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Lenovo Unveils Android ThinkPad and IdeaPad Slates

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the everyone-likes-new-stuff dept.

Android 132

MojoKid writes "While many tablets are slimming down (and losing valuable ports), Lenovo's new ThinkPad Tablet is on the bulky side with the hope that business professionals appreciate it. The Tablet is a biz-oriented slate with a 10.1" panel, a Tegra 2 (1GHz) chip, and most importantly, a full-size USB port. Lenovo is also introducing a $99 Keyboard Folio case, which will wrap around the device to keep it safe, but also provides a full QWERTY keyboard and an optical trackpad. It features Android 3.1, access to Lenovo's app store, a 2MP front-facing camera, 1080p video output, Wi-Fi, 3G, 16/32/64GB of storage, and a 5MP rear camera. The company also introduced a consumer targeted slate called the IdeaPad K1, and it sports a 13.3mm thin form-factor that focuses on entertainment and consumption."

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Price? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36826716)

At that price, why wouldnt i just buy the thinkpad edge or something? looks to be about the same size + weight. or that low end X series?

Re:Price? (1)

zget (2395308) | more than 3 years ago | (#36826908)

$500 sounds like a low end laptop. I bought myself Clevo laptop last year that cost $3000 because I was traveling a lot. But it's freaking awesome and is still working great. However, it was 17.1" and obviously a bit too large to use comfortably on flights. I could easily think about getting ThinkPad Tablet for those flights and also to use comfortably from bed and sofa. I was already thinking about getting iPad, but this really looks better and more business oriented too.

Re:Price? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36826986)

$500 sounds like a low end laptop. I bought myself Clevo laptop last year that cost $3000 because I was traveling a lot. But it's freaking awesome and is still working great. However, it was 17.1" and obviously a bit too large to use comfortably on flights. I could easily think about getting ThinkPad Tablet for those flights and also to use comfortably from bed and sofa. I was already thinking about getting iPad, but this really looks better and more business oriented too.

So, you bought an expensive $3000 laptop just last year and are glad it is "still working great"?! Talk about lowered expectations.

Re:Price? (1)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828172)

$500 sounds like a low end laptop. I bought myself Clevo laptop last year that cost $3000 because I was traveling a lot. But it's freaking awesome and is still working great. However, it was 17.1" and obviously a bit too large to use comfortably on flights. I could easily think about getting ThinkPad Tablet for those flights and also to use comfortably from bed and sofa. I was already thinking about getting iPad, but this really looks better and more business oriented too.

So, you bought an expensive $3000 laptop just last year and are glad it is "still working great"?! Talk about lowered expectations.

I bought a relatively expensive laptop almost 8 years ago, and it's still working great, too! I regard this as good value...
It has a gorgeous 17" 1920x1200 screen (not that shortscreen 1920x1080 that infests the market nowadays) with every pixel still working. Running Lubuntu with compiz goodness and adequate performance/speed, despite its lowly specs: 1.6GHz Celeron, maxed out with 1GB RAM, ATI Mobility Radeon 9600 graphics. Still using its original battery which gives about 2 hours with fairly bright screen and network in use. This laptop is unlikely to be replaced until the shortscreen nonsense leaves us - those extra 120 vertical pixels are actually quite valuable.

FWIW, it's an early Sony VAIO VGN-A117S. From the days when Sony hardware meant something (in a positive sense).

Re:Price? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36826996)

Battery life? I don't think you'll get 8 hours out of them without bulking them up with a slice battery.

ARM SoCs generally beat x86 more on idle than under load, so if it'll be used constantly, the difference may not be all that much, but for anything where you want to keep it powered up for occasional use, this will kick its ass.

Re:Price? (2)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827084)

This tablet is not x86, it is powered by a Tegra 2 ARM CPU.

Re:Price? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36827858)

Yeah. Which is why I suggested "battery life" as a reason to get this ARM-powered tablet instead of the x86 options GGP was suggesting.

Idiot.

