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Ask Slashdot: How To Combat IP-Based Censorship?

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the tactical-nuclear-strikes dept.

Censorship 103

An anonymous reader writes "For a while now there has been a lot of buzz on a new proposed censorship scheme in Turkey. The government wants to crack down on freedom of speech and other rights by preventing us from accessing any websites it deems unsuitable. The reasons for that could be criticism of the government, pornography and basically anything a politician might dislike (YouTube is blocked for example — I'm not sure about Google, etc., because I'm bypassing the filter). Right now the state is using DNS-based filtering which can be circumvented with OpenDNS or proxy services which everybody knows about in Turkey. On August 22, however, a new scheme will go into effect that uses IP-based filtering. Bypassing this by any means is illegal, but I wanted to get some opinions on how this could be done without having to set up a VPN server outside of Turkey and using it as a private proxy."

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103 comments

Request Assistance from Garden Networks? (3, Informative)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026548)

You know, there's not a lot of ways other than VPN and the other ways usually aren't as secure. The last link provided covers most of the bases -- albeit in subpar English. So I guess what I would suggest is you contacting a not-for profit like Garden Networks [wikipedia.org] and ask them to grant Turks the same status as Chinese users in that you don't have to subscribe to use their premium servers. Their gTunnel application seems straight forward and intuitive and appears secure. It appears that users in China, Kuwait and Iran [gardennetworks.org] enjoy it so I imagine you shouldn't have any problems either.

Furthering that idea, you might pass out "awareness" pamphlets while asking for donations to "keep the internet uncensored" and then pay for your pamphlets and donate the rest of that money to Garden Networks. I don't fully know what level of risk that might entail in Turkey, I certainly would not suggest that to a Chinese citizen.

I will say that it is conceivably possible for your government to go insane and block ranges of IP addresses so that you cannot access Garden Network's premium servers or Tor nodes ... that would be pretty extensive however.

Re:Request Assistance from Garden Networks? (3, Insightful)

xnpu (963139) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026758)

This is pretty poor advice. For one, the software is quite crappy (I can't get it to work here in China). More importantly, by using their software you associate with them. Which may already be risky. Then you go as far as to say the OP should help fund this NGO. Enough for the government to classify him as a danger to national security / terrorist / whatever.

IMHO it's much better to get that $2.99 VPN (I've seen them even cheaper) and claim you just wanted to talk to your Facebook friends abroad than to get involved with these type of NGO's.

My Apologies But Better to Act Now (1)

eldavojohn (898314) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026938)

This is pretty poor advice.

Well, I apologize, I assure you that I have no affiliation with Garden Networks and, yes, their free service uses Tor -- which I think is largely German based if I'm not mistaken. I would imagine that would be better for Turkish users but who knows. I thought their protocol was novel but if you say they suck in China, I'll take your word on it.

Then you go as far as to say the OP should help fund this NGO. Enough for the government to classify him as a danger to national security / terrorist / whatever.

"Help fund this NGO" is not really what I said. I'm pretty sure I suggested raising awareness and, assuming Garden Networks is giving them free premium service, send any extra money their way. I said "you might" and cautioned against it if any risk was involved. I do not want to come across as saying anyone should do anything. You know if you start a pamphlet activity with a large and diverse group, it's going to be kind of hard for them to classify everyone participating as "national security / terrorist / whatever." I mean, cower in your homes in fear is good advice? Don't seek assistance from your fellow countrymen while you have the internet and you can? I guess you and I have different desired levels of resistance to impending oppression. If they're gonna take away your most powerful form of communication, I would not advise waiting and doing something about it later.

IMHO it's much better to get that $2.99 VPN (I've seen them even cheaper) and claim you just wanted to talk to your Facebook friends abroad than to get involved with these type of NGO's.

$3 a month is nothing for me but I was under the impression that the IMF had screwed up Turkey's economy for a while by some sort of disinflation plan and it's not like their median household income is exactly stellar [wikipedia.org]. Hit the wealthy neighborhoods with pamphlets asking for donations and spread the word ... just like I volunteer to do here in the United States for charities and causes like cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay.

