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Millions of Jellyfish Invade Nuclear Reactors

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the what-we-need-is-a-good-jellyfish-recipe dept.

Power 280

oxide7 writes "A nuclear reactor in Japan was forced to shut down due to infiltration of enormous swarms of jellyfish near the power plant. A similar incident was also reported recently in Israel, when millions of jellyfish clogged the sea-water cooling system of a power plant."

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I for one (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36708882)

praise our new jellyfish overlords.

Re:I for one (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36708918)

Finally a match for sharks with lasers!

Re:I for one (2)

macraig (621737) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708920)

Scholl's wants to know: are you jellin'?

Re:I for one (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36708952)

mdsolar, is that you?

Jellyfish love global warming (5, Funny)

mrxak (727974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708884)

I have a theory that jellyfish are alien invaders, here to xenoform our planet. They love basically everything we do to the planet, from pollution to overfishing to global warming. This is just further evidence, but by shutting down nuclear reactors, the only current viable alternative to fossil fuel power plants, they ensure we use more coal and oil power plants, contributing to the environmental change they love.

I think humans are the alien terraformers (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36708910)

Think about it, within a relatively short time on earth we've multiplied to the billions, with no indication of stopping. We're like the grey goo of nanotech horror, or flying penises of second life!

-Matt

Re:I think humans are the alien terraformers (1)

mrxak (727974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708932)

Except we're clearly from this planet. If you wanted to argue the jellyfish are trying to stop us from spreading to other planets, you may be right. Their efforts thus far to change our environment to suit their own purposes have been quite effective, and may end up destroying us.

We better start fighting back now. Countries such as Germany are already under the influence of jellyfish. We should look for distinctive jellyfish sting marks on the necks of their lawmakers who voted for the nuclear power ban.

Re:I think humans are the alien terraformers (1)

arglebargle_xiv (2212710) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708996)

Countries such as Germany are already under the influence of jellyfish. We should look for distinctive jellyfish sting marks on the necks of their lawmakers who voted for the nuclear power ban.

At least they only under the influence of jellyfish. My country (UK) is run by them.

Re:I think humans are the alien terraformers (5, Interesting)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709166)

Historically, we didn't have a population problem. China reflects the population growth of the entire world. Until about 1850, population growth was a stable thing, growing fractionally every century or so. After about 1850, we saw this exponential growth.

The reason I picked China as the example, is that China has made a conscious effort to control population. One couple, one child. Negative population growth, which should put China comfortably within the land's capability to support their population within the next 100 years or so. (Sorry, no, I haven't researched projected population figures - I'm just guesstimating that 100 years from now, China's population will be (very roughly) about 1/4 what it is today.)

Roughly half of the rest of the world still practices unrestrained population growth - all of Islam, all of the Catholic people, and much of the third world no matter their religion, politics, or anything else.

I think it's past time that some of those people were brought up to date on the results of unrestricted procreation.

chinas program is an utter failure (5, Insightful)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709264)

they have profoundly disrupted the balance between male and female, leading to social unrest and massive mental health problems.

the idea that there is insufficient land is bogus as long as we are paying farmers to not grow things. there is plenty of food, the problem is distribution and marketing. we throw away food every day from supermarkets and restaurants, and people go to jail if they try to dig in the trash for food to eat. there is no food shortage, there is a shortage of low-priced food, and that has nothing to do with the supply of land (except maybe as it relates to ethanol). it has to do with things like the Goldman Sachs Commodity Index Fund and other investment banks and hedge funds attempts to manipulate food markets for profit . . . something that is very old, a good 20th century example being the potato market and NYMEX.

the problem with 'population control' is that someone has to decide what 'sort of people' are 'better' - nobody who thinks they know the answer to that should ever be in any position of power because it is amongst the basest, most primitive and violent impulses of the human species, to 'wipe out the other clan'.

see also. eugenics. t4. genetic health courts. etc etc.

