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Ask Slashdot: Living Without Internet At-Home Access?

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the you-thought-your-uncle-was-weird dept.

The Internet 462

An anonymous reader writes "I've decided that the internet is no longer a positive influence on my life, and am interested in canceling my service. In the interest of not forgoing all digital conveniences, I plan to set up a small intranet, hosting a few resources that I think I'd like to have access to on a regular basis (e.g. a text dump of Wikipedia). I'll also still have access to the internet at my office, and have easy access to public Wi-Fi at libraries and coffee shops. My questions are thus: Does anybody have any experience living without the internet? What major nuisances did you encounter? What resources should I put on my intranet? Is there anything I'm overlooking?"

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Obvious (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705780)

Porn

Many do. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705784)

Here's one man's story [lansingstatejournal.com] I saw a story about yesterday.

No Carrier (3, Funny)

Pete LaGrange (696064) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705800)

I've got some really sage advice for you, but you won't be able to get it...

Re:No Carrier (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705964)

Exactly. The first step if you want to prepare for living without an internet: Learn to figure out this sort of stuff without asking about it online.

Besides, it's not the internet that is your problem. The problem isn't your ability to read news, do banking, etc. online but that you waste your time by doing things you shouldn't do. Canceling your internet as a time management method is like realizing that you drove drunk last night and deciding that your problem is the car ownership. If you can't channel your time to something more productive even after realizing the problem, you have a lot bigger issues than the time wasting itself.

Re:No Carrier (4, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706174)

Canceling your internet as a time management method is like realizing that you drove drunk last night and deciding that your problem is the car ownership.

Is that not a valid way of dealing with the problem? If you know you can't control your drinking, this seems like an effective way of mitigating the damage it causes.

I believe you've mispelt (2, Insightful)

jra (5600) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705802)

"I think the Internet contains things which are a negative influence on my life, and I haven't the self-control *not to do those things and go those places*."

There; FTFY.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705838)

Im guessing that his gf caught him jerking it to tranny porn and it came down to the internet or his gf.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705864)

What's wrong with tranny porn?

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

Xacid (560407) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706086)

The girlfriend, obviously!

Re:I believe you've mispelt (3, Insightful)

D'Sphitz (699604) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706114)

I prefer tyranny porn.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

gmuslera (3436) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706186)

This [wikileaks.org] kind?

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705932)

You can find a girlfriend on the internet. You can't find an internet on your girlfriend.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706018)

"Hey, hon, let me borrow your phone."

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706042)

You can't find an internet on your girlfriend.

Doesn't mean I can't keep trying her ports, though, does it?

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705862)

One way to not go to those places and not do those things is to remove your ability to do so.

Cutting off your own internet access is one way, although to many a drastic way, to do that.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

Xacid (560407) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705930)

Agreed. Nothing wrong with their method if that's what they felt they needed. Hell, I'm even a bit envious.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

John R. Isidore (2330334) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706014)

The internet can simply be a huge drain of time. Spending the day on the net isn't any better than spending the day to watch TV. If the original poster realized he needs to take some distance, that's his right. Looking at your post history, trying this probably wouldn't hurt you either.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

UncleTogie (1004853) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706100)

Spending the day on the net isn't any better than spending the day to watch TV.

Better, maybe not. More interactive? Surely.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

Threni (635302) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706178)

And? By that measure the internet is more desirable than consuming great art and literature. Reading a good book vs arguing with the Twitter monkeys... hmm, tough call.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (2)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706124)

But he doesn't need to go Cold Turkey.

Simply dropping-back to a Dialup service like $7 netscape or the $0 Netzero is enough. Webpages load slow, hulu doesn't connect at all, and facebook works but only just barely. The frustration will break this guy's addiction.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706094)

Yes, that is a good way to not do things you think are not right. Such as drugs, alcohol, porn, etc...

I can tell you are not addicted to anything. Addicts do not think like you or I, of 'just dont do that'. They will make any excuse to use. It is just a matter of what their flavor is. His is internet. He is even planing a 'mini internet', and ways to still use it, in his sabbatical.

