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BlackBerry PlayBook First Tablet To Gain NIST Approval

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the perfect-for-bureaucrats dept.

Blackberry 132

An anonymous reader writes "Despite its current struggles to win over consumers, RIM has always been strong in the enterprise. The company remained steadfast in its support for corporate environments with the launch of the PlayBook, calling it the only business-grade tablet. The NIST is now ready to back that claim, giving the BlackBerry PlayBook its stamp of approval — meaning it's now the lone tablet that is certified for use in U.S. government agencies."

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Gov't approval (1)

alphatel (1450715) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854108)

Is that the sound of a $1,000 toaster?

Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854182)

Waddling: it's cute ... when ducks do it!

Killing yourself with food is really, really slow. There are faster ways that don't burden the health care system and force somebody else to pay for your gluttonous slobbery. Of course that might be exactly what you don't like about them you selfish pigs.

If making excuses for why you can't put the fucking fork down burned calories you'd all look like anorexic crackheads. Not a single one of you can say hey, my shitty decision making got me into this mess and better decision making will get me out. Spineless cowards who fail at life, all of you.

"Oh it's my big bones" Yeah sure because bone looks exactly like jiggly rolls of fat, you fatass. "McDonalds made me do it!" Really? Did they strap you to a chair and force-feed you then? Cuz it seems to me fast-food is the LAST thing a lard-ass should eat. Veggies are at least as cheap. "But you don't understand how it is." Yeah I do, that's why I eat good food and exercise so I don't end up like you. You think it's some cosmic accident I'm not a gluttonous pig? I bet you do, don't you?

Oh yeah and at grocery and department stores, quit using those electric wheeled fat-carts. For the love of god if anybody needs to do more walking, it's fatass america. Oh yeah and if you are so ginormously lard-ass fat that you take up the space of three normal people, it is you who should move out of my way. Consider it your exercise regimen to shift your enormous bulk a few feet over. Gotta start small and all of that.

When the aliens come, I hope they eat the FAT ones first. The rest of us will thank them. Both for getting rid of you and the body odor since you can't seem to properly clean yourselves and for your children who will no longer be abused by you teaching them to be little lardasses so they get predisposed to all kinds of fun diseases from a young age.

If any of that offends you, i am sure you can find a nice big bucket of comfort food to eat. Because that'll help.

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854262)

Um... what?

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854338)

Um... what?

Ok, you know how in most countries of the world people are generally in decent (if not triathlete-style exceptional) shape and big fat disgusting lardasses are relatively rare and an unusual thing to see?

That's not how it is in the USA.

It's exactly the reverse. People who aren't trying to commit long, drawn-out, slow suicide with food are rare. Adults who understand the Second Law of Thermodynamics and the whole concept of "you cannot possibly gain weight unless you overeat, and 'overeat' means eating more calories than you burn" are hard to find in the 'States. This simple concept that a retarded dog could understand is a hard doctrine for them. They will come up with a millon excuses to avoid admitting it. Not because they have any reason to believe it isn't true, mind you, but because it would imply they should change their ways and by God they can't stand that one bit.

Some of us in the 'States are pretty fucking tired of it. The only thing worse than the rampant suicidal obesity is the attitude that goes along with it. The attitude is that adult life "just happens", that nothing ever has anything to do with the decisions you make, that it's all some big cosmic lottery and you just got the lotto ticket for "lardass" and there's nothing to be done about it.

Just try finding a good woman in the USA. A good woman doesn't hate herself and pollute her own body with fat and diabetes and heart disease to express her self-hatred. You really don't wanna be with a woman who hates herself. She can't love you without first loving herself. No matter how hard you try to deny that, it's true. These days, that automatically rules out something like 60-70% of the population depending on where you live.

This is not sustainable. Another couple of generations and we won't have a country anymore. Maybe it's a good thing that so many Mexicans don't respect our immigration laws. Maybe what they really don't respect is that we think our prosperity gives us the right to be fat, stupid, wasteful, gluttonous lard-asses who can't even manage our own bodies, let alone our own affairs or our own government. Maybe the Mexicans deserve this country more than we do after all.

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854644)

From "Blackberry Playbook" to "we won't have a country anymore." LOL. Go get me a cheeseburger you drooling cunt-trickle.

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854698)

It's actually the first law of Thermodynamics (second law is that entropy always increases).

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (1)

beardz (790974) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854302)

Cool story, bro.

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (1)

LongearedBat (1665481) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854530)

Whoosh!!! I think GP meant that Blackberry's are as useful as toasters (ie. not).

While I'm not disagreeing with that general image of people in the US, I also know (despite not living in the US myself) that there are too many exceptions to make it overall true.

Your post is completely off topic flamebait. Someone mod parent as such please, just to teach him to be polite.

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854634)

Blackberry's what are as useful as tosaters?

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (1)

LongearedBat (1665481) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854714)

Where I live, few people use Blackberry's (iPhone and Andoid devices are far more prevalent) and the few Blackberry users I've spoken seem have been disappointed with them. So that's my interpretation of the "Gov't approval" post.

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (1)

camperslo (704715) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854742)

One would hope that something for government agencies would avoid the usual security problems (like Flash issues), but that doesn't seem to be the case unless they're getting a special configuration.

http://btsc.webapps.blackberry.com/btsc/search.do?cmd=displayKC&docType=kc&externalId=KB27365 [blackberry.com]

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855652)

Where I live, few people use Blackberry's

Where you live, do few people know how to use an apostrophe too?