Re:chinas program is an utter failure (5, Insightful)

mrxak (727974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709306)

You're exactly right, that we produce enough food to feed everyone. Inadequate packaging and storage, as well as inadequate distribution channels, corrupt governments, and plain old poverty keeps a lot of it getting to where it needs to go. Much of it spoils before reaching market and much of it gets used as a political and social weapon.

Just recently the UN FAO said we need to double our food output by 2050, when population is expected to reach 9 billion. Well, ignoring the fact that math doesn't make sense, it's missing the point. We can produce food for 6.5 billion right now. Production will need to increase to meet the demands of another 2.5 billion people, but the problem isn't production and never was. So long as there isn't enough refrigeration, pest-resistent procedures and packaging, and the roads and governments in place to distribute it adequately, production is irrelevant.

Re:chinas program is an utter failure (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709546)

the idea that there is insufficient land is bogus as long as we are paying farmers to not grow things.

You might be able to use it now, but that might make it completely unusable in future. Land needs to recover, they'd worked that out in the middle ages.

Re:chinas program is an utter failure (1)

omfgnosis (963606) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709568)

the idea that there is insufficient land is bogus as long as we are paying farmers to not grow things.

That's only logically true if the land on which nothing is grown could replace the food that is being grown on land that is being cleared (for instance, in the Amazon) for food production. The amount of land subsidized not to grow is about 34 million acres. From various sources, I'm seeing anywhere from 6 to 47 million acres of Amazon rainforest alone being cleared for food production each year. Taking the lowest figure for granted, that 34 million acres of unfarmed land could effectively produce "sustainably" (in place of clearing forest land) for six years. And that's assuming an acre is an acre and equally capable of producing food. All of this takes a lot of assumptions I'm not comfortable with, about whether current production levels are even remotely necessary, about quite a lot of things. But the "paying farmers not to grow" argument is just far too facile for me to ignore anymore; the fact is, sustainable food production requires a certain amount of land per person, and it requires certain features of land that need to be maintained over a period of time. Adding more people adds more burden to that requirement. And it adds more burden to the land, which once depleted stops producing.

Re:I think humans are the alien terraformers (1)

mrxak (727974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709270)

I think you'd be surprised how many Catholics use artificial birth control.

Re:I think humans are the alien terraformers (1)

LibRT (1966204) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709452)

The idea that the earth has some sort of "population problem" is nonsense: the entire population of the earth could fit into the state of Texas with plenty of elbow room (Texas: 696,241 km^2 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas); 1 km^2 = 1,000,000 m^2 X 696,241 = 696,241,000,000 m^2; population of earth: ~6,930,000,000 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/World_population); 696,241,000,000 / 6,930,000,000 = 100.47 m^2 per person (or about 1,081 ft^2)). There are more than enough resources, too (including food) to go around.

Re:I think humans are the alien terraformers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709490)

Yep, cause all a person needs to live can be found withing 1000 square feet of Texas. Brilliant.

Re:I think humans are the alien terraformers (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709526)

Until about 1850, population growth was a stable thing, growing fractionally every century or so.

You mean the population on a particular date would be, say, x% more than it was a year previously?

After about 1850, we saw this exponential growth.

You mean where the population on a particular date would be the base population at some time in the past, multiplied by some number, let's call it ((100+x)/100), raised to a power which corresponds the number of years after the base?

I wonder what biological mutation or socio-economic upheaval caused such a fundamental shift in human reproduction.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (4, Interesting)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708938)

Many Jellyfish and Fish compete in their ecological niche. Because people the world over are over-fishing the sea, it leaves room for more jellyfish to snatch the food the fish would otherwise eat. Furthermore, Jellyfish are also nearly nutrition-less so people do not try to catch them. So, we have a collection of species of animal that have less predation vs. their main competitor and more food to eat, so they tend to thrive. Its not really a good idea for us to continue to ravage the sea life without regard to their continued survival. Coal and Oil plants really don't affect the Jellyfish as much.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (5, Informative)

zill (1690130) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708948)

Furthermore, Jellyfish are also nearly nutrition-less so people do not try to catch them.

