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Microsoft Exec Responds To the Google-Motorola Deal

Unknown Lamer posted about 3 years ago | from the closed-is-open dept.

Businesses 293

adeelarshad82 writes "In a statement released yesterday, Microsoft's Windows Phone Division President Andy Lees said 'Investing in a broad and truly open mobile ecosystem is important for the industry and consumers alike, and Windows Phone is now the only platform that does so with equal opportunity for all partners.' What's interesting is that even though some analysts are actually expecting OEMs to switch their focus to Windows Phone 7, past sales figures (especially for Samsung) show that the decision to do so might not come easily."

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Analyst can chime all they wish. (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108636)

I mean, android is what 47% of smartphones, and Microsoft Windows 7 around 2%.

Keep on wishing bitches!

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (2)

Nerdfest (867930) | about 3 years ago | (#37108682)

I think they're hoping their latest round of patent abuse will push a manufacturer or two their way. Based on how Microsoft's previous 'partners' have fared, it will need to be a little stronger push.

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (3, Informative)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 3 years ago | (#37108834)

No all of Windows mobile is 2% which includes WM6. While MS may have sold more WP7 phones this year, it isn't matching the growth of Android and iPhone. Without looking at the split between WM6 and WP7, I would guess that many users of WM6 are not migrating to WP7 as WM6 users were mostly business while WP7 is mostly consumer.

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37109220)

Windows Phone 7 has nothing to do with Windows Mobile though. It is a stand alone platform. Windows Mobile is 6.5 and lower.

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (2)

dwlovell (815091) | about 3 years ago | (#37109292)

Incorrect, all of Windows smartphones is around 9-10%, it is projected that the WP7 portion is around 2%.

From July 28th, 2011, showing all Windows Mobile + WP7 = 9% of smartphone market share
http://www.engadget.com/2011/07/28/nielsen-android-leads-us-smartphone-market-with-39-percent-shar/ [engadget.com]

From March 2011 showing all Windows Mobile + WP7 = 10% of smartphone market share
http://www.engadget.com/2011/03/03/visualized-us-smartphone-market-share-by-manufacturer-and-plat/ [engadget.com]

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (2)

geoffrobinson (109879) | about 3 years ago | (#37108938)

I don't expect Android to give much ground, but the reason for Android's growth is obvious. Cell phone companies needed something to compete with the iPhone and the Android OS was free. If they end up lagging behind Motorolla due to their special access, they may latch onto another OS.

I don't envision it happening but crazier things have happened.

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (-1, Flamebait)

bonch (38532) | about 3 years ago | (#37108944)

Most Android smartphones are cheap "smartphones" that can barely powerful enough to do the things you'd expect a smartphone to do. Android has the market cornered on junk phones. Also keep in mind that, with iPads and iPod touches counted, iOS greatly surpasses Android in total market share, and the iPhone is the top-selling smartphone as well as the most profitable.

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (2)

morcego (260031) | about 3 years ago | (#37109036)

Most Android smartphones are cheap "smartphones" that can barely powerful enough to do the things you'd expect a smartphone to do. Android has the market cornered on junk phones. Also keep in mind that, with iPads and iPod touches counted, iOS greatly surpasses Android in total market share, and the iPhone is the top-selling smartphone as well as the most profitable.

Also keep in mind that, with bicycles and oranges counted, Android greatly surpasses iPhone.

It is totally possible the iPhone is the most profitable, but can you back your other claims somehow ? It being the top-selling and most android phones being "barely powerful enough to do the things you'd expect a smartphone to do" ?

Until you back that somehow, all you did is make a faith based statement. Is Apple still a religion these days ?

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (1)

s73v3r (963317) | about 3 years ago | (#37109156)

No, you're seeming to make excuses. While his flamebait about android not being powerful is laughably stupidly false, deciding not to count iPads and iPod Touches into iOS marketshare figures is pretty stupid. Just like deciding not to count Android tablets in Android sales figures.

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (1)

RyuuzakiTetsuya (195424) | about 3 years ago | (#37109500)

Just like deciding not to count Android tablets in Android sales figures.

What? I thought those fell into, "margin of error."