Also my suggestion to him is cold turkey. Then figure out what is really important on the internet to him. Dont try to hole up with everything he will just end up backsliding.

For me it would be bill paying as a few places I deal with only allow online bill payments.

Also this is not the audience you want. (5, Insightful)

ChinggisK (1133009) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706152)

Does anybody have any experience living without the internet?

Yes, but those people can't see your post to Slashdot.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

slick7 (1703596) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706204)

"I think the Internet contains things which are a negative influence on my life, and I haven't the self-control *not to do those things and go those places*."

There; FTFY.

Television is just as negative as the internet, the same as some people. It all boils down to what you do with them.
For me, I haven't owned a TV for about 20 years. It just sucks the life and intelligence out of you. My caveat is that do whatch some shows at friends houses and on the internet, however, I am very selective about friends and shows.
The greatest obscenity on TV is the news,. In Russia, Pravda means truth and Izvestia means news, so the saying goes: "There is no truth in the news and there is no news in the truth."
Texting and IM-ing friends removes you from personal contact with them causing you to lose the behavioral markers such as body language. Friend-ing everyone and anyone on social networks shows a lack of true discrimination in the choices made.
Timothy Leary popularized the saying "Turn on, tune in and drop out." , I say, " Turn off (your electronic device), tune in (to your physical friends) and drop out (of the electronic blogosphere). A time will come when electrical as well as electronic media will be at a premium, if available. This will not be the time to start connecting with people without the necessary requirements of discrimination of your choices.

Re:I believe you've mispelt (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706206)

Today's internet is no more wasteful than what I did BEFORE the web arrived in 1993:

- forums
- chat rooms
- watching videos (on VHS)

Same old crap - it's just faster now. You hit the nail on the head, because the problem is not the net. It's the person. I don't know the Original poster's habits, but for me disconnecting the net would be pointless. I'd still continue the same time-wasting habits, except with older technology.

And what does it matter if I waste time? I LIKE being able to see my favorite shows on demand, or chat live with old friends hundreds of miles away, or download the latest Science novel to my kindle. The world of 2011, with the web, is much more "fun" than the world pre-web, pre-VHS, et cetera.

you are cheating yourself (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705814)

Sounds to me like you are not living without internet. Just disconnecting it and making it on demand.

Life goes on (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705828)

I have personally gone without the Internet for six months at a time, to only get a taste and go for another six months without. Life just goes on. You go back to writing letters to your family, calling people on the phone and actually getting stuff accomplished.

Re:Life goes on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705986)

Same here. Productivity goes up. Mood in general improves. However, some stuff still requires it, and it has always been a problem for me. If you've got easy access, then go for it.

Re:Life goes on (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706126)

You go back to writing letters to your family, calling people on the phone and actually getting stuff accomplished.

I'm sorry, letters...? Phone...?! That technology is the work of the devil and you'll be much freer without it. The only proper way to communicate is through song and dance around a campfire, plus a cave painting now and then if you want to fit in with the "modern" crowd.

Seriously, if using the internet makes you less able to communicate with people and "get stuff accomplished", you're using it wrong.

Sanity check (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705832)

"Is there anything I'm overlooking?"

Sanity comes to mind. If the net and you don't get along then, fine, I am completely behind unplugging a little. But you're talking about on;y removing the net from home and then only a little bit. It sounds to me like you're going about this completely backward. Try pin-pointing the parts of being connected that are bad for you and look at reducing or filtering those. What you're doing will involve a lot of trouble and inconvenience and half-measures. It would be much better to set up a filter to block things you don't think you should access or talk to your ISP about changing your account options.

Relinquishing Internet? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705836)

Stage one, preparation. For this you will need one room which you will not leave. Soothing music. Tomato soup, ten tins of. Mushroom soup, eight tins of, for consumption cold. Ice cream, vanilla, one large tub of. Magnesia, milk of, one bottle. Paracetamol, mouthwash, vitamins. Mineral water, Lucozade, pornography. One mattress. One bucket for urine, one for feces and one for vomitus. One television and one bottle of Valium.

Re:Relinquishing Internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705908)

=D... best line

Re:Relinquishing Internet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705984)

Great movie! Internet = heroin.