Hint: That is what the grandparent poster was commenting on.

Re:Just For You Disgusting Fatbodies (1)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855306)

We get it, Steve, you have trouble maintaining weight since the cancer, and now this Playbook thing...

Re:Gov't approval (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854510)

Is that the sound of a $1,000 toaster?

If you're making it for the Space Program, then yeah probably.

Re:Gov't approval (1)

thedarkchaos (1947234) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855654)

It blends in nicely with the $7,600 coffee maker [utne.com] .

DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (4, Informative)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854122)

We in the Air Mobility Command â" think cargo jets â" have been looking at tablets for flight pubs and Jeppesen products. The iPad is without question out for various reasons. The two we have been looking at are the HP TouchPad, and the RIM product. The HP product has received better feedback, but because the RIM product already has the NIST approval (and the fact that the government is already in love with RIM), it is probably the direction we will go. Keep in mind that, of course, the air crew will still have to haul around the paper products, they just will not use them. Also, most of our guys already pack personal iPads, but they cannot be officially used for anything involving the actual operation of the aircraft.

I'm sure the DoD will buy them buy the many 1000's.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

Known Nutter (988758) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854142)

The iPad is without question out for various reasons.

Could you (or someone) point out some of these reasons? Not trolling here, just not familiar with this subject and would like a little insight.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

alen (225700) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854156)

need itunes to load media on it
no way to mass purchase licenses of software

apple probably doesn't want anything to do with the GSA or any government business

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

Moridineas (213502) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854186)

Not arguing that iPad doesn't have problems in large corporate/institutional environments, but of the two reasons you list, one is clearly invalid:

https://volume.itunes.apple.com/ [apple.com]

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854410)

You know this shit has just been released, it's not like he's reasons are "cleary invalid". He's just misinformed. You fucking arrogant and dishonest faggot.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

robmv (855035) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854430)

Buy in volume and distribute, that looks like applications still will be tied to an user, companies want applications tied to them and be able to move licences between users. " you will receive redemption codes for each app. You can control who gets the apps by providing these codes to users via email or an internal website" looks like apps are distributed but could the company later assign that app to another user? If not its an awful program from the business company point of view, for Apple and the developer is a dream multiple sales

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

Moridineas (213502) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854660)

Is that true? I have very limited experience with rollouts of software in large environments (as I currently work at a small company) but our volume licensing setup for Adobe protects is tied to the machine, not the user. I thought that was fairly common?

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

dragonturtle69 (1002892) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854690)

In my limited, thankfully, experience dealing with licensing, the license following the user or device depends upon the software being licensed. The OS belongs to the machine, or in a large organization, the organization. Third party applications follow the user, within the organization. But, the licenses tied to a user can be moved within the organization.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854764)

that looks like applications still will be tied to an user, companies want applications tied to them and be able to move licences between users.

Citrix and Microsoft have similar licensing models.

With citrix/microsoft per-user licensing you assign a license to a user. It is possible to re-assign a license from one user to another, but once you do so, there is a significant waiting period before you are allowed to re-assign the license again.

The only option besides per-user licensing is per-device licensing. But per-user is the prevalent licensing option. So i'm not seeing Apple's per-user method as a major drawback; the corporation still owns that software in any case.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

milkmage (795746) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854884)

that's for apps from 3rd parties. say you want everyone on your team to use Angry Birds.. you buy bunch of licenses and distribite to your team. it's not terribly different than buying bulk licenses for something like Photoshop. IT buys the licenses then decides who gets one.

but

there's also a way to deploy apps made by you (or for you) internally. you don't see the SalesForce apps in the app store. You can also distribute apps via email (in your company) if each device is provisioned. once it is, you can get the ipa file via any means, and install with itunes. this is how my company distributed our app for pilot testing (in production) before it was submitted to the store for public consumption.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854750)

And they also have integration [apple.com] through MDM:

Businesses have a variety of options for deploying iPad across their enterprises. End-users can quickly install configuration profiles to get corporate services up and running. For large scale deployments IT can query and manage devices with Mobile Device Management. iTunes can be customized to fit the needs of both IT and end-users. And, enterprises can also distribute custom iPad apps over-the-air for their users to install.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

Barsteward (969998) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855020)

"enterprises can also distribute custom iPad apps over-the-air for their users to install."

i'm sure an enterprise will love that lack of control - technically illiterate users installing apps.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854190)

apple probably doesn't want anything to do with the GSA or any government business

Why? What would it be about selling several dozen 1000 of these things and the support contract that would go with them to the DoD that Apple wouldn't like?

But, the iPad is a consumer product that answers consumer needs, not general computing needs. The DoD (and I suspect most "enterprise") will not be using their tablets primarily for social interaction and watching multimedia, viewing photo albums, playing games and such - consumer wants and needs, not "enterprise" wants and needs.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (0, Troll)

rtb61 (674572) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854458)

Easy to sum up 'government grade' how boring, iPad like all the other iStuff is all about marketing and the perception of being 'special' for owning iJunk, of having better fashion taste and sense, of being able to afford it. In other words when it comes to actual function over form it tends to fail against the competition. So fine plenty of money in the iGullible market, it's just once you loose that fake 'cool; the market can collapse pretty fast.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

methano (519830) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854622)

I know you're trying to be funny but it's not polite to make fun of people whose first language isn't English.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

dragonturtle69 (1002892) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854700)

So, are you saying that "iStuff" is the 2000's Jordache/Izod? ;)

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36855576)

Again with the "it's all marketing" argument, as if NO ONE IN THEIR RIGHT MIND would choose an Apple device. Maybe they're not for you, but that's no call to insult the intelligence of people who do like and purchase those devices.