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (0)

Anomalyst (742352) | about 3 years ago | (#37109058)

As opposed to Microsoft, where it is the software that epically fails instead of the hardware.

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37109440)

My Microsoft phone (WP7) has not had any of the "epic fails" in software, that you mentioned. Mind you, I've only had it since may. Still, my android had already crashed twice, and run into software glitches that required restarts in the same timeframe, so... I'd have to say, please remove your head from your rectum.

It's got more to do with who made the phone and how good they are with the platform, than the OS, both OSs are quire reliable in the right hands, and lousy in the wrong.

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37109110)

Good job you stupid whore. You managed to (again) bring up the iPhone even when it wasn't the topic. I hope Jobs' cock is worth the price of servitude.

Re:Analyst can chime all they wish. (0)

s73v3r (963317) | about 3 years ago | (#37109144)

Most Android smartphones are cheap "smartphones" that can barely powerful enough to do the things you'd expect a smartphone to do.

Source? And if so, who gives a shit? Every carrier has the low cost ones, but they also have the beefy, powerful ones. It's just a way of letting the consumer choose how much power they need, or can afford.

Analysts are idiots (2)

Tridus (79566) | about 3 years ago | (#37109218)

This type of "analysis" is what you expect from Gardiner. It's nonsense. You're bang on. The fact of the matter is that there's consumer demand for Android, and there isn't for Windows Phone.

The handset makers will go where the sales are and expecting them to pay Microsoft for a platform that people don't want over a free one that people do want is lunacy. It's not happening. This only changes if Microsoft can drum up some demand for WP7 hardware. Maybe Nokia can do that.

Assholes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108650)

Nothing Microsoft says about fair competition, "open ecosystems" or the like can be taken serious. That name is forever stained. I sincerely hope that company and the tragic people who work for them rot in hell. Those greedy assholes have made my life much worse than it could have been.

Re:Assholes (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108738)

Maybe, but some of their execs make a strong case for legalizing mind altering drugs. This is comedy gold. Now pass the pipe Mr Lees.

Re:Assholes (2)

i_b_don (1049110) | about 3 years ago | (#37108902)

Seriously? The definition we all think as an "open ecosystem" is the PC. The opposite of an "open ecosystem" is the Apple Apps Store or locked down cell phones.

All I have to say to MS is "show me". Words are cheap.

d

Re:Assholes (1)

lwriemen (763666) | about 3 years ago | (#37109450)

Microsoft didn't make the PC an "open ecosystem". (If I'm interpreting your comment correctly.) IBM's "choice" to make the PC an open platform (and choosing DOS) is the only reason Microsoft exists. (You can probably throw OS/2 and Linux into that statement as well.)

Re:Assholes (0)

bonch (38532) | about 3 years ago | (#37108914)

You hope that employees of a company rot in hell because you don't like the company's products? What's the matter with you? Who would ever mod you up?

Re:Assholes (0)

wiedzmin (1269816) | about 3 years ago | (#37109072)

You hope that employees of a company rot in hell because you don't like the company's products? What's the matter with you? Who would ever mod you up?

That's why he posted as AC.

Up is down, down is up, cats and dogs agree. (2, Insightful)

ThisIsSaei (2397758) | about 3 years ago | (#37108652)

And Microsoft is lecturing the tech world about being open and free with software. I'm pretty sure that's one of the signs of apocalypse.

Re:Up is down, down is up, cats and dogs agree. (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 3 years ago | (#37108786)

Actually, for specific definitions of "open" that is a longstanding Microsoft tradition:

Microsoft does, in fact, enthusiastically endorse the right of as many hardware vendors as possible to license Microsoft operating systems and certain other platform technologies(unless that doesn't work out, like 'Playsforsure', in which case dump their sorry asses and leave the 3rd parties to rot). They also endorse the right of as many software developers as possible to develop software that depends on win32, .NET, or other Microsoft technologies.

They take these principles of freedom and openness quite seriously...(except when they don't work out).

Re:Up is down, down is up, cats and dogs agree. (1)

ThisIsSaei (2397758) | about 3 years ago | (#37108802)

I was just being comical. (Well, trying.)