Try it out for yourself. (5, Insightful)

MiddleHitter (473147) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705842)

I think the best thing to do is simply try it for a while. This is as easy as unplugging the physical connection to your ISP. Deal with issues as the come up.

Wrong Place? (5, Insightful)

froggymana (1896008) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705848)

[quote] Does anybody have any experience living without the internet? [/quote]

Is the *internet* really the best place to ask this question?

No thanks (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705854)

I use it for everything. The tv is what i am doing without.

Get cable or satellite for the news and sports (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705868)

Get cable or satellite for the news and sports

good luck (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705872)

i did it for about 6 months bringing home txt dumps like you said from wiki anf other sites like you said... wasn't a choice though for me it was i moved and my new residence didn't have cable or phone access. after about 6 months i tethered my cell phone i couldn't take it think about that night your at home no one is their nothing to do no internet and you have watched every movie you own...

I tried it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705874)

I tried it for 2 days and had to be hospitalized. I won't do that again!

Not a positive influence because ... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705880)

... the guy only looks for the negative. There is plenty of positive information on the web.

If you only look at child porn, violence, death and whatever you consider negative, then yes it is a source of negative information. But the negative influence is YOURSELF. You are the one explicitly looking that negative information. The internet will not display anything you don't ASK for.

No matter how you disconnect from the world, you will always be a negative influence to yourself. Hiding from your own problems will never get rid of the problem ....

Re:Not a positive influence because ... (2)

Xacid (560407) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706064)

Depends on your criteria for why it's negative in his life. It may very well not simply be the content.

Web addiction is still his own fault (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706104)

The Internet is not responsible for the actions of the users.

Re:Not a positive influence because ... (4, Funny)

Kell Bengal (711123) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706098)

Speak for yourself! Mine turns on unbidden at night and beams images into my brain. That's the only explanation for the queer thoughts that have been running through my brain of late - shameful things like voting for social progressives.

I did this once... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705884)

When I was in university I "took a year off" from the Internet. I did so by leaving my computer at the school in a secure place and I made myself stay on campus 8h per day so that I had access during business hours. I cut my cell phone too. It was amazing. I cleared a lot of clutter from my life that year.

Sometimes I had a term paper due and I needed access to submit documents, etc. so I had a land line telephone and the University's dial-in number (not sure if they still offer it though - this was way back in 2004).

Currently Living The Life (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705886)

I have no internet or intranet whatsoever, barring my access to public hotspots. I have configured GMail to forward my emails to my cell phone via text message, and have re-activated Facebook Mobile, again, controlled via text message.

It sucks. No Netflix, no Cracked.com, no ability to check useless and, more importantly useful information at a whim, which would be helpful as I have recently moved out of my parents' house (again) and have to re-learn maintenance and upkeep of a domicile. Also, my operating system, Fedora 15 has not been updated on my desktop, netbook, or laptop in weeks. Everything functions well, but there's a hell of a lot you miss out on when you don't have internet.

Easy! (1)

Tasha26 (1613349) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705888)

Major withdrawal syndrome... You can trying filling the void with TV or Radio but it's not the same.

I lived without the internet ... (1)

PC and Sony Fanboy (1248258) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705890)

And it was fine. Of course, this was prior to your birth, but I assure you - people lived just fine without it.

Re:I lived without the internet ... (1)

Matheus (586080) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706210)

No we didn't!

Re:I lived without the internet ... (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706212)

People made a lot of money distributing letters by horse, do you also recommend such job?

Of course you can live without it, but nowadays the expectations are much different that when almost nobody had it.

Experience living without the internet.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705896)

Yes, Its called life before the early 90s. Pick up the phone and talk to your friends and relatives. Buy a nice pen and paper set to hand-write letters to the newspaper, or grab a typewriter from a garage sale . Visit your local library; sit and read a magazine and make sure you get a library card to check out books. Buy a radio to listen to the news and weather. Get out your old CD player, tapes, or records if you feel like going really retro. Basically what everybody did before the early 90s. Stick with the plan of public wi-fi's when you actually want to get online, otherwise just get on with your life.