Re:Price? (1)

C0vardeAn0nim0 (232451) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828116)

my motorola xoom uses the same tegra 2 chip (tegras are dual-core ARM chips + GPU) and it gets 10 hours of video playback using _software_ codec. using optimized video files than play using hardware acceleration, i get 12 hours out of it. web browsing, i can get a comfy 12 hours too.

using sparingly, i got a whole weekend visiting my mother and still had some 10% of the charge when i got home.

tablets are great on the battery side. i don't know how much one can get from an ipad2, but being apple, the number might be even better.

Re:Price? (2)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827104)

At that price, why wouldnt i just buy the thinkpad edge or something? looks to be about the same size + weight. or that low end X series?

Er, because the are two completely different things? A laptop does not deliver the experience a tablet does and vice versa. How many laptops weigh less than a pound and a half yet deliver 10 hours of battery life? How many laptops for 500 dollars have capacitive multi-touch screens? How many laptops at that price have zero moving parts to break? How many laptops are an "always on" device that will continue to get your email and notifications and perform tasks even when the unit is on "standby"? Tablets in this class have built-in accelerometers and GPS, front and rear cameras, etc. And on and on.

Re:Price? (1)

PvtVoid (1252388) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827260)

How many laptops weigh less than a pound and a half yet deliver 10 hours of battery life? How many laptops for 500 dollars have capacitive multi-touch screens? How many laptops at that price have zero moving parts to break? How many laptops are an "always on" device that will continue to get your email and notifications and perform tasks even when the unit is on "standby"? Tablets in this class have built-in accelerometers and GPS, front and rear cameras, etc. And on and on.

Man, that sounds awesome! Can I get one with a keyboard?

Re:Price? (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827290)

No problem [asus.com] at all!

Re:Price? (1)

scott666 (1008567) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828602)

No problem [asus.com] at all!

I have this thing and it's amazing. I get about 24 hours out of it (with the keyboard dock) from full charge to nothing (made it through a 3-day weekend with medium use).

Re:Price? (1)

symbolset (646467) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828798)

Agreed. I use mine a lot and the battery just goes and goes. I bought the keyboard but frankly used it only twice. An amazing bunch of tech for only $399 for the tablet.

Re:Price? (1)

kelemvor4 (1980226) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827634)

Yes, from TFA the keyboard is $99.

Re:Price? (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827474)

This tablet weighs 4.5lb.

Re:Price? (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827696)

This tablet weighs 4.5lb.

Are you trolling?

There are, of course, differences. The ThinkPad Tablet is clearly targeted at a business audience. So where the IdeaPad is all smooth lines and curves, the 1.57-pound, 14mm-deep ThinkPad Tablet is all black and features squared off corners and more visible buttons.

Re:Price? (1)

AvitarX (172628) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827830)

Didn't they drop the x120?

It's a feature! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36826718)

This tablet's 4.5 lb weight is not a design flaw. It's a feature!

Re:It's a feature! (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827864)

What 4.5 pound weight? It weighs 1.57 pounds.

barcodes (1)

slartibartfastatp (613727) | more than 3 years ago | (#36826730)

Then it may read barcodes. My company is stuck on ex-symbol, now-motorola MC50 and alikes, overpriced and underperforming for today's standards. We're seeking an alternative for them, but barcode reading on iPad and such devices are clumsy, not suitable for production. Hope that full-size USB can power devices.

Re:barcodes (1)

Intron (870560) | more than 3 years ago | (#36826766)

It may power them for a while, but the power is coming from the unit's batteries. Just factor battery life in when you look at the choices.

Why not use a hardware scanner with an iPad (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#36826796)

barcode reading on iPad and such devices are clumsy, not suitable for production.

I don't think you are going to be much happier with the built in cameras on the new device then...

The solution is to use a dedicated hardware reader, such as the Scanfob [serialio.com] . There may be others for the iPad as well, there are a number of choices for the iPhone that are integrated cases.

The iPad does offer a USB port dongle but like you say it can't really power devices.

Re:Why not use a hardware scanner with an iPad (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36826890)

Read the sentence after the one you quoted :)

Re:Why not use a hardware scanner with an iPad (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827988)

Read the link I posted to an external reader that is self powered...

