×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Ground-Based GPS Mimic Is Inch Perfect

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the keep-to-the-left-for-8-inches dept.

The Military 140

holy_calamity writes "For several years the U.S. Air Force has used WiFi-router-sized boxes on a New Mexico missile range to create a GPS-like service to track munitions to the nearest inch. Now the Australian company behind the technology is rolling it out for civilians. One gold mine is already using the tech and specifications are being released so that GPS receiver manufacturers can adopt the technology. Locata hopes that construction sites, factories and city governments will all want to install their own high accuracy 'location hotspots.'"

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

140 comments

Where's the First Post? (0)

billstewart (78916) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955216)

Ought to be around here somewhere?

Re:Where's the First Post? (1, Offtopic)

el_tedward (1612093) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955230)

You'll need to unplug the router and plug it back in first.

Re:Where's the First Nigger? Oh Wait, It's You! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955420)

Ought to be around here somewhere?

Fuck you.

I hope you crawl all the way up your own asshole and disappear.

can you build one with a linux box ?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955228)

just wondering if its possible to do this with open source.

Hasn't this already been done? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955234)

Is this cheaper than professional GPS systems from Trimble? I thought they already had acurracies like this.

Re:Hasn't this already been done? (3, Informative)

wagnerrp (1305589) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955510)

There are several solutions available currently that offer 1" or better absolute accuracy off of GPS signals. They all function by resolving the issue that GPS is precise, but not accurate. By positioning themselves at a known position in space, they calculate the offset from what GPS is telling them, and broadcast that to the nearby area. They end up being much cheaper as all you need is a good GPS receiver.

This solution instead requires accurate local time references, and as such is going to be considerably more expensive. The advantage of this system is that GPS has an incredibly weak signal. It requires line-of-sight, and even trees will block a signal. If inside a building, or down in a quarry, you are likely to not receive enough signals to get an accurate position lock. This uses local transmitters at high power to allow them to operate in less advantageous terrain.

Re:Hasn't this already been done? (1)

JoeMerchant (803320) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955680)

There's a few companies doing Loran/GPS-like tracking of police radio transmissions based on time of signal receipt time at various antennae. Accuracy varies with precision of time signal, availability of multiple receivers, etc.

Re:Hasn't this already been done? (1)

MacGyver2210 (1053110) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955738)

WWV time is almost everywhere, and free. A WWV receiver is a simple circuit.

Re:Hasn't this already been done? (1)

msauve (701917) | more than 2 years ago | (#36956064)

WWV, et al, work on HF, and are subject to significant propagation delays. You can get much better time from the GPS constellation (25 ns, pretty easily). To get into the inch/centimeter range, you need sub nanosecond accuracy.

Re:Hasn't this already been done? (1)

EETech1 (1179269) | more than 2 years ago | (#36956992)

A very accurate time can be determined from WWV by synchronizing with the carrier frequency. The 20MHz (example) carrier for WWV is also a calibrated reference signal that can be used to calibrate your local oscillators or clocks.

Why was the above wrong guess marked informative? (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955790)

There are several solutions available currently that offer 1" or better absolute accuracy off of GPS signals.

That doesn't help where you can't get GPS - which is what this thing is for in the first place! It's for indoors, undergound etc.

This solution instead requires accurate local time references

No it doesn't. If the article gave you that incorrect impression there is another on the website of Australia's ABC Science Show from a program several months ago.

This uses local transmitters at high power to allow them to operate in less advantageous terrain.

Such as underground where GPS signals do not go!

Re:Why was the above wrong guess marked informativ (1)

toastar (573882) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955952)

There are several solutions available currently that offer 1" or better absolute accuracy off of GPS signals.

That doesn't help where you can't get GPS - which is what this thing is for in the first place! It's for indoors, undergound etc.

This solution instead requires accurate local time references

No it doesn't. If the article gave you that incorrect impression there is another on the website of Australia's ABC Science Show from a program several months ago.

This uses local transmitters at high power to allow them to operate in less advantageous terrain.

Such as underground where GPS signals do not go!

Because I get lost walking from oneside of the bomb shelter to the other all the time.

Re:Hasn't this already been done? (1)

Cynicor (1220572) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955560)

Is this the sort of technology used in those (Tokyo) Disney rides, like Pooh's Hunny Hunt and some water-based one? Every ride seemed to be different, and the cart would just go and do its own thing.

