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Anonymous Releases 90,000 Military E-Mail Accounts

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the and-another-one-gone-and-another-one-gone dept.

Security 319

jjp9999 writes "Anonymous Operations posted 90,000 military email addresses and passwords to the Pirate Bay on July 11, in what they're calling 'Military Meltdown Monday.' They obtained the emails while hacking government contracting and consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton. They hinted at other information obtained during the breach, which they describe as 'maps and keys for various other treasure chests buried on the islands of government agencies, federal contractors and shady whitehat companies.' The breach comes just days after Anonymous hacked government contractor IRC Federal. Both breaches are linked to the new AntiSec movement, which LulzSec joined forces with shortly before disbanding."

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holy crap!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727276)

The pirate bay is still around!??!?!?

Re:holy crap!! (1)

sortius_nod (1080919) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727310)

still quite strong. yet more proof that MAFIAA can't win!

Re:holy crap!! (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727476)

No, but the Feds can.

Leaking information on current and former US military personnel is just going to fan the flames of "shut everything down" in Congress.

People keep poking at the bear and eventually it's going to wake up and rip things apart.

Yes, I know its from a military contractor, that distinction will be lost on Congress.

Re:holy crap!! (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727658)

Do I understand this correctly? A group of grinning show-offs decided to Crack information from another group of people that routinely travel the planet murdering other people, no matter how well hidden the victims are?

good luck

Re:holy crap!! (-1, Troll)

Dishevel (1105119) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727812)

Always remember. All killing is MURDER.
Especially when it is the US.

I think what should happen is that all the people who should not be allowed to live within the rest of society should move to your house.
Move in with your family.

Then we can move you and your clan to another continent. Where we can put up a huge wall.
That way our evil asses can be separated from your Utopian society.
We can even check in on you in 50 years and see how well you are doing.

I am sure that your society with its free health care for all, guaranteed jobs for all, high pay for the workers and low pay for the owners, everyone is equal and no harming of cows will be doing perfectly well without us.

Yeh (5, Insightful)

sortius_nod (1080919) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727278)

I don't think I'll be grabbing that torrent...

Re:Yeh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727348)

You afraid of something, citizen? You live in a free country, no?

Re:Yeh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727450)

You go straight to the gulag comrade!

Re:Yeh (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727498)

It's against Federal law and state law to knowingly acquire stolen property.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Possession_of_stolen_goods#United_States [wikipedia.org]

Re:Yeh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727544)

it is also a free country thanks to the people whose emails they are exposing...

Re:Yeh (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727660)

Quite simply, the fact that this is happening indicates that the impacted are not capable of defending our freedoms or anything else according to modern realities of engagement. We may wish it were otherwise, but it is not. I'm sorry.

Re:Yeh (2)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727592)

A. Information falls under copyright law, and possession of such things is not legally considered theft. That distinction is absolutely relevant here.
B. Actually, it's not so relevant, because the government can't own copyrights - anything they own belongs to the people.

In no way, shape, or form would downloading this amount to possession of stolen goods. As a matter of fact, it's not even a crime. Hacking the computers to obtain the info was a crime. After that the cats out of the bag.

A Military Contractor Named Booz? (2)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727282)

That name itself just screams trustworthiness, doesn't it? I know I would happily hand over my secrets to someone named Booz to keep confidential and secured.

Re:A Military Contractor Named Booz? (1)

siddesu (698447) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727386)

But you would order your subordinates to do so if you're bossing a military outfit and your former boss is now bossing Booz and you both helped this contract to come about. Which is how these contracts happen anyway.

Re:A Military Contractor Named Booz? (4, Funny)

zill (1690130) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727418)

Not as ironic as Standard & Poor's.

Not Ironic - descriptive (1)

Roger W Moore (538166) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727996)

Not as ironic as Standard & Poor's.

That's not ironic its descriptive for a credit rating agency. Either you make their arbitrary standard you'll be poor...just ask the Greek Government.

Re:A Military Contractor Named Booz? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727824)

That name itself just screams trustworthiness, doesn't it?

It's his parents' fault, not his.

Not sure when this is going to end.. (2)

darkc0der (2215926) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727290)

Not sure when this is going to end. Maybe Operating Systems needs to be redesigned with built in security.

Re:Not sure when this is going to end.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727354)

Well, more like systems need to be redesigned without people.

Re:Not sure when this is going to end.. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727374)

Not sure when this is going to end.