Re:Experience living without the internet.. (1)

genner (694963) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705954)

Yes, Its called life before the early 90s. Pick up the phone and talk to your friends and relatives. Buy a nice pen and paper set to hand-write letters to the newspaper, or grab a typewriter from a garage sale . Visit your local library; sit and read a magazine and make sure you get a library card to check out books. Buy a radio to listen to the news and weather. Get out your old CD player, tapes, or records if you feel like going really retro. Basically what everybody did before the early 90s. Stick with the plan of public wi-fi's when you actually want to get online, otherwise just get on with your life.

There was no life before the early 90's. Only the vast waste land known as the 80's.

Re:Experience living without the internet.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706176)

And before that were the 70's.
And before that were the 60's.
    Now that was a great decade. Man landing on the moon. Hendrix playing well everywhere in London. Getting laid for the first time.
    Seeing Pink Floyd (with Syd) on the same bill as Zeppelin.
    Buying my first T120 for £425. 17/11 from Commerfords of Thames Ditton, Kingston.
    Now that was a decade.

Re:Experience living without the internet.. (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706040)

And people in the 1890s got along just fine without cars, planes, bank accounts, antibiotics, radio, and TV. That doesn't mean that choosing to live without those things today is a good idea.

Co-incidence or what? (1)

kartiksinghal (1444295) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705898)

Dunno if this is plain co-incidence, I just decided 2 days back that I am going to disconnect for a whole next week (starting Monday) just for the sake of experimenting if I can still live without internet. I have been planning it and am considering whether to even check my mails or not during that time. One thing that put me off recently was intrusion of Google+ after being so deeply connected in Facebook. Let's see how it goes.

I'm currently doing the same thing (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705902)

It's been over 6 years since I had any sort of access to the internet in any capacity. I don't find that I have any problems with it. You just spend more money on actually buying porn. Otherwise it's no different.

Adjust. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705918)

I lived without the internet for about 6 months. I still had browser capabilities on my Blackberry, but I never spent more than moments checking emails/news/etc. It's just an adjustment.

Its sort of like when your internet goes out and you ask yourself "how did we live without constant access?", but we all know that people lived fruitful and fulfilling lives long before the internet. Typically we go out and do other things instead and adjust to the inconvenience and move on with our lives.

I have done the same (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705928)

I've recently done the same thing. Its really nice, I achieve a lot more, and when I do want to use the internet I am at least getting up, getting dressed and joining civilisation in a cafe or in the Library. I am lucky and live close to a 24 hour free internet through the local university.

I have studied much more and find my self being more creative. I listen to the radio and get my news from Radio 4.

I now no longer have TV or internet at home. I down load programs I want to watch or listen to at work and then take them home.
One problem with this is not so easy access to the pirate versions of everything..

Some of the other down sides, are not being able to look up a recipe or have youtube sessions with friends when they are around.

I have a USB cellular dongle that is deliberately put on a high tarrif, £5 per megabyte, so if I really need internet at home then I can, but it costs!

Sorry... you need Internet Access to see this. (1)

krelvin (771644) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705934)

I don't think that /. is a positive influence on your life... why are you asking this on an Internet based service?

There you go... (5, Funny)

malraid (592373) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705936)

Does anybody have any experience living without the internet? Yes
What major nuisances did you encounter? Lack of internet
What resources should I put on my intranet? A router hooked up to your ISP
Is there anything I'm overlooking? The usefulness of the internet

In all seriousness, good luck.

I don't think I could make it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705938)

I admire your determination, let me know if you can actually manage it, I don't think I could (yes, to admit to have an addiction is one of the first steps to cure it).

I'd think even simple things like getting software updates on your machines at home or not being able to look up things like the phone number of your bank or movie times or whatever might turn out to be pretty annoying.

Don't get bored. (1)

John R. Isidore (2330334) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705944)

Find stuff to fill your time; as with any addiction, getting rid of it will create a whole you'll have to fill, so plan ahead.

Re:Don't get bored. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706122)

..a whole you'll have to fill...

A whole is complete. How could anyone fill it?

Old foggies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705946)

I'll give you the phone number to my parents and they can tell you how they're doing w/o internet. AFAIK, they're living a happy retirement never having looked at a webpage.

