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The Net (According To Akamai)

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the do-you-see-what-i-see dept.

The Internet 100

The Installer quotes a gizmag story saying "Akamai might not be a household name but between 15 to 30 percent of the world's Web traffic is carried on the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based company's internet platform at any given time. Using data gathered by software constantly monitoring internet conditions via the company's nearly 100,000 servers deployed in 72 countries and spanning most of the networks within the internet, Akamai creates its quarterly State of the internet report. The report provides some interesting facts and figures, such as regions with the slowest and fastest connection speeds, broadband adoption rates and the origins of attack traffic."

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Hypersonic Missile Flight Test in August (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36896988)

The Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) next month is planning to conduct a critical flight test of a missile that could strike fleeing terrorists or stop an imminent launch of a weapon of mass destruction. The planned flight test, a followup to a failed one conducted last year, is the second and final test of the Falcon Hypersonic Technology Vehicle-2 (HTV-2). The launch is currently scheduled for August 10, from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California, with a window that extends to the 17th, in case of weather or other delays.

HTV-2 has been considered as one of the possible candidates for what the Pentagon calls Prompt Global Strike, the military's plan to field a weapon that could quickly reach fleeting targets, such as a senior Al Qaeda leader. DARPA currently describes HTV-2 as a test vehicle rather than a "missile," and program manager Air Force Maj. Chris Schulz tells PM that the eventual goal is "to validate that you can fly a vehicle anywhere in the world in 60 minutes or less."

Capable of traveling at speeds of up to Mach 20, the HTV-2, which looks similar to an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM), could indeed reach any target on Earth in less than hour. But unlike one of the other leading candidates for the Prompt Global Strike mission— a conventionally armed intercontinental ballistic missile—the hypersonic missile would have a very different flight profile than an ICBM. Thus, it would be less likely to be mistaken for a nuclear attack, which is a main concern stated by those who have opposed such weaponry in Congress and beyond.

But a much anticipated April 2010 test of the HTV-2 ended in failure after 9 minutes, when mission controllers lost contact with the vehicle. The flight test started off smoothly: The test vehicle was launched on a Minotaur 4-Lite from Vandenberg, and after separating from the rocket, was set to travel at hypersonic speeds to a test range on Kwajalein (on the Marshall Islands in the Pacific Ocean). But the vehicle began to experience what Schulz called "lateral directional coupling," essentially a very slow roll, rotating around the missile's center line. A malfunction led to a self-destruct sequence that sent the missile tumbling like a football into the ocean.

I hate slideshows (3, Informative)

rbrausse (1319883) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897000)

all the pictures in the gizmag slideshow can be downloaded as one handy zip file [akamai.com] .

Re:I hate slideshows (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36897662)

i love you

Re:I hate slideshows (1)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897766)

More information and analysis on ars [arstechnica.com] .

Gizmagoowhatzitnow? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36898946)

Is a gizmag anything like a jizzmag?

Re:Gizmagoowhatzitnow? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36899756)

No. No it is not.

Re:Gizmagoowhatzitnow? (1)

morethanapapercert (749527) | more than 3 years ago | (#36903536)

Only if you love gadgets even more than the average /.'er, that is to say, with a degree of obsession unhealthy in an adult.

The Net according to AC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36897024)

The Gimp quotes a gizmag story saying "Anonymous Coward might not be a household name but between 15 to 30 percent of the world's first post traffic is carried on the Christmas Island company's internet platform at any given time. Using data gathered by software constantly F5'ing Slashdot's front page via the company's nearly 100,000 servers deployed in 72 countries and spanning most of the networks within the internet, Anonymous Coward creates its quarterly State of the Frosty report. The report provides some interesting facts and figures, such as first, french toast, frosty pisser, and early post metrics with the slowest and fastest connection speeds, broadband adoption rates and the origins of attack traffic."

Re:The Net according to AC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36897356)

You forgot nigger jokes. And GNAA talking about the Zionist plot to conduct 9/11 (which is actually true - it was meant to be obvious you idiots, 9/11 was a controlled demolition and a controlled demolition means an inside job).

Re:The Net according to AC (1)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897892)

I thought that 9/11 was planned by Republicans as an excuse to invade oil-land, and Zionists were focusing on gradually replacing all seats of power in the US with sympathizers. Clearly I haven't been keeping up with the news...

Re:The Net according to AC (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898610)

Warning: those who deny the existence of a Zionist conspiracy may be Zionist conspirators themselves.

Re:The Net according to AC (1)

That Guy From Mrktng (2274712) | more than 3 years ago | (#36903560)

by derGoldstein

ionists were focusing on gradually replacing all seats of power in the US with sympathizers

Clearly I haven't been keeping up with the news

Seems legit ;)

On a more on topic comment: You forgot Apple evangelists, Linux zealots and Winblow$ Luzerz, Also a debate betwen C++ and Java fanboys while exploring VI and emacs connections to goat.cx and how Google knows it all and it's going to show your donkey-midget-tentacles-porn searches to YOUR WIFE!.