You don't? I'll be glad to tell you.

Maybe Operating Systems needs to be redesigned with built in security.

Wait, it sounds to me like you do know. Just remember that "security" in this case doesn't mean "security from outside attackers" it means "security from users."

This is going to end with iOS. Programmers will be required to license their compiler and IDE from official government sources and only be allowed to enter code into "secure" disconnected computers. You will only be allowed to run programs that have been signed off by the Government, and you will have to provide your Government Internet License on demand.

Think I'm just paranoid? Remember, this is only the end state. We've got quite a few steps to make it there. But with things like iOS, and Sony being allowed to remove OtherOS without penalty, we can already see we're walking down that path.

And when you read stories like "Ex-NSA Chief Supports Separate Secure Internet [slashdot.org] ," you know where we're headed:

Expect more and more invasive laws and less and less anonymity. You will be required to give up your liberty in exchange for security, friend consumer.

Re:Not sure when this is going to end.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727540)

Someone mod this up -- for real. You can't prove a program absolutely secure any more than you can prove that a program will go on for ever. The only solution is to secure the entire hardware->compiler->program chain. I think I'd rather deal with the occasional hack over certain gvt snooping

Re:Not sure when this is going to end.. (1)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727608)

Think I'm just paranoid?

Yes, yes I do.

Re:Not sure when this is going to end.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727968)

That won't happen because there are existing regulatory models which are applicable, like that of consumer banking. Data security will become more like money security, in that (as more and more public sensitive data leaks occur) if you want to convince people to take their data from under their mattress, and put it in your bank, you'll need to meet certain standards and be subject to various regulations. Otherwise they can keep their data in house and take the risk and responsibility themselves.

Imagine a paypal-like service that handled usernames, passwords and maybe email addresses, but no financial information (maybe it already exists I haven't looked). You could use this service on your website and not have to worry about the security of the usernames and passwords of your subscribers because you don't store them.

Re:Not sure when this is going to end.. (1)

biodata (1981610) | more than 3 years ago | (#36728150)

Who is going to require that programmers license anything? The United Nations?

Re:Not sure when this is going to end.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727426)

built in security? the issue mostly seems to be user stupidity rather than security holes.... the only security that would prevent this would be the inability to login. Security and Ease of User are mutually exclusive.The more secure a system is, the harder it is to access/use. The problem comes when secure systems are breached because user's take shortcuts such as writing down passwords (example) or sharing information without first verifying the recipients credentials, which they do because they are frustrated, and usually just dont care. OTOH, if the system is easy to use, the user need not be bothered for an attacker to get in, as the security just isnt there. Until someone can design a system that is dead simple and conivenent for people to use, which IS STILL secure, this will continue (HINT THIS IS NOT POSSIBLE)

Re:Not sure when this is going to end.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36728014)

It will probably 'end' when the hackers give Congress enough motivation to finally pass a bill forcing CONUS ISPs to start using White lists and other restrictions, throttling the internet so much US residents will think they're running 28.8 modems instead of DSL/Cable.

Re:Not sure when this is going to end.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36728230)

Any operating system is going to give programmers enough rope to hang themselves with. Security is something that has to be considered when designing any system. If Anonymous was able to get passwords and not just hashes, then someone was not even considering security when writing the code. At a higher-level design, [multi-use] passwords should never be used as the sole login credentials for a remote service; it makes phishing/replay attacks too easy as well as simply hacking the server and copying the [possibly not even hashed] password database.

And this helps how? (0)

OverlordQ (264228) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727294)

~nt~

I don't get it. (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727330)

Anonymous has an agenda. That's fine. Originally they were after Scientology. If they've shifted focus, I have no problem with that. If they're trying to become another Wikileaks and expose government wrongdoing, that also makes sense.

What I don't understand is the wholesale posting of email addresses and passwords. What are they trying to accomplish? Military or not, these are email addresses of real people. This is no longer a crusade against "bad guys" whoever they may be, or even against bad activities. This is now a crusade against privacy. You know, the concept that keeps Anonymous, well, anonymous.

If we use exactly the same standard that they use to judge what should be public information, then the names, email addresses, and passwords of everyone who calls himself/herself Anonymous should be public as well.

Re:I don't get it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727398)

>implying anonymous a and anonymous b are actually the same anonymous

You're an idiot. I'm sorry, but read the definition of anonymous please.

