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Russia Launches Delayed Radiotelescope

Unknown Lamer posted about 3 years ago | from the us-declares-satellite-communist-deception dept.

Space 35

An anonymous reader writes "Yesterday the Radioastron Spektr-R satellite was successfully launched from Baikonur cosmodrome. It became first launch of an astronomical satellite in 25 years for Russia. Its mission is to search the Universe for black holes, quasars, pulsars, and other mysterious objects. Using a highly elliptical orbit of around 340,000 km it will conduct interferometer observations (in conjunction with the global ground radio telescope network) with the extraordinarily high angular resolution. The project's life expectancy is 5 years but its creators are hoping for it to work at least twice as long."

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35 comments

In non-Soviet Russia (3, Funny)

elrous0 (869638) | about 3 years ago | (#36814098)

Spy satellite turned *away* from earth.

Re:In non-Soviet Russia (1, Funny)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 3 years ago | (#36814142)

How else would they spy on capitalist Plutonian pigs?

Re:In non-Soviet Russia (1)

flaming error (1041742) | about 3 years ago | (#36814266)

So that's what they're up to... Plutonium. And bacon. Mmmm.

Re:In non-Soviet Russia (1)

flaming error (1041742) | about 3 years ago | (#36814168)

"I fart in your general direction!"

My Very Own Original Nigger Joke (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36814322)

Why do niggers like to dress in sports jerseys? So they can pretend to have a job skill!

SPECTRE? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36814212)

Anyone else think of the SPECTRE (SPecial Executive for Counter-intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge and Extortion) organization from the James Bond movies when they read the name of the satellite?

Re:SPECTRE? (1)

Trent Hawkins (1093109) | about 3 years ago | (#36815364)

no, but I think they missed the perfect opportunity to name it Spekr N7

Re:SPECTRE? (1)

Cyberax (705495) | about 3 years ago | (#36818280)

"Spektr" is just Russian for "spectrum" (nominative case).

media continues to downplay planetary genocide (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36814244)

preferring yet another sideshow where murderers prosecute vandals.

it's scheduled to get even whackier?

Declaration: July 4, 2011

1. We the people believe that the crimes committed by prior
administrations is unfinished business. Those who committed these crimes
need to be brought to justice and justice needs to be done. We repudiate
the current administration for allowing these criminals to avoid
accountability and we pledge to right this wrong.

2. We the people believe that the current administration has also
committed grievous crimes, including murder, war crimes, crimes against
humanity, various crimes against the peoples of other nations and crimes
against citizens of the United States, including direct attacks on the US
Constitution and the rule of law, a general failure to preserve, protect,
and defend the Constitution and what it stands for. Those who have
committed these crimes also need to be brought to justice and the
Constitution restored to its rightful place in the world.

3. We the people believe that unconscionable economic crimes have also
been perpetrated against the American people and other peoples around the
world. These crimes were aided and abetted by US government officials who
failed in their duty to honor the trust given to them. Our elected
officials, including members of both houses of Congress and the President,
have systematically betrayed the people by selling their allegiance to
private interests at the expense of the People. They are fiduciaries of
the highest order and they have betrayed our trust in the most egregious
manner possible. They have lied to us, cheated us, and hidden behind walls
secrecy in order to perpetrate frauds on us; ignored basic principles of
fairness and decency. They have squandered the people’s wealth in exchange
for favors. They have aided and abetted leaders of corporations and other
financial operatives to perpetrate frauds against the People and they have
obstructed justice by refusing to pursue those who broke the law in doing
so. These frauds shall not stand. Those who are responsible shall be made
accountable.

4. We the people believe our government has pursued economic policies
designed to benefit the wealthy few at the expense of the many and we
repudiate these policies and those who set them in motion. The tax
policies of the Bush administration are odious, unfair, and fraudulent in
every way, as were the bank bailouts. No business is too big to fail and
no person is so important as to be above the law. Innocent people have
lost their jobs and well being while individuals and financial
institutions have not been held accountable for their crimes, nor have
those who were cheated been properly compensated.

Damn the English Language (1)

gblackwo (1087063) | about 3 years ago | (#36814264)

I read that as:

Russian (adj) launches (noun) delayed (verb) radiotelescope (noun)

instead of

Russia (noun) launches (verb) delayed (adj) radiotelescope (noun)

My brain inserting one little letter can change so much!

Re:Damn the English Language (1)

Anderspawn (2368908) | about 3 years ago | (#36814376)

There's also the matter of "It's mission is to search...."

Re:Damn the English Language (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36814752)

In Soviet Russia, launches delayed YOU.

Well done (2)

serbianheretic (1108833) | about 3 years ago | (#36814286)

Well done Russia. Finally some competition in space research area. Maybe this will also get NASA some badly needed funds. Then again, war in Afghanistan/Iraq/Libya/... is more pressing. And making rich richer by reducing the tax they are paying. They need their gold plated Lamborghinis after all, silver plating just won't do.

Re:Well done (2)

gblackwo (1087063) | about 3 years ago | (#36814304)

Russia never stopped being a leader in astronautics. But nicely done slipping your agenda in on a compliment.

Re:Well done (3, Informative)

elrous0 (869638) | about 3 years ago | (#36814360)

Shit, they CREATED astronautics.

Cosmonautics ;-) (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36814724)

no text

Re:Well done (2, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36814496)

You're confusing 'astronautics' and 'space research' - the latter is usually taken to mean space science.
Russia's space program overall has remained strong, but its space physics and space astronomy program has been moribund for two decades
(and the rest of their space science only a little better)
It's wonderful to see them back in the game.