Re:My Apologies But Better to Act Now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028246)

$3 a month is nothing for me but I was under the impression that the IMF had screwed up Turkey's economy for a while by some sort of disinflation plan and it's not like their median household income is exactly stellar [wikipedia.org].

3$ per month is not a problem for the average Internet user in Turkey. Plus, these VPN connections can be shared, e.g. in the case off students and such. I'd also recommend paying for these services with Bitcoin (although it's still not very popular in Turkey yet, at least not as popular as Tor) as a further precaution.

Re:Request Assistance from Garden Networks? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026966)

Run to your legal representative and tell him about this problem, show how many votes can be gained by fighting this, and you'll get full support. Of course, knowing the politics of my own country and how every politician regardless of origin think the same, both sides are probably getting shitloads of money for this, and the only recourse remains to go illegal and follow advice found here, or form your own party and fight it on your own.

Tor with bridges? (2)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026602)

What about using Tor bridges?

https://www.torproject.org/docs/bridges [torproject.org]

This is assuming, of course, that simply using encryption will not put you under suspicion.

Playing Chicken With Turkey? (2)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 2 years ago | (#37027502)

It sound like the Turkish government is beginning to emulate the repressive and regressive moral "leadership" established by the totalitarian Internet regimes in Australia [smh.com.au], the US [pcworld.com] and the UK [eff.org].

Hey! You get all the free speech [thedomains.com] you can pay for!

Re:Tor with bridges? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37030500)

If encryption is a problem I can't see online banking and finances going on anymore. They will probably still allow it.

I2P (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026620)

You should look into I2P: http://i2p2.de/

Re:I2P (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#37027028)

You should look into I2P: http://i2p2.de/ [i2p2.de]

I use it, love it, also love the freenet, but the problem is those are "another net" not "the net". They will help you transfer files past the iron curtain. They will not help you log into youtube and facebook.

The problem is almost exactly like trying to replace ms office with openoffice.org. Whiners will not be satisfied with "doing about the same thing", they'll used it as a whining point unless they can get it exactly the same down to the pixel and last decimal point.

SSH tunnel to VPS? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026628)

A cheap option could be rent a *nix VPS outside of Turkey and setup an SSH server with IP forwarding (in the kernel). You can then use a local machine to open an SSH connection to it and route traffic via the SSH tunnel.

Re:SSH tunnel to VPS? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37027048)

This is probably the best option IMO. I'd recommend you set up the VPS as an OpenVPN server as opposed to an SSH tunnel however.

Re:SSH tunnel to VPS? (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | more than 2 years ago | (#37027596)

How come?

SSH is a lot more common than openvpn, I would imagine flying under the radar is a lot more effective, on that note I use VPN all the time to gain access to an entire network and it is a lot better than sshing into every single server as well as more secure.

Also SSH tunnels offer better performance IMO sometimes by a lot. Remember a lot of people don't use TOR because it's slower than a 56k sometimes. I've never seen VPN achieve super speeds anywhere based on the nature of the technology and the extra layers and handshakes.

I'm surprised more people aren't mentioning this, if your tech savvy and know basic networking or are willing to learn (this is scalable learning) this is by far THE best way to set up a bypass of your country's firewall.

Protip: don't register the foreign server under your name, send bills to a PO box or w/e you have similar. Don't let the server be affiliated back to you easily. If your going to do down, all they should have is that you connected to a random server at set time intervals with heavy encrypted traffic and your regular web traffic was light (also ez to fix). Of course u can't have anything compromising on your computer either (linux goes 10 miles here), encryption is not the solve all, just use the server and encrypt that, of course. What I can't vouch for is if the country in question really care's, they're already tyrannical in their implementation of a firewall, why would they bother to get proof?

All of the above is just theory and is untested under fire, if my internet was being censored though, I'd try to find a way around it.

Re:SSH tunnel to VPS? (2)

Dog-Cow (21281) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028356)

OpenVPN uses SSL as its encryption layer. No worse performance than visiting an HTTPS site.

