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Swede Arrested For Building Nuclear Reactor

CmdrTaco posted more than 3 years ago | from the now-you're-playing-with-power dept.

Power 410

An anonymous reader writes "A 31 year old Swedish male was arrested for trying to build a nuclear reactor in his apartment. He got hold of radioactive material thru mail-order purchases and from smoke detectors. Police raided his apartment after he had contacted the Swedish Radiation Authority (Strålsäkerhetsmyndigheten) to inquire if it was legal to construct a nuclear reactor at home."

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Now, Come On ... (4, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958502)

Geez, everyone's a critic. He's just trying to send electricity back onto the grid and he probably couldn't get approval from his landlord to put solar panels on his roof.

Next on Discovery... (2)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958764)

Arrested? He should get his own TV show!

Re:Next on CBS (1)

MRe_nl (306212) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958914)

Bazinga!

Re:Next on Discovery... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958948)

Bad boys, bad boys, watcha gonna do?

Re:Now, Come On ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958932)

if your landlord refuses to allow solar panels, it's a safe bet he won't green light a nuclear reactor in the broom closet

Lesson learned (5, Insightful)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958504)

Never ask for permission, but just do!

Re:Lesson learned (2)

impaledsunset (1337701) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958548)

If you're going to ignore the answer to a question, sometimes is best to not ask it at all.

Re:Lesson learned (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958628)

Except the question was never answered (at least in TFA) as to whether it is legal or not to build such a reactor at home. The only real information is that once you attempt to do it, police will come, arrest you, seize your property and intimidate you.

Re:Lesson learned (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958698)

It's better to beg forgiveness than ask permission, unless you're looking to stay out of jail...

What is with these fork-truckin' Scandinavians???? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958508)

Mass murder in Norway, homemade nuclear reactors in Sweden. WTF????

Well, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958526)

I guess the Anarchist Cookbook's nuclear reactor WILL work. Thanks, Jolly Roger!

Better to ask forgiveness than permission (5, Insightful)

barlevg (2111272) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958530)

I love that the only reason he got busted is because he asked if it was okay...

Seems like he should have either:

(a) Asked BEFORE acquiring the material or

(b) Not asked at all

Re:Better to ask forgiveness than permission (0, Flamebait)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959162)

Or not do it at all.

What are you in for? (5, Funny)

TehNoobTrumpet (1836716) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958532)

Prisoner 1: "I raped a bitch and killed her. What're you in for?"
Prisoner 2: "I built a nuclear power plant in my kitchen."

Re:What are you in for? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958696)

Prisoner 3: "I downloaded and shared 10,000 movies."

Re:What are you in for? (4, Insightful)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958756)

Prisoner 5: "I published the encryption algorithm used by an American company, which is legal where I live"

Re:What are you in for? (2)

ginbot462 (626023) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958832)

OMG? What happened to Prisoner 4? You bastards, wait until Number 6 hears about this. (He'll probably look smugly at you .. in knowing sort of way)

Re:What are you in for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958966)

Prisoner 4 was there for autism. Somebody at an airport found his attitude suspicious.

Re:What are you in for? (2)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958968)

She was caring for a hedgehog. From the same source... http://www.thelocal.se/35230/20110729/ [thelocal.se] Those Sweeds are a bunch of criminals!

Re:What are you in for? (1)

Nofip (1174643) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959006)

Maybe it's a case of the Prisoner's dilemma. =)

Re:What are you in for? (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958992)

10,000? They'll be out loooong before you are.

Re:What are you in for? (5, Funny)

Amouth (879122) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959014)

Arlo: "Littering." And they all moved away from me on the bench
there, and the hairy eyeball and all kinds of mean nasty things, till I
said, "And creating a nuisance." And they all came back, shook my hand,
and we had a great time...

Re:What are you in for? (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958766)

"And they all moved away from me on the Group "W" bench there."

Re:What are you in for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958958)

And causing a nuisance...

The hard parts (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958536)

Choice quote: "To get it to generate electricity you would need a turbine and a generator and that is very difficult to build yourself".

Yeah, it's not like thhey're nineteenth century steam technology like the redundant safety systems.

Re:The hard parts (4, Interesting)

plover (150551) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958644)

Choice quote: "To get it to generate electricity you would need a turbine and a generator and that is very difficult to build yourself".

On its face, the quote is correct. A turbine and generator would be hard to build yourself. From scratch.