How dare you criticize your betters, peasant? (1, Insightful)

Benfea (1365845) | about 3 years ago | (#36815220)

Why should Paris Hilton's pet chihuahua suffer wearing cheaper jewelery just because some undeserving peasant wants to go to school, or doesn't want his child to starve, or doesn't want to drown in a flood? If peasants really want those things, they can get them for themselves! Stop punishing the chihuahua just because you're a lazy bum who thinks the government has the right to force innocent corporations to not poison toddlers! Commies! you're all a buncha commies! [/conservolibertarianstrawman]

Re:Well done (3, Insightful)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 3 years ago | (#36815232)

Well done Russia. Finally some competition in space research area.

Here in this reality, there's never been a lack of competition - the ESA, among many others, has been launching research birds for decades. Hell, even Canada has launched a small space telescope [astro.ubc.ca] .
 

Maybe this will also get NASA some badly needed funds.

NASA has plenty of funds. What NASA doesn't have is consistently competent management, accounting, or engineering. Yes, engineering. If they don't do their jobs rights, including cost and risk estimation and development planning, then the others can't do theirs either. (Yes, bean counting is part of engineering.) Exacerbating the impact of NASA's inability to consistently and reasonably project cost and schedule is Congress and the general public insisting that each and every NASA project be groundbreaking and cutting edge, be on budget and on schedule, and have a 100% success rate. (In the real world, you get to pick two as the saying goes.)
 
When you expect an agency to accomplish three impossible things before breakfast (and NASA is nearly unique among US government agencies in this respect) - you're setting the stage for problems. It shouldn't surprise anyone therefore when problems regularly occur.

Re:Well done (1)

elrous0 (869638) | about 3 years ago | (#36822888)

NASA doesn't have is consistently competent management, accounting, or engineering.

Yeah, but their PR department is second-to-none.

Re:Well done (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | about 3 years ago | (#36825308)

Spot on sadly enough...

Much delayed VLBI satellite (3, Interesting)

mbone (558574) | about 3 years ago | (#36814428)

VLBI fans, rejoice ! Really, after the Japanese VSOP [nasa.gov] mission, it has been a long wait for this one (first proposed in the 1980's). Together with antennas on the ground, RadioAstron should provide the highest resolution of any human telescope, anywhere, at any wavelength. (Here [skyrocket.de] are some more technical details.)

The USA pioneered the use of this technology (the first space VLBI [sciencedirect.com] , in the 1980's, used a NASA TDRSS communication satellite that was underused after the Challenger disaster), and Irwin Shapiro suggested putting VLBI terminals on the Moon well before that, but here is another case where the USA can't seem to actually get its stuff into the orbit.

Poor wording... (1)

tommy2tone (2357022) | about 3 years ago | (#36814504)

"Using a highly elliptical orbit of around 340,000 km"

this in no way describes the eccentricity of the orbit. It simply tells us that the apogee is 340,000 km...

Re:Poor wording... (1)

vlm (69642) | about 3 years ago | (#36814726)

"Using a highly elliptical orbit of around 340,000 km"

this in no way describes the eccentricity of the orbit. It simply tells us that the apogee is 340,000 km...

Even worse it could be the perigee and then it flings itself out to Mars. That would not be a complete waste of rocket fuel; keep it far away from near earth interference like geosynchronous sats.

Re:Poor wording... (1)

tommy2tone (2357022) | about 3 years ago | (#36814976)

If that were the case, maybe a couple of guys could hitch a ride, and Russia would win the space race to Mars...

Re:Poor wording... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36815102)

They already did [vodo.net] !

Re:Poor wording... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36836070)

It could be the circumference of the orbit.

The Russians??!?! (3, Insightful)

Frangible (881728) | about 3 years ago | (#36814858)

I'm shocked. If only we could form some sort of giant national space agency to compete with Russia in space. Nah, it'd be expensive, and we'd probably need a bunch of German scientists or something.

Re:The Russians??!?! (1)

timeOday (582209) | about 3 years ago | (#36815280)

I don't understand your comment. Just because the shuttle program ended doesn't mean NASA has stopped exploring space. This Russian mission is un-manned, with scientific objectives - just the type of thing NASA is doing more of [nasa.gov] :

On July 16, the Dawn spacecraft begins a year-long visit to the large asteroid Vesta to help us understand the earliest chapter of our solar system's history. In August, the Juno spacecraft will launch to investigate Jupiter's origins, structure, and atmosphere. The September launch of the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project is a critical first step in building a next-generation Earth-monitoring satellite system.

Re:The Russians??!?! (1)

Frangible (881728) | about 3 years ago | (#36818200)

It was a sarcastic comment along the lines of "If only there were giant machines that could see inside the human body" from House MD.

Not completely true, but just to illustrate a point. Yes, I know NASA is still around... but things have changed for science funding in America without the cold war driving government funding, and not for the better, although I am glad the cold war is over and have no issues with Russia.

Re:The Russians??!?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36823600)

It was a retarded statement.

Authentic, my camarades! (2)

Bipoha (540839) | about 3 years ago | (#36815354)

There's nothing more authentic than reading about the Russian space program, and missing a grammatical article:

"It became first launch..."

This totally made my day, and I couldn't continue reading it without a Russian accent.

Re:Authentic, my camarades! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#36820816)

Funny thing - I am, being a Russian myself, find it entertaining enough to sometimes read space-related news with the voice of Jean-Luc... I mean, Patrik Stewart. Cultures mixing together, heh.

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