things.

America, Fuck yea.

Re:Growing up (1)

hawguy (1600213) | about 3 years ago | (#36689662)

My dad owned the same electric can opener my whole life, which is to say it over 30 years old.
My dad owned the same clothes dryer my whole life, which is to say it over 30 years old.

I cant find an electric can opener that lasts 6 months.

Therefore I say:
The Chinese need to learn to make things.

America, Fuck yea.

Silly American - don't buy an electric can opener - I've had the same manual can opener (made in Germany, I believe) for nearly 20 years. It has a handle big enough that my elderly mother can operate it, and I can open a can in about the same amount of time as an electric opener.

Re:Growing up (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689802)

Did your Dad pay at least 60 times as much (converting for inflation, naturally)? Because if not, it sounds like it's not a "learn to make things" issue -- it's a "consumers will spend more on a succession of crap than a single long-term investment" issue. And if you would rather spend more to get quality, that's great; most people won't, so it sucks to be you.

First-hand experience (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689538)

I'm married to a Chinese lady. One of the difficulties in learning Mandarin is that people do not speak it in the home. Within family, they speak a "home-town dialect", which is usually much different than Mandarin (unless one comes from a few select areas). It's difficult to learn Mandarin by being "embedded" in the culture because most Chinese only use Mandarin in a narrow set of circumstances, such as shopping or doing business away from their home city. And in the southern parts, Cantonese is used more often for that purpose than Mandarin.

Re:First-hand experience (1)

Gideon Wells (1412675) | about 3 years ago | (#36689660)

So the Chinese use Mandarin like the West uses English?

No wonder they are learning English so much faster. Either all the west can learn their merchant language or they can learn ours. By them adapting to us they can lock us out of their newscycle.

There are fewer than 50 (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36689828)

NA/Europeans (not raised in China) that speak traditional Chinese even semi-fluently IN THE ENTIRE WORLD
1. Because the writing system is ridiculous (arguably 5,000-25,000 characters to learn, the vast majority of which one can find in an everyday newspaper)
2. Because the language doesn't have the common sense to use an alphabet.
3. Because the writing system is MINIMALLY phonetic if at all.
4. Because you can't cheat by using cognates (cognates vastly accelerate the learning of language, especially when living with indigenous speakers).
5. Because its a tonal language.
6. Because translation can require multiple (5-20) dictionaries, and using the dictionaries is incredibly complicated in and of itself.
7. Because we don't see language like this:
FEAR LESS LY OUT SPOKE N BUT SOME WHAT HUMOR LESS NEW ENG LAND BORN LEAD ACT OR GEORGE MICHAEL SON EX PRESS ED OUT RAGE TO DAY AT THE STALE MATE BE TWEEN MAN AGE MENT AND THE ACT OR 'S UNION BE CAUSE THE STAND OFF HAD SET BACK THE TIME TABLE FOR PRO DUC TION OF HIS PLAY, A ONE MAN SHOW CASE THAT WAS HIS FIRST RUN A WAY BROAD WAY BOX OFFICE SMASH HIT. "THE FIRST A MEND MENT IS AT IS SUE" HE PRO CLAIM ED. "FOR A CENS OR OR AN EDIT OR TO EDIT OR OTHER WISE BLUE PENCIL QUESTION ABLE DIA LOG JUST TO KOW TOW TO RIGHT WING BORN AGAIN BIBLE THUMP ING FRUIT CAKE S IS A DOWN RIGHT DIS GRACE."

If you live in the US, learn Spanish. Do not waste your time trying to teach yourself Chinese with rosetta stone, YOU WILL FAIL!!!!

Complete nonsense (5, Informative)

sjbe (173966) | about 3 years ago | (#36689834)

"MAKE Magazine is making that case that any 'maker' who builds, buys or creates electronics should learn (Mandarin) Chinese.

MAKE has no idea what they are talking about. I DO manufacture electronics (electronic data harnesses primarily) for a living and fairly little of the parts we make come from China and most of what we buy is commodity parts. (wire, terminals, connectors, etc) Lots of it comes from Japan and much of it is made here in the US. Sure there are some parts from China but it isn't as much as one might think. The manufacture of many of these products is highly automated and China has no cost significant cost advantage.

Furthermore, virtually all sales of commodity electronic components are done through distributors. You simply are NOT going to buy direct from China unless you are a purchaser for a manufacturing company. Distributors have customer service representatives, most of whom do not speak a word of any Chinese dialect. And even if for some reason you did need to contact someone in China directly, there are a HUGE number of English speakers there. I've been to Shanghai, Hong Kong, Chengdu and other places in China. It is NOT hard to find someone who speaks rather good English.

source of just about everything we buy in the USA.

The US has a $3.7 TRILLION manufacturing sector and most of that stuff we make is also sold here in the US. In 2010 the US imported $364 BILLION [uschina.org] in goods from China or roughly 10% of what the US makes itself. A big number to be sure, but nowhere close to "just about everything".

who cares? (1)

t2t10 (1909766) | about 3 years ago | (#36689838)

China is a billion people, 3x the US, I bloody well hope they'll have a bigger economy than the US at some point, because otherwise it means that they remain poor. Same with India.

The sooner they take the "#1 spot" and the responsibility that goes with it, the better as far as I'm concerned. The US is still big enough to make sure its own interests are preserved, and Europe can then kvetch about China for a while, while the US can focus on improving its infrastructure and education.

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