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Start-Up Claims Immortality For Data With 'Stone-Like' Disc

timothy posted more than 2 years ago | from the load-up-the-station-wagon-with-these dept.

Media 261

CWmike writes "Start-up Millenniata and LG plan to soon release a new optical disc and read/write player that will store movies, photos or any other data forever. The data can be accessed using any current DVD or Blu-ray player. The M-Disc can be dipped in liquid nitrogen and then boiling water without harming it. It also has a Defense Department study (PDF) backing up the resiliency of its product compared with other leading optical disc competitors. The company would not disclose what material is used to produce the optical discs, referring to it only as a 'natural' substance that is 'stone-like.' Like DVDs and Blu-ray discs, the M-Disc platters are made up of multiple layers of material. But there is no reflective, or die, layer. Instead, during the recording process a laser 'etches' pits onto the substrate material."

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261 comments

This story certainly has immortality (1)

toby (759) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028058)

Like the fabled non-volatile memory, stone-like disks have appeared on Slashdot at least once before.

On my Christmas list (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028062)

I need to copy my mind onto something that will survive the heat death of the universe.
These M-discs sound like just the ticket.

What? (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028072)

The M-Disc can be dipped in liquid nitrogen and then boiling water without harming it.

Yeah ... /me rushes out and buys one tonight at Best Buy because, you know, the last fourteen computers, MP3 players and PDAs i've owned all died in the vats of liquid nitrogen around my house - for some stupid reason I keep dropping stuff in those.

Re:What? (2)

Mordok-DestroyerOfWo (1000167) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028142)

In fairness, I think all of us have accidentally dropped a consumer device in water or let it sit on a dashboard on a hot day. While this technology may not initially be useful for regular devices, eventually we may come to benefit from it.

Re:What? (2)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028242)

Yeah, the right questions would be...
1) Will a 3 ft drop to a concrete floor break it? How many such falls can it withstand?
2) If I rub the readable side with sand paper, will it get damaged? How long will it hold? Can the data still be recovered?
3) How variable is the temperature range it is supposed to stored in? What happens if there is power outage and I cannot maintain the range for 1-2 weeks?
4) Ditto for moisture, and general exposure to air & water.

Re:What? (4, Informative)

Sene (1794986) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028448)

I didn't see them calling the disc idiot-proof :)

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028504)

The first 2 questions are not answered by the article, however the 3rd one certainly is and the 4th is hinted at:

"Millenniata calls the product the M-Disc, and the company claims you can dip it in liquid nitrogen and then boiling water without harming it."

Thus implying temperature ranges of -196 *C->100 *C, and that it can survive direct exposure to water, though the time frame of such exposure is not accurately measured.

Re:What? (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028778)

I am concerned about the time frame too. A dip is usually 5 seconds. I would be concerned about much moderate temperatures for much prolonged time period.

Re:What? (1)

chill (34294) | more than 2 years ago | (#37029100)

Assume it is multiple layers of synthetic diamond or sapphire. Sapphire crystal is used to make some damn impervious stuff [youtube.com] .

How do you think something like that would hold up to your scenarios?

Re:What? (1)

nbauman (624611) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028656)

Be careful when you hold the baby.

Re:What? (2)

Gadget_Guy (627405) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028668)

Yeah ... /me rushes out and buys one tonight at Best Buy because, you know, the last fourteen computers, MP3 players and PDAs i've owned all died in the vats of liquid nitrogen around my house - for some stupid reason I keep dropping stuff in those.

That was obviously a reference to climate change. Global warming does not mean that it will get uniformly hotter, but that the temperatures become more extreme at both ends of the range. Hence it will get as cold as liquid nitrogen in Winter and as hot as boiling water in Summer.

So it will be nice to know that our data will survive, even if we won't stand a chance.

Re:What? (1)

ArcherB (796902) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028762)

Yeah ... /me rushes out and buys one tonight at Best Buy because, you know, the last fourteen computers, MP3 players and PDAs i've owned all died in the vats of liquid nitrogen around my house - for some stupid reason I keep dropping stuff in those.

