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NASA Briefing on New Mars Finding This Afternoon

Unknown Lamer posted more than 3 years ago | from the mulder-found-exploring-face-of-mars dept.

NASA 231

ipsender writes with a NASA announcement: "NASA will host a news briefing on Thursday, Aug. 4, at 11 a.m. PDT (2 p.m. EDT) about a significant new Mars science finding. The briefing will be held at NASA Headquarters in Washington. The new finding is based on observations from NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, which has been orbiting the Red Planet since 2006." You can catch the briefing online at the NASA TV site.

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An alien spacecraft (3, Insightful)

wsxyz (543068) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985572)

...mysteriously pinned to the bottom of a dust-filled crater.

Sugar Caves... (1)

Braintrust (449843) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985606)

... lots and lots of sugar caves.

Re:An alien spacecraft (0)

cHiphead (17854) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985620)

One that looks like the Millenium Falcon? ;)

Re:An alien spacecraft (1)

hellfire (86129) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985842)

Nope, this time it's Slave One.

Inside scoop (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986112)

NASA discovered that Han really shot first.

Re:An alien spacecraft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985648)

By alien do you mean Russian or Chinese?

Re:An alien spacecraft (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985666)

Mexican, of course.

Nothing nearly so exotic... (0)

msauve (701917) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985742)

they just found a Starbucks.

Re:An alien spacecraft (0)

Damouze (766305) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985792)

Or a Heineken beer tender.

Re:An alien spacecraft (1)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985976)

...mysteriously pinned to the bottom of a dust-filled crater.

Send Captain Scarlet

In AD 2101, war was beginning... (2)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985610)

...okay, so we won't see a Zig.

On a more serious note though, I actually hope to Heaven they present something insanely fascinating to the general public - enough to kick the government in the ass and get Mars human exploration seriously going.

Sadly, I suspect it'll be something only of use to some niche of geologists.

Re:In AD 2101, war was beginning... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985680)

What's this obssession with sending people to a dead rock made of rust orbiting in a deadly, radioactive vacuum? Oh wow, look, a rock. Let's spend billions in hauling every single molecule required for life in 100% fail-safe engineering... so we can look at rocks!

The Space Age died decades ago. Let it go.

Re:In AD 2101, war was beginning... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985772)

agreed. much much better to spend billions blowing up rocks in the fucking desert and getting thousands of our troops killed along the way.

Re:In AD 2101, war was beginning... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985902)

How come perfectly normal people always wanna swing it this way and act like you're a warhawk just because you're not interested in spending on something science related.

I mean, why don't we send astronauts to Somalia with beef jerky instead, then?

Re:In AD 2101, war was beginning... (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986152)

They're assuming that because you're whining about spending "billions" on it, when the total money spent on the entire space program (from which we actually do get productive returns that improve the general quality of life on earth) is less than one percent the amount spent on military action. If it's the money you're upset about, you should be re-directing your complaints. If it's the "people having hope for the future being better than the shit-hole of a present that we live in" that you're angry about, you're a short-sighted idiot.

Frankly, by assuming you're a violence obsessed warhawk who wants to shoot and blow things up, they're giving you the benefit of the doubt, and regarding you as a better person than you probably actually are.

Re:In AD 2101, war was beginning... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985824)

Saturn's moon Titan has a thick atmosphere [nasa.gov] (acutal ground pic). It also has gravity low enough that if a person could strap on a pair of wings, they could fly and more oil [universetoday.com] than the entire planet.

Re:In AD 2101, war was beginning... (2)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985834)

You need to ask yourself: How are we finding out about the briefing? Is it from someone who watches every minutia from NASA? then don't hold your breath. If it's from someplace more accessible to the general public, then MAYBE i'ts a big deal the general public...whether or not the general public understands it's impact immediately is a different question.

Lisa Pratt is involved, so my hopes are high the found evidence of life.

http://geology.indiana.edu/pratt/ [indiana.edu]
http://www.indiana.edu/~deeplife/homepg.html [indiana.edu]

Re:In AD 2101, war was beginning... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986194)

Get your ass to mars.

Marvin the Martian wants his planet back (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985640)

You are making him very angry.

Desperate (-1, Troll)

stevegee58 (1179505) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985684)

Desperately trying to prove their legitimacy by holding news conferences.