Re:barcodes (1)

VIPERsssss (907375) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828476)

Try an HP slate w/ a bluetooth scanner. Ours runs Win7 and our ERP system.

So what does it offer over an iPad? (0, Flamebait)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#36826856)

The iPad2 already has:

USB port (via dongle)
HDMI out
A number of third party cases with integrated keyboards
Rear and front camera (admittedly slightly lower in resolution)
better battery life under REAL conditions (this states eight under "ideal").

The iPad is far lighter too. And the idea of including an optical trackpad so you can "move around the device" is NUTS on a touchscreen system.

So what is going to be the draw? Especially for a business, where the third party aftermarket is much more extensive for the iPad?

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (0)

Missing.Matter (1845576) | more than 3 years ago | (#36826970)

Dongle Dongle Dongle. Now with the new Mac Mini, the CD drive has turned into just another dongle you need to buy. In the future, all Apple products will have exactly one (proprietary) port. Of course you can add any functionality you want, just buy the dongle (at $39.99 a pop)! Want an ethernet port? Dongle! USB? Dongle! Collect them all! Trade them with your friends! Is there anyone who sells Apple dongle cases yet? I might want to patent that idea.

At any rate... how exactly do you use HDMI out and USB at the same time?

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36827042)

And by "one (proprietary) port," you mean "an industry-standard Thunderbolt / LightPeak port, which will be used to daisy-chain all the peripherals which you can't connect wirelessly," right?

Because when you predict that in the future, technology will function exactly the same as it does today, you look kind of retarded.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36827088)

Wait, are you honestly suggesting that having 1 port to daisy-chain all of your devices is ideal? Do you really want to have to have to unplug devices just to remove one in the middle of your chain?

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827122)

Even if Thunderbolt comes to the iPad (which I highly doubt) you will still have to buy a $50 cable for each device.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827170)

Are you claiming you can use any old Thunderbolt accessory with an ipad2, because I don't believe that for a second. I'm sure they check for Apple's approved chip/license key before talking to an accessory just like they do for iPhone and iPad 1.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

cyn1c77 (928549) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827348)

And by "one (proprietary) port," you mean "an industry-standard Thunderbolt / LightPeak port, which will be used to daisy-chain all the peripherals which you can't connect wirelessly," right?

By industry-standard, I assume that you mean "Apple industry standard!" Firewire 800 was good example of that: It was neat, worked well, and no one except Apple really adopted it. This limited its usefulness in contrast to the actual industry standard that was USB. Hopefully Thunderbolt is more readily adopted, but companies are already complaining about the price associated with the connector (much like they did with Firewire).

Because when you predict that in the future, technology will function exactly the same as it does today, you look kind of retarded.

There is no doubt that there have been many connector-based improvements have really occurred since USB 1.0, but have they really been worth the cost increase associated with (1) buying new connectors, (2) buying new interface cards or computers to handle the new protocol, (3) paying for proprietary dongles? I would argue no, especially since software bloat seems to have matched the bandwidth increase.

There's no doubt that I get a better screen resolution with my DVI/HDMI/DisplayPort cables, but my eyes can't see details that small anyway. And cables that used to cost $10 are now $50-$100.

This post-USB1.0 cable technology may be a win for the computer enthusiast, those of us with specialized needs and the companies, but so far I would argue it has been a big and expensive fail for the average computer user.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827514)

And cables that used to cost $10 are now $50-$100.

If you cannot find DVI/HDMI/DisplayPort cables for under $10 you're buying them from the wrong places.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

Pope (17780) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827102)

I haven't used the optical drives in my MBP and Mini in years. I have used a FireWire external optical, since it's far faster and more reliable than either of the ones in the computers I hook it up to.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828522)

I replaced the optical drive in my ThinkPad T510 with a ultrabay caddy that holds the stock hard drive. The stock hard drive was swapped out with an SSD. I like that the ultrabay is hot-swappable for the times I may want to burn a disc too. In the next few years we'll probably see the optical drive start to go the way of the floppy, Software will probably become a download only sort of thing, Apple is already doing this with the new version of their OS.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827280)

Gotta buy 'em all, gotta buy 'em AAAALLLLL! DongleMon!