Re:SSH tunnel to VPS? (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 2 years ago | (#37033440)

Yes, there is worse performance because of traffic to multiple ports and multiple protocols that have to be identified, wrapped and sent down the pipe to have those things undone. I use openvpn all the time, but its a resource pig when trying to do VOIP, web, rdp, etc. all simultaneously.

Rules are there to be followed (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026630)

Why just don't break them?

Re:Rules are there to be followed (1)

sajjadG (1995610) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026730)

because following sucks. nobody likes to be treated like poppets imagine that youtube, wordpress, blogspot, facebook, google+, twitter, any video hosting site and any outside news site are filter. Do you like it yourself?

Tor (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026632)

Tor is a simple way to bypass a censorship "firewall". If you can find a private exit node (or someone provides one for you) it reduces your chances of getting caught by the ISP.

Re:Tor (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026722)

From what I understand of Tor though, there is a bigger problem. By using it, aren't you opening yourself up to being charged for other people's shit? I mean, sure they can't trace my IP address if I'm downloading movies off Pirate Bay. But wtf good is that going to do me if the FBI is still kicking down my door because some other asshole used my IP address to download kiddie porn?

How about a solution that doesn't involve some trigger-happy SWAT team thug with a gun to my head because they think I'm diddling kids?

Re:Tor (2)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026796)

You seem to be confused about the difference between using Tor and running a Tor exit node. A simple way to think of Tor is as a system that automatically sets up a chain of proxy servers for you, and then builds a new chain periodically (your connections to each proxy are encrypted, so there are many layers of encryption surrounding your connection -- hence "onion routing"). As a user, you connect to an "entry node," and use that node to connect to a "relay node" and ultimately to an "exit node," and from the exit node you connect to whatever it was that you wanted to anonymously connect to. Running an exit node entails the risks that you described, although I hear that the EFF will defend any American citizen who is caught up in such a situation.

Re:Tor (1)

That Guy From Mrktng (2274712) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026866)

By using it, aren't you opening yourself up to being charged for other people's shit?

No, only using it will not allow any other Tor dweller to use you IP/connection as an exit node, You have to explicitly set up and start the "Relaying" service which is not on by default (at least in Tor browser bundle)

I know I use Tor to access websites (lets leave it in forums that don't like non-white people) that block my IP range and my country have pretty good CP monitors, I've never had problems, I don't trust Tor to do anything stupid anyway so I don't get click-happy while using it. But then again I actually have paranoid traits so it's probably just my imagination. :P

Re:Tor (1)

Pf0tzenpfritz (1402005) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028322)

No. You're just plain wrong. You seem to be able to write, so you probably can read, too. Why don't you take a look at www.torproject.org or even Wikipedia and RTFFAQ before spreading FUD?

Which Turkish political faction is responsible? (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026634)

Which faction is supporting this?

islamists (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 2 years ago | (#37027150)

the equivalent of republicans in america - a faction which merges capitalism (corporate capitalism like in america), and religion.

actually they are not 'supporting' it. they are doing it. due to majority.

Re:islamists (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028188)

It figures. Ataturk's vision was always in conflict with the real culture of Turkey, and that culture is why it should never be allowed in the EU.

Re:islamists (1)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 2 years ago | (#37030032)

As long as Turkey isn't acknowledging the Armenian genocide they should be kept on ice.

But the whole region there seems to be poisoned politically. Including Israel.

Re:islamists (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028308)

Not entirely true. The ones who filed a criminal complaint against YouTube and caused it to be censored were Kemalists, which comprise conservative leftists (I'd say similar to Democrats in USA, but in reality they are nothing alike). So, this was bound to happen regardless of the government, as soon as there was a majority vote. Assuming one of those two (three?) factions won of course. If liberal democrats had a non-zero chance though...

Use Tor (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026644)

Check https://www.torproject.org/ it was build exactly for that purpose and come now packaged for multiple platforms for a very easy use.
Note that performance won't be great but it will let you access the content you want without restriction.