However, you can go to an automotive junkyard and pick up a used turbo unit for a few bucks, and while you're there, you can pick up an alternator, too. Now the problem is no harder than piping the steam from a pressure cooker through the turbo, and hooking the turbo to the alternator. Just add fission and you're on the grid!

A lot of people are playing with homemade turbine engines made from junked car parts. Perhaps they are deliberately trying to make it sound hard to discourage other Swedes with too many smoke detectors from trying a similar experiment.

Re:The hard parts (4, Insightful)

jfengel (409917) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958802)

That would get you out some electricity. Building it as a continuously-operating system is somewhat trickier.

Even trickier than that is getting it into your house power grid, which means syncing up the AC and other EE-grade power issues. You can buy the device you need, but it would end up costing more than just buying power from the power company, and be less convenient. (Plus, he was doing it in an apartment, probably without direct access to the mains.)

He didn't want to generate power, just do a little tinkering. He might well have hooked it up to a junk generator at some point, just to prove he could, but it wasn't the point. And the authorities were right to get nervous about it: the materials are toxic as well as radioactive, and putting more lives at risk than his. Get yourself a shed in the middle of nowhere next time.

Re:The hard parts (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958834)

It can't be that hard to find one ... I remember a Mister Rogers episode where he had a tiny steam boiler hooked up to a turbine that powered a light. Maybe too small for his little reactor, though.

Re:The hard parts (1)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958904)

Personally I would be a bit leery of an old junk yard turbo since most people who have a turbo car don't bother to take care of it, like let the car idle so the turbo cools off so you don't scorch the oil in it before shutting the car off, or doing regular oil changes. Now if it was off a relatively new car that was just totaled then I wouldn't be anywhere near a leery. But it is easily doable.

Being arrested is no big deal... being CHARGED is. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958542)

What's the big deal about being "arrested"? Police (and others) use their power of arrest all the time. The big story will be if he is charged with something.

Re:Being arrested is no big deal... being CHARGED (1)

Darkness404 (1287218) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959018)

And somehow you don't see it as a big deal that they are denying someone's freedom? Being arrested -is- a big deal because it often causes more damage than being charged with a crime.

Chances are slim that the government will pay you for the emotional trauma of being arrested, the loss to your reputation if you are arrested and all other effects of you being arrested even if you aren't charged with a crime in the end.

I'l bet... (2)

vk2sky (1463797) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958570)

...it's that bloody boy scout [wikipedia.org] , up to his old tricks again.

Re:I'l bet... (2)

Talderas (1212466) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958720)

He wasn't even an Eagle Scout at the time. He earned that later. Can you imagine if he was an Eagle Scout? I bet you he either would have figured out some awesome new method for nuclear power generation or would have died in the process as so many Eagle Scouts seem to do in the name of progress (Roger Chaffee, Ellison Onizuka, William McCool).

headline != article content (5, Informative)

rbrausse (1319883) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958572)

he was questioned by the police because he apparently violated some Swedish nuclear material laws.

the story in short:
- he invested $950
- he bought radioactive material and dismantled one domestic fire alarm
- he blogged about his expirements
- he asked the Swedish authorities if it is allowed to build a nuclear reactor
- some official accompanied by police offices visited his flat and found no radiation problem
- he was questioned at a police stations and was afterwards released
- all the nuclear stuff was confiscated

Re:headline != article content (1)

HungryHobo (1314109) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958868)

Is he being charged with anything?

If not then that actually seems a fairly reasonable response given that he asked permission before doing anything risky.

Re:headline != article content (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36959030)

From his blog [blogspot.com]
110722 - Project canceled!
Wednesday, I was arrested and sent to jail, when the police and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authory searched my apartment. They took all my radioactive stuff, but I was released after a hearing. But I am still suspekt for crime against the radiation safety law.

Re:headline != article content (2)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958888)

Everything about the story makes sense except for

- all the nuclear stuff was confiscated

What he was doing, and what he owned, was perfectly legal, right?

That's the whole point of exempt sources... Ultra super low power, yet detectable with good gear... Assuming he wasn't stupid enough to beg borrow steal non-exempt sources...

Now if he had unlicensed non-exempt sources, I can see why they'd throw the book at him and confiscate it all. I'd even more or less support it. I have friends who are in charge of non-exempt sources and the legal requirements are mostly sane and sensible so its not only legally correct but also scientifically / morally / ethically correct to follow non-exempt source licensing laws. So many laws in the US are corrupt that its weird that I can actually whole heartedly support one...