Re:Up is down, down is up, cats and dogs agree. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37109346)

Yeah... I'm not a Microsoft fan, but people are always overlooking a critical aspect of openness. Windows isn't free to compile, but as hardware openness goes it's very liberal. It's too bad they abandoned this idea after seeing the success of the iPhone. Openness to Microsoft now means that a limited list of authorized developers is allowed low-level kernel/API access to the system. I'm sure that's how they intend for Windows to be in the future as well.

Re:Up is down, down is up, cats and dogs agree. (1)

bonch (38532) | about 3 years ago | (#37109008)

Based on how they've been behaving the last couple of years, I think Google could use the lecture, actually.

Re:Up is down, down is up, cats and dogs agree. (1)

s73v3r (963317) | about 3 years ago | (#37109188)

Once I can see the source of WP7, can compile it myself, and create a ROM for loading onto my phone, then maybe I'll consider it "Open and Free". Until then, it's another locked down system. Which, if I was going to use one, there's nothing compelling about WP7 over the iPhone anyway.

Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (5, Insightful)

hawguy (1600213) | about 3 years ago | (#37108656)

So when Microsoft says this:

Windows Phone is now the only platform that does so with equal opportunity for all partners.'

Does that mean that everyone gets billions of dollars from MS?

http://thenextweb.com/microsoft/2011/04/21/nokia-and-microsoft-deal-official-definitive-agreement-signed/ [thenextweb.com]

As a result of the deal, Nokia will pay Microsoft royalties for the Windows Phone platform, starting only when the Finnish company launches its first Windows Phone devices. Microsoft has also agreed to make payments to Nokia “measured in the billions of dollars” for services but also intellectual property royalties.

Or are we supposed to believe that MS would have paid for Nokia's IP even if Nokia hadn't switched to Windows Phone?

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108782)

What is your point? Nokia is their most valuable partner. That doesn't mean that Microsoft isn't supporting all of the hardware makers. Since partnering with Nokia they have also added ZTE, Fujitsu, and others. Clearly Nokia is their #1 partner, but Microsoft doesn't own them and Microsoft is not promoting Nokia as "the" WP7 to get. The internet is promoting Nokia as the WP7 phone to get, but so far Microsoft hasn't even show off a Nokia phone while has demoed new phones from Samsung, Fujitsu, etc...

Also WP7 is not in a spec war like Android so WP7 could end up being cheaper to make than Samsung. With Android it seems every 2 months a phone comes out with a better CPU, more RAM, etc.. where with WP7 it is more like the iPhone and apparently Microsoft is happy to refresh specs once or maybe twice a year. That should save hardware makers money because they can use the same guts and just pump out new phones with different body styles, cameras, etc...
 

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (2)

hawguy (1600213) | about 3 years ago | (#37108862)

What is your point? Nokia is their most valuable partner. That doesn't mean that Microsoft isn't supporting all of the hardware makers. Since partnering with Nokia they have also added ZTE, Fujitsu, and others. Clearly Nokia is their #1 partner, but Microsoft doesn't own them and Microsoft is not promoting Nokia as "the" WP7 to get. The internet is promoting Nokia as the WP7 phone to get, but so far Microsoft hasn't even show off a Nokia phone while has demoed new phones from Samsung, Fujitsu, etc...

My point is that on the one hand, MS is claiming that they are the only vendor-neutral mobile phone software maker, but on the other hand, they are throwing billions of dollars at "their most valuable partner".

That hardly sounds vendor neutral unless they do the same for every partner. Google has no reason to give special treatment to their new motorola division at the expense of their other hardware partners - they profit from getting more Android handsets out in the market, they aren't going to make a bundle of money from hardware sales.

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (1)

DickBreath (207180) | about 3 years ago | (#37108874)

For some of us, Android phones pushing the hardware boundaries, causing new more powerful phones to come out every couple months is a good thing.

Microsoft wants a monopoly on a closed source phone operating system. I'm sure the phone OEM's have learned from watching Microsoft rake in the billions while PC OEMs live on razor thin margins. I'm sure the phone OEMs are just thrilled at the prospect of handing Microsoft a new monopoly. Thrilled I tell you.

The reason Android is winning is because it is open source. You can download it and build it.

The only form of control Google has is it's Android Market. As for app stores, Amazon has its own app store. Best Buy is rumored to be working on one. Nobody is stopping anyone from building more app stores.