To put it more simply: grow up.

Wrong. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854246)

Apple is on the GSA schedule, has a gov't store, and is just as easy to work with as any of the other large IT companies (Dell, IBM, HP, etc) that regularly do business with the DoD.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854384)

>

apple probably doesn't want anything to do with the GSA or any government business

except the Australian Government: DSD tests Apple iOS for national security http://www.zdnet.com.au/dsd-tests-apple-ios-for-national-security-339310133.htm

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (2)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854922)

apple probably doesn't want anything to do with the GSA or any government business

Funny they this page [apple.com] linked off their store (www.apple.com, click on "Store", then "Government Store"). GSA schedule and all.

Of course, you can also use your government status to buy slightly-discounted stuff for yourself, too.

(No, I didn't know it existed until someone asked me to look it up a few days ago...)

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854166)

For us it has a lot to do with custom applications and the available development languages. The iPad is a very nice product, but as a platform is tightly controlled by Apple (as is their right, it's their product).

Idiotic password management (2, Insightful)

Shivetya (243324) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854366)

which according to our tech people will not be fixed by Apple until sometime in 2012.

Apparently iOs devices will retry a failing password over and over locking out the account. Happened to me and they told me, next time I change my password on the network delete the network entry from my iPad and recreate it afterward. They determined my iPad spammed the network with my old password the moment I turned it on.

Re:Idiotic password management (3, Insightful)

mysidia (191772) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854786)

Apparently iOs devices will retry a failing password over and over locking out the account.

This is a minor nit with the iPad itself, but a MAJOR FLAW in the network device/server the iPad is logging into.

Before you should talk with Apple about this, you need to talk with whatever vendor is providing that server with the account lockout policy that allows one misconfig'ed device to DoS an account.

That is... a sane network login server application would tarpit the network device attempting to login, not lock the account itself.

Re:Idiotic password management (1)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854938)

That is... a sane network login server application would tarpit the network device attempting to login, not lock the account itself.

How do you propose to stop an attacker who changes IP and/or MAC addresses with every new password attempt?

Re:Idiotic password management (1)

mysidia (191772) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855040)

How do you propose to stop an attacker who changes IP and/or MAC addresses with every new password attempt?

Well... first of all: if you only saw failed attempts from one or two IP addresses, then you can be quite confident that's not what's happening. Second: if you see failed attempts to a user in rapid succession from many IP addresses, then you know something is amiss.

You've come up with an unusual theoretical, and quite implausible attack. There aren't enough IP addresses out there to change IPs after every new password attempt.

IP address is not just a free form field a computer can change to whatever it wants -- the IP address you want to use actually has to be routable, otherwise it's useless.

The only way that makes any sense at all is if the attack source is on the LAN; which means either an internal system has already been compromised, or you have an insider attacking through an inefficient method (trying brute force, when there are much simpler and more successful methods).

As for someone playing with MAC addresses.... it's called Port Security [cisco.com] or 802.1x authentication, esp. in the case of wireless.

Layer 2 security issues are not something to ignore, for sure; there are ways of addressing all those, and they need to be addressed on their own merits, anyways.

Re:Idiotic password management (2)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855204)

IP address is not just a free form field a computer can change to whatever it wants -- the IP address you want to use actually has to be routable, otherwise it's useless.

Botnets. Plus you presume a simple brute-force attack rather than a dictionary attack or something even more specific to the target account like names of family members.

The only way that makes any sense at all is if the attack source is on the LAN; which means either an internal system has already been compromised, or you have an insider attacking through an inefficient method (trying brute force, when there are much simpler and more successful methods).

Neither are reasons to dismiss such a straightforward vulnerability.

As for someone playing with MAC addresses.... it's called Port Security or 802.1x authentication, esp. in the case of wireless.

At which point you are at the same practical result - the only node the user cares about - the one in his hands - is locked out.

I really don't see a practical use to selectively locking out a device versus simply locking down the account. In either case you've got a user who can't get logged in and is almost certainly going to require a call to the support desk. So selective lockout has minimal benefit but comes with your choice of increased risk or increased complexity and overhead. Certainly not a flaw worthy of bolded, all-caps.

Re:Idiotic password management (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36855410)

The principle of locking an account out after a defined number of failed login attempts is a long standing security principle, it significantly reduces the likely success of brute force hacking attempts.

Before you start jumping to the defense of Apple/the iPad you should perhaps strive to learn a little more about well defined and documented security principles.

An application that just keeps retrying the same username/password after being told that the combination is wrong is just incredibly stupid and is a good example of incredibly stupid programming of the Homer Simpson variety.

Re:Idiotic password management (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36855470)

"Apparently iOs devices will retry a failing password over and over locking out the account." ...and that is different from Windows exactly how ?

Windows does it in all known versions (NT, 2000, XP, 2003, Vista, 2008 and 7).