Breaking News! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985698)

NASA find a penis-shaped crater on Mars!

My guess (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985702)

They'll probably announce that they've spotted the first Starbucks on Mars.

Is it: They got a better photo of that guy (1)

BetaDays (2355424) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985706)

Is it: They got a better photo of that guy sitting on a rock? http://youtu.be/MMtMHxT5orY [youtu.be]

timezones, schmzones (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985708)

Crazy idea: slashdot is a worlwide-reaching site. Why don't you post date/hours in terms of GMT?

Re:timezones, schmzones (1)

Nidi62 (1525137) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985738)

Because how hard is it to add 6 hours to EDT to come up with GMT?

Re:timezones, schmzones (2)

dylan_- (1661) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985838)

Because how hard is it to add 6 hours to EDT to come up with GMT?

Thanks for proving his point! :) Everyone knows their GMT offset, so why not give those times? (I suppose it should really be UTC since it's space stuff...)

Re:timezones, schmzones (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985988)

Also, he got his offset wrong. A quick lookup tells me EDT is actually 4 hours behind GMT.

Re:timezones, schmzones (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985840)

Very... in fact extremely... Actually it's impossible.. but don't take my word for it

Re:timezones, schmzones (2)

eepok (545733) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985852)

It's not. However, not everyone memorizes time zone differences.

Re:timezones, schmzones (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985876)

how hard is it to add 6 hours to EDT to come up with GMT?

Slightly harder than adding 4 hours to EDT to come up with GMT (which incidentally has the advantage of being correct).

Re:timezones, schmzones (0)

maroberts (15852) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985800)

Crazy idea: slashdot is a worlwide-reaching site. Why don't you post date/hours in terms of GMT?

Because the only USians who can deduct 6 from times are those with degrees....

My guess - (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985712)

Methane. It's going to be something about methane. Look at all the geologists on the briefing panel;

The briefing panelists are:
-- Philip Christensen, geophysicist, Arizona State University, Tempe
-- Colin Dundas, research geologist, U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, Ariz.
-- Alfred McEwen, planetary geologist, University of Arizona, Tucson
-- Michael Meyer, Mars Exploration Program lead scientist, NASA Headquarters
-- Lisa Pratt, biogeochemist, Indiana University, Bloomington

Re:My guess - (2)

SeNtM (965176) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985760)

Interesting. Isn't the presence of methane indicative of life?

Re:My guess - (5, Funny)

pahles (701275) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985826)

No, it is indicative of the presence of methane.

Re:My guess - (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985832)

ABSOLUTELY!
Now give us that money so we can send stuff on there to check this out.

Re:My guess - (3, Informative)

Darth Snowshoe (1434515) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985890)

They have certainly found methane on Mars, and so far can't conclusively explain where it's coming from, or its periodic nature;

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/news/marsmethane.html [nasa.gov]

Here's the good bit;

"Methane is quickly destroyed in the Martian atmosphere in a variety of ways, so our discovery of substantial plumes of methane in the northern hemisphere of Mars in 2003 indicates some ongoing process is releasing the gas," said Dr. Michael Mumma of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center [...]

Take a look at Lisa Pratt, among today's panelists - her IU home page is kind of a big clue;

Lisa M. Pratt, Provost's Professor of Geological Sciences, Biogeochemistry

Research Interests:

Geomicrobiology of sulfate-reducing microorganisms
Biotic and abiotic fractionation of sulfur isotopes in modern and ancient oceans and lakes
Influence of wildfire on carbon isotopic excursions during the Cretaceous
Fate of complex organic molecules on the surface of Mars

      Ph.D., 1982, Geology, Princeton University
        M.S., 1978, Geology, University of North Carolina
        M.S., 1974, Botany, University of Illinois
        B.A., 1972, Botany, University of North Carolina

Re:My guess - (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986518)

They have certainly found methane on Mars, and so far can't conclusively explain where it's coming from, or its periodic nature;

I read that part and clicked on your post expecting a fart joke.

I want my money back.

Re:My guess - (1)

MightyMartian (840721) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986094)

I believe it could also be explained by other active geological processes. Maybe not as exciting as organisms, but still, considering the view right now is that Mars is a geologically dead planet, so it would be at least moderately interesting to find out that there are geological processes still ongoing. It also could provide yet another possible place for life to exist.