That was obviously a reference to climate change. Global warming does not mean that it will get uniformly hotter, but that the temperatures become more extreme at both ends of the range. Hence it will get as cold as liquid nitrogen in Winter and as hot as boiling water in Summer.

So it will be nice to know that our data will survive, even if we won't stand a chance.

I didn't see any reference at all to climate change in his post. To me it was a sarcastic point that being able to survive being dipped in liquid nitrogen is a bit excessive, because no one keeps liquid nitrogen around the house. See, it's called sarcasm.

Nor did I see anything in the summary that would point to climate change. I think they were simply showing that if it can survive going from liquid nitrogen to boiling water, it will survive 10 years in your non-climate controlled storage shed.

Or were you just desperately looking for any way possible to preach to us about how global warming is going to kill us all sometime next week?

Re:What? (2)

countertrolling (1585477) | more than 2 years ago | (#37029052)

See, it's called sarcasm.

Well, speaking of which... I mean, I'm sure you're responding to something perfectly serious

Bedrock: (4, Funny)

Hartree (191324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028078)

I think this is how Fred Flintstone's instant camera worked.

Re:Bedrock: (5, Funny)

GrumpySteen (1250194) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028184)

M-Disc
Meet the M-Disc
It's modern stone-age data storage, you need

M-Disc
Meet the M-Disc
It will store your data till the human race is history

Let's write the data on a piece of stone-like strata
Thanks to the guys at Millenniata

When you use the M-Disk
Your data will last a life time
Even more than a life time
Your data will last a long ass time!

Is my boredom showing?

Re:Bedrock: (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028972)

Yes.

Re:Bedrock: (3, Funny)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028996)

I'm still waiting for beaver shots of Betty.

Immortal Reader As Well (4, Insightful)

Normal Dan (1053064) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028116)

I'd like to see this along with a disc reader that will withstand the test of time. What good is a disc if it can't be read with future technology? Imagine an archaeologist finding this disc 2000 years from now, with no way to read it. Now imagine if there was a device that withstood the test of time and could play back the information on the disc in some form. The people of the future would just need to wipe the screen down and press play.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (5, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028240)

It wouldn't be cheap; but so long as the standard survived, or was infer-able, an optical disk reader in working condition would be merely a convenience:

Using the microscopy capabilities of the present, much less the future(assuming we aren't fighting wars for canned goods and desperately holding off the murderous rat-men, in which case it probably doesn't matter), getting a complete image of the pits and lands on the disc surface would merely be a matter of considerable tedium. From there, with knowledge of the standard, it would be an image processing task to recover the data(and, of course, those would have to be stored in a known format, not some encrypted nonsense that depends on a keyserver that went offline during the transgene crusades of 2031)...

The same is largely true of magnetic media. Having a device that costs $20, hangs off a contemporary bus, and is designed to handle the medium sure is handy; but a microscope and some patience is a functional substitute.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028310)

Honestly, how hard would it be to create some stone tablets laser etched with the wiring schematics, signalling information, and physical/mechanical dimensions for a reader? It seems to me like we should be preparing some 'technology bootstrap' packets like this anyway given the precarious nature of modern technology. Combined with the current IP laws and trade secrets, I have to wonder how much information is lost each day regarding technology dating back 20 never mind 50+ years in the current social and commercial climate.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (3, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028418)

Given modern CnC/laser engraving tech, I'm assuming that 'rosetta stoning' some technical standards onto suitably chosen rocks would be as cheap, or cheaper, then ever. A competent hacker could probably knock out a 'pseudo-printer' driver that takes arbitrary print jobs and churns out control signals for an engraving system fairly quickly, at which point you'd just need a bunch of stone tablets chosen for geologic durability.

Whether anybody would bother is much less clear.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028552)

Archaeologist: It appears the ancients worshipped a god known only as "RFC", whose commandments were numbereed consecutively. There is some confusion as to whether these were taken as literal commandments or spiritual allegories; while some seem to dictate simple enough standards for a (primitive) digital society, a few seem distinctly implausible, involving e.g. using pigeons for data transfer; some researchers contend these were wholy allegorical, while others suggest these were actual ceremonies carried out at religious festivals known as "cons".