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

stephanruby (542433) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854590)

1. The iPad is made in China (the paranoids could say there could be a backdoor in there, just like we've made backdoors within Intel products and Xerox Machines in the past, we're fearful that a large enough foreign power would try doing the same back to us at some point. It wouldn't have to be an obvious backdoor. Introducing a vulnerability or two into iPhones/iPads at a low enough level could still allow China access to our devices and yet still provide some plausibility of denial that this was just a vulnerability, not a purposeful backdoor).
2. The iPad needs iTunes connectivity. The iPad/iPhone is a consumer device first and foremost.
3. Android can be encrypted all the way down to the hardware level, there are custom ROMs and chips made by researchers and defense contractors for that purpose. I also believe RIM, Nokia, and Windows Phone 6.5 had that too. The iPhone received some kind of encryption capability only recently, and then, I'm not even sure if it goes all the way down to the hardware (and even if it did, then the paranoids would complain that we shouldn't trust hardware-level encryption that's manufactured in China).
4. The iPhone/iPad often needs custom proprietary parts. With Android, MS/Nokia, RIM/BlackBerry, they allow you to use something as trivial as OEM batteries, or OEM extended batteries. The military has a long history of requiring a second source for all the hardware it commissions, hence the only way that Intel could get government contracts was to teach its arch nemesis AMD how to manufacture some of the same exact parts the military commissioned. And right now, Apple just doesn't seem interested in sharing its technology or licensing its technology to a competitor just so it could win big government contracts (the company is making plenty of money as it is, it certainly doesn't need to blow its IP in order to pander to the needs of the military).
5. The learning curve for doing iPad/iPhone development is still much higher than doing stuff on Android (although with better HTML5 mobile support, that may change soon enough I suppose).
6. Steve Jobs is a damn controlling hippy. There I said it. See my snippet of the quote from the iPhone/iPad/iTunes Terms of Services below. This is not to say that the military is interested in making weapons with iPads, I seriously doubt anyone wants to do that, but this clause just seems to be completely unnecessary in my opinion and would cause enough of a pause from military procurement to consider that Apple products really haven't been designed with the military in mind in the first place and that it may be hard to extract extra concessions from Apple in case the military needs anything else from Apple.

"Licensee also agrees that Licensee will not use the Apple Software for any purposes prohibited by United States law, including, without limitation, the development, design, manufacture or production of nuclear, missiles, or chemical or biological weapons."

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

Mr. Freeman (933986) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854648)

Of course, US law doesn't prohibit the military from producing weapons, so there's really no conflict in the license terms. I've seen that line in a lot of licenses for a lot of products that seem to have absolutely nothing to do with anything related to weapons or manufacturing of the same. I think it's just something that a lot of product manufacturers throw in there to cover their ass in case some terrorist gets caught with an iphone/ipad/whatever in their car.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

kybred (795293) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854806)

This is from a BlackBerry Software license agreement:

(2) You will not use the RIM Products and Software in the development, production, handling, maintenance, storage, detection, identification or dissemination of chemical, biological or nuclear weapons or their missile delivery systems, or of materials or equipment that could be used in such weapons or their missile delivery systems, or resell or export to anyone or any entity involved in such activity;.

That's pretty standard legalese found in most SLAs. So is RIM a controlling hippie, also?

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854896)

The iPad is made in China (the paranoids could say there could be a backdoor in there, just like we've made backdoors within Intel products and Xerox Machines in the past, we're fearful that a large enough foreign power would try doing the same back to us at some point. It wouldn't have to be an obvious backdoor. Introducing a vulnerability or two into iPhones/iPads at a low enough level could still allow China access to our devices and yet still provide some plausibility of denial that this was just a vulnerability, not a purposeful backdoor).

If that was the big problem, then NIST will not certify anything. Practically all consumer Android devices, iOS devices, the PlayBook, and other tablets are made in China. In fact, it's likely that with this announcement, China may decide to figure out a way to backdoor the PlayBook knowing the government has approved it.

Blackberries aren't made in North America, they're made in China at the same factories churning out iPhones, Droids, and everything else. They're vulnerable to the exact same hacks that'll break through an iPhone and an iPod.

In fact, the sheer volume of iPhones and iPods sold could very well mean the chance that any particular device will have access to sensitive data is very low - if they're churning 5+ million devices a month, it's pretty hard to ensure that one will make it to its intended destination, short of sabotaging the entire run which is extremely difficult (how do you hide the fact that someone just purchased millions of parts?, and if the sabotage has any side effect, you can bet someone will blog about some oddity they're seeing, and being Apple, it'll land on the front page of /.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36855022)

FYI Blackberry phones are made in canada, mexico, or hungary. Although the individual parts they buy in mass and probably come from china/taiwan/india

Not sure where the playbook is made

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854284)

I've got a friend whose business is stuffing the iPad full of flight documentation and manuals and it's for defence. Sorry, don't make stuff up.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854534)

I've got a friend whose business is stuffing the iPad full of flight documentation and manuals and it's for defence. Sorry, don't make stuff up.

Sounds like nice work if you can get it. Outside apple land he would be replaced with a few short scripts.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854794)

I've got a friend whose business is stuffing the iPad full of flight documentation and manuals and it's for defence. Sorry, don't make stuff up.

You, sir, may have a "friend", but he is *not* stuffing iPads with whatever for Air Force flight crews, at least not for official use. For the USAF, it is *not* an approved device. In fact, there are *no* Apple devices that are approved to be connected to to our network (at least NIPR or SIPRNET), so it would not be possible to update the device - flight pubs, nav databases, and Jeppesen products are updated quite often, almost monthly. Not to mention the aircraft TOs and FCIFs. Currently, the only portable computers we use for pubs are Panasonic ToughBooks.

You "friend" may have a job stuffing something, but it's *not* iPads for the Air Force.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (2)

symbolset (646467) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854382)

The government is hard to understand. All this proves is that RIM is good at passing these gates. Dell is good at this too, and a US company, and has Android tablets. RIM Won't be alone on this field long enough to matter.