Most Asian cuisines have Jellyfish dishes. Some US fisheries even export Jellyfish to Asian countries.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (1)

mrxak (727974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708992)

Luckily they have no regard for their own lives, as TFA clearly shows they're willing to use suicidal tactics to get us to shut down our alternative energy sources that will halt their advance. If they did care more, they might be pissed off that we're eating them.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (5, Informative)

Guppy (12314) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709106)

Most Asian cuisines have Jellyfish dishes. Some US fisheries even export Jellyfish to Asian countries.

The problem is, preparation of Jellyfish for food is very time and labor intensive, due to the absurdly high water content that needs to be dealt with. Asians eat it, but not as a major dietary protein source like fish. So while it may support some small Jellyfisheries, there will never be huge fleets capable of making a dent in their populations.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (4, Interesting)

MassiveForces (991813) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709164)

...absurdly high water content, some protein... hmm how about we use them to fertilize the desert?

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (1)

MrQuacker (1938262) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709178)

Huh. Interesting idea, but would it work?

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (1)

RsG (809189) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709250)

I wonder if the reason we don't use them as fertilizer has to do with salt content. Residual salt buildup, wherein the salt content in agricultural soil gets fractionally higher each year, is a problem already; if jellyfish fertilizer exacerbates it, that might be why nobody's tried it.

Desalinating something before you use it adds quite a lot of energy to the requirements.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709290)

But it's got what plants crave...

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (1)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709150)

See Guppy's post below. You can eat jellyfish, but the nutritional content is almost nil. You have to heavily process jellyfish to make it nutritional, and even then it is nowhere near the same level of nutrition as fish. You can catch a single fish like a Salmon and feed a man for a few days, or catch several hundred jellyfish and feed the same man for a couple hours.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (1)

smellotron (1039250) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709554)

You can catch a single fish like a Salmon and feed a man for a few days, or catch several hundred jellyfish and feed the same man for a couple hours.

Um, I'll take the fish, please?

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (2)

mrxak (727974) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708976)

Increasing water temperatures do correlate with increased jellyfish populations, and they do better in depleted oxygen waters, which pollution causes. More fossil fuels do result in increased jellyfish numbers, it's been shown in a number of scientific studies.

They ARE xenoforming our planet, and we have limited time to stop them before they begin constructing saltwater-filled vehicles to roam the lands and take over.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (0)

dissy (172727) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709346)

They ARE xenoforming our planet, and we have limited time to stop them before they begin constructing saltwater-filled vehicles to roam the lands and take over

A salt-water filled vehicle, that's the real news for nerds here. I just hope they post how they made it on instructables!

Oblig. http://home.pacbell.net/fakeout/futurama_fish.jpg [pacbell.net]

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (4, Informative)

anagama (611277) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709018)

I was with you up to the last point.

When carbon dioxide dissolves in this ocean, carbonic acid is formed. This leads to higher acidity, mainly near the surface, which has been proven to inhibit shell growth in marine animals and is suspected as a cause of reproductive disorders in some fish.
...
The oceans currently absorb about a third of human-created CO2 emissions, roughly 22 million tons a day. Projections based on these numbers show that by the end of this century, continued emissions could reduce ocean pH by another 0.5 units. Shell-forming animals including corals, oysters, shrimp, lobster, many planktonic organisms, and even some fish species could be gravely affected.

http://ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/critical-issues-ocean-acidification/ [nationalgeographic.com]

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (2)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709182)

Ive read that Jellyfish thrive more in oxygen depleted waters, and I have not read about the carbonic acid problem. However I still think overfishing is the main problem for fishes. Since carbon dioxide is produced by pretty much any decaying or burning matter and we make up a minority portion of that (albeit significant since its beyond homeostasis) I am pretty sure the fact that people are eating fish far far beyond sustainable levels is the culprit. http://www.un.org/events/tenstories/06/story.asp?storyID=800 [un.org] . We are talking about 70 percent of species that will be fished out of existence in the next 50 years if we don't do something. Im not against extinctions, and human beings are pretty much guaranteeing their own if they don't stop being short sighted twats.

yeah but i love McDonalds fish filet (1)

decora (1710862) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709282)

shrug.

did you see american idol last night?