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028574)

"I'm assuming that 'Rosetta stoning' some technical standards onto suitably chosen rocks would be as cheap, or cheaper, then ever"

Laser etched tungsten carbide tablets about 100mm square and 5mm thick should do the trick. very tough and should age quite well. you could dip them in glass if you really wanted them to last.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (3, Funny)

Lanteran (1883836) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028720)

But if we're talking movie DVDs, you've got CSS to deal with. That would probably ensure that none of our pop-culture survives millennia. Thank god...

What about Africans? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028270)

"Imagine an archaeologist finding this disc 2000 years from now, with no way to read it."

I think you meant to say:

"Imagine an AFRICAN finding this disc 2 years from now, with no way to read it."

Because remember, "We're all the same", right? I mean, it's not as if blacks are parasites and thieves, who leech off white people's technology and hard work, or anything like that. No, of course not. "We're all the same", remember, 'comrades'?

Re:What about Africans? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028352)

Because remember, "We're all the same", right?

Actually, no. People from Africa are descendants of homo sapien sapiens, or Cro-Magnons. Everyone else are descendants of homo sapiens neanderthalensis.

So, being part caucasian/native american, I'm actually not related to black niggers from africa at all.

Imagine my delight at discovering that little fact! :)

CAPTCHA: epithets

Re:What about Africans? (1)

rpresser (610529) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028404)

Apparently you're also part troll.

Re:What about Africans? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37029020)

I resent that!

Bill Bailey

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (2, Funny)

PRMan (959735) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028280)

Any DVD reader can read it. Compatibility with those should last beyond our lifetime.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (1)

Ziekheid (1427027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028286)

You honestly think that future generations wouldn't be able to access information on how devices from the past worked and rebuild them after that?
There must be one major disaster if we ever reach a stage where this happens.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (1)

JonahsDad (1332091) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028346)

Not a major disaster, just a global war between three groups of athiests.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (1)

cduffy (652) | more than 2 years ago | (#37029018)

Not a major disaster, just a global war between three groups of athiests.

...or between three groups of theists, for that matter.

That said -- information and devices for the retrieval thereof are small and ubiquitous enough that I'd be surprised to see a global war with human survivors reset the clock entirely. Nuclear warheads are expensive, and there are certainly large populated areas lacking target value to nuclear-armed nations -- even if the popularity of devices is low, it just takes one village full of OLPCs with Wikipedia preloaded to be preserving a whole lot of content... never mind all the converted Cold War bunkers now housing datacenters.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (1)

im_thatoneguy (819432) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028292)

I would hope in 2,000 years your average archaeologist would have the tools to scan the disk at a molecular level and have an AI extract any important information based on historical archives of data formats.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (2)

bpsbr_ernie (1121681) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028398)

But... will there be DRM... and will it annoy them... and lead them to believe... "oh, its just a stupid Hollywood movie... not worth decoding..." ;-)

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (2, Funny)

camperdave (969942) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028468)

I would hope in 2,000 years your average archaeologist would have the tools to scan the disk at a molecular level and have an AI extract any important information based on historical archives of data formats.

"Esteemed Instructor. I have found a stone disk from 2000 years ago, in the diggings."
"Have you indeed? Is it intact?"
"Yes, Esteemed Instructor. I have taken the liberty of scanning the disk at the molecular level, and I have had my AI extract the information based on the historical archives of known data formats."
"And what have you found?"
"This! [dafk.net] "

formats (1)

bussdriver (620565) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028358)

just think about encoding nightmares! reading the data problem is not too hard to solve even if we claw back from the stone age; the real problem is how to decode the data and then how to process it.

I can imagine them getting stumped on the DOC files they are trying open; the jpegs have to be even more difficult.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028434)

Archaeologist doesn't need to use Microsoft Office 4011 for not reading it, even with Microsoft Office 2012 s/he won't be able to read it.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028626)

For the disk to be readable in the distant future. All you would need is good specifications. Even if they need to use an electron microscope for a drive. Archaeologist will use it. The problem is storing the specs. The simple solution would to write in small but readable text on stone tablets. distribute to libraries across the world. Obivously, they'll need the specs to our data formats so give them discs with simple ASCII text and BMPs with all the most popular data formats including File Systems. Hell give them the source to a complete Linux distro with a the best C and C++ refernces along with the logic to a simple CPU with it's compiler. God, I can almost feel the screams of the IT Archeologists having to reimplement Microsoft WORD doc formats.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (1)

Trogre (513942) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028712)

With the seemingly downward trend in optical drive quality over the past twelve years, I doubt that a drive made today could read such a disc in 3 years time, much less 2000.