Re:DoD is Ga Ga For RIM... (1)

gilesjuk (604902) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855388)

Sounds about right for government applications. Pick the device that has the poorest usability.

Doesn't Matter (1)

desertfool (21262) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854128)

In the corporate world it is all about looking cool in the airport. Which means we have to support iPads.

Re:Doesn't Matter (2)

CharmElCheikh (1140197) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854146)

Is my business the only one ever to realise that blackberry stores your emails on their servers, and that the patriot act gives US government the right to read it? I don't understand why so many businesses overlook that.

Re:Doesn't Matter (1)

jjetson (2041488) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854194)

What does it matter if RIM is holding Encrypted emails that they don't have the key to decrypt? They don't overlook it, because there's nothing to overlook. The government doesn't have the keys to decrypt those messages either. Hence RIMs problems in middle east countries.

Re:Doesn't Matter (2, Insightful)

causality (777677) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854356)

What does it matter if RIM is holding Encrypted emails that they don't have the key to decrypt? They don't overlook it, because there's nothing to overlook. The government doesn't have the keys to decrypt those messages either. Hence RIMs problems in middle east countries.

That whole affair with service in India proved that if they really want to, they can indeed decrypt the e-mails.

Re:Doesn't Matter (2)

kevinmenzel (1403457) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855062)

Really? I don't recall RIM capitulating on BES encryption, only BIS where they actually have access to the keys. BES is encrypted with keys not held by RIM, so how would RIM give them access? I suppose if you happen to crack the keys... but it's not like they're relying on encryption methods and key generation methods that aren't known... and there's a reason Governments force RIM to give them BIS access instead of just cracking it themselves...

And in terms of government and business, users are pretty much connected via BES, not BIS. Heck, even home users could theoretically roll their own BES setup if they wanted to (You can get free versions of BES, though of course the software and hardware that requires isn't exactly free)

Re:Doesn't Matter (1)

erroneus (253617) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854438)

Problems RIM has capitulated on... problems they didn't seem to have with the US government which, if you think about it, can only mean that it was given to them quietly and without a fuss. RIM controls not just what passes through their servers (which is everything) but also controls the servers which integrate with the unencrypted servers on the government/business end. Given how easily most telecoms rolled over and allowed the NSA to set up their listening rooms, I have little doubt that RIM was complicit in a similar way.

Re:Doesn't Matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854202)

Most businesses view it as a convenient form of backup, or don't particularly believe that there is a reason they should worry about the government having access to their e-mails, or know that they could be subpoenaed directly from the company mail servers under the Patriot Act anyway

Re:Doesn't Matter (1)

causality (777677) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854236)

Is my business the only one ever to realise that blackberry stores your emails on their servers, and that the patriot act gives US government the right to read it? I don't understand why so many businesses overlook that.

I wish the problem were simple ignorance as you describe. That may be going on as well, of course, but the real problem is much worse than the kind of ignorance that could be remedied with a couple minutes' explanation. The problem is denial.

The problem is that the average person doesn't recognize the danger that represents. They think, "well *I* have nothing to hide" and "well, *I* haven't done anything illegal". Of course, both of those assume that government thugs would only ever go after real criminals after finding real evidence that crimes have been committed and would always respect the privacy of everyone else. Both of those assume that government agents never, ever, never, ever, ever, not once, ever, abuse their authority.

Any thinking person who even slightly paid attention to history can see the problem with that. The probem is, they're outnumbered thousands-to-one by everyone else. Time and time again it has been shown that extraordinary surveillance powers will be extraordinarily abused, but to appreciate that, you must first admit that we're not the very first exception. The attitude that police states only occur in those foreign countries, that "it can't happen here" so we can all go back to sleep, well that's the one thing most certain to guarantee that it does.

The other thing that history has repeatedly shown is that runaway government which never stops expanding is a far greater threat than any foreign enemy has ever been. It happens this way every single time it's tried. I suppose those who are really in denial would find fault with me for seeing that two and two added together equals four, every time you try it, and concluding that it will equal four the next time you try it, too.

Re:Doesn't Matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854538)

Is my business the only one ever to realise that blackberry stores your emails on their servers, and that the patriot act gives US government the right to read it? I don't understand why so many businesses overlook that.

I hope you aren't the one giving that advice to your business.
You are thinking of the way they handle PIN messages or BBM instant messages *or* their basic BIS service. These are like any cloud service like gmail as far as their ability to access it.

A BlackBerry Enterprise Server (BES... don't confuse with BIS) goes on your premises and transfers messages in and out of your mail server (Exchange, Domino or GroupWise.) This server connects to the RIM infrastructure, which is responsible for communicating with the carriers. They only transport the data and have no need to decrypt it (and they can't, because you set the keys.) It works both ways. When you 'send' a message on your BES-connected Blackberry, the device sends an encrypted blob back to your BES server which then acts like any other client to the mail server.

BES doesn't hold the messages anyway (trust me, not enough disk space on them) - they remain in their original location on your own mail server.

Re:Doesn't Matter (1)

datapharmer (1099455) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854544)

So I suppose you don't use webmail google apps or any online storage? If the government wants to know what you are doing there are a lot of other ways they can find out beyond asking RIM for a copy. After all, it is *email* which is sent plain text over public networks. Remember those special rooms in the at&t facilities that were oh so controversial a while back? I'll give you a hint, they weren't being used to store old bollywood films.