Sometimes I think slashdot is like a polymorphic meme.

Akamai in my pants (1)

slashpot (11017) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897144)

I have The Net (According to Akamai) in my pants!

Re:Akamai in my pants (1)

That Guy From Mrktng (2274712) | more than 3 years ago | (#36903566)

You may want a doctor to check that spotty panorama

Myanmar is under influence from China... (2)

madhatter256 (443326) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897156)

The most likely reason Myanmar is number one is most likely due to China....

With the large influx of Chinese influence in Myanmar (http://www.asiapacificms.com/articles/myanmar_influence/) this past year and before, I'm not surprised they have become number one. Maybe China is out-sourcing their hackers over to there so as to draw attention away from China and simply grow their cyber-attack force.

I wouldn't be surprised if our government knows about this....

Re:Myanmar is under influence from China... (1)

tripleevenfall (1990004) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898618)

These future events will affect you in the future!

Instantaneous Telecommunication System (1)

hantarto (2421914) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897182)

After reading article 'The Universe as a Hologram', I've an idea to apply this theory into telecommunication system.

Briefly, in "holographic universe" theory, reality is stored in a high dimension space. Reality is a kind of superhologram which the past, present and future all exist simultaneously. Men can only receive/project a part of that reality. Maximum men can receive/project is only 4 dimensions (3 for space, 1 for time), and it's not the entire space and time. It's just a point in space and time ocean.

If we could store data in at least 5 dimension space! The sender stores the data there and the receiver projects to the same data/reality. This is what causes the instantaneous telecommunication system.

This can change future of 'the Net'. All traffic can be transmitted instantaneously. In 5 dimension space, the 'state' of the net is all possible states, so Akamai report no longer necessary haha.

Re:Instantaneous Telecommunication System (1, Flamebait)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897290)

After reading article 'The Universe as a Hologram', I've an idea to apply this theory into telecommunication system.

Briefly, in "holographic universe" theory, reality is stored in a high dimension space. Reality is a kind of superhologram which the past, present and future all exist simultaneously. Men can only receive/project a part of that reality. Maximum men can receive/project is only 4 dimensions (3 for space, 1 for time), and it's not the entire space and time. It's just a point in space and time ocean.

If we could store data in at least 5 dimension space! The sender stores the data there and the receiver projects to the same data/reality. This is what causes the instantaneous telecommunication system.

This can change future of 'the Net'. All traffic can be transmitted instantaneously. In 5 dimension space, the 'state' of the net is all possible states, so Akamai report no longer necessary haha.

Here, This [timecube.com] might help you understand things better. You're pretty close.

Re:Instantaneous Telecommunication System (1)

DrData99 (916924) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897400)

Wow. You might want to check your medication levels...

Re:Instantaneous Telecommunication System (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897718)

While that's likely true (the caffeine levels are probably suboptimal) I guess I forgot the 'for humorous purposes only, not to be taken internally or seriously for that matter' disclaimer.

Re:Instantaneous Telecommunication System (1)

Jeng (926980) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897918)

Have you read some of his posting history?

They are interesting in a way I am not able to explain yet. Not quite a schizophrenic mind set, but definitely not part of our reality.

Re:Instantaneous Telecommunication System (1)

arbulus (1095967) | more than 3 years ago | (#36899332)

Bloody hell. I think that entire page is written in h1 tags. Apparently this person has never heard of a CMS (though that's the least of their worries, I suppose).

Reg Required (3, Informative)

uncledrax (112438) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897350)

The ACTUAL report (and archives), but behind a reg-wall: http://www.akamai.com/stateoftheinternet/ [akamai.com]

Re:Reg Required (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36897732)

heres a link to the file

http://www38.zippyshare.com/v/5436596/file.html

akamai=useless (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36897352)

having just come off an akamai migration i can tell you that akamais web caching package is completely useless. They have problems with stupid things like session handling (akamais load balancers arent sticky like any open source package such as keepalived). They cache logged in user pages and serve them to other users when they shouldnt (expiry is broken). They do stupid shit like caching stuff even when you tell it not to cache (the servers pass thru the requests instead of level 4 routing which means you see akamais IPs instead of the originating IPs which means it breaks fail2ban). Basically they are a gigantic heap of stinking shit at $150/month. but at least its cheap right ?

Re:akamai=useless (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36899676)

between 15 to 30 percent of the world's Web traffic is carried on the Cambridge, Massachusetts-based company's internet platform

And your expert credentials are...?

Re:akamai=useless (1)

jnpcl (1929302) | more than 3 years ago | (#36901062)

Just because something is popular doesn't make it any less shitty. Examples: Twilight, Justin Bieber, PayPal.

Speed vs. Usage (3, Interesting)

s31523 (926314) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897410)

I find it interesting that the U.S. is number 1 in usage (most unique IP's), but 14th in average connection speed. I would have thought the U.S. would have been a little bit better (speed-wise). China is #2 in both usage and speed. Interesting... Yet another area China will soon dominate the U.S. in (once they take the top spot in usage).