Re:yeah but i love McDonalds fish filet (1)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709310)

I don't really care to watch shit as it slides down sandpaper.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (1)

GooberToo (74388) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709128)

The jellyfish explosions have been created by two things. Firstly, from massive over fishing in Asian waters. Secondly, from massive waste runoff in oxygen rich fresh waters from China. Its almost completely a problem of both Japan and China's making.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (1)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709206)

We are creating or have created similar problems. Consider the fact that crab and lobster fishing requires you throw away crabs/lobsters below a certain size. That is selective pressure on their species to encourage smaller animals. Also consider that in my home state (Montana) they introduced the Mysis which killed all the salmon. Furthermore, Americans want to eat fish that other nations import. We may care about what happens in our waters but we certainly don't bitch too much about where or how certain major importers of seafood get their fish.

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36708988)

They've realized that radioactive water is the fastest way to genetic evolution. They just don't realize that they'll become giant, air-breathing human-eaters...yet...

Re:Jellyfish love global warming (2)

stms (1132653) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709216)

I for one welcome our new radiated Jellyfish overlords.

Sayonara Fishies (5, Informative)

Tablizer (95088) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708888)

We over-fished the oceans, and now jellyfish have all that extra food available to themselves to grow like weeds. Don't act surprised.

This is not flamebait (4, Insightful)

turing_m (1030530) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709292)

How is this flamebait? What Tablizer says is true. The fish that are the normal predators of jellyfish have been overfished, along with a lot of the smaller fish they feed on. What results is an abundance of the food that jellyfish eat along with an absence of predators (including the human predator), which causes a surge in jellyfish numbers.

It is flamebait because some don't want to hear (1)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709534)

The flamebait or troll mod is not there to catch flamebait or trolls but to label things as "I don't want to hear this". Take tuna, it is easy to see it is over fished as it has become harder and harder to catch. The people who want to continue catching with no restrictions don't even bother denying it, they just don't want to deal with it. They want their tuna now, if that means no tuna tomorrow, so be it.

The Abyss (2)

chill (34294) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708892)

They're just the advance troops sent by the aliens in The Abyss [imdb.com] !

Re:The Abyss (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36708922)

Or figment of Jerry's imagination from The Core [imdb.com]

Re:The Abyss (1)

dragonturtle69 (1002892) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708968)

LOL, ya beat me to it.

Re:The Abyss (1)

JabberWokky (19442) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709020)

Or, as a better fit, from the novel "The Kraken Wakes" by John Wyndham. Great book.

I for one... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36708908)

...welcome our new gelatinous overlords.

Two months ago? (1)

kriston (7886) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708914)

Didn't this hit the regular news over two months ago? What's new this time?

Re:Two months ago? (1)

SJHillman (1966756) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708928)

Slashdot posted news within 2 months of it being news... that's new

Re:Two months ago? (1)

jmd_akbar (1777312) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708958)

Slashdot posted news within 2 months of it being news... that's new

ONLY two months

Re:Two months ago? (1)

baegucb (18706) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709278)

Not to worry. It'll be back again in a year or two.

Also the reactor in Torness, Scotland. (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36708926)

The Torness reactor was shut down on June 28th because jellyfish clogged the seawater inlet filters.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/jun/30/jellyfish-shut-nuclear-reactors-torness

Up Next... (4, Funny)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708980)

Up Next:

Radioactive Jellyfish spotted

Up Next after that:

Man stung by radioactive jellyfish, gains superpowers. New crime-fighting "Jellyman" reduces world crime considerably.