I'm sure that screwing around with a domestic fire alarm is 1) Perfectly safe 2) thru a peculiarity of a loophole of the law is technically illegal. But thats right up there with ripping off mattress labels, or currency defacement laws.

Anyway does anyone know if he was busted with the Swedish-chef equivalent of exempt or non-exempt sources? Maybe Sweden must have the concept of exempt sources, modern industrial society more or less depends upon it?

Re:headline != article content (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958936)

All his nuclear stuff was confiscated, plus:

- police uniforms
- chemicals
- hand grenade replicas
- computers

From a Swedish forum where he posted under the nickname "Psychopatic" in the section physics/mathematics/technology. Source: https://www.flashback.org/sp31878961 [flashback.org]

Nope (2)

symes (835608) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958576)

He was not trying to generate electricity - "To get it to generate electricity you would need a turbine and a generator and that is very difficult to build yourself," he told HD. He was just tinkering! Obviously a DIY purist. This guy should get a geek medal or something. Utterly brilliant. And I am very pleased I'm not his neighbour.

Re:Nope (1)

Kyusaku Natsume (1098) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958872)

The submission is a litte incomplete. Where are the plans and schematics of his reactor!? It could be the heigth of geekness and coolness if most of the case and support structure were made of LEGO.

another attempt (5, Informative)

An ominous Cow art (320322) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958586)

This kid [wikipedia.org] tried (badly, apparently) to do the same in the US a while back. I lived only a couple of streets over, but had left the area a dozen years before his attempt. I think I delivered newspapers to his house.

Re:another attempt (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958874)

I'd heard about him, but I didn't know he was arrested recently for stealing smoke detectors and has radiation sores on his face. I thought the guy would be a bit smarter now that he's in his thirties.

Re:another attempt (1)

dascritch (808772) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959132)

You're glooming

Government destroys economy (0)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958604)

and that's one way government destroys economy, by preventing people from experimenting with their ideas and possibly finding better and cheaper solutions to energy needs. I am not saying this guy would find a better and cheaper solution necessarily, but what we have here, is government that interferes and definitely this prevents many more people from trying and finding something.

Re:Government destroys economy (1)

rolfc (842110) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958678)

Actually, it is patents that prevents people finding better and cheaper solutions, as we can see in the software industry now.

Re:Government destroys economy (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958730)

My first reading of your comment confused the hell out of me, because I read it as parents, not patents.

But after the second reading I see what you are saying, I've been saying the same thing as well. [slashdot.org]

But governments prevents market from working, be it patents or just preventing people from tinkering.

Re:Government destroys economy (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958722)

Considering he was doing this in his own home, with a risk of irradiating his neighbours, I think it was right to stop him experimenting. If he did it in a properly shielded location then it wouldn't be so bad.

Re:Government destroys economy (0)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958776)

Again it's not government's business. If the neighbors don't like what he is doing, it's between them and this guy.

Re:Government destroys economy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958806)

If I take a big shit in your living room, is it "not the government's business"?

If enforcing that a citizen does not interfere with the health, safety, and property of another citizen without consent is "not government's business" then what the hell is government's business?

Re:Government destroys economy (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959050)

Considering he was doing this in his own home, with a risk of irradiating his neighbours, I think it was right to stop him experimenting. If he did it in a properly shielded location then it wouldn't be so bad.

No one seems able to answer if his sources were exempt or non-exempt. Thats the key.

As for the "properly shielded location" that is pretty irrelevant, if he had to dough to own a pig and pay inspection fees, unless he's trying to make a political statement, the paperwork to make it perfectly legal would be pretty easy, depending on what he's doing.

Exempt sources are technically radioactive, and great for experimenting and fooling around, and the level of radiation is right up there with a granite countertop. The reason you use an exempt source instead of a granite countertop is because unlike a granite countertop, a dude with expensive calibration gear verified the exact quantity of the exact isotope, and its reasonably pure rather than a mixture of random junk. Kind of like the difference between a wooden Chinese 25 cent ruler and my $150 American made micrometer is mostly that my micrometer is actually calibrated to measure correctly.

Non-exempt sources are supposed to be licensed and CAN theoretically be quite dangerous, in addition to being totally illegal if you're not licensed, stored in an inspected facility, etc. A lot of it is chain of custody issues... a sheet metal thickness gauge from an old mill is probably harmless in an apartment, but thrown into a recycler could make an unholy mess if melted. Or tossed into a fish pond that people eat out of, that could be really bad. Much as my box of mouse poison in the basement is perfectly safe while its in my basement, but dumped into a vat of baby food at the baby food factory could be kinda bad.