It can be done (1)

reboot246 (623534) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705956)

I lived without the internet for the first 42 years of my life.

It wouldn't be an easy thing to do now because I pay my bills online and do a lot of my shopping online, but I could go back to the old-fashioned way without too many headaches. Life would go on.

Re:It can be done (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706062)

You lived the fist 42 years of your live without Internet in a society where very few people had access to the Internet. Doing the same in a society where most people have access to the Internet is a bit more difficult.

WOW - talk about going the wrong direction (1)

cpu6502 (1960974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705962)

I canceled my Cable TV and Sat Radio, but would never get rid of the internet. Free videos and music is a great boon. Plus being able to talk to friends online, send resume to future employers, and the occassional visit to college girls dot.com ;-)

I just spent the last 6 months in a hotel, on an out-of-state job, and all they had was 26 kbit/s dialup (fast enough for bittorrent; too slow to watch hulu). That was torture enough. I can't imagine going completely without.

Especially for the price. I'm only paying $15/mo. for DSL It's not as if I'm breaking the bank.
So basically I don't understand your motive at all?
It makes no sense to cancel the net.

Ask anyone over 30 (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705968)

"Experience living without the Internnet?" Ask anyone over thirty. Not only did we live our lives without the Internet, we didn't have cellphones or more than four television channels either. So, yes, we've experienced living in an unconnected world. It sucked as i recall.

Been there... (1)

SuperCharlie (1068072) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705972)

We moved to a rural area with pocket change left in our bank..it was a very tough time for us and we had no internet for quite a few months. To compound the issue, our only income was a web development company we run with only a few clients. Our first month or so we "sniped" access by driving around the motel district of the closest large city. we could always find a few bars of open wireless and did what we had to do to keep the small flame of our business going. We then found that the library in our little rural town had free internet and started going by there to make our connections and fanned the biz flames a little more. from there we tried dial up and looked into cell/3g with poor results and eventually ended up with satellite..which sucks..but not as bad as sneaking around town. Local libraries are the fall back when you dont have it in the house imho.

That's one way to break your porn addiction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705974)

Just make sure that you resist the temptation to do a "resources dump" to your intranet of xhamster.

Timing, timing, timing (5, Funny)

UberOogie (464002) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705976)

Is Saturday really the right time to be asking on the Web for helpful advise from people who have already foregone the Internet except at work?

Text dump of Wikipedia? (1)

Unkyjar (1148699) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705978)

Aren't those called encyclopedias?

Just need a smart phone (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36705980)

Just make sure to have a smart phone for the convenience of looking up things, getting directions etc.

Posting on Slashdot? (5, Insightful)

goodmanj (234846) | more than 3 years ago | (#36705992)

You want to go off the Internet, so your first instinct for advice is to POST TO SLASHDOT?

A) You've come to the wrong place.
B) You'll never make it anyway.

RMS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706000)

> Does anybody have any experience living without the internet?
Ask Richard Stallman.

Very Silly (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706012)

It is trivial to live without "the internet" at home. If you can't you have a very serious problem and I recommend seeking help.

Glad to see (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706030)

You are asking this question on the internet.

A healthy way to test this (1)

Joshua Fan (1733100) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706034)

is to simply take an extended camping trip without 3G/4G. Bring some books. Life is quite fulfilling without internet. You don't need it as much as you think. Once you're free from its constant distraction you'll find more meaningful, lasting ways to distract yourself. Take up a physical hobby.

Psychologist? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706036)

I don't know what pushes you to try to get rid of the Internet in such a half-way. To me and I think to many slashdotters, this seem to be the symptom of a bigger problem. I would suggest that you seek professional help, like a psychologist or a psychiatrist. Facing a problem and using all the tool are your disposals, including professionals will only empower you and make you a better person.

Personally (1)

Xacid (560407) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706044)

Personally - I wouldn't even bother with the text dumps and whatnot. Just cut it off completely. If you need wiki or whatnot then catch it when you're at work. If it's important enough you'll find yourself at the library or coffee shop anyway.