Similar to previous systems of yesteryear (2)

slater86 (1154729) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955240)

Wasn't this like a system they used before GPS that was still in minimal use until recently?
I vaguely remember they still had PDP-8's still in storage as replacement parts

Re:Similar to previous systems of yesteryear (4, Informative)

Penguinshit (591885) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955294)

you mean LORAN [wikipedia.org] . Yes, it seems like a hybrid LORAN/GPS.

Re:Similar to previous systems of yesteryear (1)

slater86 (1154729) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955482)

Yeah, That sounds like the one. About 12 months ago a bunch of PDP-8 machines still in original packaging came up for auction around the place that were perfect for hobbyists and collectors.
I think I remember reading that Steve Gibson of GRC purchase a handful or so.

Re:Similar to previous systems of yesteryear (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955300)

Are you talking about LORAN or Decca?

Re:Similar to previous systems of yesteryear (1)

whiteboy86 (1930018) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955472)

This could be a breakthrough for automation, imagine robots navigating a warehouse with sub-inch accuracy. GPS is not that precise.

Re:Similar to previous systems of yesteryear (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956018)

They already have that, it's called painting lines on the floor or installing rails.

Re:Similar to previous systems of yesteryear (2)

Dynedain (141758) | more than 2 years ago | (#36956332)

Henry Ford's adoption of the assembly line is even better for robot-enabled productivity than it is for human workers.

Re:Similar to previous systems of yesteryear (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955516)

Wasn't this like a system they used before GPS that was still in minimal use until recently? I vaguely remember they still had PDP-8's still in storage as replacement parts

I vaguely remember to use Google before asking stupid questions.

Y'know, that thing you just failed to do. Bitch.

Re:Similar to previous systems of yesteryear (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955954)

FUCK.YOU.ASS.HOLE

improved cellphone location? (1)

kiwijapan (1293632) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955252)

I wonder how long it will take before this becomes available for use in cellphones to improve the accuracy of tracking. It would make services like 'find my iphone' even better, but would also enable government agencies and stalkers to get an even better lock on those they're tracking.

Re:improved cellphone location? (1)

russotto (537200) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955356)

I wonder how long it will take before this becomes available for use in cellphones to improve the accuracy of tracking.

It already is. It's how TDoA cell phone location works -- the cell towers themselves are the base stations.

Re:improved cellphone location? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956136)

Totally. I've been able to bullseye womp rats in my pilotless T-16, using just my iPhone's GPS and camera for navigation and targeting, they're not much bigger than two centimeters.

Re:improved cellphone location? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955726)

I would have a completely different business today, if GPS had a accuracy of <0.5m and would also work indoors.
(And if Nokia wouldn't have shot itself, but that's another story.)

- A-GPS (GSM-assisted differiential GPS) can do 3m at best. 30-100m at worst (when the assistance is off)...
- WLAN triangulation works indoors, but is even less exact in most cases. I tested it for months, and I never got anything better than 50m.
- RFID triangulation is nice, but you have to put them in the place first, and then you need an expensive RFID reader device on each mobile phone. You'll get 1cm accuracy though. It's really impressive.
- IR laser based systems also are extremely accurate. But obviously, if the area is occluded, it stops working. There are other problems too.

So if this works with standard mobile phone technology that everyone has built-in, it would be very sweet, and maybe I could do my old plan for real this time.

If only we could roll it out to the whole country first. ;)

Re:improved cellphone location? (1)

FooAtWFU (699187) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955780)

Technically, WLAN location isn't triangulation - it's actually done with circles. You get signal strength, but not generally much in the way of a direction (well, there's antenna orientation patterns). The proper word for this is "trilateration".

Also, there are some ways you can improve WLAN location. For starters, you want to use a different AP deployment pattern, putting APs around the outside of the building instead of deploying them for maximum coverage. Statistical techniques, in concert with taking detailed site surveys, can also help.

aka Differential GPS (0)

phoebe (196531) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955256)

Which has been developed and used for the last 20 years. What is new here? http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differential_GPS [wikipedia.org]

Re:aka Differential GPS (1)

ceiling9 (1241316) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955338)

DGPS is all about using the fact that error in a normal satellite GPS signal is relatively constant in one location on Earth - the ground based transmitters just tell the DGPS receiver what that error is in your specific location. This sounds like they are using actual ground-based GPS transmitters, thereby removing the calculation of where the satellite is in the first place, to improve accuracy.