Re:Up Next... (3, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709016)

Man stung by radioactive jellyfish, gains superpowers. New crime-fighting "Jellyman" reduces world crime considerably.

Unfortunately he is ultimately beaten by his nemesis, "The Knife", who defeats him easily with the aid of a giant jar of Jif Peanut Butter.

Re:Up Next... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709244)

"New crime-fighting "Jellyman" reduces world crime considerably"

Reduces his enemies to a quivering mass of jelly, I'd bet.

Re:Up Next... (0)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709370)

No, he is the quivering mass of jelly. His enemies just really, really don't want to touch him. Neither do his friends, come to mention it. But toss a pair of glasses on him, and he becomes a mild-mannered Democratic congressman!

Re:Up Next... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709324)

Thanks for providing SyFy with their next few "original movie" ideas.

Not surprising (4, Interesting)

PhrostyMcByte (589271) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708982)

A friend of mine used to work as a deep diving welder. Things get pretty cold when you've got that much water between you and the sun, so they'd pump down warm water from the surface to let the divers stay under for as long as possible.

Some of the divers discovered they could get even warmer by sticking the hoses into the neck of their wetsuit. After a few weeks of doing so, a number of jellyfish swam near the surface. You can probably guess what happened next -- one of them got sucked into the pump and shot through the hose, straight down the back of his wetsuit and settling right between his legs.

It took a few days before he was able to walk after that, and probably a week more before he could do it comfortably. I guess he was lucky they weren't a more deadly variety, and that he had a buddy nearby to help him surface and remove his wetsuit.

Re:Not surprising (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709322)

Cool story bro

Your story would go over better if it were not so obviously fabricated.
1) Deep waters welders: We almost always wear dry suits not wet suits.
2) When we do wear wetsuits (short shallow dives in warm water) we want the water in our suit to remain constant because our body heat warms it up and it is trapped inside the suit providing insulation. You would be stupid to break your seal to pump in other water as you would loose body heat that way.

Re:Not surprising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709442)

Also, no way the Master would move from up his neck to down between his legs and still have anything left to sting with.

Re:Not surprising (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709436)

It's a UL. Read it (and weep) on Snopes.

I've seen these jellyfish "swarms" (1)

TheJodster (212554) | more than 3 years ago | (#36708998)

This happened when I was out on my boat fishing last summer. It's the most amazing thing I think I've ever seen in salt water. They were everywhere as far as I could see with the water clarity being what it was. It would have been a very bad day to fall off the boat! That's a lot of tentacles in the water. I did not, however see a radioactive Super Jellyfish with psychic powers which saddens me a little.

US Navy vs Jellyfish (5, Interesting)

ikedasquid (1177957) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709004)

Jellyfish clogging marine heat exchangers is a common problem at sea, but is of particular concern for US Naval vessels using nuclear propulsion. Typically the only fix is to open the exchanger and manually clean the stuff out. Some ships have a capability to flush with either low pressure steam or reverse flush with firemain water (although the firemain is now also likely to contain jellyfish). How these multi-billion dollar machines are designed without a method for removing dead jellyfish is beyond my comprehension.

Re:US Navy vs Jellyfish (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709036)

although the firemain is now also likely to contain jellyfish). How these multi-billion dollar machines are designed without a method for removing dead jellyfish is beyond my comprehension.

But they are designed with that in mind. The fire mains, you say? Repelling boarders is pretty easy when you can shoot jellyfish out of hoses at them.

Re:US Navy vs Jellyfish (1)

qwak23 (1862090) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709084)

That's because an automated/mechanical means of removing jellyfish was not in the original contract write up. Oh, and it's not just the vessels with nuclear propulsion, pretty much every vessel sucks in water and thus marine life for various systems, most of the time it's not a huge issue, though in really shallow ports it can be.

Bring in some Chinese chefs (2)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709024)

One thing we know how to do is kill stuff. One thing Chinese chefs know is to make dish out of almost anything.