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

sharkey (16670) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827886)

Sounds like a huge market for Silly DongleZ. Collect dogs and horses and goatse^W Apple Consumers!

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36826980)

The advantages are:

USB port without needing to worry about a dongle (losing it, forgetting it, carrying it around)
HDMI out without a proprietary cord/dongle
Higher resolution camera
Android (a back button!, I don't know how you live without a back button).

I don't see it anywhere, but the USB port also might be able to power devices, which would *greatly* increase ease of use and potential use cases.

You also can't judge the trackpad until you know what it does. ThinkPad users are often considered strange for favoring certain pointing devices (the red stick), but they still find it useful.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

Americano (920576) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827066)

USB port also might be able to power devices, which would *greatly* increase ease of use and potential use cases.

Yes, instead of getting 5 hours of battery life, your new accessories can activate the Lenovo ThinkPad Tablet's "paperweight mode" in half the time! That's a tremendous speed increase!

A USB port powering external devices means that those devices are draining your Tablet's battery that much faster. I don't see that being a very compelling use case.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

LBArrettAnderson (655246) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827160)

Wow. Your vision is incredible. Is getting anything less than 100% battery life a deal-breaker for you? Maybe there are people who do consider it a compelling use case. I can think of a whole bunch of powered devices that would use a very small amount of electricity compared to what the tablet is using. I'm willing to bet that there are even use cases where it'd be worth it to cut battery time in half.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

Americano (920576) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827312)

"Optimal" conditions: 8 hours of battery life. This means it realistically can be expected to get 4-6 hours of "real-world" usage. Plug in a couple of peripherals and reduce your charge time to 2-3 hours of actual use - far short of the length of a typical workday.

This is targeted at "professional" and "workplace" usage. If the point is mobility, why would you consider being tethered to a charger every couple hours a value-add? Do you think any user is going to consider it a good thing that they have to constantly return to a charging station and charge their "mobile" device because their USB-powered peripherals are draining the battery so fast?

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

LBArrettAnderson (655246) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827432)

You are making a lot of assumptions there.

One, you assume that there are no use cases that don't cut battery life in half (since this is the basis of your argument, you shouldn't give "worst case" scenarios).

Two, you assume that it needs to last (in use) for an entire work day. I don't think I need to explain why this is a bad assumption. Maybe someone just needs to around with a USB barcode scanner taking inventory. I worked at a place that did this (though they used a laptop with a USB barcode scanner. And by the way, most laptops don't get more than a few hours of battery life).

Again, you can't argue against something's worst-case scenario. People don't look at buying something and consider how horrible it would be for a worst-case use case. They consider how useful it would be for what they need to be done. This doesn't always involve using it 8 hours a day. It also doesn't always involve high-wattage peripherals.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827536)

The specs on Lenovo.com say 8 hours of battery while on wifi.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

mikechant (729173) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827876)

Don't know about US equivalents (domestic air flights I guess) but in the UK internal business travel is often by first class rail - with power sockets. That means in a UK business-meeting type day you might spend 3hrs on trains with sockets, 4 hours in offices with sockets and 3hrs in various in between places (taxis, waitng rooms, lobbies) on battery power. In this sort of setup, battery life is much less important than (if you really need to) being able to power/charge a useful peripheral.
And of course if you're driving, you can charge the device off the cigar lighter socket.
It would be pretty unusual here to go more than an hour or two without a handy mains socket.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36827156)

You are right Apple is all about dongle and excuses.
You ask anything and all they will say is because of security reasons we cannot implement it, what the hell.
Apple is not confused if its a security company, hardware company or a software company. Lately they have added one more feather, they think they are a Lawyer/Legal consulting company no wonder they are after suing other companies

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (3, Insightful)

mswhippingboy (754599) | more than 3 years ago | (#36826998)

So what is going to be the draw? Especially for a business, where the third party aftermarket is much more extensive for the iPad?

Ummm. It's not from Apple. That's enough for many...