Re:I don't get it. (1)

bstender (1279452) | more than 3 years ago | (#36728224)

exactly. could be the damn govt itself.

Re:I don't get it. (1)

Necroman (61604) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727452)

"Doing it for the Lulz."

I'd imagine it's the same reason many others publicize their work, for the notoriety and as a symbol of proof that they did it.

Re:I don't get it. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727522)

Anonymous has an agenda.

Oh, wow... Did Fox News tell you that?

Re:I don't get it. (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727556)

If we use exactly the same standard that they use to judge what should be public information, then the names, email addresses, and passwords of everyone who calls himself/herself Anonymous should be public as well.

Keep in mind that if Anonymous hackers happened to be in the military, they would have to expose their own passwords in this dump in order to avoid suspicion. So it's quite possible one or more of the hackers gave out their own info.

Re:I don't get it. (1)

Chucky_M (1708842) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727718)

If we use exactly the same standard that they use to judge what should be public information, then the names, email addresses, and passwords of everyone who calls himself/herself Anonymous should be public as well.

Ah you opened the door to the obligatory link :) http://xkcd.com/834/ [xkcd.com]

So... (2)

cozzbp (1845636) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727334)

Wouldn't it be safer just to download it with HTTP instead of torrent? That way, you don't have peers who are collecting IP addresses. Correct me if I'm wrong, because I really am not sure.

Re:So... (1)

Gohtar (1829140) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727394)

You can still collect IP addresses with an HTTP download.

Re:So... (1)

LordLucless (582312) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727520)

The hosting server can. An arbitrary client can't hop on and grab a list of everyone else downloading it at the same time, though.

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727424)

It would be very easy to take down the server, but it's much harder to take down a distributed tracker [wikimedia.org] . Also, you don't need to buy large quantities of traffic.

Re:So... (1)

pavon (30274) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727510)

With HTTP you have one peer - the HTTP server. With torrent you have many peers. In both cases they have access to your IP address. So it depends on how much you trust the server.

The reason they use torrent and not HTTP for stuff like this is because
A) they don't want to pay for the bandwidth of serving that file to thousands of people, nor to be able to be traced to that server.
B) Free HTTP sharing sites have bandwidth limits, rat people out, and are a general PITA.
C) With bitorrent there is less centralization so it is harder to stop distribution of the file.

Re:So... (1)

Wyatt Earp (1029) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727514)

Wouldn't it be best to use Tor to distribute it?

Re:So... (1, Informative)

MBGMorden (803437) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727648)

TOR is an end-user decision. Host it on the web and the people downloading it could use TOR, but you don't really specifically distribute via TOR.

What you're talking about is more akin to Freenet.

Re:So... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727684)

It's "Tor", and you can host anonymously with "hidden services".

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36728074)

you could distribute it as http published to a Tor hidden service... but then hardly anyone would see it.

Re:So... (1)

kodr (1777678) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727554)

You can still use TOR if you need to.

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727930)

No, safer way is to hack a WEP protected wireless, preferably in the downtown area. Then used it to grab the torrent.

that'll teach them a lesson not to use WEP

Not sure I see the point of this. (3, Insightful)

cvtan (752695) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727362)

How does releasing email addresses and passwords aid the fight for good and thwart evildoers? They should go back to the Scientology thing.

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (1)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727404)

I wonder how many are using good passwords.
I am betting not many.

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (3, Insightful)

Mashiki (184564) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727446)

Didn't you hear? The US is and in turn US army is full of evil. I mean just skip Iran murdering gay's, or the years of things going on in Sudan with religious persecution. Or the pakistan military being so corrupt that they've been infiltrated by terrorists. It's the US that's evil.

And yet the US is ignoring pakistan (1)

VAElynx (2001046) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727508)

And messing up Libya. I wonder what that tells about them.

Re:And yet the US is ignoring pakistan (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727646)

How is the US messing up Libya?

Re:And yet the US is ignoring pakistan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36728152)

By preventing a whole bunch of people from being slaughtered. Two countries is more messed up than one country, after all.

Re:And yet the US is ignoring pakistan (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727798)

what i like is that in Libya the US feels they NEED to help the people, however in north korea this seems the people seem to not be oppressed enough. right?

unless ofcourse the US has something to gain from another person power in Libya, or some big country is protecting north korea/the us already gains something from north korea.

Re:And yet the US is ignoring pakistan (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36728078)

Cheap Manufacturing.