Depends on how much risk you want to take (3, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026646)

Bypassing this by any means is illegal

Well, obviously then just about anything you do WILL be illegal. Depending on how well this law is enforced, that could be an acceptable risk or not.

I wanted to get some opinions on how this could be done without having to set up a VPN server outside of Turkey

In your situation, just about any solution is going to involve outside help from SOMEONE. And an outside VPN is as good a solution as any.

Re:Depends on how much risk you want to take (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028742)

Why wouldn't a proxy work? The op implied it wouldn't with ip based filtering.

Re:Depends on how much risk you want to take (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#37034876)

Because the first thing any block would do is to not only block all the known proxies and proxy lists, but probably log your IP for even trying to access them. And, depending on how well they enforce the "no bypassing" provision he mentioned, the next step may be them kicking down your door and dragging you off for questioning.

Re:Depends on how much risk you want to take (0)

Z00L00K (682162) | more than 2 years ago | (#37030062)

If it's illegal in a country like Turkey you can always get around it using a sufficient amount of bribes.

Turkey and EU? (1)

tycoex (1832784) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026660)

And Turkey wants to join the EU. Don't make me laugh.

Re:Turkey and EU? (-1, Troll)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026764)

The fact that the EU is even *considering* that backwoods Koran-thumping shithole is a fucking embarassment. Fucking hell, it was bad enough when they let Greece in.

Re:Turkey and EU? (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028208)

You wouldn't have been correct thirty years ago, but as the Kemalists lose power Turkey will turn into another Iran. Muslims do not produce secularist democratic governments suitable to integration with the West.

Re:Turkey and EU? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37030086)

What Islamists produce is kids - to be indoctrinated with the right opinions and used as cannon fodder.

Re:Turkey and EU? (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#37034780)

Hey, when you believe in polygamy, something has to be done with all those extra young men.

Re:Turkey and EU? (1)

Pf0tzenpfritz (1402005) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028378)

Right! Greeeeeks! These bible thumping orthodox godsuckers are almost as disgusting as the Irish, Polish, Italian, Spanish and Portugese catholes. And they're not half the plague these protestant and Calvinist heretics from France, England, Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, Switzerland and the goddamn, degenerated COLONIES are! Get 'em all out!! Aaargh! Derr Chuttn Strafen!

Re:Turkey and EU? (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#37034812)

Sorry, I don't judge civilizations on what they did 2500 years ago. I gotta go with what they've done for me lately.

Re:Turkey and EU? (1)

operagost (62405) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026778)

But Cyprus is a member, and that country has a Really Obvious Problem That is Also Turkey-Related.

Re:Turkey and EU? (1)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 2 years ago | (#37027824)

A large, vocal minority of the population of Cyprus would say they have a Greek problem, not a Turkish problem.

Re:Turkey and EU? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37030016)

A large, vocal minority of the population of Cyprus would say they have a Greek problem, not a Turkish problem.

Actually even on the Greek (speaking) side of the fence many people admit that they have a Greek nationalism problem.
(For the readers interested in history try the little "historical joke" and find out for how long in the last 3000 (no typo) years Zyprus has been a part of any Greek state). But the ones blocking any progress on point for most of the last 40 years have been the Turkish. So its right to blame Turkish Nationalism once in a while.

Re:Turkey and EU? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37030690)

a large minority?

Re:Turkey and EU? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37031032)

Any amount less than 50%. Apparently. Probably more like "An amount of people, that if we chose to persecute/expel/murder, the UN may spend 5 minutes at the next meeting telling us to stop or if we have oil may cause Haliburton to lobby for a US-led invasion."

I wonder what a small majority is.

Re:Turkey and EU? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37031420)

A large, vocal foreign minority, settled centuries ago by the force of turkish arms, in a pure bloodbath, which has no right whatsoever to be there in the first place. Like brits in Ireland or moors in Spain

Re:Turkey and EU? (1)

dave562 (969951) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026898)

The EU needs to court favor with Turkey. The Turks are going to be a serious military and economic force in the coming decades.