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

Grizzley9 (1407005) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827012)

Oh stop, you're just an Apple fanboi!

/s

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (0)

LBArrettAnderson (655246) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827264)

Get rid of the /s and you are absolutely right. I don't understand why people ask "I don't see any advantages, so why not just get apple?" Well, what advantages does the iPad have? Not many. And he's wrong about there not being distinct differences ("advantages" to many people) with this tablet. Android is one of them. Dedicated ports without requiring dongles is another. Pressure sensitive stylus is another. Perhaps there are even people who dislike Apple's aluminum obsession.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36827020)

Yea but that's an Apple, who wants that? Apple is the new microsoft, the one people love to hate, except of course the ~%7 fanatical Jobs fan club.

Because its not an iPad? (1)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827040)

Don't underestimate nerd rage ain't going buy anything from Apple types. Believe me, they are everywhere. Not quite as numerous as the gottagetitnowiGeneration

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (2, Insightful)

Kenja (541830) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827108)

SD slot, no Apple telling you what software you're allowed to run, Lenovo is entrenched in many businesses, etc.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#36829240)

Lenovo is entrenched in many businesses, etc.

That is the single reason I have seen that makes any sense as to why it might actually get some traction.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (0)

c1t1z3nk41n3 (1112059) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827124)

There are a number of people who will not buy into the Apple ecosystem. The turning point for me came when I had an iPhone 3G and had to keep worrying about updates breaking my unlock. I refuse to again purchase hardware that they refuse to let me use as I see fit. Android tablets don't seem to be there yet, but if they keep innovating like manufacturers have on the phone side I'll be satisfied within the year and actually own my device.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827598)

Lenovo is also filtering out all the junk apps in their App Shop, I'm hoping that will mean easier access to quality apps. You'll still be able to use the Google Market too. Lenovo is trying to make this a serious business tool, unlike the shiny toy that the iPad is.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

vijayiyer (728590) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828812)

The odd part is that the iPads are all unlocked, and the Android tablets aren't.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827168)

The iPad2 already has:

USB port (via dongle)
HDMI out
A number of third party cases with integrated keyboards
Rear and front camera (admittedly slightly lower in resolution)
better battery life under REAL conditions (this states eight under "ideal").

The iPad is far lighter too. And the idea of including an optical trackpad so you can "move around the device" is NUTS on a touchscreen system.

So what is going to be the draw? Especially for a business, where the third party aftermarket is much more extensive for the iPad?

The SD card slot is pretty serious draw.

For business??? (-1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827302)

The SD card slot is pretty serious draw.

For consumer use, the iPad can also read SD cards with a plugin reader (actually a few, Apple makes one but so do other companies).

However for business use, why would they want something like an SD card so easily lost/stolen to begin with? When the device has 16 to 64 GB of memory, you hardly need the expansion of an SD card, it's way nicer to simply save stuff out to the network.

Re:For business??? (2)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827642)

For consumer use, the iPad can also read SD cards with a plugin reader (actually a few, Apple makes one but so do other companies).

Do you really want a dongle flopping around while you are walking around with your device in your hand?

However for business use, why would they want something like an SD card so easily lost/stolen to begin with?

How easy is it to lose something that is inside the device? This tablet also encrypts the SD card, so theft is not an issue. If you look at the specs on Lenovo's site you will also see that it comes with Computrace for free.

The Point? (0)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827828)

Do you really want a dongle flopping around while you are walking around with your device in your hand?

No, that's why I mentioned that specifically for consumer use (to read camera cards).

How easy is it to lose something that is inside the device? This tablet also encrypts the SD card, so theft is not an issue.

Think about what you are saying for a second. It's easy to remove, right? So why would someone not simply walk off with it - not for theft, but just to use it?

Which brings me back to my main point - WHY? When you already have 64Gb of storage, what are you really going to use another 8-32GB for that is not better served by simply downloading data over the network and caching it on-device? Remember for business use these are primarily going to be dedicated devices, it's not like someone is going to store every episode of "24" on here. You 64GB is a huge space to cache all kinds of dedicated data, and instead of an SD card which WILL get "lost" you simply download it over the network at any time.