Re:Speed vs. Usage (2)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897556)

China didn't start with a full copper network. US did. Early adoption isn't great for this.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36898474)

That's a convenient scapegoat, but not really an excuse.

The argument is that there was a lot of money invested in the original infrastructure. Corporations (the telecoms, cable and other companies) need time to re-coup their investment in these technologies.

The problem with this argument is that the corporations are no longer competing, just doing all they can to keep the status quo. This means they legislate against new technologies. Need spectrum for a new technology? Too bad for you because these legacy corporations have it all locked up. Want to adopt some new tech that incorporates peer to peer or some form of distributed architecture? Too bad for you, since your company will run into a host of legislation that prevents you from actually providing that service to customers unless you're one of the legacy corporations.

Emerging economies will depend upon high speed Internet. The fact that the pioneer in almost all of this technology is now dropping to 14th and 15th is fully the fault of corporations artificially maintaining the status quo.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (2)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898582)

Emerging economies will depend upon high speed Internet. The fact that the pioneer in almost all of this technology is now dropping to 14th and 15th is fully the fault of corporations artificially maintaining the status quo.

And the voters who let them and get allergic reactions when anyone suggests that the government should regulate businesses.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 3 years ago | (#36899840)

But then the job creators won't create all the wonder jobs we have.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

houghi (78078) | more than 3 years ago | (#36899056)

The reason at least Belgium has so much fast connections was due to pricing. Dialup you need to pay by the minute. Last price I recall was 45BEF (Just over 1EUR) per hour. That is on top of your account.
With ADSL I pay now 10EUR for the ADSL connection (As I MUST have a phone number as well)

So the moment you would be 10 hours or more online, ADSL would be cheaper. So the step to ADSL was 'forced' by the single phone company. Cable was not an option at that moment.

Yet what does speed matter if you can't realy use it, because your provider has installed a limit on the amount of how much you can use?

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 3 years ago | (#36899818)

~There's always some excuse. Europe had copper lines shoved down in old tight passages and they managed. Oh of course there will be the excuse that European countries are so tiny!. But if you compare states with similar densities they still come up short against a lot of European countries. The US just isn't interested in being the best at anything and seems quite happy with companies maximising profits at the consumer's expense.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 3 years ago | (#36900054)

Europe was also very far behind on adoption for broadband. While I was enjoying unlimited cable internet and DSL here in 2000, when I spent the summer in Britain and France laughing at their advertising for hourly dialup.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 3 years ago | (#36900286)

Yep on dial-up Europe was behind. It was always expensive & per minute and 2000 and yeah broadband would have only been starting off around that time. I believe NTL would been just offering cable internet in villages outside of Cambridge. But one thing they did was invest heavily and grew quite quickly.

I think Europe benefits by having more competition. Had things been left to only BT the UK would probably still be on 1 mb broadband and the reason there is more competition because the government steps in and ensures it exists. The US is lacking any sort of controls to enforce competition.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

omnichad (1198475) | more than 3 years ago | (#36899914)

Not the real issue. How much do you think it takes to run fiber optic cable 2 feet to the next subscriber in a densely populated country like China?

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 3 years ago | (#36900064)

That is the second factor involved. South Korea, for instance, has one of the top average offerings for consumers for speed. Very dense and didn't modernize that infrastructure until very recently.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36900918)

Not all of China is as densely populated as you think. There are enormous swathes of sparsely populated land in the west of the country.

And yet, when I was riding my bike through there in 2007, with distances of 50-100km between towns, you could clearly see where the fibre cables had been laid, running alongside the highway. Plenty of cell towers out in the middle of nowhere too. Small towns in remote parts of the country had fast cheap Internet readily available.

China is making absolutely massive investments in infrastructure.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 3 years ago | (#36901694)

Is the Chinese govt financing it or does private industry shoulder the burden? What kind of wage and permit cost differential are we looking at(since that is the major part of the cost, particularly if you're laying underground cables)?

People forget that Sprint spent billions deploying the ION network over a decade ago. Blew away every other consumer offering at the time(something like 5-6x faster than my cable internet at the time) and affordable, but hardly anyone switched over. Few years later they shuttered the service because they couldn't cover maintenance. Set back speed growth for consumers for a long time. Took many years before another national push for a service that was far and away faster than all the rest came about(FIOS)

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 3 years ago | (#36903006)

About as much as for a high rise apartment in New York?

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

Voyager529 (1363959) | more than 3 years ago | (#36908134)

I don't know the first thing about Chinese building codes, but comparing stereotypes to stereotypes...

--New York high-rises would likely be SO dense with computing devices that you'd likely need to invest in half a central office in the basement of the high-rise just to handle the backhaul. You'd need a stack of permits so high you'd likely need a consulting firm just to oversee that they're followed. You'd need to convince the building owners to let you run cable in the building, and those guys are usually so tight-fisted that stereotypically they'd need to have a lawsuit filed against them for a tenant's child drowning to have them fix a burst pipe. All of that assumes that you're not in the "territory" of your direct competitor, who didn't somehow weasel the zoning ordinances in such a way that you can't possibly make the requirements anyway.