Re:Turkey and EU? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026904)

Sounds like citizens of Turkey need to take a more active role in government.

You know...the away Amercan citizens do!

(this is sarcasm)

Re:Turkey and EU? (2)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028266)

"Sounds like citizens of Turkey need to take a more active role in government."

They are doing just that, which is the problem. Democracy is fine, but don't delude yourself that it can't also be used by an Islamist people to produce Islamist government. Consider democratic Iran.

Lost battle (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026674)

Although the scheme is postponed for another three months, it is still a lost battle. The protests against the filter was censored in main stream media, and the majority of the public does not care and even in some cases they actually support censorship.

youtube isn't banned in Turkey (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026732)

Youtube isn't banned in Turkey since quite some time. I don't know where the author is from or whether he checks with local community.

Re:youtube isn't banned in Turkey (1)

sajjadG (1995610) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026808)

Youtube isn't banned in Turkey since quite some time

just wait. it will be :)

Pure IP filtering or DPI? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026798)

When you say IP filtering, do you mean any TCP SYN packet to an IP address of a known 'bad' website will not be carried? This would mean any other sites on a shared server would be blocked too.

Or will the next step be the 'hybrid' solution of IP filtering then DPI be used to get the Host header before deciding whether to block the connection? In this case, some filters will not re-assemble TCP packets so fragmented host headers will work.

Re:Pure IP filtering or DPI? (1)

AK Marc (707885) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026906)

DPI has reassembled packets for the last 10 years as a requirement for DPI, because fragmentation was key in a number of successful attacks against security that didn't reassemble before checking contents. Most will be set to drop all fragmented packets, or those fragmented with a size below some reasonable threshold. So, given a misconfigured filter, your suggestion may work, but against anyone that's paid attention to network security for any time in the past 20 years, they'd not make such a rookie mistake. It would be a good "try this and see if they screwed up" suggestion, but to incorrectly suggest that any reasonable DPI based filter will fall for that is misleading. Not to mention that DPI is likely not used for cheap "filter by IP" schemes that need nothing more interesting than an access list blocking based on layer-3 info, and not layer-(4 through 7) of DPI.

IPv6? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026856)

Just thinking out loud here, but is the IP censoring based on IPv4? If so, why not look for a provider that will give you an IPv6 tunnel to move all your traffic through?

Democracy (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026870)

The government wants to crack down on freedom of speech and other rights by preventing us from accessing any websites it deems unsuitable.

Solution: Vote in a new government. It works for us.

Not.

Re:Democracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37027016)

The government wants to crack down on freedom of speech and other rights by preventing us from accessing any websites it deems unsuitable.

Solution: Vote in a new government. It works for us.

Not.

The TEA baggers, regardless of ones political leanings, did a pretty good job of changing the direction of our government. In the Middle East a very vocal majority are making some changes there. We are starting to see some huge changes in the World - some good and some bad. For those of us Americans who are wed to our "exceptionalism", I think you may want to revisit those beliefs.

With all these financial meltdowns around the World (there will be more!) and civil unrest - both good (Middle East) and bad (Europe), things are looking good for charismatic leader who will blame a certain section of the populace for all of our problems.

It's just looking like history is kinda repeating itself here.

Re:Democracy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37027802)

Hey if it leads to the persecution of lawyers, judges, politicians and dishonest government employees (law enforcement or otherwise), I'm all for it!

The problem with persecution has always been that the people who should be persecuted against are passing the buck off onto someone else :D

Captcha was 'richer'. :-)

HERE'S A NOVEL IDEA !! MOVE !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37026936)

What are you doing there in the first place, so you gots something to bitch about ??

Re:HERE'S A NOVEL IDEA !! MOVE !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37027208)

It's his home. His entire family lives there. His job is there. His friends are there. It's not that easy to just uproot yourself that way. Sure, it can be done, but think about it: every aspect of his life would be completely rewritten, and that's a lot of stress. Not to mention the sheer costs of travel and shipping his belongings. As a matter of fact, some people prefer to revolt and sacrifice their lives than move from their homeland.