Re:Government destroys economy (1)

DrgnDancer (137700) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958986)

So what you're saying is that it should be perfectly permissible for someone to tinker with chemically dangerous and radioactive chemicals in an apartment building where he will surrounded by other people? Some of those other people being the particularly vulnerable kids and the elderly? The danger here isn't that he could be building a bomb, the danger is that large concentrations of radioactive material is inherently unhealthy. There was no one to make sure he stored it properly, didn't have too much of it, or general making sure he wasn't giving a X-ray levels of exposure to everyone in his building 24/7. Not to mention that the chemicals themselves are often toxic in concentration even ignoring the radiation.

Overkill much? (2)

Xacid (560407) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958610)

Is it really necessary to raid a guy who was asking for permission in the first place? Seems like he would have welcomed an "inspection" and handled things accordingly from there. Since he was asking for permission it sounds like he wasn't trying to break the law - give the guy some credit. All this is going to do is discourage others from inquiring and just doing whatever they're after.

Re:Overkill much? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958640)

Yes - didn't you know? Terrorists always go through airport TSA security checkpoints, illegal immigrants always arrive by air, and people who seek to build weapons of mass destruction always ask for permission from the government beforehand!

The world of big government (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958652)

In the big government paradigm, everything you do is subject to whims of a bureaucrat who will decide whether or not you can do it.

In this case, although apparently he did nothing wrong, his equipment was confiscated, and I suspect he was warned if he made any waves, he would be brought up on charges.

Other than go to work every day on public transportation living in a suitably small flat (and maybe have an approved "smart phone" as long as it can be tracked), a bureaucrat will decide what is appropriate for you to do, have and where to live.

The worst part is, half the population thinks that's okay, as if a free person's life is made to serve the greater good.

These are the first people to look at the Chinese and say "tsk tsk, they don't have the freedoms that we do".

Re:Overkill much? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958708)

I don't think its the kind of raid you see before you.
I'm guessing they came by, knocked on the door and asked to see his experiment, then asked him to join them to the police station for questioning and took the equipment. Not exactly kicking down the door with a full swat team swarming into the apartment kind of raid.

Re:Overkill much? (1)

Xacid (560407) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958788)

I was wondering that too. I'm from the States so police + raid doesn't usual equate to a friendly stroll. Then I started asking myself if it's that much nicer over that way in that aspect too.

I'm still curious why they confiscated the equipment and not just the radioactive material. I take it this story is too fresh to get any good details yet, but I have a hunch it'll come out.

Re:Overkill much? (1)

tom17 (659054) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958988)

Not quite...

FTB (From the Blog)
"Wednesday, I was arrested and sent to jail, when the police and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authory searched my apartment. They took all my radioactive stuff, but I was released after a hearing. But I am still suspekt for crime against the radiation safety law.

I was ordered by the police to get out of the building with my hands up, then three men came, with geiger-counters and searched me. Then I was placed in a police-car, when Radiation Safety Authory went into my apartment with very advanced measure-tools. "

Re:Overkill much? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959090)

Is it really necessary to raid a guy who was asking for permission in the first place?

Ask permission first and you get licensed to work with non-exempt sources. No problemo.

F around and ask stupid questions after already doing it, they're gonna come down like a ton of bricks.

Try building an addition onto your house once by acquiring a building permit before starting work, and once by acquiring a building permit after the work is complete, and report back on which experience was more "fun".

The worying bit is (1, Interesting)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958622)

He ordered some radioactive material from overseas

Which was evidently delivered without any of the authorities being notified. How many Jihadi's are reading this and putting in their orders now?

Re:The worying bit is (2)

biodata (1981610) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958654)

Replace the words 'radioactive material' with the word 'fertiliser', given recent events, and see whether you are more/same/less worried.

Re:The worying bit is (0)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958812)

personally more worried, a dirty bomb could have affects lasting for decades

Re:The worying bit is (1)

biodata (1981610) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958894)

In theory (because the whole dirty bomb theory has never actually happened and is just a security theatre bogey man myth). In actual historical fact, fertiliser bombs HAVE had effects lasting for decades. Oslo city centre will never be the same for instance.

Re:The worying bit is (0)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959062)

In theory (because the whole dirty bomb theory has never actually happened and is just a security theatre bogey man myth). In actual historical fact, fertiliser bombs HAVE had effects lasting for decades. Oslo city centre will never be the same for instance.

You would have to look hard to find people lamenting the changes to the baltic exchange [wikipedia.org] , or manchester city centre [wikipedia.org] today. With a dirty bomb they could still be contaminated areas.