I mean seriously, you may as well ask for a 5 1/4" floppy in the thing too.

Re:The Point? (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827928)

WHY? When you already have 64Gb of storage

Where can I get this tablet you speak of with 64GB of storage for the price of this Lenovo ThinkPad?

Re:The Point? (1)

SuperKendall (25149) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828750)

Fine then; few business apps require even 8GB (I believe that's the lowest model). Point still stands.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827618)

The SD card is encrypted too.

Re:So what does it offer over an iPad? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36827254)

Custom enterprise apps. E.g. UPS can drop those specialty pads in favour of similar pads. Yes, those pads they have now are far more durable, but you get the gist.

MORE BULK! (3, Funny)

sglewis100 (916818) | more than 3 years ago | (#36826892)

Lenovo's new ThinkPad Tablet is on the bulky side with the hope that business professionals appreciate it.

I think they will. I can't tell you how many professionals that have taken one look at my iPad, and said "nah, I could never use something like that. It's not bulky enough."

Re:MORE BULK! (2)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827230)

Agreed. Many people (like myself) want that weight and bulk. I look at many lightweight and thin phones and really notice the poor quality construction which is a by-product of keeping the weight down. I know it won't sustain much damage (which I'm prone to deal out) so it's usually off my list.

Re:MORE BULK! (1)

sglewis100 (916818) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827268)

Seriously? You thought I was being serious? PS: The iPad may be lightweight and thin, but it certainly is not of "poor quality construction".

Re:MORE BULK! (1)

rvw (755107) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827318)

Seriously? You thought I was being serious? PS: The iPad may be lightweight and thin, but it certainly is not of "poor quality construction".

The iPad lightweight? Maybe compared to this [oldcomputers.net] . I think it's quite heavy.

Re:MORE BULK! (1)

sglewis100 (916818) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827378)

Seriously? You thought I was being serious? PS: The iPad may be lightweight and thin, but it certainly is not of "poor quality construction".

The iPad lightweight? Maybe compared to this [oldcomputers.net] . I think it's quite heavy.

Which tablet did you recommend again? I didn't realize the iPad was such a bulky tablet.

Re:MORE BULK! (1)

gorzek (647352) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827900)

Hey, I actually have one of those Compaqs... It's not as heavy as those laptops they put desktop Pentium 4 chips in. ;)

Re:MORE BULK! (1)

LBArrettAnderson (655246) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827326)

Even if he knew you were kidding, it's a valid opinion. Have you seen what your UPS delivery man carries around? I own an iPad (strictly to develop apps for it; my Xoom is much more capable for actual use), and I do indeed question its structural integrity, even if it isn't justified.

Re:MORE BULK! (1)

sglewis100 (916818) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827416)

While you have a point re: field ready, ruggedized equipment - the article mentioned "business professionals". I was thinking more of the "man in suit" type of person, who really didn't concern himself with a rugged tablet the way a driver might.

Re:MORE BULK! (0)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827688)

Just like the iPhone 4 the iPad glass tends to shatter when dropped. I would not call it durable.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBCpTRul5G0 [youtube.com]

Re:MORE BULK! (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827702)

I forgot to mention that the ThinkPad tablet uses Corning Gorilla Glass, that stuff is hard to break when you're trying.

Re:MORE BULK! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36829134)

That video of the guy who took a supposedly "indistructable" phone and smashed its screen against the corner of an aquarium, a few times, before it broke, comes to mind.

Re:MORE BULK! (1)

odirex (1958302) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828516)

I'm sorry, but the iPad is far too thin. In all seriousness, it is incredibly uncomfortable to hold for long periods of time without an otterbox case or something similar adding a bit of bulk to the edges for better grip. Without it, I can feel it digging into my hands. It's also so smooth out of the box that my friend managed to drop it immediately at the apple store when he picked it up (luckily the anti-theft cable stopped it from hitting the ground). Metal back and glass front is super slippery if your hands are even a tiny bit moist. I own an iPad for all the unique apps, but I think the Notion Ink Adam has a much more comfortable design. When apple releases the new ipads with fiberglass bodies, I hope the back has at least some texture.