If you can put with the FAP and LAG satellite (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#37026944)

If you can put with the FAP and LAG there is satellite internet.

Re:If you can put with the FAP and LAG satellite (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37031074)

If you can put with the FAP and LAG

I don't think they condone that kind of behaviour in Turkey. Neither would I, at least in polite company.

I thAnk you for yOur time (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37027112)

Appl3 too. No, feel an obligation of an admittedly

In Egypt they used RDP. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37027174)

In Egypt during the uprising against the government,
  the people used RDP connections to windows servers outside of the country to publish on facebook and twitter.

each end user had his own desktop and workspace.
that's one of the reasons the government over there dropped all the BGP ...

using an SSH tunnel is alright for basic usage, but the bandwidth costs might differ from place to place.. so it's not that cheap if you Really need a lot of traffic.

Re:In Egypt they used RDP. (1)

aiht (1017790) | more than 2 years ago | (#37029422)

In Egypt during the uprising against the government, the people used RDP connections to windows servers outside of the country to publish on facebook and twitter.

each end user had his own desktop and workspace. that's one of the reasons the government over there dropped all the BGP ...

using an SSH tunnel is alright for basic usage, but the bandwidth costs might differ from place to place.. so it's not that cheap if you Really need a lot of traffic.

Because RDP doesn't use any bandwidth...

Options (1)

DaMattster (977781) | more than 2 years ago | (#37027210)

This is easy and I recommend looking at a very inexpensive service called Tunnelr [tunnelr.com]. Tunnelr offers SSH and OpenVPN tunnels and is located primarily in the United States. Tunnelr also uses the most secure OS on the planet, OpenBSD, so you are fairly safe. However, I would be very careful because the last thing that you want to do is end up in a Turkish prison.

Re:Options (1)

fremean (1189177) | more than 2 years ago | (#37027248)

Yes because the united states is the bastion for free speech.. ask a mexican how they trap wild pigs

Re:Options (1)

fincan (989293) | more than 2 years ago | (#37029820)

However, I would be very careful because the last thing that you want to do is end up in a Turkish prison.

Turkish people think exactly the same thing for US prisons. At least you don't have to worry about your ass if you drop the soap in Turkish ones.

Re:Options (1)

niw3 (1029008) | more than 2 years ago | (#37030866)

Turkish prisons are much better than US prisons, if US prisons are exactly as they are pictured by movies and TV shows. Ironically, you rate Turkish prisons after watching ONE non Turkish movie, which is a well known anti Turkey propaganda everyone is apperantly willing to buy.

Create an outernet, or rather many outernets. (1)

thegreatbob (693104) | more than 2 years ago | (#37027222)

Using off the shelf hardware, groups of people could pool internet resources to ensure their continued ability to access the internet. Even with a very large mesh network (not just wireless), it would only be a few hops to an internet gateway. This would have the added benefit of providing redundancy for the people involved (e.g. in an area where Comcast and AT&T are the only "physical" ISP's). It would also be imperative not to "oversell" your connection capacity, as this would basically kill the usability of the system. You could also contractually obligate people involved to prevent unauthorized usage. Obviously, you'd want to eliminate or restrict leeching as much as possible. This in conjunction with other external proxies, TOR, intelligent routing around of things filtered by certain ISP's, etc. would make for a potentially uninterruptable local service, provided that internet access was available anywhere in the general area your system covered. Automatic routing of certain sites to foreign proxies by encrypted tunnels would be potentially useful. You could even pull from internet gateways many miles away with wireless point to point links. The biggest problem is... getting people to work together, before it becomes impossible to deploy such a system. So sadly, a useful outernet is probably never going to be realized. Should it ever become necessary, I'll give it my best shot. I don't necessarily see untampered internet access as a basic human right, but so long as it's available for some(most?) it should be available for all. The internet should simply be a packet delivery system... would you put up with someone cutting open your mail, reading everything, possibly making modification, taping it back shut, and sending it on?