Re:The worying bit is (1)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958972)

personally more worried, a dirty bomb could have affects lasting for decades

Only in a small area. As for the decades part I believe there are still 2 giant holes in the ground in New York that were created almost 10 years ago.

Re:The worying bit is (0)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959088)

personally more worried, a dirty bomb could have affects lasting for decades

Only in a small area. As for the decades part I believe there are still 2 giant holes in the ground in New York that were created almost 10 years ago.

That's really down to the reaction and deciding what to do with it - it could have been fixed much quicker, and in many countries would have been.

Re:The worying bit is (1)

gutnor (872759) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959004)

The effect of the last terrorist attack have already lasted a decade with no end in sight, and they affect the whole nation and arguably the whole world. So we are debating if we are more worried about loosing my right arm than our left arm.

Re:The worying bit is (1)

rbrausse (1319883) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959060)

He ordered some radioactive material from overseas

Which was evidently delivered without any of the authorities being notified

it was most likely a Radium preperation like this one [ld-didactic.de] (or a similar product for scholastic purposes), more intensive radiation sources are strictly controlled.

Re:The worying bit is (1)

emanem (1356033) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959104)

Even catholic fundamentalists...

How was this going to work? (4, Insightful)

volsung (378) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958624)

I'm puzzled how this guy was going to build a "nuclear reactor" out of mail-order isotopes and smoke detectors. Smoke detectors usually contain Am-241, which is an alpha emitter. The mail order stuff I assume was uranium ore. Was he planning to create neutrons from (alpha, n) reactions and use those to trigger a few fissions from the uranium?

This sounds like his experiment bears as much similarity to a reactor as a balloon full of hairspray resembles a car engine.

Re:How was this going to work? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958976)

WTF?!?! We all have an alpha emitter in our homes?!?!?!?!?!!

Re:How was this going to work? (2)

hAckz0r (989977) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959190)

Don't worry, just hide behind your newspaper. That will be all you need to stop alpha particle radiation.

Now after the Americium-241 degrades into Cm or plutonium, that is another matter. For the neutron radiation a good thick wall of lead should do it. Just keep that tucked inside your closet for easy access.

Re:How was this going to work? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36959038)

This sounds like his experiment bears as much similarity to a reactor as a balloon full of hairspray resembles a car engine

Hmmm. Interesting. Do you by chance have a newsletter?

Re:How was this going to work? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36959122)

Try a Google Shopping source for "Radioactive source" sometime. Top result is an educational kit with an Alpha, Beta, and Gamma source. There are also a number of Gamma emitters available for industrial sensor use, Cobalt-60 and Cs-137, for example, used for all sorts of non-contact sensing and radioactive imaging applications. I work for a company that builds large scale pressure vessels, and they use a gamma source to detect microscopic cracks and imperfections in the welds prior to installation. In the US such sources are all heavily watched and regulated by the DHS, so actually getting them across the borders would be hard if not impossible without a lengthy licensing process. But in other less paranoid countries, that may not be the case.

Re:How was this going to work? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959152)

I'm puzzled how this guy was going to build a "nuclear reactor" out of mail-order isotopes and smoke detectors. Smoke detectors usually contain Am-241, which is an alpha emitter. The mail order stuff I assume was uranium ore. Was he planning to create neutrons from (alpha, n) reactions and use those to trigger a few fissions from the uranium?

This sounds like his experiment bears as much similarity to a reactor as a balloon full of hairspray resembles a car engine.

Trolling the local authorities asking about homemade reactors is a pretty good sign of being crazy to anyone who knows anything about the subject, which on one side makes him harmless, but on another side might make them wanna check him out before whatever made him bonkers is making him more bonkers and he tries doing something stupid with something that he actually has a chance of successfully operating, like say, a sniper rifle.

You can build more or less whatever you want with electronic gear in your basement. Millions of people do perfectly successfully and quietly. On the other hand, asking the cops if making an electric chair is ok, and then being surprised when that pisses them off, is just beyond stupid.

Afterwards... (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958646)

... he received simultaneous job offers from Iran and North Korea ...

Cool (1)

should_be_linear (779431) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958650)

Sounds like 5-digit Slashdot user or something...Extra geek points for mushroom over Stokholm.

Is this even possible? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958658)

You can't build tiny nuclear reactors.

The minimum amount of reactive material you need to keep a chain-reaction going is too high to build tiny nuclear reactors.