I've been slowly cutting myself off from a lot of things like that (cable tv, WoW, Starcraft, Facebook, etc) and I find I just fill the voids with other things. I'm currently playing my PS2 more than I have in ages. Not all bad though because my attention span for that is much shorter than the other options (such as hanging out on slashdot). I find I've been hanging out with friends more in person, talking more to my family, and in general just getting more shit done. I've also picked up some more hobbies on the way.

For me I think the next step is getting away from this smartphone craze. Hell, just for the cost it's not worth it. $40/mo extra to do 5% comfortably of what I can do on a laptop? After that I may consider dropping internet but it is a pretty handy tool. Perhaps I'll just wire it to a desktop so I lose some convenience of it to discourage me from using it everywhere in the house.

While some people on here are quick to shun those of us for trying to shed such things - I say fuck 'em, rock on, and good luck. You'll probably enjoy the change.

bill/bank stuff, directions, store hours... (1)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706052)

  • Checking bank account balances and activity
  • Paying bills
  • Getting directions to places (ok, so you can get a GPS or use a smartphone, sure)
  • Store locations, hours, etc.

As another poster pointed out, this seems like more of an issue of self control. I would suggest starting out with a dd-wrt or similar firmware for your router, and a)setting no-internet hours (say, maybe you only have internet for 2 hours after dinner?) and maybe blocking sites you spend too much time on.

These mechanisms could be defeated in an emergency (such as suddenly needing to book a flight, car, hotel, etc to visit a sick relative or for a work trip), but enough to keep you from getting lost in the internet instead of a good book. Another option would be canceling your wired internet connection, but having a tetherable cell. A pain in the ass, but doable if there's a sudden urgent need.

What i need to store wikipedia\English? (1)

yoptibase (2224032) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706054)

By need i maen hardware/software Any estimation of memory? How can i do it?

Ask anyone in the military (2)

BenihanaX (1405543) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706058)

Anyone that's been in the military recently can give you a pretty good of how much of a pain it is, though they are all dealing with far less (no full access at work). Obviously mileage will vary, since some of them have access to wide open internet all the time, and others won't have any for months.

On the carrier, I had access to email pretty much all the time (while I wasn't actively working and the ship wasn't on radio silence), but internet access meant 15-30 minutes on the slowest and most unreliable connection I've ever used. We'd pray that a page would even load, and often it didn't (so no Googling, you need to know exactly where you're going, and don't bother downloading files because they'll fail before they finish). Granted this was for a 2006-07 cruise, and from what I understand they've made some changes since then.

I ran a game server for the department berthing, including one which required SQL and was in development. Prior to that, I hadn't used the software or SQL, and was learning while underway. What I found out, was that not being able to Google an error or download patches and modules was a massive pain. Trying to research anything (an apartment, college, etc) or order anything online was out of the question. I wouldn't ever choose that, even if I cut back on internet.

My point, is that obviously it's entirely dependent on you, your situation, and your usage, and we have no way of addressing your concerns since you haven't even given us a clue of what your concerns are. In general, it's probably whatever you're doing on the internet that's the issue (Facebook, porn, etc), and not access in general. It sounds like you won't be that disconnected anyway, between having access elsewhere, and likely still using a cell phone.

If you need to cut off certain activities, do so. Get someone else involved and have them control access (lock your Facebook profile, set up parental filters for porn, whatever the issue happens to be). Try going to a cafe or somewhere you might normally use wifi, and don't get the password. I do this anyway when I need breaks from the distractions of wifi.

No intranet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706068)

I've gone that route, and the first thing you need to go is ditch the entire intranet idea. There is nothing that you really want from the Internet that won't leave you wanting more.

It's actually very easy to go without the internet at home, and the main side-effect is that you have a lot more time on your hands that will a take a while for you to figure out how to waste and be unproductive.

It's like coming off an addiction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706070)

I think many commenters missed the point that the question was about not having Internet at home and not about cutting off Internet completely. Clearly the latter would be much more difficult as so much of our communications and information/news intake nowadays rely on having Internet access.