Re:Immortal Reader As Well (2)

Dahamma (304068) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028944)

Modern archaeologists have been able to read etched stone records from 5000 years ago [wikipedia.org] . And most of the deciphering was done in the 19th century - ie. without the help of computers.

I think 2000 years from now they can handle whatever system we can dream up.

Prior art! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028128)

The island of Yap [google.com] may have something to say about it.

Re:Prior art! (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028272)

No problem, we can just burn some bitcoin hashes to these new "stone-like" disks and pay the royalties that way...

I knew it! (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028130)

Stonehenge is a data center! I wonder if they're hiring?

Can I get my rock music on this? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028132)

Also, will I need a truck to transport a box full of music StoneD's (TM) ? On a more serious note, is the "stone-like" substance less brittle than actual stone? Half a StoneD is not going to help even if the etching on it is perfectly preserved if my great-great-grandson drops it upon landing on Mars.

Edit: The Slashdot AI seems to have recognized that this is a juvenile post and the captcha it presented was "puberty".

Mica Discs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028138)

I wonder if it's possible they could be made of some variant of Mica.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mica

Re:Mica Discs (1)

kanto (1851816) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028368)

I wonder if it's possible they could be made of some variant of Mica. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mica [wikipedia.org]

Interesting, live in one of those countries that export it the most and had no idea of the stuff :) Personally I was thinking of a thin layer of artificial diamonds/graphite, just don't know how you'd imprint anything on them without upgrading the laser to a handcannon.

Re:Mica Discs (1)

Ira Sponsible (713467) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028484)

I was thinking something along the lines of carborundum [wikipedia.org] or artificial corundum [wikipedia.org] , either of which would make very durable disks.

Re:Mica Discs (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028402)

Mica is a very soft mineral and not very suitable for this sort of application.

Re:Mica Discs (1)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028530)

Mica is a very soft mineral and not very suitable for this sort of application.

They didn't say the whole disc is made out of (whatever it is). They say it's made up of "multiple layers of material."

Re:Mica Discs (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028558)

Go over your Moh's hardness scale again - Mica is TOO SOFT to be usable as ANY layer. It's very brittle as well and not quite transparent.

Re:Mica Discs (1)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028838)

Go over your Moh's hardness scale again - Mica is TOO SOFT to be usable as ANY layer. It's very brittle as well and not quite transparent.

Really? So it's too soft to be sandwiched between two pieces of hard, transparent plastic?

Re:Mica Discs (1)

gumbi west (610122) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028600)

I'm guessing sapphire, what the little stones in sand paper, and high end watch crystals are made of. There is already patents for data storage on it, and it is incredibly heat resistant. I don't know about die free writing.

Awesome (0)

danielfrancis (2280266) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028152)

bro this is awesome bro I like more awesome story please do take this seriously.

It's durable... (5, Funny)

jspayne (98716) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028158)

...but the write times are a bitch.

*chinkchink. pause. chink. pause. chinkchink. *

Re:It's durable... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028226)

Well there's your problem.

Everyone knows the Chinese are slow stone-cutters.

Re:It's durable... (4, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028262)

Just whip the scribes harder. They were advertised as "52x" on the box, and by god they'll put out 52x or die trying!

Here are some field proven techniques. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028190)

Literally lasts forever ...field tested to 250BC
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_Indian_epigraphy

slashpot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028194)

I have a 'stone-like' 'natural' substance in my pants.

Re:slashpot (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37029074)

p.s. I'm not slashpot, I just had to say that before he did.

Re:slashpot (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37029094)

"I have a 'stone-like' 'natural' substance in my pants."

Sand?