Re:aka Differential GPS (1)

AfroTrance (984230) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955372)

AFAIK DGPS uses fixed nodes to broadcast error in the satellite signal, while this system used fixed nodes to act like satellites. So this system can work with zero signal from satellite.

Re:aka Differential GPS (3, Informative)

wagnerrp (1305589) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955514)

No. Differential GPS uses a local transmitter to provide local offset to the GPS position. This uses local transmitters as the time source, to allow it to operate in places the GPS signals will not reach.

Re:aka Differential GPS (1)

Demanufacture (113381) | more than 2 years ago | (#36956070)

I've worked in the DGPS industry for nearly a decade now, and I can tell you that this is not a new concept in any way. Firstly, it is true that there exist many free correction sources (e.g. WAAS in the US, EGNOS in Europe) which will allow a DGPS receiver to determine it's position to decimetre accuracy. Centimetre accuracy can be achieved with Real Time Kinematic [wikipedia.org] (RTK) corrections (either from a local base station or delivered remotely by some kind of long distance connection, e.g. GPRS). Neither option is free, but subscribing to a correction provider is a hell of a lot cheaper than buying your own base station. Millimetre accuracy can be achieved using very expensive laser equipment and is very common in the surveying industry.

The concept of using local transmitters for underground applications is not new either. I am aware of a number of mine sites in Australia which have been using Pseudolites [wikipedia.org] (Pseudo Satellites) for a number of years for this exact purpose.

Re:aka Differential GPS (1)

TooMuchToDo (882796) | more than 2 years ago | (#36956108)

Are there any free DGPS data providers? Difficult to integrate into mobile platforms like Android? I spoke with the developer of GPS Status for Android and we were discussing WAAS integration, but apparently not enough of the low-level GPS system is available to android apps.

Re:aka Differential GPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956940)

No. Differential GPS uses the differential between 2 or more GPS signals to increase accuracy. You are thinking of an RTK GPS system, which uses a base station to correct for accuracy.

Re:aka Differential GPS (2)

amirulbahr (1216502) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955602)

GPS accuracy is poor to non-existent within buildings and underground. Accurate sensor localisation is far from trivial in such environments. One hurdle is multi-path interference which renders the time-to-receive of a packet as near useless. AFAIK to achieve a high level of accuracy requires a mesh-like network and the use of multiple sensors including accelerometers with the accuracy increasing with the number of nodes in the mesh.

The CSIRO, Australia's peak science body is has been working on wireless tracking [csiro.au] for a while. Don't know if they are involved with this new company Locata or not.

Because it's Australian. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955682)

Slashdot editors have been promoting Australia very heavily for quite a while now.

Re:Because it's Australian. (1)

belg4mit (152620) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955820)

Yes of course. National internet filtering (of whatever, for whatever reason) is a great ploy to sell to nerds.

Re:Because it's Australian. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956290)

Yes of course. National internet filtering (of whatever, for whatever reason) is a great ploy to sell to nerds.

The original AC may be closer to the truth than he suspects. The climate and geography of this particular part of New Mexico ain't that different from the Australian outback. Hot, dry, dusty, and the nearest human being and/or structure is several miles away.

Re:aka Differential GPS (3, Informative)

JoeMerchant (803320) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955690)

What is new here?

Complete lack of dependency upon satellite signals?

Re:aka Differential GPS (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955868)

And also no requirement for the expensive accurate time sources that are in the satellites.
There is a transcipt of an interview about it here:
http://www.abc.net.au/rn/scienceshow/stories/2010/3058425.htm

Speed, Size, and Cost (1)

Intropy (2009018) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955272)

TFA doesn't go into details, but I'm imagining a replacement for mo-cap and wiimote/kinect if it updates quickly enough, is small enough, and cheap.

Re:Speed, Size, and Cost (1)

duk242 (1412949) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955388)

That's exactly what I'm thinking it would be good for. You could do some awesome VR/MoCap stuff with this :D

An Australian company (3, Funny)

Gadget_Guy (627405) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955328)

Something tells me that an Australian company would not be using inches to track anything. TFA seems to agree. Our official conversion tables between metric and "ye olde worlde" include the phrase "an inch is as good as a mile", which does not bode well for its accuracy.

Re:An Australian company (1)

feepness (543479) | more than 2 years ago | (#36956380)

Something tells me that an Australian company would not be using inches to track anything. TFA seems to agree. Our official conversion tables between metric and "ye olde worlde" include the phrase "an inch is as good as a mile", which does not bode well for its accuracy.