--Even in a Chinese high rise, mobile internet connectivity outnumbers stuff requiring a cable to connect, so less backhaul gear would likely be needed. Wires would be stapled to the wall in a week and no one would care, including the building owner and the local zoning board, if there is one.

Like I said, I'm comparing stereotypes here, so there's probably plenty of case-by-case examples where permits are easy to acquire in New York and an impossible to deal with high rise owner in Bejing. However, it stands to reason that overall, there's simply less red tape in China to deal with than there is in America when it comes to the kind of infrastructure building being discussed here. .Personally, I can't get FiOS where I live because Cablevision has such a death grip on my local township that it's prohibitively expensive for Verizon to run the fiber.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

Fremandn (316311) | more than 3 years ago | (#36905174)

To be honest I've never understood this argument. Is it that companies haven't made their returns on the copper yet, companies find the path of least resistance to be less speedy than for new infrastructure, or that these markets are in greater flux creating more competition which spurs innovation. Of course, it could be something else, but this is what came to my air bubble head just now.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 3 years ago | (#36909036)

No, it's more that if it's not broke, don't fix it. The infrastructure is already there, the people are already customers, so why spend billions tearing it all out to replace with fiber?

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36897562)

Actually not surprising at all. China mostly skipped dialup era and they have a lot of population centered into specific areas that are a lot easier to connect into with Fiber and cable. People who aren't online like rural china aren't going to show up in these numbers and the phenomenon known as internet cafes are only going to show up as a single IP even though 4 or 5 people may have used it.

The US still has dialups laying around and a lot more connected rural population where its costly to get better connections out to that drag down the average speed numbers but boost the total unique IPs.

Fun with statistics.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

Brett Buck (811747) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897656)

Why do I care about the speed? It's fast enough, faster isn't going to help me.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897834)

But it's not fast enough. It's hindering our use of the net for more cutting edge use. I'm lucky enough to have a 5mbps connection which is faster than much of the rest of the country, but I'm sitting here only a few miles from an IXP and Qwest is saying that they're not going to be upgrading the connection speeds of much of the city. I'm lucky in my neighborhood, I know of at least two other neighborhoods where the peak connection they offer is 1.5mbps.

Comcast is more or less a non-option as they cheat on connection tests and cap downloads at 250gb per month, as well as having folks sharing their bandwidth with each other.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36898246)

As much as people whine and complain about ComCast I have yet to see any speed cheating. I get a consistent 15mb+ pretty much anywhere I go that supports that speed (BTW this is in Memphis, TN and upper MS. I also do my own tests to verify anything I see on SpeedTest). That is not cheating if the remote site can't keep up with your speed so I don't know where you are getting this cheating from. I get a consistent 50ms or less ping to most places in the ConUS and even if the pipe is shared in my neighborhood, I don't notice it. Yes, anecdotal evidence all, but making broad sweeping claims isn't exactly convincing either.

As for the monthly cap...I have tried to hit that 3 months running. Even streaming movies every night I can barely get above 200gb. I am sure if I just downloaded the same 4g file over and over again I could hit it, but the point is under normal and even above normal use it is not just satisfactory it is more than I actually need. So complain about the cap all you want, most people do not need more. If you really need more (well here *is* the rub) go elsewhere...if you can. The fact that many municipalities do not allow or offer alternatives is a problem, but that is another discussion.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898954)

It's not that they're specifically cheating on the tests it's the way that they use their bandwidth. They offer a much larger amount of bandwidth for the first bit of a download which skews the results and gives the impression that they're providing more bandwidth than they really are.

http://ask.slashdot.org/story/08/02/19/0434234/Comcast-Cheating-On-Bandwidth-Testing [slashdot.org]

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36899968)

Yeah, I see 2+ mb for the first 10 megs or so, then its down to the usual .7-.8 . I have noticed that it got a bit better in the last few weeks. Consistent download rates right at 1mb. yay.

This is on comcast.

Just had this conversation. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36899780)

Even streaming movies every night I can barely get above 200gb.

I

You.

Try again when you have roommates, a girlfriend or a wife and kids.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36898278)

Comcast is more or less a non-option as they cheat on connection tests and cap downloads at 250gb per month

Actually, the cap is apparently (uploads + downloads) 250GB

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36898404)

I want my Netflix to stop hanging up every few seconds (3G)
I want my friends WoW to stop disconnecting randomly. (Cox Cable, east side of town. West side doesn't have that problem)
I want to be able to stream video to 3 computers, do a 25 man raid, and not have google chrome take 25 seconds to load my home page.
I want mumble to not make me sound like I'm talking underwater.

I'm paying for 50mb/5mb. Why is it so difficult to be able to accomplish those tasks?

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

PortHaven (242123) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898974)

Weird...