Pen input? (3, Interesting)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 3 years ago | (#36826922)

Does it have a capacitive finger-friendly screen that can also do pressure sensitive (512+ levels) pen input for more accurate stylus use or sketching?

And "8 or so hours in ideal conditions" - man I hope that's not directly from the marketing department. If your marketing guys are hedging their words like that, they know damned well that it's going to go 3 hours under full use, and probably have everything turned of and in active sleep mode for 3 of the hours to get 8 hours of runtime.

I've said it before - it's going to come down to software support. The OS and drivers are going to have to handle stuff seamlessly. Apple gets away with is 'cause they offer so little functionality, there's little to break/go wrong. I want to see this work, but I'm sure as hell not going to by the first version.

Re:Pen input? (1)

TheClarkster (1130495) | more than 3 years ago | (#36826978)

It does come with an active stylus. I can't find any mention of pressure sensitivity though.

Re:Pen input? (1)

TheClarkster (1130495) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827002)

Just did some searching, some places say it is an active stylus with pressure sensitivity, but nothing about the quality of it.

Re:Pen input? (1)

Amouth (879122) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827072)

not sure about the pen but i do like this spec listing:

"Display: 10.1" HD Glare with integrated camera 1280x800"

"HD Glare" - finely someone accurately advertising glossy screens - that took long enough

They offer so little functionality? (2)

hellfire (86129) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828690)

Okay I'll bite on this because the way this is presented is a bit of a slanted statement. It's accurate, but disingenuous by what it implies. TCP/IP offers very little functionality, it only does one thing... and it does it really really well. Because it does it so well, it frees up developers to innovate on top of it. Therefore trying to say iOS offers little functionality distracts from the idea that despite this, it's doing very very well for businesses who want to easily expand on the product and provide services to people who want to use iPads and iPhones in their business and personal life, simply because it does what little it does very well. Apple lets other people expand on the functionality.

It doesn't come down to software support, it comes down to the experience. Windows has the software support already, and it's on a decline because the market is saturated and Tablets are changing the computer paradigm. If you think pressure sensitive pen input support is the make or break feature for the tablet market at the moment you need to go back and study the market again.

cost (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36826930)

Why Android tablets cost twice as much as a netbooks running Win7?

Re:cost (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827246)

Well for one thing this tablet has an active digitizer built in. The display is also an IPS panel.

Re:cost (1)

Registered Coward v2 (447531) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828438)

Why Android tablets cost twice as much as a netbooks running Win7?

It's a price you pay to *not* have to run Win7.

Also has SD card slot (1)

traindirector (1001483) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827036)

This tablet also has an SD card slot for storage.

I don't understand why publications are so focused on presenting the varying built-in storage options but not even mentioning whether a memory card slot of some type is present. I'd much rather know if the device has cheap expandable storage than know how much the company is going to overcharge me for the largest built-in storage option.

Re:Also has SD card slot (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36827300)

Because to most consumers it's not as the importance as nerds place on it? If SD slots were so important the Xoom would have outsold the iPad yet it was a complete flop and no one cared.

Re:Also has SD card slot (1)

traindirector (1001483) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827426)

Because to most consumers it's not as the importance as nerds place on it?

If that's true, that's only because they don't know what it is.

Most people, if told they they could get the 16GB tablet now and add another 16GB later if they need it, would consider that a nice feature that makes it so they don't have to spend the extra $100 on the 32GB tablet "just in case".

Clearly it's not important enough for the average consumer to buy one tablet over another based solely on this feature, but that doesn't mean it isn't a great feature (or, more realistically, a horrible omission by the market leader to fleece more money from customers).

Re:Also has SD card slot (1)

Dynedain (141758) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828822)

Because most of the time the external slot is difficult to use. Apps generally don't run from external cards, meaning you have to swap things back and forth. About the only thing you can usably keep on them is pictures and movies.

External slots are a way to get production costs down, since no-one can command the bulk rates that Apple does on flash memory to embed in the devices.