South Korea and North Korea both operate factories in the north, producing cheap goods with slave labour. These goods are used to subvert labour rights movements and wage demands in South Korea, making South Korean goods cheap in the US.

And then there's China, they prop up the North Korean regime, because they realise that if it fails, it will be an unrealistic burden for them to support the large numbers of refugees that will poor into China from the failed state.

Finally, there's that whole thing that the US couldn't really do anything even if they wanted to. The North Koreans are indoctrinated from childhood to believe that the US are the evil imperialists that are going to come and rape and murder them, what better way to prove them right.

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (5, Insightful)

andb52 (854780) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727542)

The obvious logical fallacy with your statement is that, just because other regimes may be evil and corrupt, it does not mean that the US is not.

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (2)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727894)

The obvious logical fallacy with your statement is that, just because other regimes may be evil and corrupt, it does not mean that the US is not.

Especially since two of the three cases he cited the US was complicit by providing the country military aid (Sudan was the 6th largest recipient of US military aid and everybody knows about the billions given to Pakistan).

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (1)

andb52 (854780) | more than 3 years ago | (#36728080)

Well said, sir!

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (3, Insightful)

blackraven14250 (902843) | more than 3 years ago | (#36728188)

The US has had, and will have, bad presidents who muck around in shit they shouldn't be. That doesn't make the US an evil regime; it makes the people idiots for electing people willing to get us into sticky situations.

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (1)

Thruen (753567) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727486)

I wondered the same thing, and the only thing I came up with is that if the emails belong to high-level officials, we can go through their things on our own and dig up dirt while Anon looks for more holes. Yeah, I know, that's pretty thin. I think it's more plausible that it hasn't been as easy to dig up dirt as it used to be and they're releasing things like this so we don't forget about them.

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727566)

They did this with an incredibly simple attack that any script kiddie could do. They even boast this in the torrent. China/Iran would otherwise silently sit on this data and it is likely they already are.

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (2)

LordLucless (582312) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727580)

How does releasing email addresses and passwords aid the fight for good and thwart evildoers?

Maybe next time, they won't hire contractors relying on porous security, able to be penetrated by any script kiddy with a modem, increasing the security of the US Defense Force in the process. But more likely, they'll just send goons after script kiddies - goon security is easier than real security.

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (1)

gtirloni (1531285) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727594)

It helps to destroy the false sense of security that tons of dollars spent on hardening systems seem to give to everybody. It also keeps govt/mil on their toes and who can be against some additional scrutiny on public entities? Remember: your money. It goes to show that 'whitehat' security companies are mostly clueless and are not delivering on their promise of security. It shows that they have some ethical problems in dealing with the information they are given (or not) access to to their own advantage. How many whitehat security companies were exposed in the past few months? Lots of high profile ones.

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (1)

_Sprocket_ (42527) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727874)

It goes to show that 'whitehat' security companies are mostly clueless and are not delivering on their promise of security.

Or it shows that lumbering bureaucracies have fundamental disadvantages that can not be overcome by bolting on additional layers of bureaucracy (read: compliance).

Re:Not sure I see the point of this. (5, Insightful)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 3 years ago | (#36728234)

How does releasing email addresses and passwords aid the fight for good and thwart evildoers?

If LulzSec/Anonymous can do it, so can our enemies and allies.

The fact that these guys are so prolific and haven't been caught yet, strongly implies that others have done the same thing.
And probably gotten away with it because they didn't announce it to the world.

The fact is, this will go on for as long as LulzSec/Anonymous feels like doing it.
Between government agencies and contractors, there's just too much low hanging fruit.

BUT, all things being equal, I'd rather it was blackhats humiliating us in public instead of China silently doing it for economic gain or espionage.

IT'S THE FUCKIN KOMMIES !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727392)

Or Komics !! Or Kovaks !! I can't tell !! I won't tell.

Conspiracies... (1)

WaffleMonster (969671) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727416)

I just can't help but think what has changed recently which might explain the flood of all these high profile attacks.

A critical mass of stupidity? (OWASP greatest fails)

TLA false flagging for 1984 legislation?

Two hacking groups (lulz and anon) with nothing better to do?

Whatever the reason I hope people are taking this opportunity to wake up.

Re:Conspiracies... (1)

mandelbr0t (1015855) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727574)

This is what happens when a government oppresses its people for too long -- anarchy. Obama wants people to believe he can control the Internet, but he can't. "The more you tighten your grasp, Tarkan, the more the galaxies slip through your fingers."