I've lived in Connecticut and now live in fairly rural Pennsylvania. I have a 6mb/s connection, but usually far exceed that in speedtests. Granted my mother-in-law is stuck with a 1mb/s wireless cell service for her internet. But seriously, I'm not even paying for the higher data speeds.

Most urbarn/suburban areas now offer 6mb/s in America.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

swb (14022) | more than 3 years ago | (#36899380)

I'm no fan of the telecommunications/infotainment oligarchy, but 10 years ago I paid $85/month for 768k/768k DSL and one static IP. That's $112 in current purchasing power.

I now pay $69 for 10m/3m with 5 static IPs. That's a 33% reduction in price for nearly 7 times the product.

How is that not an improvement?

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36897920)

Why do I care about the speed? It's fast enough, faster isn't going to help me.

And I'll bet 640k will enough, too. More isn't going to help.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36897992)

Fast enough for what?

Sure, it's fast enough for what we're using it for today - with things designed with the connection speed of today in mind (ever had a discussion where it ended with "but that requires insane bandwidth!"?)

It's today's version of "640k should be enough for everybody". It might have been at one point where computers were nothing more than a glorified electronic typewriters.

I want faster speeds because instead of taking pictures of my kids, resizing them to a smaller size, then emailing them to the grandparents, i'd like to take HD videos and send the video. better yet, i'd like the grandparents to be able to chat with the grandkids with HD video. it's starting to get there at the high end but it's not quite there with consumer level stuff. And i want to be able to do this as i stream videos from Netflix, stream music from Rhapsody etc.. you get the idea.

How about an even further out ideas? Like immersive interactive 3D content that lets me "experience", say, the Eiffel tower in HD - don't know what that means but that's my point, anyone dreaming up the next big thing with end the though with "but that would require insane bandwidth".

The speed/bandwidth is enough only for what has already been created. Not enough for things I hope to be able to use/witness in my lifetime.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898184)

Like immersive interactive 3D content that lets me "experience", say, the Eiffel tower in HD - don't know what that means but that's my point, anyone dreaming up the next big thing with end the though with "but that would require insane bandwidth".

3D web content of architecture and museums wasn't uncommon in the 90s. Look up "VRML".

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36899514)

I know VRML. Was disappointed that it didn't really take off.

Show me an HD quality (or raytraced quality, or anything that's not vector graphics/polygons) virtual reality stuff - then i'll be impressed. Right now the bottlenecks are CPU for such a thing and bandwidth. CPU is catching up fast. there was an article about Intel doing a demo of raytraced game on the "cloud". Where's a bandwidth provider with the intent to make such things possible?

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36899688)

Its not fast enough not even by today's standards. I would like to do a mirror of my offsite computer every now and then over the network to home. Now since my computer initial mirror is somewhere around 3-4 terabytes its cheaper to just move the data over with a car. The problem is that the best they will sell me is 100/10, now id like to have 100/100 (50€/month) but they aint selling not without bumping my price up by a factor of 100 (yup i asked and got a quote for 5000€/month). Its not like i don't have fiber optics running all the way to the hub form home cod i do, they just don't want me serving form home (well i dont really want to either but its the best option ive come up with so far).

Re:Speed vs. Usage (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898082)

It's a sad story. After successfully inventing the thing, and scoring some sweet IP blocks, we've been sticking our fingers in our ears and pretending that our telecommunications oligopoly-with-local-monopoly-characteristics is a vibrant free market, with predictably tepid results.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

StormReaver (59959) | more than 3 years ago | (#36900966)

...we've been sticking our fingers in our ears and pretending that our telecommunications oligopoly-with-local-monopoly-characteristics is a vibrant free market...

Who's "we"? Most Americans will eagerly point out how little choice we have in phone and Internet service, and how we're being vastly overcharged and vastly underserviced. The only people who seems to not be listening are regulators and politicians. No one else is pretending that America's current telecom situation is anything other than unmitigated crap.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

demonbug (309515) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898108)

I find it interesting that the U.S. is number 1 in usage (most unique IP's), but 14th in average connection speed. I would have thought the U.S. would have been a little bit better (speed-wise). China is #2 in both usage and speed. Interesting... Yet another area China will soon dominate the U.S. in (once they take the top spot in usage).

To me the most surprising thing was that U.S. average speed wasn't nearly as bad as my impression of it has been lately. Sure, South Korea has a significant advantage at ~14 mbps average, but other than that outlier the other nations ahead of the U.S. are in the 5.6-9 mbps range. Faster, but not really materially so - I don't think there is a lot you can do at 9 mbps that you can't do at 5.2 mbps. Yes, we still need to invest in faster speeds and expanding availability to more people, but at least from this metric we aren't as far behind as I thought.

I was also surprised not to see Finland in the top 10 - it seems like every time there is a discussion of broadband access and speeds someone brings up Finland as a shining example of good broadband availability in a relatively sparsely populated nation; apparently, at least from Akamai's view of the 'net, availability (or at least uptake) isn't nearly as extensive as some have suggested.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898500)

I was also surprised not to see Finland in the top 10 - it seems like every time there is a discussion of broadband access and speeds someone brings up Finland as a shining example of good broadband availability in a relatively sparsely populated nation; apparently, at least from Akamai's view of the 'net, availability (or at least uptake) isn't nearly as extensive as some have suggested.