Keyboardless laptop with a keyboard (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36827154)

Uhmm, looks like the only thing they eliminated is the hinge.

Re:Keyboardless laptop with a keyboard (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827308)

We've almost come full circle back to...*drumroll*...convertible laptops!

Available Q3 2011? (2)

CycleFreak (99646) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827164)

Why wait? Just today, I finally broke down and joined the tablet craze by ordering an Acer Iconia 32GB tablet. Nvidia Tegra 2 1GHz dual-core processor, 1GB DDR2 RAM, 32GB flash storage, USB, HDMI, micro-SD slot, bluetooth, WiFi, 1280x800 10.1" display, Capacitive Ten-point Touchscreen, 2MP front camera, 5MP rear camera with flash Android Honeycomb.

BONUS? Available now for $450

Better late than never? Not so sure in this case. Lenovo has a lot of catching up to do to play in the same market as Asus, Motorola, Acer ...

Nice... laptop? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36827332)

Wow, where is the tablet?

Docking port (1)

steveha (103154) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827552)

So, Apple has a standard docking port for iPads. I hope the Android world can converge on a standard docking port as well.

Clearly the ThinkPad Tablet must have some sort of docking port, since TFA mentions a clamshell keyboard case that docks with it. Does anyone know what this is?

I have read that the Samsung Galaxy Tab uses PDMI [wikipedia.org] for its docking port; can anyone confirm that?

I don't really care what the standard is; I just hope there will be one.

P.S. The worst thing about the Motorola Xoom is the lack of a docking port. Desktop docking stations for it require you to get a micro-USB connector and a mini-HDMI connector to line up and engage the sockets on the tablet. And, none of the available desktop docking stations pass through the USB! You do get HDMI passthrough but not USB, which totally sucks if you are a developer trying to work with a Xoom.

steveha

Re:Docking port (1)

mswhippingboy (754599) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827684)

Clearly the ThinkPad Tablet must have some sort of docking port, since TFA mentions a clamshell keyboard case that docks with it. Does anyone know what this is?

I believe the full-size USB port IS the docking port for the keyboard folio case.

http://www.engadget.com/2011/07/20/lenovo-thinkpad-tablet-and-keyboard-folio-case-hands-on-video [engadget.com]

Priced for fanbois? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36827972)

Apple can get away with exorbitant pricing because they have a hugely loyal fanbase. Lenovo, while well regarded, probably won't be able to get away with it. The business folks, being decades behind, are still mentally stuck on Wintel.

It also seems overpriced compared to a Wintel netbook. The netbook's Intel CPU+chipset is more expensive, Windows license cost is substantial, the battery has to be larger to get the same runtime... And yet they can sell netbooks for $200-300. Ok so the tablet has a cap touch screen and on additional low quality camera, but at best that's a wash with the netbook's higher costs. And they have the gall to charge $99 for a keyboard?? That totals to $599 for the Lenovo tablet + keyboard, roughly 2-3x the cost of a good netbook.

Re:Priced for fanbois? (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828634)

Does that netbook have GPS, 3G, IPS display, active digitizer, accelerometer and both front and rear camera's? Didn't think so. It also comes with Computrace for free and it looks like it comes with free accidental damage protection. I'd say it is a pretty good value considering what all you get.

Handles (1)

symes (835608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36827992)

Why dont any of these tablets have handles? Seriously... I have a tablet and would just love something on the back or side to attached something a bit more grippy than flat smooth plastic. I've already lost one due to a slippery dry hand on a cool day.

Think Pad boringness is a good thing. (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 3 years ago | (#36828632)

The think pad has the same style for about 20 years now. Yes there were tweaks here and there slimmer lighter... But still the black dull matted plastic shape. I am happy the Lenovo Tablet follows that design.
Businesses don't want noticly fancy they want the borring drab color system so they can look really good with it.

ThinkPad Tablet Unboxed (1)

rhook (943951) | more than 3 years ago | (#36829080)

Lenovo has posted an excellent video showing off this tablet on YouTube.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IXFexk6k39M [youtube.com]

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