What people call a "tiny" nuclear reactor is the size of a hot-tub.

Scandinavians (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958660)

WOW! Scandinavians (Norwegians, Swedes...) have been making headlines lately for terrorist acts. They're some of the most peaceful people on Earth. So, what the hell is going on lately??? I know it sounds like he simply wanted to produce his own electricity but...... weapons grade or not -- that's nuke material!

Hmmmm

Re:Scandinavians (1)

biodata (1981610) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958714)

I don't think there was any indication in the article that this was anything to do with terrorism. See my comment above about fertiliser. If you fear terrorism you will see it everywhere. If you don't then you will not necessarily associate any particular material object with terrorism.

Re:Scandinavians (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958798)

weapons grade or not

That distinction would be wrong to gloss over. While it is relatively easy to build a nuclear reactor (not a safe one, mind), building a nuclear weapon (and merely producing or handling weapons-grade nuclear material) requires technological and industrial resources beyond any individual. Therefore, this is not nuke material. It is at worst usable in a dirty bomb.

Belt buckles, shoelaces and a piece of gum (3, Funny)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958728)

Who needs radioactive material to build a nuclear reactor? This is clearly no Macgyver.

Re:Belt buckles, shoelaces and a piece of gum (2)

geoffaus (623283) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958952)

I prefer my Mr Fusion

Link to his blog (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958754)

Extremely old? (1)

kyrio (1091003) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958800)

Isn't this extremely old or is he just copying someone else who did this?

Mail-order? (1)

SirDice (1548907) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958810)

I really, really wonder what mail-order company delivers nuclear material?!?

Re:Mail-order? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958998)

http://unitednuclear.com/

Re:Mail-order? (1)

Bob the Super Hamste (1152367) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959054)

My understanding is that you can get some very low level radioactive material through mail order. I worked at a company that had some for testing semiconductors against to ensure that they were properly hardened against radiation. I have also seen Geiger counter calibration kits sold as well so it doesn't seem unreasonable since he was probably buying stuff slightly more radio active than a granite counter top.

Swede Arrested For Building Nuclear Reactor (0)

adalrichschmidt (2427550) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958818)

This is hardly newsworthy. All websites (including new ones by Google) undergo normal fluctuations. Besides, the changes are not so drastic to warrant such a publicity. Atlantic International Partnership Madrid Local News and Latest Events [atlanticin...ipnews.com]

Ugh (1)

rebelwarlock (1319465) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958830)

Don't write about nuclear anything if you're going to do it "in shrt frm". Have the attention span to type the whole word.

As an immigrant in Sweden I'd say... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36958848)

That there are two swedish facts in this story:

1) The guy ASKED if it was legal to build a nuclear reactor
2) There was a public office where he could place such inquiry

I love this country xD

Easier to ask forgiveness than permissions.... (1)

i_want_you_to_throw_ (559379) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958902)

well maybe not in this case.

Strange (1)

maroberts (15852) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958944)

I seem to recall that USia has a number of people trying to build home brew fusion reactors, why not have a few guys experimenting with fission??...

Un-sharp (1)

Sta7ic (819090) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958954)

That's pretty stupid, overall. He should've done his research before doing some experiments, and the government shouldn't've gone in with a vengeance. As far as silly ways to get arrested, though, it's sillier than getting arrested for making moonshine in the US. http://www.burningstill.com/?q=node/57 [burningstill.com]

Information published by the experimenter himself (1)

Bromskloss (750445) | more than 3 years ago | (#36958994)

  • His blog [blogspot.com] (English), where describes his experiments.
  • Forum thread [flashback.org] (Swedish), started by himself, where the arrest and possible consequences are discussed.

Nuclear-secrets.com is dead homer used it when (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959002)

it still had real info on it.

But he needed to steal some plutonium from the power plant to make it work.

I bet he had a DeLorean in his garage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36959106)

He just needed something to power his flux capacitor. duh!

"Arrested" (1)

scubamage (727538) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959116)

Hmm, I wonder if he was arrested, or "arrested." Meaning, he'll disappear from the grid, and turn up working in a government lab. I'd think sensible politicos would want to nurture this sort of thing.

Nuclear Boy Scout (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36959130)

Has been done. By a retarded kid here, who created a superfund site out of the shed behind his moms.

He's a waking pile of scabbed over tumors now.

Fun times.

Big power is keeping the little guy down! (1)

scorp1us (235526) | more than 3 years ago | (#36959160)

If we all had mini reactors, we'd be free of oil and electric companies.

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