Re:My guess - (1)

Narcocide (102829) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986140)

Only probably, and that's only based on what we currently know about necessary components for life. Remember that not so very long ago we didn't even know that chemosynthesis was possible.

Re:My guess - (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986322)

Not unless you think the atmosphere of, say, Neptune indicates life. Methane can form from biological processes or non-biological processes. Methane on Earth is most abundant from biological sources, but methane is also expelled from volcanoes, among other places. The Fischer-Tropsch process [wikipedia.org] is one of the reactions that can produce methane non-biologically.

Re:My guess - (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986498)

No. It is indicative of he who smelt it dealt it.

Re:My guess - (2)

cunniff (264218) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985808)

I noticed that too. My guess: they've found a currently active or very recently active volcano

Re:My guess - (3, Informative)

squidflakes (905524) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985880)

Humm... looking at the biographies of the scientists involved, I'm going to guess something about water, ice, and life.

Re:My guess - (2)

HappyHead (11389) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985844)

Methane, Large sources of easily available water, or Oil. One of those three are the most likely.

Considering the focus on geology, it's also possible they've found a surface deposit of some rare earths minerals (such as those which are currently exported only by China), though you're right, methane is probably the most likely, and while geologists studying Mars might find it interesting, it's not nearly as significant to the rest of the human race.

Re:My guess - (3)

Splab (574204) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986162)

I'm hoping oil then, that should get us to Mars in a hurry!

Re:My guess - (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986412)

Oil? As in petroleum? Seeing as oil is an organic byproduct, that would be orders of magnitude more significant (and less likely) than large sources of water.

Re:My guess - (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986676)

Rare earth metals aren't "rare". China only have the correct conditions for economic mining at the current prices. If the prices rises, it becomes economical (again, because it used to be so) to mine then in other places, including the United States. I really doubt that rare earth "deposits" on Mars would be newsworthy.

Re:My guess - (2, Funny)

WrongSizeGlass (838941) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985950)

Look at all the geologists on the briefing panel

Hmm, let's see ...
Geologists -> Rocks
Rock -> Mountains
Mountains -> Beer
Beer -> Bad Commercials
So, it looks like Coors has officially sponsored the Mars expedition and will be using official NASA footage from the rovers for their next stupid commercial?

Re:My guess - (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986406)

You could have just

Geologists -> Beer

Re:My guess - (0)

dimethylxanthine (946092) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986072)

A slight typo - I think you mean Unobtainium. You think NASA is spending all this cash to send Lego figures to the outer planets to find methane (that won't even burn on Mars). No no no no no no, no! They're after a much bigger fish. Ooooh, fish?

Methane (0)

dugn (890551) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986104)

The source of Global Warming on Mars.

Re:My guess - (1)

SnarfQuest (469614) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986206)

Then it must be about Global Warming caused by Man. Those two SUV's they've been running all over the place has destabilized the planet, and runaway greenhouse methane has caused devistating thermal effects. The only chance Mars has, is if George W Bush signes the Kyoto treaty. But republicans hate martians, as proved by the fact that they pay Slim Whitman records.

Re:My guess - (1)

gtall (79522) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986262)

So you are saying cows are involved in this?

Re:My guess - (3, Informative)

pz (113803) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986264)

Lisa Pratt studies sulfur and specifically biological sulfur with respect to the surface of Mars. Check out her lab's web page:

http://geology.indiana.edu/pratt/ [indiana.edu]

Here's a list of her research interests from that site:

Geomicrobiology of sulfate-reducing microorganisms
Biotic and abiotic fractionation of sulfur isotopes in modern and ancient oceans and lakes
Influence of wildfire on carbon isotopic excursions during the Cretaceous
Fate of complex organic molecules on the surface of Mars

As far as I can tell from that list, Dr. Pratt is the only hard scientist. The others are more involved in managing the program (Meyer) or designing the instruments (Christensen, Dundas, McEwen). Interestingly, there are no post-docs or graduate students listed, and they would have been the lead investigators doing the actual work -- perhaps this is a reaction to the Felisa Wolfe-Simon snafu? I'm not familiar with the field, though, so much of this is speculation from 2 minutes' work with Google. Take it for what it's worth.