Re:Doesn't Matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36855650)

No we don't. We use iOs devices, Android, MacBooks Pro and Linux laptops (Windows has been banned as end user OS), storage is always in house, only exception is calender entries which are replicated, all work is done on our Citrix farm which is accessed thru IPsec tunnels from laptops and iPads.

btw. it seems that DoD has learned the lesson too... the LPS distro looks more or less like our Linux clients.

Our biggest problem are users at management level who WANT to have "their" documents on the device.

Wouldn't it be cheaper (1)

apparently (756613) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854160)

to just buy the CEO a pair of clip-on sideburns?

Re:Doesn't Matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854178)

You also support iPads because the corporate world sends and receives emails and runs applications.

Re:Doesn't Matter (1)

kevinmenzel (1403457) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855082)

Hmm. If you have a blackberry, the playbook can do email. So for organizations that are 100% blackberry, does the e-mail issue strike you as particularly relevant?

Re:Doesn't Matter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854180)

"In the corporate world it is all about looking cool in the airport. Which means we have to support iPads"

Which, strangely sounds more enterprise than...PlayBook? Really? Not - oh I don't know...WorkBook? EfficiencyBook? I know - EnterpriseBook!

Re:Doesn't Matter (1)

Sinthet (2081954) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854244)

Heh, I noticed this as well. Kinda poor choice of words when you're trying to sell primarily to business.

Certified for Use? (3, Informative)

cetroyer (805668) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854226)

Not quite. But for once, the article isn't any more accurate than the Slashdot summary. The Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS), which comes from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, is a test of the encryption module of a device or software. In this case, it is RIM's proprietary OS that runs on the PlayBook that has had its crypto module validated (PlayBook FIPS certificate [nist.gov] ). Yes, it is probably the first tablet to achieve this, since most computers leverage Window's validated crypto module (Go here, FIPS certificates [nist.gov] , and search for Microsoft). However, meeting FIPS is only part of the process. Federal regulation also requires National Information Assurance Partnership (NIAP) certification and a test by an approved DoD test lab. After all of that, the device or software will probably be "certified for use in the U.S. government".

Re:Certified for Use? (4, Informative)

Panaflex (13191) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854600)

You forgot to mention that they only have a level 1 certification - which is the bare minimum set of requirements. The security library was developed by Certicom, - known as the "Security Builder FIPS Module."

Getting it certified was really just using the existing certification on a new platform - which only requires a security policy update, some known answer tests, and a run through of the self-testing framework (in some cases - the NIST is funny about that). No code review and not a lot of approved lab time is required for a platform port as long as the hardware is similar and software stays the same.

That's how they got it in and out of NIST in 3 months!

Re:Certified for Use? (2)

friedmud (512466) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854752)

If you want FIPS on iOS all you have to do is use Good Technologies app: http://good.com/ [good.com]

Trust me when I say that many government entities are using this to support iOS and Android....

I wonder... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854238)

I wonder how much the government official who moved the PlayBook to the top of the the NITS' stack got payed by RIM...

An obvious choice, due to security concerns (1)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854248)

A device that's so hard to get your media, email, and such onto or out of... no one's worried you'll bring one to work and be able to cart off any secrets!

Re:An obvious choice, due to security concerns (1)

kevinmenzel (1403457) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855126)

Wait, I'm sorry, since when is BlackBerry Bridge "Hard"? It has an additional requirement of having a BlackBerry phone, but that's not hard, it's an additional requirement.

And is getting media on or off the Playbook that hard? Certainly Blackberry Desktop Manager supports the playbook, no?

I think you're confusing "hard" and "different than what I want". If you don't want to do things the way the PlayBook does things, well then, don't buy a PlayBook. If you have to deal with one for work, well, can you honestly say that in an enterprise type environment where the business decides what device you're using, every other aspect of your job is exactly doing things the way you would want? All the health and safety regs, etc.?

Look, I really like what RIM does. I don't have a Playbook not because I would be frustrated with how it works, but because I don't have a use case for a tablet that's particularly compelling or worth spending the money. But I do have a BlackBerry phone, and will be replacing it with another. Because it works for me like no other solution does. And if that's not why you would buy something... well gosh... I guess I just feel sorry for people who let things other than financial and use considerations be the primary guide for their purchases. Doesn't seem very efficient.

Regulatory bull (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854264)

This just means rim put more regulatory paperwork and compliance documentation together. Aka bullsh!t paperwork pushing.

christian louboutin clearance (0)

Louboutins (2331422) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854288)

christian louboutin discount [christianl...cesale.org] is having regular discount offers that are not possible with local stores and shops.

Disconnect (1)

xuniluser (996255) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854330)

With a name like "PlayBook", few bosses will be promoting this device in the work area/enterprise.

Re:Disconnect (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854378)

I was thinking the same thing. If there was ever a product name that was completely wrong for the target market. Why not call it the "workbook", "securebook", "blackbook", or just about anything else.

Re:Disconnect (3, Informative)

real-modo (1460457) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854436)

Just for the record:-

I think the name is intended to be a sports reference, to the list of set plays that a team develops ahead of time.

The use of metaphors referring to team sports is nearly universal in corporates and Fedland. "She's not a team player" is about the worst thing that could be said of someone. You're expected to "take one for the team" when your boss screws up. And so on.

So, in RIM's target market, "playbook" is intended to hook into key parts of the cult-ure.