I had an experience while studying abroad where I did not have Internet where I lived. It certainly was uncomfortable at first not being able to check my mail or news whenever I wanted. But after a while it became liberating as I spent more time reading books or hanging out with other students. I think the biggest inconvenience was certainly not being able to check my emails whenever I wanted (or I guess fb, g+, twitter now), especially on the weekends since free WiFi didn't exist then and I was too poor to pay for Internet cafes. But otherwise, I think it will just take a little bit of getting used to. If you ever run into issues later, you can always go to a place with Internet access like you mentioned and download the resources you need. Also make sure people can contact you by phone if they previously relied on other electronic means.

Get very slow internet; Take the pleasure out (1)

Animal Farm Pig (1600047) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706074)

I lived in Africa for about a year. We shared a 14.4k modem connection between about 10 people. It that stayed up about half the time. In another place I lived, we had about 30 people sharing a 1.5Mbps satellite link with 350MB/day quota.

In both cases, internet access was possible for basic things like sending emails (without attachments), text browsing, etc., but the latency was so high and bandwidth so low that it took all pleasure out of internet use.

The danger of disconnecting completely is that you'll find something for which you "need" internet and make a visit to the local coffee shop or library where they have high speed access. You can spend a lot of money on gas and coffee that way. Having internet that's just slow and painful to use helps to avoid that.

So, maybe you should invest in a 9600 baud modem and find a dial-up ISP?

Also, as a tip, make sure you have a phone book and some road maps for your area.

Re:Get very slow internet; Take the pleasure out (1)

MimeticLie (1866406) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706120)

The Alt-Text for this [xkcd.com] XKCD strip offered a technical solution for achieving a similar effect using your exiting internet connection:

After years of trying various methods, I broke this habit by pitting my impatience against my laziness. I decoupled the action and the neurological reward by setting up a simple 30-second delay I had to wait through, in which I couldn't do anything else, before any new page or chat client would load (and only allowed one to run at once). The urge to check all those sites magically vanished--and my 'productive' computer use was unaffected.

Doubt it will work. (1)

bircho (559727) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706076)

I can't imagine how this can work. Computers without internet aren't 1% as useful. If you think about making a Wikipedia mirror, you don't plan to cut back on computer time anyway.
Just take the slowest connection you can find, or share with a neighbor, or use a cellphone for tethering.

Employment & banking (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706088)

If you're hunting for a job, the internet has become indispensable. You go for work anywhere and ask about employment for any position and it's "Oh, apply online."

Same for banking. More and more banks are charging $$$ to use a teller and their ATM fees are ridiculous - I don't believe they have to charge over $0.50 per transaction because it costs them that much.

Library or coffee shop? You're going to send personal stuff over a coffee shop wan?!?

Library! Try just getting on for one. And the same applies to it as the coffee shop.

And if you have a landline, AT&T atleast is making it almost impossible not to have internet with their "packages". I think AT&T is trying to push everyone of their customers into getting $100+ "packages" that have phone, long distance, TV, internet - U-verse shit - yeah try to get a tariff line and basic $19.99/month dsl out of the rep - try it and see!

Experience without Internet Access (1)

hackus (159037) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706102)

Yeah, I had that once...it lasted about 24 hours.

It was awful to and it involved bouts with:

Vomiting and nausea..(mainly from having to deal with real life human beings) and fits of hopeless anxiety. The latter from not knowing anything I wanted to know in less than 100ms response time.

Then of course there is working on a machine with a svn or git repo handy for doing latest kernel devel work or device driver debugging.

That didn't make me sick, just very very angry.

So, I wouldn't advise it.

-Hackus

a bit sad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706116)

i find it a bit sad that someone would pose such a question, have you not the willpower to simple avoid the "negative influences" of the internet? you could even blacklist all but a few useful sites such as wikipedia, perhaps youtube, and maybe an online store or two. If you do want to hop off the internet, why cling to a few of the best things it has to offer? Also you can download condensed versions of wikipedia on DVD images I believe, and you could use site ripping software to get portions of other things, but then thats like getting all of your news and information about whatever from an old book somewhere. Just stop doing the things that you think are negative influences. Spend less time on the web, whatever you think is best. And drop to the cheapest internet that is offered in your area, to save money, or maybe even dialup - that would keep you away from most things one could consider bad influences anyways, and if not that, then make anything beyond simple things like wikipedia so slow as to prevent you from wanting to wait on them.