My point about open vs closed and monopoly is that if Google went away, Android would continue. If Microsoft went away, or just had a whim to stop investing in WP7, then WP7 would cease. The value in Android is the momentum it has in developers, applications, OEMs and mobile network operators even if Google suddenly stopped investing in Android.

Android is not perfect. Far from it. But openness it the winning characteristic.

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (2)

JDG1980 (2438906) | about 3 years ago | (#37109032)

Razor-thin margins on PC hardware may be bad for OEMs, but they are good for consumers. And after seeing all the crap that both OEMs and phone carriers load up their systems with, I don't really have much sympathy for them.

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (3, Insightful)

DragonWriter (970822) | about 3 years ago | (#37109330)

What is your point? Nokia is their most valuable partner. That doesn't mean that Microsoft isn't supporting all of the hardware makers.

It does, however, mean that Microsoft's claim that, with Google acquiring Motorola Mobility, Windows Phone is the only remaining mobile platform where all hardware vendors are treated equally is false, or at least if it is true it is true only in the Animal Farm sense of "all vendors are treated equally, but some are treated more equally than others".

Since partnering with Nokia they have also added ZTE, Fujitsu, and others.

And Android is still owned by the Open Handset Alliance, which includes more device makers than just Motorola, more software vendors than just Google, and a bunch of wireless carriers, component manufacturers, and other firms in markets where Google doesn't play and isn't buying anyone at the moment.

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (1, Troll)

nevillethedevil (1021497) | about 3 years ago | (#37108822)

Does that mean that everyone gets billions of dollars from MS?

No it means everyone gets equally raped.

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37109004)

Except that MS is not anymore in position to rape anyone. They are facing obsolescence within decade unless they actually succeed with their win8/wp7 plan.

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (1)

wiedzmin (1269816) | about 3 years ago | (#37109158)

Except that MS is not anymore in position to rape anyone. They are facing obsolescence within decade unless they actually succeed with their win8/wp7 plan.

Assuming you are referring exclusively to the mobile platform, because last time I checked Microsoft still owns consumer and enterprise PC markets?

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (1)

Penguinisto (415985) | about 3 years ago | (#37109498)

Question is, for how long will they have that iron grip on the consumer side? Windows has already dropped below 90% marketshare, and is likely far lower than that once you remove the corporate/business boxen from the equation. They've been trending downwards for quite awhile now, and that downward trend has been slowly gaining velocity.

To add salt to the wound, consider the tablets. Forget iOS vs. Android, count 'em all, and you notice that few if any of them selling in volume have windows on them. You'll also notice that the growth curve for them is staggering, and that the numbers will soon be (if they're not already) substantial enough to start taking some really large bites out of the typical laptop/desktop market. So what? Well, those are consumers/users/seats/licenses that aren't Windows-by-default-based laptops or PCs. While tablets aren't desktops or even laptops, they are computing devices that fulfill most (if not all) of the needs of the typical Joe Consumer who is buying it.

If I were Ballmer, I'd be scared shitless. Sure, he's got the EA and SA money coming in by the tanker-full. OTOH, the consumer side of things is, IMHO, rapidly slipping from his grasp. We can already see some reaction from Microsoft in the form of the whole Windows 8 initiative (though honestly I think it'll shape up to be another WinFS), and the whole Nokia buy-off thing, not to mention all the software patent hanky-panky we've seen in the past couple years. But... in spite of all that, Microsoft is still losing the consumer.

I mean, sure, you can say that the remaining grip on the enterprise will keep Microsoft from becoming obsolete, but then again, Sun Microsystems once had that too, no?

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108920)

Well to be fair didn't Google pay 12billion for Motorola patents? Seems similar, but MS doesn't own Nokia, it's still a separate company.

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (1)

recoiledsnake (879048) | about 3 years ago | (#37109162)

So when Microsoft says this:

Windows Phone is now the only platform that does so with equal opportunity for all partners.'