... or it's fast enough and with enough local content that they don't need Akamai as badly.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36898572)

Here's my experience with Korean vs American internet speeds. My internet speed in Korea was something like 60mbps average for less than $40 per month with no bandwidth cap as far as I knew, and I downloaded a lot (rough testing with steam downloads- 6-8 megabytes per second, and torrents-similar speeds. Sites like megaupload were around 12-24mbps). I didn't really notice speed drops during busy times either, like I've noticed with Comcast in the U.S. I think the equivalent of that in the US costs about $150-200 per month.

      I don't know how they got their data for this test. Maybe there's tons of rural places in South Korea where people are still on dial-up, but I doubt it. It's a highly urbanized country from what I saw (moreso than Japan) and the availability and q

     

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

Plainswind (2089218) | more than 3 years ago | (#36904104)

"I was also surprised not to see Finland in the top 10 - it seems like every time there is a discussion of broadband access and speeds someone brings up Finland as a shining example of good broadband availability in a relatively sparsely populated nation; apparently, at least from Akamai's view of the 'net, availability (or at least uptake) isn't nearly as extensive as some have suggested" Akamai do not serve the nordic countries very well. No local servers, and I suspect that they deliberately cap bandwidth use from us too. On my connection, where I can get 11.5MB/s download speed from at 19:00 swedish time when downloading the EVE client from CCP(via LLNW), grab stuff from Sunet, Funet or similar at the same speeds too, or get 8MB/s or so from some other sources, if I have to hit an Akamai server, I'm glad if I get 1.5MB/s

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898178)

blame flyover country

the coasts and major cities are just as fast as asia. all the people who live next to cows with their sub 1mbps connections bring everyone else down. a lot of places are not served by cable or they don't want cable TV leaving them with DSL. even a lot of people in the cities have satellite TV and the cheapest DSL for internet at $10 a month

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36899654)

actually, that's not even all that true. I own a house in northern KY, just a few miles from a lot of farms (and cows). My house gets 30/5 cable service, and does far better than the cable I get in the apt I've been at while consulting.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898418)

I find it interesting that the U.S. is number 1 in usage (most unique IP's), but 14th in average connection speed. I would have thought the U.S. would have been a little bit better (speed-wise).

I'm not surprised. The only way the US has been able to stay high up on the charts of broadband connectivity is by redefining broadband to a much lower standard than the rest of the world.

The US has been surpassed technologically by quite a few countries by now. I think the rest of the world accelerated to a quick pace in the 80s that the US just hasn't been able to keep up with. I remember when I moved to the US in '99, I thought "Cassette tapes? Pagers? Cheques for payment? 4:3 TV? No broadband? Did I move to Burkina Faso or the US?".
And now, 12 years later, you still find pagers and cassette tapes even though they're less common, most TV is still 4:3, and people still use cheques for payment. And I still can't get broadband where I live. 1500/256 DSL or 0-15000/0-512 cable (averaging at 3 Mbps / 150 Mps) is the best I can get.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

Pope (17780) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898598)

And now, 12 years later, you still find pagers and cassette tapes even though they're less common, most TV is still 4:3, and people still use cheques for payment. And I still can't get broadband where I live. 1500/256 DSL or 0-15000/0-512 cable (averaging at 3 Mbps / 150 Mps) is the best I can get.

3Mbps? That is broadband.

PS every new TV show I watch is 16:9, so I don't know where you're coming from.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#36899038)

3Mbps? That is broadband.

No, it isn't. By the CCITT definition, you need to be faster than PRI rate, both ways. I.e. it's not enough to have a typical download speed exceeding T1 speeds if the typical upload speed is only a fraction of that. That won't let you do video-conferencing, for example, or use a remote desktop in any meaningful way (X11 lbx was nice to get around that)

Also, you should not measure the maximum speed, but the CIR. Which for cable is zero. A 0-8 Mbps line is not broadband, but a 2 Mbps line is.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36899354)

The definition of broadband varies greatly. The only definition that everyone agrees on is "faster than dial-up" - but in the States, for example, it is 4/1 Mbps as of 2010.

Also, the CIR for all residential connections is justifiably zero. There is not enough fiber on the planet to give everyone a CIR of even 1 Mbps.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

arth1 (260657) | more than 3 years ago | (#36899518)

Also, the CIR for all residential connections is justifiably zero

This is not true, and not even true for the US. If you get ISDN or non-PPPoE (bridged ethernet) DSL, it's not zero. Of course, that is to the head end, and the rest of the infrastructure might lower it, but if you and your neighbour both have bridged SDSL, you should be able to maintain full speed between the two at all times.