Re:Conspiracies... (1, Insightful)

atriusofbricia (686672) | more than 3 years ago | (#36728112)

This is what happens when a government oppresses its people for too long -- anarchy. Obama wants people to believe he can control the Internet, but he can't. "The more you tighten your grasp, Tarkan, the more the galaxies slip through your fingers."

Er... what oppression are you referring to? Or is this another case of someone who has little idea what real oppression is like trying to say that he US is sooooo evil and oppressive because... oh.. I don't know.. something or other.. Not saying it is perfect and hasn't gotten less free over time.. just saying that if you think living in the US is living under oppression then you don't know what oppression really is.

Err, Anonymous? (1)

bbbaldie (935205) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727474)

The recording industry really, really7 sux. Evil city Their RIAA, too. Please, go after them. These guys are on our side.

Re:Err, Anonymous? (1)

bbbaldie (935205) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727598)

Sorry for the incoherence. You guys should make us proofread first ;-) The recording industry really, really sux. Evil city. Their beloved RIAA, too. Please go after them. These guys are on our side.

Re:Err, Anonymous? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727626)

No they are not on our side, they're on their own side, serving their corporate overlords. When there's an invading force, and the armed troops aren't on the other side of the planet, maybe you'll have a point? I see little to gain from publishing email address for jar heads, but the private contractors making trillions out of "our" wars deserve extensive investigations. After all, if they've nothing to hide, what's the problem?

They sure have some bawlz. (2)

Qbertino (265505) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727488)

You got to hand it to them: These blackhat/lulz Hacker types sure do have some balls. I'd be scared shitless to pull such a stunt, even if I *did* have the information. I'd be super-ultra-extreme paranoid and cover my tracks many times over. I actually wouldn't know where to start when attemting that.

Probably something like this:
1. Multiple levels of undetected low-profile unix breakins to start off a botnet.
2. Multiple levels of botnets on top of that to finally hack the systems involved in the attack and breach, using totally different malware strategies as to go undetected among the usual hodge-podge of criminal botnets.
3. Low-profile IDS on all levels to scout for detection or suspicious tracing activity 24/7.
4. Encrypted, low-profile bit-by-bit intrusion and trickle-data-grab over weeks or months.
5. Complete rollback and teardown of the entire network with IDS remaining on the last lines of defense (see 1.) ready to send out signals if someone comes for you.
6. Wait. A long time.
7. Release data and press release over simularly complex channels.

Imagine what happens to you if the CIA or some other 3-letter blackops finds out where you're at. Your life is pretty much over then.

Re:They sure have some bawlz. (2)

Shark (78448) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727582)

This type of knowledge has been deemed dangerous. Please report to your local intelligence agency for evaluation and risk assessment.

Re:They sure have some bawlz. (1)

Normal Dan (1053064) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727604)

Nah, you don't need anything this complex. You can hack in from your home network with nothing special and even leave your email address and contact information. As long as you don't brag about what you did, they have no way of tracking you. Trust me on this. There's nothing to be worried about... nothing to worry about.... worry about... worry...

Re:They sure have some bawlz. (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727630)

Tell that to the majority of Qaeda members who've been making a mockery of the CIA for decades.

More likely is that if any of these crackers are even caught, the CIA will make a deal to coopt them instead of destroy them. The CIA likes nothing better than skilled makers of mayhem - except perhaps mayhem itself.

Re:They sure have some bawlz. (1)

Jerry (6400) | more than 3 years ago | (#36728114)

Your plan would fail at this point:
"1. Multiple levels of undetected low-profile unix breakins to start off a botnet."

Two years ago it took some bad guys 6 months to hack into only 700 Linux boxes [blogspot.com] because they had to do it manually. Just sending an email with an infected packet won't work on Linux the way it worked to create the most recently discovered Windows botfarm, which contained over 4,500,000 Windows zombies.

nuke in exchange for ground up security? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727502)

If a nuclear explosion would cause the government to fund a free software development initiative to ensure the security of systems I think I would want it to occur. The insanity of writing insecure programs and fixing bugs later is not the way to design software. It should be written from the ground up with security in mind. Updates adding new features should not be applied without serious review and consideration. AND features should be modular so that components aren't needed aren't installed and thus can't be exploited.

Re:nuke in exchange for ground up security? (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727610)

That's right - the certainty of vast damage, perhaps triggering armageddon, is worth the annoyances, risks, and comparatively tiny damages of fixing security bugs.