Just be careful... (1)

Kargan (250092) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028206)

...not to drop it.

Re:Just be careful... (4, Funny)

MaxBooger (1877454) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028604)

Moses, "The Lord, the Lord Jehovah has given unto you these fifteen... ", *CRASH*, "Oy! Ten! Ten commandments for all to obey!"

and if I use another "Burning laser" device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028214)

I would mark more pits corrupting the data.. that is how i sanitise cd-r/dvd-r/rw media before mechanical destruction....

Won't work, not toddler-proof (1)

greg65535 (1209048) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028228)

Wasn't tested on toddlers, just ask my 2yr old about the state of my DVD library.

**IA (1)

Immostlyharmless (1311531) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028282)

I wonder what their comment on backing your stuff up to a media that will last forever will be?

It doesn't really last forever (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028354)

It doesn't really last forever. Given a long enough period of time there won't be any devices capable of reading the discs and even if someone digs an old DVD player out of a garage, it's unlikely that it will be able to interface with any modern equipment. What's the point of having media that will last eons when technology changes so rapidly that it will be obsolete and unreadable several times over within our lifetimes?

I found there first customer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028284)

His name is Moses. Wants to write commandments on a couple.

Stone discs? (1)

Thraxy (1782662) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028360)

Oh great, they hired Moses...

Even stone disks degrade. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028388)

Just witness the amount of tombstones that are unreadable due to weathering. Heck look how Stonehenge no longer has sharp corners. Nothing is indestructible.

Lab Test (1)

djl4570 (801529) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028390)

Give a few of these to Labrador Retrievers and check back the next day to see if they are as durable as claimed.

Atlantis reborn :D (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028392)

So we have Orichalcum http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orichalcum

The "die" layer must be why (5, Funny)

rpresser (610529) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028412)

... the CD/DVD/BD discs don't last. If only they'd used a dye layer instead.

Re:The "die" layer must be why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028758)

The data layer of manufactured CDs (etc) are pressed with a die [wikipedia.org] , unlike those of recordables.

Re:The "die" layer must be why (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028912)

Slashdot editors! phew! They appear to be drunk even if it wasn't a weekend!

Re:The "die" layer must be why (1)

hierophanta (1345511) | more than 2 years ago | (#37029070)

the author of the article actually switches from die to dye 3 times in one line of text (on my screen)- 'dye. During recording, a laser hits the die layer and burns it, changing the dye ' (page 2).

but the face palm happened when i read this:

"However, the discs write at only 4x or 5.28MB/sec, half the speed of today's DVD players. "We feel if we can move to the 8X, that'd be great, but we can live with the four for now," Shumway said, adding that his engineers are working on upping the speed of recording."

they record half the speed of todays players at 4x?

thats unpossible !

Or you could just post your data on the web (1)

presidenteloco (659168) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028466)

and wait for it to be archived.

Re:Or you could just post your data on the web (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028868)

and wait for it to be archived.

Steganography. In pr0n. Problem solved. :)

String Theory at its Finest (1)

Kojow777 (929199) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028518)

Obviously the M-Disc uses M-Theory to quantum lock the data.

Liquid Nitrogen (3, Interesting)

pcjunky (517872) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028534)

You can put a normal CD-R disk in Liquid Nitrogen without any damage. I have tested it myself. Although it warps into a dome shape until it warms.

So kind of like factory-made CDs/DVDs? (1)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028548)

This doesn't sound a whole lot different than CDs or DVDs burned in factories. Those don't use a dye layer either, but pits etched into an (aluminum?) substrate. It sounds like this company has found a way to produce similar results at home -- but that doesn't mean the resulting discs will be any more durable or have longer life than your store-bought CDs/DVDs.

Re:So kind of like factory-made CDs/DVDs? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028782)

This doesn't sound a whole lot different than CDs or DVDs burned in factories. Those don't use a dye layer either, but pits etched into an (aluminum?) substrate. It sounds like this company has found a way to produce similar results at home -- but that doesn't mean the resulting discs will be any more durable or have longer life than your store-bought CDs/DVDs.