As for the rest of the world outside the US, in many places you can buy 10 and 100 Mbps connections directly to your head end. Fiber and dedicated copper pairs. For less than what cable and DSL costs in the US.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36900418)

Its great. Every show is 16:9, but the cable box still puts out 4:3. So I end up with a 16:9 tv in 4:3 watching a 16:9 picture.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (1)

PortHaven (242123) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898938)

1) Does the study record simply the speed of connection? Because I highly doubt all of China's citizens have access to personal internet connection. Not every American does, but it's pretty darn high. It's easier to have a high avg speed if only a select portion of the populace has access.

2) Usually, these studies fail to account for geography. For example, a densely populated modern nation like Japan or Hong Kong will score high because most of their population is within a small region and thus less infrastructure is required, maintained or updated.

In the U.S, we have internet out to many areas that would be considered "rural". For many nations (ie: Canada where 90% of the population lives on the southern border beside the U.S.) the ranking will be higher than the U.S., because we're covering a lot more suburbs, & rural areas.

So what we really need in order to rank a nation are two additional statistics. Population density and percentage of population in the most dense areas. Why is this important? Canada has a lower population density level than the U.S., but a larger portion of it's population lives in it's denser areas.

Combine that factor with speed, and percentage of citizens with internet access and you'll find out who really is the top dog for providing it's people access to the internet. I'd wager that America wouldn't show too badly in that measurement.

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36899426)

So what are the speeds/USD in the densly populated areas? The speed/prices I have seen in the past are ridiculously high.

I live in a city with 1/5th the pop. density of New York City and yet 100Mbps/100Mbps has been available for 39 EUR/month for the last 4 years., before that it was 10Mbps/10Mbps for the same price (and before that 8/1.5, 3/0.768, 1.5/0.384, 0.5/0.06 over the last 15 years and the near constant price of 40-45 EUR/month).

Re:Speed vs. Usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36900502)

No, Hong Kong is #2 in speed. Hong Kong is a single urban area. China didn't even make the list.

The Net? (2)

bhcompy (1877290) | more than 3 years ago | (#36897532)

Akamai are the Praetorians? Do they hide pi symbols on all of the websites they control?

Re:The Net? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36897830)

Dude, most people here wheren't born when this "Movie" (for the lack of a better term) was in the Cinemas, so they won't get your, like, joke ;)

Re:The Net? (3, Informative)

cashman73 (855518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898352)

Most people here also weren't born when Admiral Ackbar muttered his famous, "It's a Trap!" line in Return of the Jedi, either, but that doesn't stop them from turning it into the Greatest Internet Meme Ever! ;-)

Re:The Net? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36905252)

Do you mean it's other meaning? (Like when it comes to animé and manga.)

Wrong photo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36898290)

Very misleading that the cover photo from the gizmag article has nothing to do with the report, or even with the Internet. It's a photo of earth taken from space:

http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/view_rec.php?id=1438

Re:Wrong photo (1)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898460)

Very misleading that the cover photo from the gizmag article has nothing to do with the report, or even with the Internet. It's a photo of earth taken from space:

http://visibleearth.nasa.gov/view_rec.php?id=1438

The caption on the photo is:

Akamai's State of the Internet report provides a global snapshot of global Internet use

And the photo does appear to be a snapshot of the globe, so it doesn't seem all that misleading. I think it's fair to say that where the light appears in their photo is where the internet users are. What if they had included a hand drawn caricature of the globe? [clker.com] Would that also be misleading?

As an ex-Akamaiite... (0)

GillBates0 (664202) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898306)

I can only say nothing.

Re:As an ex-Akamaiite... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36904020)

As an ex-Akamaiite I *could* say plenty of terrible, terrible things.

But looking at the stock price makes me think someone else already did.

Re:As an ex-Akamaiite... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36913036)

Like!

Noscript! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36898630)

And Akamai was why I installed Noscript. Any given heavy traffic site would ~mostly load, but be 'waiting' on akamai links to finish, thus 'slowing down' my internet usage. Yes, I'm using generalities here, but the point remains. I don't need to see every damn ad and have the counters at akamai log it. For a while there, I was damning them daily. These days? Not so much.

Thanks Noscript! And adblock! And Flashblock!

Most users with speed at 40th (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36898638)

Wow. The US has the most users but speeds barely rank in the top 40 with other nations. I wonder who has the greediest bastards owning the ISPs.

Re:Most users with speed at 40th (1)

silentace (992647) | more than 3 years ago | (#36899952)

I don't have any references to show but I have lived in 3 different continents and multiple countries (so my experiance is what I am referencing). The avarage american city/county/state is by far exceedingly more spread out than any town/country I have ever lived in (outside the US) We build houses on acres of land while many countries have a fraction of our property sizes. The reason I say all that is it is a whole lot simpler/easier to get connections to 100's or 1000's of homes in non US countries then it is in the US.