Don't even try (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37027238)

give up, let them censor - fat lot of good it does anyone in the long run - uncensored, censored, we all die in less than 100 years... some will die censored, sheltered from the outside world and frankly possibly happier for it. others repressed. and even more as content little pigs who never realized they were being pushed to fulfill someone elses agenda.

What about IPv6? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37027484)

When most people discuss IP, they mean IPv4. If their filtering does not have the ability to dig into the IPv6 packet to look for destination, you may have an out with plausible deniability.

There are also IPv6 tunneling technologies which are freely available and *may* be built into your system already. Take a look at Toredo for instance (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teredo_tunneling).

You might check Ultrasurf (1)

white_owl (134394) | more than 2 years ago | (#37027646)

Ultrasurf was developed to evade the Great Firewall of China. I would not be surprised if Turkey is getting consultation from China. There is a wired article at http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/11/ff_firewallfighters/ [wired.com]

A good starting point for UltraSurf and some of the other options is a consortium of several organizations including the folks behind gTunnel which is at:
http://www.internetfreedom.org/ [internetfreedom.org]

Their web site has not been updated very recently, but I don't know how the individual organizations are doing.

Remote Desktop anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37027788)

I think that the simplest way to do this, with minimal risks on law enforcement in Turkey, would be to have a bastion server/terminal server in another country (e.g) the US, and a remote desktop of some type (VNC, MS-RDP, your choice) for you to be able to access it. In that instance, it would be much harder to prove you have been bypassing the filter since your computer itself won't have these cache files, cookies and other misc traces on the hard drive, and it may be impossible or at the least unwieldy for the Turkish government to legally access your expatriate terminal server for evidence of circumventing the filter.

On a side note, I think IP-based filtering is impossible to pull off and maintain functionality. Considering the use of "virtual hosts", and ISP-wide NAT in some places, it is clear that an individual IP does not represent an individual web site, in fact it may represent dozens of web sites with virtual host. It may also represent entire server rooms full of computers if BGP is used and it is an anycast IP.

Likely, the end result of this will be a stifling of commerce in Turkey, lots of frustrated internet users, and a turnaround by the government once it hits their tax coffers.

Re:Remote Desktop anyone? (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028830)

"In that instance, it would be much harder to prove you have been bypassing the filter since your computer itself won't have these cache files, cookies and other misc traces on the hard drive,"

Use a live CD and leave your hard disk untouched. Do searches etc using your hard disk whose traces make you look innocent.

You can conceal a live CD/DVD by burning the live content as a boot image then filling the rest with music or video.

Alternative (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028660)

An alternative to real-time access would be one based on static pages delivered by usb key or dvd. A collection of web pages could be stored easily on each device. It won't get you that instant fix, but at least it's one more tool that's available for use.

Re:Alternative (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028858)

Rename them as video or mp3 files, mix with real video or mp3 files, and use a DVD. That way casual inspection won't indicate the files are not what they seem since you cannot rename files on read-only media.

A few cosmetic scratches for effect wouldn't hurt either.

until they start listening to phone calls, do this (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37029010)

1. get a shell here: http://sdf.org/
2. register for dial-up
3. get a NetBSD shell at 1200bps, and bitch about it on Slashdot via lynx
4. ???
5. Wiretaps!

Turkish "safe internet" is opt in (1)

dj-nix (101489) | more than 2 years ago | (#37030192)

While it doesn't change (or answer) the question on how to bypass the filtering, what the poster does not make clear is that the "safe internet" infrastructure that will be enabled by all operators (due to government regulation) will be opt-in. Unless subscribers specifically request that their internet be filtered, their traffic will not even pass through the filtering system, and the Turkish government has specifically stated (believable or otherwise) that they have no intention of making the system mandatory, and the ISPs have dimensioned their newly purchased parental control systems accordingly which means that the new systems are not designed or capable of handling the load of all subscribers...

Re:Turkish "safe internet" is opt in (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 2 years ago | (#37030656)

no. the 'opt in' they talk about, is the 'main' package which will keep filtering websites just like they do. the difference is, it will be ip based filtering instead of dns based filtering, and it will be illegal to circumvent it. so basically the 'opt in' just covers the fact that websites will be censored nation-wide, but there will be 2 heavier censored packages.