Ask your parents (2)

HockeyPuck (141947) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706128)

Hey buddy, why not just ask anybody that's older than say 30, "What did you do before you had internet?" Since internet access from the home isn't that old, i'm sure you can find some things to do and resources to use... for example...

Get a phone book.
Buy a map.
Buy a dictionary/thesaurus
Buy stamps, envelopes and practice writing with this invention called a 'pen' or alternatively a 'pencil'.

Do you miss playing FPS games with your friends? Try paintball.
Miss online racing? Try go-kart racing.
Videoconferencing/skype? Use the telephone and look at a photograph of the person you're talking to. That's a printed photo, not flickr.

You know that area in your backyard, that's probably covered in weeds and crab grass? Try cutting it, planting something and watching it grow. It'll be more rewarding than 'gold farming', infact some of the things you can grow in your back yard are edible or attract other forms of life. Setting up a bird feeder is easy.

Oh yeah, and since you don't have the self control to handle internet access, please cancel your cable/satellite service, since you'll fall into this pit of despair called "Jersey Shore."

Don't do it!!!! (1)

methano (519830) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706134)

Don't do it, Man!!!

You'll go mad!!!

Experience without it? Seriously? (1)

digitalPhant0m (1424687) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706146)

I think the author is showing their age, and obviously wasn't around during the early 90's when the access we did have was about equal to what he's asking for.

I know this maybe a stretch of the imagination but yes, people managed to "live" without it. Also, in this day and age, I'm sure people can't figure out what to do with a computer once the interweb's are turned off, but we managed to use it as a useful tool back then too.

We still could shop from home, except it was from a much higher bandwidth medium: Mail order catalogs.
We managed to still have "social networks", and actually talked face to face with our friends, or spent time in their presence.
We had streaming media, it was called television. Although back in those days MTV and VH1 actually played music.
We had an instant messenger called the telephone. It was really cool, because when you said "hello" someone actually responded quite promptly.
We shared photo's, music, and ideas. Although via different mediums, such as cd's, tapes, paper and the telephone.

Life is not much different now, for those of use that don't spend endless hours valuing our worth by the size of our f@cebook friend roster or the amount of posts off random ramblings from twitt3r.

My suggestion to you, and anyone feeling overwhelmed by the internet is:
- Ditch the "social networks". If you have friends, call them on the phone, or go hang out with them. I promise it's much more rewarding.
- Unless you actually NEED something, keep your browser closed.
- Get a hobby that doesn't include the computer. Believe it or not, there is a plethora of things to do that don't require the internet, or even a computer. A ton don't even require electricity!

Not a bad move at all (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706150)

There is way more positive that will come from ditching internet at home than there is negative - regardless of the pornography - the whole thing is generally a waste of time.

"Is there anything i am overlooking" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706158)

the internet is having a negative affect on your life, so you ask the internet how to go without it? So what are you over looking? common sense? reason?

I lived without the internet for 40 years (1)

MpVpRb (1423381) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706166)

1953 to 1993.

Believe it or not, in the 60s, we thought we lived in the modern world.

Of course, today I can't imagine life without internet.

Re:I lived without the internet for 40 years (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706192)

Dad, I did not know you visited /.

Aging Liberal Hippy Douche (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36706194)

Hipsters need to die in fire

I know how to fix this! (1)

Just Brew It! (636086) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706208)

There are some nice communities [wikipedia.org] in Pennsylvania and Indiana you may wish to consider relocating to. Low crime rate, clean living, and none of that pesky Internet stuff.

Don't do it. (1)

xclr8r (658786) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706220)

If you have any type of internet connection at work you will end up overusing the internet at work instead of what you were doing at home. Using the net at work for non-business items can be costly to your career.

I am not a doctor but impulse control disorder maybe something you need to look into.

"anybody have experience living without the net" (1)

John Hasler (414242) | more than 3 years ago | (#36706222)

Yes. I've lived most of my life without the Net.

> What major nuisances did you encounter?

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