Invite some Chinese chefs and take care of the bidnis.

Re:Bring in some Chinese chefs (4, Funny)

xs650 (741277) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709060)

I've eaten jellyfish in China. Reminded me of chewing on rubber bands without the flavor.

Re:Bring in some Chinese chefs (3, Funny)

RussR42 (779993) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709422)

OMFG!1 I've always liked rubber bands, except for the flavor!

This entire thread (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709038)

is this [ompldr.org]

In Non-Soviet-Japan, Jellyfish clog YOU!??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709048)

Nah, doesn't have the same ring to it.

All Hail Sosai X! (1)

eveversion4 (785389) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709054)

This reminds me of that episode of Gatchaman with the giant jellyfish lens monster that was created using polluted sea water.

Jellyfish (1)

thr13z3 (214476) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709082)

Fcking Jellyfish, how do they work?

Re:Jellyfish (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709110)

They are actually just small regions where the seawater is held together in semi-solid form by magnetism...

I for one.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709108)

Welcome are squishy yet stingy overlords.

great! (1)

superwiz (655733) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709120)

Now they are gonna blame any new problems in the nuclear reactor on the Israeli jellyfish.

Re:great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709146)

Zionist Jellyfish Hold Up Reactor

Nothing can get done around here until we do something about these amoral tentacled monsters trying to poison everyone. They must be purged, killed if necessary.

fsckn NIPS are totally corrupt (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709122)

fuck em

Sea water for cooling? (1)

adolf (21054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709124)

IANANE (I Am Not A Nuclear Engineer), but why is raw sea water being used for cooling water, where it can be blocked by jellyfish?

Or raw lake water, for that matter? ISTR a similar almost-problem at the Davis Besse reactor in Ohio from the (invading) zebra mussel trying to plug things up.

Certainly both sea water and lake water are cheap and plentiful, but if using them allows living creatures to foul the works and cause actual problems (instead of simply costing more money) is it really worth the convenience?

Re:Sea water for cooling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709162)

It's for emergencies. If you can't handle an emergency at a nuclear power plant, the plant shuts down.

Re:Sea water for cooling? (1)

ikedasquid (1177957) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709192)

IAANE -- 2nd law of thermodynamics. That Carnot will get you every time. The plants need to dump about 60-75% of heat produced to reduce entropy. For plants of this size that is a considerable amount of energy. Dumping to seawater, river or lake water is easy, cheap, and typically a non issue. I'm not sure there are any other solutions that are better than what they are doing now, even with the sea critters clogging the condensers.

Re:Sea water for cooling? (2)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709204)

I think it's a multiple stage cooling system. The reactor's excess heat is transferred from the internal cooling loop, to ponds, the ponds are cooled by a separate cooling loop - into yet another pond? Then the pond is hooked up to an open ended system that pulls cool water from the sea, dumping warm water back into the sea. The reactor is isolated from the sea by a couple of stages, but ultimately, the excess heat has to go SOMEWHERE other than another closed loop system.

Re:Sea water for cooling? (1)

Omniscient Lurker (1504701) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709272)

The Shimane Nuclear Power Plant is a Boiling water reactor. This means it has two water loops in it. One is boiled by the reactor and turns a turbine. A second (probably from the sea in this case) is used to condense that steam and recycle it through the reactor. For any heat based power generation you need a final heat sink, usually the atmosphere (cooling towers) or a body of water for nuclear power plants; coal plants usually have an entirely open system and just go water source to air.

Most of Japan uses BWRs. https://secure.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/wiki/Boiling_Water_Reactor [wikimedia.org]

(I am a Nuclear Engineering Student)

Re:Sea water for cooling? (1)

Antisyzygy (1495469) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709304)

Thermal pollution has been a problem with nuclear power plants. Whenever you change the conditions in a chaotic system the results are not usually predictable. You may force the system into whole new orbits or it may fly away to some other orbit or it may just shoot off to infinite. Mathematically speaking that is. In this case, warm water expelled from the plant caused lifeforms that do well in warm water to do better. They started moving closer to the source because they thrive in even warmer water yet. There are numerous other problems this warm water in an otherwise stable environment caused, but the only one the news is talking about is the one that directly affects humans over + or - 2 weeks.