I think what you mean is:

"That's not an inch. THIS is an inch!"

Perfect to the inch or cm? (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955340)

Doesn't the military use metric (klicks = km), along with every other industry that needs a sane measurement system?

Re:Perfect to the inch or cm? (1)

petman (619526) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955500)

TFA uses metric. For some reason, the poster felt it necessary to impose his imperial will onto slashdot.

Re:Perfect to the inch or cm? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955846)

TFA uses metric. For some reason, the poster felt it necessary to impose his imperial will onto slashdot.

Darn those Imperialists!

Re:Perfect to the inch or cm? (1)

rts008 (812749) | more than 2 years ago | (#36957224)

I don't know how far and deep the metric system has been adopted by the US military, but I do know when I was in the US Army(1977-1981), all of the weights and distance metrics presented to us were metric system.

Meters instead of yards, kilometers instead of miles, grams and kilograms instead of ounces and pounds; all of the basic stuff at least.

It was presented in an inexact, crude, Drill Instructor fashion though:
"A meter is a yard, a klick (US military jargon for 'kilometer') is a half mile and a 'rock throw', and a kilo (kilogram) is about half a pound. If you need to know anything else, well, your sorry ass should have went to college and become an officer!"
(close paraphrase)

On a side note:
There has not been an acceptable, widely adopted metric equivalent proposed for the ubiquitous US military measure of distance known as the 'cunt hair', to the best of my knowledge.
The debate usually bogs down when the color of the hair in question is brought up....and the conclusion is more research is required. ;-)

Has existed for years, called Differential GPS (0)

drtsystems (775462) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955346)

Its called differential GPS and is already being used all over the world. Hell its even being used on farms to guide tractors by now. It can get down to the cm level of accuracy. Not News.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Differential_GPS [wikipedia.org]

http://www.deere.com/servlet/ProdCatProduct?pNbr=GT3TAPC&tM=FR [deere.com]

Re:Has existed for years, called Differential GPS (3, Informative)

MacGyver2210 (1053110) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955766)

Differential GPS is much different than this system.

This system requires no component of GPS except a similar receiver. That way they can use it in places no satellite signal reaches...like mines and shielded research facilities.

Not differential GPS and works where GPS doesn't (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955890)

It's not that at all and is news:
http://www.abc.net.au/rn/scienceshow/stories/2010/3058425.htm

Regrettably limited applications (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955364)

GPS was a project of the Department of Defense, where money grows on trees. That's why it's still there and being maintained.

Meanwhile, civilian administrations (read "Department of Transportation") only have finite funds to spend on implementing and maintaining a ground-based system (read "eLORAN").

Because a ground-based system can only be used to bomb ourselves, it won't get much money, especially in today's economy. Don't expect such systems to be deployed outside specific buildings and such, as alluded to in the summary.

amazing (0)

jonathanas (2426956) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955432)

Wow Amazing. I don't know have idea when tehcnology used in military well

Re:amazing (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956042)

Wow Amazing. I don't know have idea when tehcnology used in military well

I have no idea what the fuck you are trying to say. Your writing ability really sucks balls.

Seriously, are you a retarded window-licker? Did you ride the short bus? Did they always tell you how "special" you are?

Military Intelligence (1)

pipingguy (566974) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955550)

Can anyone name any other technologies that were originally developed by the military which are in common use by private citizens today?

Re:Military Intelligence (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955624)

the internet

Re:Military Intelligence (1)

cavreader (1903280) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955692)

Don't forget the basic computer (automated processing) devices built by Turing and employed in WW2. Crude tech by today's standard but it showed the military the war fighting benefits of these gadgets and they jumped on the bandwagon with money and R&D. The Trinity project also was responsible for computer advancements including the use of punch cards for data input which Richard Feynman was responsible for implementing at the time.

We need 3D GPS accuracy down to the millimeter (2)

sp3d2orbit (81173) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955558)

Millimeter accuracy in 3 dimensions would open up a lot of possibilities for use in robotics.

Re:We need 3D GPS accuracy down to the millimeter (1)

subreality (157447) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955872)

Decimeter precision with fast acquisition and several accurate fixes per second would open up a lot of possibilities too. Just think of using a GPS for street navigation - the absolute positioning is usually fine, and most most of the problems you see are either on initial startup or due to lag, especially when you change velocity in any direction.