You're an idiot.

Here rapidshare links (-1, Troll)

dotpotttt (2366294) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727506)

Found on this blog [thoughts.com]

Re:Here rapidshare links (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727942)

This is the real deal guys. Don't use torrents, or the peers will have your IP. Download from the RapidShare link over Tor.

Re:Here rapidshare links (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36728094)

Yeah, don't click the link.

Re:Here rapidshare links (0)

E.I.A (2303368) | more than 3 years ago | (#36728170)

Why the fuck would you post something like that? Warning to all: scatology in its worst form. Do not look.

Re:Here rapidshare links (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36728176)

WTF? where do you get turds that big?

Don't be dense. (1)

_KiTA_ (241027) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727532)

Don't be dense. This is Lulzsec. They're just calling themselves Anonymous to get some form of protection.

yes keep it up and intesne (0)

gedw99 (1597337) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727552)

Nice work guys !! Stick it to them and keep it up... wars suck and government just love to have them

Age of Assholes (2)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727590)

On the one hand, the military and its contractors are assholes for exposing tens of thousands (and surely more) of military people's accounts to cracking and outing.

On the other hand, Anonymous is assholes cracking and outing tens of thousands (and surely more) of military people's accounts.

That's both hands assholes. Have you noticed that everyone in public life these days is an asshole?

Re:Age of Assholes (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727866)

Well, they're mostly american military people, right? The USA is the aggressively militaristic and expansionist empire builder at the moment (sure, russia and china may be trying, but the USA is the only one really doing it). It's not all that clear that it's a bad thing in global humanitarian terms to place the american military in greater danger. (If you're american and under the delusion you're "keeping the world safe from the terrorists", well, you aren't, you ARE the terrorists. Scary door music, etc.)

Nothing as dangerous as ignorance in action (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727680)

Russia says, "Thank you."
China says, "Thank you."
You are known by your chosen friends.

False flag (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727774)

The government is doing this to incense people enough that they can put forth draconian laws about hacking and internet use.

You know, like how we used 9/11 to start multiple wars.

send in seal team 6! (1)

Joe The Dragon (967727) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727786)

send in seal team 6!

Just because you can, doesn't mean you should..... (0)

Proudrooster (580120) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727790)

Anonymous... why would you make this move? This serves no purpose but to aggravate the military and focus even more attention on P2P. I suspect the Lulzsec kiddies are now a rogue branch of anonymous.

Re:Just because you can, doesn't mean you should.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36728028)

I suspect the Lulzsec kiddies are now a rogue branch of anonymous.

 
No, this is Anonymous. Not that other Anonymous full of assholes you'd like to pin this on, to keep thinking the first Anonymous was any better.
 
They're all assholes. This is what they do.

The bigger picture (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727806)

Look, yeah sure not much good can come from posting those accounts...

BUT If they were able to get the account information.. Well then you have to assume that other countries' cyber warriors (whatever you want to call them) also had that information and potentially more.

It the very least it brings (the lack of) security to the publics mind as well as
Govt/Corps. Personally, I think the illusion of security does much more harm than good.

false flag (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727814)

false flag ops designed to facilitate a locked down internet.

What these guys are doing now is mush more serious (1)

Stan92057 (737634) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727906)

What these guys are doing now is mush more serious and may get them killed instead of jailed. They are playing Espionage Vs the US military. Selling,or giving or using for there own benefit military data that doesn't belong to them might get them a date with a firing line. And guess what, im all for it. Just because you CAN do something doesn't make it the right thing to do. If you want to play you better be ready to pay and some of theses guys might pay an ultimate price. Time will tell

So now (1)

Prune (557140) | more than 3 years ago | (#36727954)

I guess Allen Hamilton will really be hitting the Booz!

Do America a favor, and start hacking the Chinese. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36727976)

I have no problem pointing out the fuckedup'ness of our stupid fucking country... because it is our country...

However. I would like to see Anon start tackling OTHER countries, because America is not the old land of BS. It is also every other nation who we compete with.

"Pearl Harbor" (2, Interesting)

sarku (2047704) | more than 3 years ago | (#36728174)

Didn't some top ranking official recently say something about an internet "Pearl Harbor?" You see, this isn't Anonymous, or any other basement hackers looking for lulz in all the wrong places. This is the fucking government working to tighten control over the internet.
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