Re:Disconnect (1)

VortexCortex (1117377) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855742)

Just for the record:-

I think the name is intended to be a sports reference, to the list of set plays that a team develops ahead of time.

Agreed.

The use of metaphors referring to team sports is nearly universal in corporates and Fedland. "She's not a team player" is about the worst thing that could be said of someone.

...that is, Unless you're talking about a "higher up" eg: a "Team Leader" -- These are not required to "play by the rules"; See below.

You're expected to "take one for the team" when your boss screws up. And so on.

Additionally, you may "take one for the team" when your boss simply screws you. In either event it doesn't sound like your "Team Leader" is being a "Team Player"...

So, in RIM's target market, "playbook" is intended to hook into key parts of the cult-ure.

Thus the tablet supplier must be a company with a name that only a "Team Leader" with a "Team" of "brown-nosers" would love; Clearly, it will be RIM's job.

Re:Disconnect (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854454)

The name "PlayBook" is supposed to draw a parallel to the sports world, where a playbook is used as a device for storing plans of action. Since this device can be used to store files of value (much like the secret plays of a sports team) the name "playbook" makes sense (as opposed to "WorkBook").

right choice but wrong move... (1)

nerdyalien (1182659) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854386)

Blackberry PlayBook is... how should I put it... hmmm... cramming in a roll-cage and bucket-seats into a family saloon.

Certainly, any digital toy can escape the hands of its owner. But mobile phones being with us for good decade or so, we rarely misplace it. On the the contrary, tablets being the new toy in our life, and PlayBook is in a smaller form factor; chances of misplacing is rather high. So it is somewhat justifiable to include the "bridging" feature. Then again, it kills the usability as a standalone device.

Personally I like the PlayBook. Recently I went to a mobile retailer, where they had both ipad and playbook demo units. I wanted to check some details on the internet. So I went to the big screen ipad... Alas! website I wanted to access was a flash site. Then I switched to a PlayBook, voila... accessed the site without an issue!

Good luck PlayBook! ... hate to say this, but it will have a painful future with other competitors..

I still don't think people are getting it (2, Interesting)

erroneus (253617) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854414)

The last time we had a RIM/Blackberry discussion, I went on about what is good about RIM/Blackberry and what they are doing right. Suffice to say, they are all about business and getting things done.

In contrast, all the other things in the smartphone movement are about fun distractions and what new, innovative and original thing can be done next... oh yeah, and getting sued or suing over it. With tablets, the firs thing in most people's mind was "what do I need this for?" and the most common criticism was "this is just a bigger phone!" And almost ALL of this focuses attention on the client side of things.

RIM/Blackberry's idea is that the phone is one of two parts of the whole. The other part is the server side. It is the server side which integrates the client device with the business stuff. If you're not integrating with your business, whatever that is, you're not getting what you need where business is concerned.

iDevice and Android use the opposite approach where the client side is the only thing. This approach is fine for Apple, because Apple wants a piece of everything the users does or experiences. This approach is fine for Google because they are getting what they want from the user as well. But neither of things things care much about what business wants,

But the majority of people here will continue to chant "RIM/Blackberry is letting the world pass them by! They are dying and they don't even know it!" I just can't subscribe to that point of view. There no question that there is a huge market for consumer oriented devices which includes iThings and Androids and that market is booming (and will have an expected bust eventually).

But that's not the market RIM/Blackberry lives in. They live in business and government markets where the requirements are different and among these are reliability, predictability, stability, workability and a lot of things that utterly bore the consumer public. The consumer public is a collection if solitary individuals and they only need to work (or play) the way they want to and they crave different things and new things all of the time. Government and business are entities comprised of teams of people who need to be able to do things in concert with each other. Enabling that need over handheld mobile devices is a tremendous challenge that they have mostly been able to meet and continue to meet.

It's not hard to imagine what you would be able to do with a tablet over a phone where Blackberry is concerned. The ability of a tablet to deliver and interact with information is quite obvious and that's what Blackberry is for. And for many business people, it can easily replace their luggable laptops. What is harder to imagine is how tablets benefit consumers. For most, it is a new shiny thing to play with and they will realize before too long that they don't need to be burdened with the size/weight/fragility of the tablet devices when comparing that against the benefits they get from their use. (A consumer's ROI analysis.)

It's nice to say that the RIM tablet is the first tablet to gain NIST approval, but I suspect it will be the only tablet to gain NIST approval unless Apple or an Android maker gets into making business integration servers which integrate the handhelds with the enterprise which is hard to imagine. Apple has repeatedly demonstrated that they don't want to do business or government -- it's too heavy of a responsibility for them. Android makers are more beholden to the carriers than the consumer or any business. It is just unimaginable for the tide to change in that regard.

Re:I still don't think people are getting it (1)

Kagato (116051) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854498)

I second the thought about Black Berry and the corporate world. However, the lack of native black berry functions like email and calendar will kill them if not corrected soon. That is a function that corporate clients expect. I think HP will likely get NIST certified with their WebOS tablet and Microsoft will likely team up with someone to get a Windows 7 Tablet certified.

Re:I still don't think people are getting it (2)

JaredOfEuropa (526365) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855506)

I agree that the corporate market and the consumer market are different, and that both RIM and Apple/Google currently serve those respective markets quite well.

What is harder to imagine is how tablets benefit consumers. For most, it is a new shiny thing to play with and they will realize before too long that they don't need to be burdened with the size/weight/fragility of the tablet devices when comparing that against the benefits they get from their use. (A consumer's ROI analysis.)