Re:We need 3D GPS accuracy down to the millimeter (1)

wisebabo (638845) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955888)

And motion capture (and probably a whole host of new applications my imagination is too poor to come up with. Surgery? Anatomical imaging? Real time engineering analysis of structural deformation? Radio telescope antennae deployment? Really accurate munitions delivery for "keyhole" shots, personal assassination? Automatically docking/refueling of vehicles?).

Re:We need 3D GPS accuracy down to the millimeter (1)

xtal (49134) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955966)

Good encoders, referencing, inertial nav, and visual cuing can give you that accuracy.

GPS should never be relied on without a backup.

Re:We need 3D GPS accuracy down to the millimeter (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956156)

Millimeter accuracy in 3 dimensions would open up a lot of possibilities...

Yes, I'll finally be able to measure my penis using GPS.

We don't /need/ mm accuracy GPS. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956198)

With the right equipment machinery now can achieve accuracy of 0.001in or ~25um. Better if you want to pay more -- the sensors used in nanometer positioning.

Use ~10cm accuracy GPS-mimic to arrive at your reference point, then use local positioning for where you need it.

Re:We need 3D GPS accuracy down to the millimeter (1)

lemmis_86 (1135345) | more than 2 years ago | (#36956448)

What we really need is food, water and air, all of which should be clean.

Great! (2)

mrxak (727974) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955594)

Now we just need to get our enemies to buy a whole bunch of these, and conveniently place them on all the nice targets we'd like to bomb.

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956144)

What we need is to not have enemies..

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956742)

What we need is to not have enemies..

Good luck with that, US..

Re:Great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956486)

"Hey bomb, this isn't the ammo dump co-ordinates. THAT is the ammo dump over there, next to the chinese embassy"

NSA? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36955698)

I thought current GPS locations were limited in accuracy by the NSA in the US. I wouldn't plan on seeing this anytime soon in the states.

Re:NSA? (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955760)

Those days have passed. Differential GPS DGPS [wikipedia.org] comes close to the accuracy of this system. It was developed decades ago to circumvent the selective availability (SA) that the military hoped would limit civilian GPS accuracy. Nothing was ever done to stop DGPS implementations, so its doubtful the NSA or anyone else would try stepping in now.

Already Exists (1)

bastianb (2426976) | more than 2 years ago | (#36955794)

This has existed for years, and heaps of companies use it. from rio tinto automation to fork lifts and kalmars for product tracking. Sigh its paid advertising - a press release/paid feature. http://www.symeo.com/English/Products/Position-Measurement/LPR-products-for-position-measurement.html [symeo.com] http://www.ctscts.com.au/shop/view/2d/41 [ctscts.com.au] http://www.idt.com.au/Stories/WSJ_Rio_Tinto_Perth%26Jupiter_Systems.pdf [idt.com.au] http://www.riotinto.com/documents/ReviewIssue90Jun09_the_shape_of_things_to_come.pdf [riotinto.com]

Synced to 2ns? (1)

Michael Woodhams (112247) | more than 2 years ago | (#36956342)

From TFA: "and all the signals are synchronized to within two nanoseconds."

Light travels about 0.6m in 2ns, so this suggests accuracy will be much less than the ~3cm accuracy claimed by the summary. (If you have lots of base stations, you can do rather better than 0.6m, but a factor of 20 would not be feasible.)

Also - I didn't notice anything in the article to support the summary's "to the nearest inch" claim. Did I just miss it, or is this from some other undisclosed source?

Re:Synced to 2ns? (1)

Draconmythica (1057150) | more than 2 years ago | (#36956704)

The 3cm mentioned in the summary = ~1in which is probably where they got the idea. Although anyone measuring something useful probably isn't using inches anyway.

Re:Synced to 2ns? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956950)

with conversion figures like that its probably not very accurate. 1 Inch = 2.54 cm

Isn't this a LPS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956374)

A local---not global---positioning system?

Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956488)

In the 70's/80's there was a lot of research carried out in Sydney using direct sequence spread spectrum for high accuracy location finding. I would guess this new system is a direct descendent of that original research. The police were very interested in the original system, which performed quite a bit better than GPS.

Differential GPS is accurate to mm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36956694)

So what is new? Only the extra expense arising from the MIC connection.

Time for Slashdot to enter (1)

dascritch (808772) | more than 2 years ago | (#36957014)

The era of modernity and forget alchemist practices.
You know, metric system. Science.

mGod 0p (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#36957270)

vitalitgy. Its
Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...