Do you think an ISP would be willing to spend 1000s of dollars to connect 2/3 rural homes in the country? I doubt it. Those users then use their trusty old analog (maybe even digital) telephone line to get very slow speed DSL or even worse... dial up. Down goes our average speeds. With every town like New York City, you have 100's of 1000's of rural homes in the US that are miles from any kind of "real" internet. I know in japan, entire cities have been lined with fiber making the intra country internet connection gigabit to the home. While in the US we share copper cable lines and deal with slower speed DSL/etc.

I don't know everything about how it all works and I may have explained/misunderstood a few concepts here.... but overall the idea, I think, is pretty simple on why we are so low on the list.

Re:Most users with speed at 40th (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36901410)

Do you think an ISP would be willing to spend 1000s of dollars to connect 2/3 rural homes in the country? I doubt it. Those users then use their trusty old analog (maybe even digital) telephone line to get very slow speed DSL or even worse... dial up.

Somebody put the analog copper lines there in the first place. I wonder what if they ever got their money's worth.

Re:Most users with speed at 40th (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36901444)

Do you think an ISP would be willing to spend 1000s of dollars to connect 2/3 rural homes in the country? I doubt it.

Do you think ISPs were required to spend their own money in the first place? Of course not. Over here in the Yoo Ess Eh, our slimy politicians tend to grant monopoly/cartel statuses to a select few providers per town, city, et cetera. In return, we're supposed to get decent infrastructure out of the deal. We don't, and the cuntdribblers we elect don't really give a rat's ass, since they've already received their personal payoff.

And let's not even go in to who it was who paid for the US's telephone infrastructure in the first place.

As for the rest, fuck me, you can't be serious if you think various Scandanavian countries have more people per capita than the US. Fuck, I lived in the middle of a sprawl, a mere hour and a half from NYC, and the best I could get was fucking 5/1Mb, which was in reality 2/1Mb, with a cap of 40GB/month.

Re:Most users with speed at 40th (1)

dbc (135354) | more than 3 years ago | (#36901794)

So explain to me why, when I live in the middle of Silicon Valley, on the tiniest lot I have ever had for any house I ever lived in, why is it that I can't get a good connection for a reasonable price? I have DSL, last mile by PacBell (because it has to be), but ISP is Sonic.net (because Sonic is mega-clueful and PacBell is a pack of greedy dipshits). But my DSL rates are not all that great. By your logic, if *anyplace* should be able to get a good connection with competition among providers it should be an area of tiny lots and high incomes.

I admit that I have more choice than others -- I could use PacBell (barf), Comcast (that doesn't even pass the giggle test, especially since I don't watch TV so the bundled price for cable is pointless), or some other ISPs that use PacBell's last mile of copper. But there would be no difference in speed among any of the DSL-based ISP choices.

Re:Most users with speed at 40th (1)

moortak (1273582) | more than 3 years ago | (#36901836)

The problem with that line of thought is that our high density areas do poorly when compared to other countries.

Canada? (1)

DarthVain (724186) | more than 3 years ago | (#36900138)

Oh that's right, we suck. We were on one, but got bumped... by Spain. Spain!

Wired and wireless connections mixed together (1)

CAPSLOCK2000 (27149) | more than 3 years ago | (#36900356)

Keep in mind that this report throws wired and wireless connections together.
Imagine a modern with one 100mbit connection to the family PC and 5 mobile phones (barely 4mbit) would have an average connection speed of only 20mbit.

Not a 100% accurate though .... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36901688)

"The fastest European city is Lyse, Norway, which comes in at number 33 with an average speed of 8.1 Mbps"

Lyse is an ISP, no such city exists. Offers only fiber with a 10/10M connection as the most popular.

olec

No problem with IPv4 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36903346)

The graphs show that only 590M ipv4 addresses are being used and that ipv6 is 0.1% of traffic

As ipv4 has 4G addresses then there is no problem with the address space as less than 15% of addresses are connecting.

Another point is that only 3% of the top 1M sites is using ipv6.

US has high speed to 97% of population? BS! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36903532)

I would like to know how they figure that many of the US states have over 97% of the people connected to high speed, when I know for a fact that large portions of Arkansas and Oklahoma don't have anything higher than dial-up available(unless you count satellite*). I know that one of the GOV reports was playing games with the numbers(if zip code 12345 has high speed to one house, then the whole area has high speed). Just because a larger town in the middle of a zip code has high speed, the suburbs(or further out), which is a lot of people, still don't have anything other than dial-up.

I bet they are fudging the numbers again by saying, those people could get satellite connections. The prices, data rates, and data caps on those connections are ridiculous.

Also, just for reference, I live in South Korea and when they say it is 100mbit to the house you get those speeds. Unlike the US where they say you will get "up to 5mb/s". The new Ubuntu/Fedora/BSD etc comes out and I download the latest CD in under a minute and can upload the torrent for weeks at a few MB(yes bytes) per second and no one questions why I am using so much bandwidth. All for approximately $15 a month.

And for those people that say US is fast enough, how are we supposed to progress if we stop at "fast enough/good enough" just because you don't use IPTV or streaming HD shows and movies, doesn't mean no one should have the ability.

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