Re:Sea water for cooling? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709316)

If your plant is sited near a massive body of cool water, why wouldn't you use it to cool off your plant? Of course, maybe they intentionally site large power plants to be near large bodies of water so they can be used for cooling. I'm sure other types of power plants have similar problems, but it's more newsworthy when it's a nuke plant.

dom

Re:Sea water for cooling? (1)

adolf (21054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709532)

If your plant is sited near a massive body of cool water, why wouldn't you use it to cool off your plant?

Because the interface for that relatively cool body of water can become readily clogged with jellyfish and/or zebra mussels, as has actually happened in the really real world?

Did you have an actual retort or vindication for the concept, AC, or are you just restating what I already declared as being obvious?

Jellyfish Heaven (1)

mnot (71203) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709156)

Jellyfish heaven
In the big blue sea
Where it's too cold to surf
And it's too warm to ski
Jellyfish Heaven
Is full of dead
Jellyfish

People always saying
"I won't eat jellyfish
'Cause they ain't got no bones
And you can't make a wish"
People always shouting
"Don't go swimming near those things!"
But when they're close to dying
You can hear them sing

Jellyfish heaven
Is not like Japan
Jellyfish heaven
Is not like Thailand
Jellyfish heaven
Is a lot
Like LA

Re:Jellyfish Heaven (1)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709268)

That's beautiful. Demented, but beautiful.

Where the hell is Aquaman when you need him? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709160)

Maybe he could take these jelly fish out with some peanut butter fish.

Re:Where the hell is Aquaman when you need him? (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709220)

He's probably the one who ordered them to do it. That filthy Green Atlantean terrorist sends sea life to their deaths with his telepathic compulsions all the time.

The Pokémon! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709172)

Lot's of them are gonna die at the Pokémon center if the power doesn't come back soon!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BLu84a1Mywg#t=3m21s
(skip to 3:45 to omit the introduction; if only the episode featured Tentacool/Tentacruel instead if Grimer/Muk)

In Scotland too (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709194)

Two weeks ago the Torness nuclear plant in Scotland has also been closed due to jellyfish clogging the water filters http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-edinburgh-east-fife-13971005

The message is clear (1)

Progman3K (515744) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709208)

SHUT
DOWN
EVERYTHING
Seriously, I think the planet is trying to to tell us "You can't contain the nuclear garbage you're making, stop it"

Re:The message is clear (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709428)

Start with your Internet connection and the power supply feeding your web browser.

Re:The message is clear (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709562)

mhmm. cuz you know, the earth isnt full of naturally radioactive things. we just move a tiny fraction around.

Been done before (1)

norriefc (1998536) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709212)

Japanese copying Scotland again Actually I'm not sure when they have done it before but I'm sure they have /Scottish

Re:Been done before (4, Funny)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709286)

Japanese copying Scotland again Actually I'm not sure when they have done it before but I'm sure they have

Three words: Japanese bagpipe music.

Re:Been done before (1)

norriefc (1998536) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709294)

I don't ever want to hear that. Our bagpipes are bad enough as it is.

Right out of fiction (3, Interesting)

Daetrin (576516) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709280)

So we've got a creature with tentacles infiltrating a nuclear power plant in japan. All we need now is for them to get exposed to some of the radiation and we'll be all set for some real live bad hentai.

Hey. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36709284)

Not surprisingly, it's Japan. I think the jelly must really like not the heat, nor the sushi, but the radioactivity.

It's obvious (2)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#36709418)

Nuclear reactors running amuck, millions of jellyfish swarming to stop them - this is just a promotional gimmick for the next Hayao Miyazaki film.

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