Does that mean that everyone gets billions of dollars from MS?

http://thenextweb.com/microsoft/2011/04/21/nokia-and-microsoft-deal-official-definitive-agreement-signed/ [thenextweb.com]

As a result of the deal, Nokia will pay Microsoft royalties for the Windows Phone platform, starting only when the Finnish company launches its first Windows Phone devices. Microsoft has also agreed to make payments to Nokia “measured in the billions of dollars” for services but also intellectual property royalties.

Or are we supposed to believe that MS would have paid for Nokia's IP even if Nokia hadn't switched to Windows Phone?

From the article:

The deal will focus on four areas, including the porting of Nokia’s mapping, navigation and location services to the Windows Phone operating system, with Microsoft ensuring its Bing search engine is present on Nokia devices. Combined, the companies hope that it will enable “better monetization of Nokia’s navigation assets” and bring in “new forms of advertising revenue”.

Bing is weak on local and mapping in EU and Asia, so this deal involves that. If another OEM brings something in value to them, I am sure they may pay up.

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37109206)

So when Microsoft says this:

Windows Phone is now the only platform that does so with equal opportunity for all partners.'

Does that mean that everyone gets billions of dollars from MS?

No, it means that everyone gets an "equal opportunity" to get fucked over when MS decides they want to build something else. See also all the poor bastards that joined the "Plays For Sure" ecosystem only to see it ditched in favor of the Zune...

Re:Everyone gets same deal as Nokia? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37109368)

News Flash! Microsoft announced Windows Phone 7 is "Open." Therefore it is dropping all patent suits against others, and others are free to use their buggy source code. Not!

I'll bet they have an opinion (1)

stevegee58 (1179505) | about 3 years ago | (#37108664)

Funny how MS always puts an openness spin on all their activities.

Re:I'll bet they have an opinion (1)

BeShaMo (996745) | about 3 years ago | (#37108696)

If they can delude the word enough, they will have won (or they'll think they have won).

Re:I'll bet they have an opinion (1)

gstoddart (321705) | about 3 years ago | (#37108794)

If they can delude the word enough, they will have won (or they'll think they have won).

Hmmm ...

Dilute the Word?
Delude the World?
Dilute the World?
Denude the World?
Denude the Women?

Definitely can't be "delude the word" ... that doesn't parse.

Re:I'll bet they have an opinion (2)

Ruzty (46204) | about 3 years ago | (#37108888)

The word you're looking for is "dilute", the act of dilution. Words can't think so it would be difficult to "delude" them as I don't think they can have delusions.

Re:I'll bet they have an opinion (1)

Anomalyst (742352) | about 3 years ago | (#37109108)

IANAEM (I am not an English major) I hazard a guess that words cant be deluded because they were never luded in the first place.

Re:I'll bet they have an opinion (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | about 3 years ago | (#37109354)

If they can delude the word enough,

I don't know if you mean "dilute the word" or "delude the world". I suppose either works.

Equal Opportunity (3, Insightful)

nschubach (922175) | about 3 years ago | (#37108666)

I love how it's assumed that somehow the acquisition of Moto will make Android less open to the Android alliance members... I guess that's the normal tactic. Spread FUD.

Re:Equal Opportunity (1)

jjetson (2041488) | about 3 years ago | (#37108742)

And you are assuming it won't. Does anyone outside of Google and maybe Moto execs know the exact implications? Nope. So we have to wait and see. Until then there will be people on either side of the fence because there are indicators that it could be either way.

Android and the Open Handset Alliance (1)

DragonWriter (970822) | about 3 years ago | (#37109454)

I love how it's assumed that somehow the acquisition of Moto will make Android less open to the Android alliance members...

And you are assuming it won't.

Which is a pretty reasonable assumption, since it is the Open Handset Alliance -- not Google -- that actually owns Android. When Google bought Android, they only held on to it until the OHA was formed, at which point it was transferred to the OHA.

Does anyone outside of Google and maybe Moto execs know the exact implications?

I'm pretty sure the OHA would have to know of anything that transferred ownership of Android back to Google from the OHA.

Re:Equal Opportunity (1)

Superken7 (893292) | about 3 years ago | (#37108766)

Yes, they spread FUD. Also, how is somehow the acquisition of Motorola giving other manufacturers less opportunities, given that MS is now so close no Nokia? My hypocrisy detector is beeping.