Re:My guess - (1)

IrquiM (471313) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986338)

Oil!

Re:My guess - (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986354)

I don't think MRO has anything on it to detect methane. Maybe they could do it with CRISM (IR spectrometer), but there is nobody from CRISM on the panel.

Someone who is on the panel is Lisa Pratt who is "specializing on the fate of complex organic molecules on the surface of Mars.," and also Alfred McEwen, the principal investigator of the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE). This says to me that they found something interesting on the surface, maybe something looking like tar or oil, or maybe something changing with time.

Jobtanium (4, Funny)

Nanosphere (1867972) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985720)

According to reading from the Mars reconnisance orbiter, they have detected sizable quantities of Jobtanium, a rare element currently found on Earth. NASA is proposing to congress and the Obama administration a manned mission to Mars to collect this Jobtanium

Re:Jobtanium (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985946)

Hilarious...

Re:Jobtanium (1)

gtall (79522) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986466)

This just in, Congress has reconvened and decided to turn over the entire country's tax payments to some place in California, it might have Infinite in the address. Some are claiming that Congress is under the sway of a weird new kind of distortion field while others are claiming that Congress itself is a distortion field.

In totally unrelated news, a company in Redmond, Washington has just announced they intend to manufacture a Jobtanium mine here on earth. A large, sweaty monkey has been seen chanting "I'm going to f---ing kill Jobs." President Obama has released a statement declaring that anyone killing jobs will be considered a Republican. Republican leaders responded with the retort, "Jobtanium is new kind of tax and we're naturally against that".

President Assad of Syria declared he was for a multi-party system and Col. Q's son declared an alliance with Islamic terrorists. Dogs and cats have been seen moving in together. A twinkie the size of Manhattan composed of psycho-kinetic energy has also been spotted, but not by reliable witnesses.

Deep Thought (1)

spacepimp (664856) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985726)

Whether they ever find life there or not, I think Mars should be considered an enemy planet. --JH

Damn it! Another bogus 'significant find' (1)

BubbaDave (1352535) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985766)

Looking at what happened with the past ferw 'significant finds', within the next couple the retractions/proof against the 'find' will be out before the press meeting concludes!

Dave

Re:Damn it! Another bogus 'significant find' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985900)

Whenever something actually significant is ever found, it will be known before any official public "briefing".

Anything else won't change the course of history per-se.

Trees (2)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985768)

They found trees. No?

Panel (1)

Dan East (318230) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985774)

The panel giving the briefing includes:
Geophysicist, geologist, planetary geologist and a biogeochemist.

Well at least we know they didn't find traces of alien civilization, unnatural structures, etc.

Re:Panel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36985836)

It must be the largest pet-rock find of the century! NASA is going to be rich once they bring those things planet-side.

Re:Panel (1)

squidflakes (905524) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985892)

Simpsons Reference Ahoy!

This mission includes a mathematician, a statistician, and two other types of mathematician.

Re:Panel (1)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985906)

"Geophysicist" et al is just NASA's equivalent of the Air Force's "Deep Space Radar Telemetry". [wikia.com]

Re:Panel (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986310)

Clearly a Giant Diamond

Re:Panel (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986670)

Lucy is here, repeat, lucy is here!

Red Weed (2)

Gauthic (964948) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985806)

The found red weed in the canals!

Hide Your Kids, Hide Your Wife!

Real Time (3, Informative)

dylan_- (1661) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985810)

That's at 18:00 GMT. I assume everyone on Slashdot knows their GMT offset.

Re:Real Time (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985878)

not any more, all this daylight saving wankery has me all confused

Re:Real Time (1)

rasmusbr (2186518) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986306)

Yeah. The NASA TV schedule say there's going to be a 1 hour long "Video file" in about 30 minutes from when I post this, followed by "JUNO Tweet Up".

I'm not sure if the schedule is anything to go by, it could be outdated because of the press conference.

Re:Real Time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986286)

"Important news about the solar system, brought to you at a time given in a form relevant to 5% of the people on one of its planets."

Re:Real Time (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986370)

What you meant was "Important news about the solar system, brought to you at a time given in a form relevant to all the people who actually paid for the research".

Re:Real Time (1)

mbone (558574) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986392)

I would assume everyone on slashdot knows that GMT has been replaced by UTC.