SSH (1)

Krneki (1192201) | more than 2 years ago | (#37030358)

While the VPN is a good solution it is also the most visible if someone is tracking this activities.

A ssh tunnel is the most discrete and while it is not a solution for everything like VPN, it does cover all you need for web surfing.

Also you could use something like foxyproxy addon for Firefox and you can tunnel SSH for only the web pages you needs, thus reducing the chances to get caught to the bare minimum.

And SSH tunnel is the most difficult type of connection for a firewall to block.

Complain to the EU? (1)

lucidlyTwisted (2371896) | more than 2 years ago | (#37030438)

Turkey is an oppressive regime with little to no regards for its subjects (e.g. Ilisu dam) yet still wishes to join the EU. If you are willing to take some personal risk, you could always contact the EU and complain; although it may be better to find a contact in another EU country to complain on your behalf. And, of course, many "free" EU states see little wrong with censoring the Internet and have plans to do so. If you are prepared to wait a while, more secure systems will become available to by-pass such blocks.
I think whatever you do, you will be running a personal risk to life and liberty. Even in other EU nations, running crypto is seen as suspicious and failure to hand over keys is a criminal offence (e.g. UK, RIPA laws). Maybe some of the human rights charities could offer pointers?

that's a lie (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37030532)

This story is incomplete/false. Turkey government will force ISPs to provide two options to users: a safe one(?) and an unfiltered one. If you don't specify this, ISPs will provide safe one as default. But you will be able to change your subscription type anytime you want. Stop lying around author.

dont bullshit. (1)

unity100 (970058) | more than 2 years ago | (#37030650)

did you or did you not read the law draft. apparently, you havent. then dont come talking here like an idiot.

Make the world aware (1)

xenobyte (446878) | more than 2 years ago | (#37030756)

Turkey really, really, really wants to become a member of EU, but there's been several obstacles already, including the state mandated denial of the Armenian Genocide and their less-than-equal treatment of women and other human rights violations. Adding full censorship to the list will make sure life will get better in Turkey as their desire to become an EU member is so strong it just might make them drop this stupid censorship and correct the other 'follies'...

Re:Make the world aware (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37035022)

I was in Turkey two months ago for my obligatory military service. The air has changed. The kind of people who thought it would be positive for Turkey to be in EU are not so passionate about it now. Average Joe in Turkey as already against the EU, so I think it's not a majority thing anymore. Most people think Turkey will be better off without EU, now that EU doesn't seem so strong after all and Turkey as better political alliances and a stronger economy. I tend to disagree, but then again, I am an Esperanto speaking vegetarian anarchist God hater.

Namecoin (1)

seanbruckman (637280) | more than 2 years ago | (#37031200)

I know Slashdot has developed a cultural sense of anything Bitcoin-related as being utter shit, but does anyone follow the development of Namecoin, or think they could help? It's in an alpha stage right now, but as i understand it, the intention is to incorporate dns services in addition to the current simple name registering scheme.

No way to bypass ... without a VPN (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37033528)

Anything you do that doesn't include a VPN hosted outside the country can be seen by the ISP and government. Sorry. Even using alternative DNS servers can be seen. One day you'll be seeing the normal traffic, then the government will start redirecting all DNS and if you aren't really paying attention, you'll not notice.

You want a VPN with private keys that you control. This can be ssh or OpenVPN or any other industry-standard private-key-based VPN. You don't want to trust SSL-based VPNs. The people who control your DNS can easily setup DNS and fake SSL certs that you're system will trust - even when you shouldn't.

I'm not certain you can trust TOR either. Whether you can or not is a question of whether the DNS requests are also part of the TOR protocol. If it is, you are good to go provide the last node drops your request off outside any country that does similar tracking.

Anyone who suggests any other solution is risking your privacy and possibly your safety. If Turkish prisons are what I hear, I'd be afraid too.

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