About this I am not so sure. For one, the business market is shifting, and corporations are now pondering the "consumerisation of IT". Many consumers already carry a smartphone or tablet of their own, and the last thing they want is for their boss to give them an additional one to drag around. If given a choice, many people would prefer to get corporate email on their personal device instead of getting a corporate smartphone/tablet. Around my clients' offices, as soon as the email servers were adapted for use with smart phones, managers were replacing their free Blackberries with iPhones en masse. Looking at the state of the UI of both devices at the time, it is not hard to see why (though the UI has been vastly improved on more recent Blackberry models).

Consumers like tablets for the same reasons as business people: in many situations it's a good alternative to a laptop or desktop PC: quick to boot, easy to use and conventient to carry. I know many people who have a laptop at home for browsing or watching movies on the couch / in the kitchen, etc. Now that those people have tablets, those laptops are pretty much left unused. And you can bet that those people will want to use their own tablet for business as well, rather than having to make do with one provided by the company.

Companies are looking for ways to safely allow personal devices to access corporate data; they are not waiting for a business-ready tablet which they can then hand out to their employees. The RIM tablet is not going to change that. With the consumer and business markets converging, RIM is going to have to compete in both if they want to survive; simply being the one with the best security isn't going to cut it anymore.

Re:I still don't think people are getting it (2)

Old VMS Junkie (739626) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855830)

Spoken like a marketer for RIM. RIM is a dead man walking in the enterprise. Yes, they're the only ones to have their own management software but there are a dozen vendors lining up with mobile device management solutions. Vendors like Good Technology and MobileIron are making enterprise-grade equivalents to BES for the iPhone/iPad and Android space. The problem, as it's always been, is applications. It's a nightmare to write anything for BlackBerry. Comparatively speaking, writing apps for iPhones and Androids is a breeze. RIM's percentage of the enterprise market is falling and will continue to fall. They're going the way of so many market leaders before them who thought that once you got to the top you'd automagically stay on the top.

neogod politicos oblivious to their employers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854420)

towards us, they behave like the walking dead, unless they're planning/carrying out
further attacks (media, pocketbook, weather, deception, threat laced
fearmongering, glowbull warmongering etc...) on us mere mortals & our last rights. can they
be disarmed/discharged?

Due to excessive bad posting from this IP or Subnet, anonymous comment
posting has temporarily been disabled. You can still login to post.
However, if bad posting continues from your IP or Subnet that privilege
could be revoked as well. If it's you, consider this a chance to sit in
the timeout corner or login and improve your posting. If it's someone
else, this is a chance to hunt them down. If you think this is unfair, we
don't care.

thanks again

--
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NFL News Today (0)

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Re:NFL News Today (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854934)

is it me or is this the worst possible target audience for this specific spam.

It's easy to get NIST approval.... (2)

pebbert (624675) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854512)

If you don't include an e-mail client !!!!!

backberry (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854568)

I like backberry,my cell phone is bb too
www.hi-swat.com

Who? (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854598)

didn't they have a pager with a keypad?

NOT approved, only FIPS 140-2 certified (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36854674)

"certified for use in U.S. government agencies" -- Very misleading. FIPS 140-2 certification is for cryptographic modules. There are a lot of other criteria a device must meet to be approved.

Sent from my iPad

For crying out loud (1)

uofitorn (804157) | more than 2 years ago | (#36854986)

The submission was clearly written by a RIM PR rep. Simon says "SILENCE"

no leaks from playbook (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36855058)

playbook is so unconfortable you will not do anything usefull there.

I'm sure (0)

Swampash (1131503) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855230)

The three people who have bought Playbooks - and the two who will buy Playbooks before the end of the year - will be relieved.

CBSE notes (0)

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corporations and government (1)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#36855396)

Rather than maximising the amount of money wasted on profit for corporations, when will government make it an aim to minimise the amount it does not produce in-house at cost? Entirely private innovation, where "private" means no connection to government or academia and "innovation" is meant in the technical rather than Apple marketing sense, is rare - if the need is to do something new, and the initial outlay is not too great, you'd be better off hiring and treating well the best people for the job. (Intelligence agencies know this, but no other branch of government seems to.)

Making a tablet is a matter of throwing a few existing components together. Government is large enough and sufficiently well-equipped to manage that bit. Hell, one man with good tooling equipment and soldering skills is, although you'd need something more than that to ensure a sturdy build.

But, no. Modern government is mostly a tool for skimming off funds for friends to those in government and collecting a nice kickback - if an advance fee hasn't already been paid as campaign funds.

There are two problems with government spending which explain most debt problems in the West:

  • Vastly inflating the cost of everything by farming off to the private sector - this includes war, much of which is on behalf of private interests;
  • Refusal to increase pension age in line with life expectancy.

The second problem, affecting the common man, is of course being dealt with in some European nations. The first, much more insidious, is being dealt with by selling off more government, making the problem worse.

This is bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36855704)

Hi guys. You got all taken in for a ride by the PR release. Here's why.

The FIPS140-2 standard recognizes 4 levels of validation. Level 1, which Blackberry Piece Of Crap achieved, basically means "the tablet can execute cryptographic algorithms". Unsurprisingly, anyone willing to shell out a small amount of cash can get this; for instance, OpenSSL is level 1 validated.

The 3 other levels rely increasingly on hardware / software, and actually mean something in terms of security. Level 1 is like saying "AES works like it does in the spec". It has nothing to do with security, apart from very basic requirements that any OS can meet.

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