Re:Real Time (1)

uigrad_2000 (398500) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986684)

I would assume everyone on slashdot knows that GMT has been replaced by UTC.

They're nearly the same thing. There's two things that everyone should know about GMT and UTC:

  • * UTC is more specific than GMT. This makes it a better standard
  • * UTC and GMT never differ by more than a second

So, UTC is better for system administration, because the standard is more exact. If you are giving a time for a press conference, and the margin of error is more than a second anyway, GMT is perfectly fine. Many people would say GMT is preferable in such situations, because the "G" is recognizable as Greenwich, and that translates to a real place.

tl;dr: UTC is for computers. GMT is for humans.

What Could it Be? (1)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985812)

Shadow Space Ship? On the plus side, finding a ship on Mars would certainly get us there in a hurry. Every spacefaring nation on earth would be building a mars ship starting this afternoon if that were the case. Nevermind the first crew that gets there being enslaved by a Shadow space ship...

Re:What Could it Be? (1)

wiggles (30088) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986006)

Not quite. More like a bunch of NASA scientists disappearing or turning up dead, followed by a massive increase in the black ops budget and a mysterious tent built over half of New Mexico, guarded by some very serious men in suits. We'd hear about it in 10 years, maybe.

"Xenu was here" (1)

RivenAleem (1590553) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985814)

And Scientologists will rejoice!

EXPERT SLASHDOT PANELIST WEIGHS IN. (0)

BlueKitties (1541613) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985872)

"We've found possible traces of water maybe sorta kinda that could maybe imply there was water on Mars. So, you guys aren't gonna cut our funding, right Obama?"

Two weeks! (1)

cmdr_klarg (629569) | more than 3 years ago | (#36985962)

Get ready for a surprise!!! *boom*

Science by press release (2)

Jazari (2006634) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986000)

This kind of science by press release is not something that should be encouraged. I respect NASA a lot, but their "we found traces of ancient life in a martian asteroid from Antarctica" a few years back dented their credibility.

Arsenic based life again? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986114)

Maybe the samples they discovered here are really remnants of martian organisms!
 
  Sorry, NASA. I love science, but your credibility took a huge hit after you pulled that stunt.

Come on, it's obvious (and obligatory) (0)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986130)

They finally located the great stone ass of Mars!

Methane? (1)

toupsz (882584) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986174)

I'm going with Element Zero.

This better be good, NASA (3, Funny)

markdowling (448297) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986196)

You made the front page of slashdot with a tease release - now you'd better produce. Nothing less than alien life or alternatively a new way to jailbreak iOS will do.

Re:This better be good, NASA (1)

markpg (59112) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986432)

Well.... a previous poster mentioned something about methane.

So maybe it's alien farts.

Red Planet (1)

kehren77 (814078) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986224)

Perhaps they've found Val Kilmer's career.

Two-headed squirrel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986300)

They found a two-headed squirrel.

Big Metal plate (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986304)

What they found: A big ass metal plate covered with dust.

With made in china stamped on it.

Cue Jeff Goldblum.... (1)

madhatter256 (443326) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986364)

... that the aliens are using the Mars Orbiter against us for them to coordinate an attack on Mars...

Surprise! (1)

plsenjy (2104800) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986368)

NASA finally makes major discovery using a craft that has been orbiting for five years, one month after their major tent pole program was finally shut down and five years before their other tent pole falls out of orbit. I can haz laid-off engineers back plz?

Evidence found of honest politicians on Mars... (1)

gestalt_n_pepper (991155) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986396)

Something previously thought impossible, since nothing like it exists on Earth.

They found life... (1)

KiwiCanuck (1075767) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986444)

in Uranus. They are sending in a probe for a closer look.

cobalt based life? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986480)

Hopefully they're not pulling the same stunt that they did with the "arsenic-based life" circus earlier this year: sweeping claims based on flimsy data that are announced publicly before critical review by the scientific community.

Yb6OU FAIL IT (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986534)

I refuse to watch it. (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | more than 3 years ago | (#36986550)

I already know what they are going to say. Sgt Scrub get off our property bla bla bla. Sgt Scrub your trailer will not fit in the space shuttle bla bla bla. Those guys are always so rude to me.

Oil! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#36986704)

Oil!

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