1. MAFIAA has little incentive to sell you discs that will last forever - I'd say, on the contrary. The fact they sell you pressed CD/DVD-es is rather related to the cost of producing them than it is with their concern on how long they'll last for you.
2. However, as a Write-Once-a-single-copy (backup, archiving purposes), I think this one will make a killing. The current life-span of recordable CD/DVD (not the pressed ones) vary between 10-300 years (subject to the quality and storage/use patterns).

Re:So kind of like factory-made CDs/DVDs? (1)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028922)

They've tested the new media for exposure to light, temperature, and humidity, and they claim it suffered no degradation (while all others did). That's significant, but if you scratch it, it's still destroyed. In that sense, it still seems more fragile than high-quality magnetic tape -- but I suppose if the goal is long-term storage, they could put an actual anti-scratch coating on the media and charge you more for it.

I think your estimates of the life of burned CDs and DVDs are way overblown, BTW. Ten years is reasonable, but I've had media fail sooner than that, and I view any media much older than that with suspicion. Unless of course it was stored in perfect, atmosphere-controlled conditions -- but if that's the case, I think DVD-R is the wrong medium. Too small and still too fragile.

Sure. (1)

wbav (223901) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028554)

It can take boiling water and liquid nitrogen, but what about that Kleenex in my pocket? That's killed more DVDs than I'd like to admit.

Archiving data long term (2)

pcjunky (517872) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028560)

My wife's Thesis was on this subject. Readers won't last long enough to make this useful.

http://explorer.cyberstreet.com/CET4970H-Peterson-Thesis.pdf [cyberstreet.com]

Re:Archiving data long term (1)

GrahamCox (741991) | more than 2 years ago | (#37029084)

You don't need a reader, as long as the format is discoverable. They didn't send a reader up with the Voyager disc, did they?

Patents for the "rock-like" material (1)

Spikeles (972972) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028578)

The longest DVD archival life achievable today is provided with the new MDISC—a revolutionary optical disc technology developed by Dr. Barry Lunt and Dr. Matt Linford of Brigham Young University and manufactured by Utah-based Millenniata, Inc. –

The material is probably mentioned in one of these Patents [uspto.gov]

Re:Patents for the "rock-like" material (1)

currently_awake (1248758) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028862)

The patent says silicon and/or aluminum. Doesn't sound very stone like to me. His patent also sounds much like an LP. I think this is yet another version of making a unique invention by adding "with a computer" to the description of something that already exists.

Re:Patents for the "rock-like" material (1)

solanum (80810) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028952)

The patent says silicon and/or aluminum. Doesn't sound very stone like to me.

What? Stone is mostly silicon dioxide, how does something made out of silicon not sound stone like?

Yes, but... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028596)

I'm not Immortal. So... who cares?
Get back with me when you've solved that little issue, mmmk?

Stone-like? I know, I know! (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028616)

It's Play-Doh.

Re:Stone-like? I know, I know! (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028644)

(Oven-fired, that is.)

The material is so good because.. (1)

Sneekyknees (771312) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028682)

they make it asbestos they can!

Useful (1)

StandardAI (1988770) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028714)

This actually fills a nitch, considering that most memory can be wiped easily with a magnet, and that personally burned DVD's only last a few years before they start to degrade. It's perfect for time capsules.

Re:Useful (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37029104)

Just because you guys can't pronounce niche correctly doesn't mean you have to spell it wrong too.

Weren't etched substratae used before? (1)

Nefarious Wheel (628136) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028880)

Weren't the original large-format Laser Video Discs created via this principle? I thought they etched dots into an aluminium substrate using a higher power setting.

so it can handle heat and cold? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37028908)

I think most of the faults i've had with cd's/dvd's is scratches on the plastic surface... does anyone know if these discs actually protect against that? we need discs that you can run over with a tank and they still function not something that can be stored in the cold or hot...

Will It Blend? (1)

Pascarello (909061) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028914)

I can not wait to see that video. :)

Like all relics it will be deemed (1)

assemblerex (1275164) | more than 2 years ago | (#37028968)

religious or ceremonial, the catch all of confused scientists.
"What were all the microscopic pits for?"
"To catch their souls of course!!!"
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