Re:Equal Opportunity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108814)

When the Googlerola phone is released first with all the new features before the other manufacturers can release theirs do you think they will continue to make Android phones?

You think Google is acquiring Motorola to help other manufacturers or to encourage them to create good phones by creating them themselves? Google has realised the only way to compete with Apple is to do what they do and control both the hardware and software.

Re:Equal Opportunity (1)

s73v3r (963317) | about 3 years ago | (#37109224)

I think Google realizes this, and so will avoid that situation. They might let Moto make one of the upcoming Nexus phones, but that's about it.

Re:Equal Opportunity (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37109244)

When the Googlerola phone is released first with all the new features before the other manufacturers can release theirs do you think they will continue to make Android phones?

When the Microkia phone is released first with all the new features before the other manufacturers can release theirs do you think they will continue to make WP7 phones?

Yes.

Re:Equal Opportunity (1)

steelfood (895457) | about 3 years ago | (#37108820)

Equal opportunity for Microsoft just means when they shaft their partners over (which they've done time and again), they shaft everyone over equally.

The smart executive has a contingency plan in place. The not-so-smart executive dives head-first into the bullsh--I mean koolaid.

Re:Equal Opportunity (1)

MozeeToby (1163751) | about 3 years ago | (#37108952)

In this case, Google's own actions caused the FUD. No one outside of Google knows for sure what their long term plans are and while I personally think the primary reason for the acquisition was for the patent portfolio, it isn't impossible that they are planning on starting a major hardware division of their own which could spell all kinds of problems for other Android manufacturers. In fact, I'd say that just about any other major company wouldn't be able to resist the temptation to throw their new weight around, so it's pretty impressive that there's a bit of fear, uncertainty, and doubt rather than enough of it to send everyone else running for the hills.

Re:Equal Opportunity (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 3 years ago | (#37109332)

I'd be willing to be that the execs at Samsung & HTC are eyeing the hills and seeing what's the best path to get there.

And if Google, just wanted patents instead of the hardware too, there were other options:
http://dealbook.nytimes.com/2011/08/15/google-turning-into-a-mobile-phone-company-no-it-says/?nl=business&emc=dlbka8 [nytimes.com]

Re:Equal Opportunity (1)

morcego (260031) | about 3 years ago | (#37109126)

What difference would it make even if it did ? I mean, all android versions that come from the manufactures suck in one way or another (bloatware, bad parameters etc).

In any case, now we know the next Nexus phone will be from Motorola.

Seriously you guys... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108668)

2012 is gonna be the Year of the Microsoft Smartphone.

Re:Seriously you guys... (4, Funny)

NatasRevol (731260) | about 3 years ago | (#37109040)

Or the ... wait for it ... MicroPhone.

Sorry.

Given how in bed MS and noikia are (2)

Sir_Sri (199544) | about 3 years ago | (#37108680)

Given how in bed MS and nokia are, I can't see the 3rd party manufacturers all that happy. This now means that the lead, and pure platform for Android will probably be a motorolo product, and google didn't just spend 12 billion dollars to only make prototypes. The Nexus one, nexus S and presumably now Nexus M will follow with the Nexus M2 or whatever.

The MS nokia hookup is equally troublesome. Not that MS can't afford to lose what it has put into Nokia, but as Nokia continues to falter until there's a big new WP7 push it may fall to MS to open the wallet and keep them afloat. That puts other manufacturers in a bind. They don't want to put out something NokiaSoft* is going to obsolete in a heartbeat, and they don't want to find that Nokia sinks and MS abandons the WP7 platform.

*I'm referring to the sub $1000 phone market. The > $1000/phone market is a whole other ball game. I doubt anyone else is going to jump headlong into the 20k/unit smartphone market the way nokia had been, but who knows.

Re:Given how in bed MS and noikia are (1)

mldi (1598123) | about 3 years ago | (#37108784)

and google didn't just spend 12 billion dollars to only make prototypes.

No, they spent $12billion for mobile patents as well as patents regarding STBs and modems, among other things. They've insisted pretty hard they are letting MM do what they do without any interference, and they're not giving them special consideration for their Nexus line over anybody else. I know, that last part is lip service, but I guess we'll find out. But really it's most about patents. They're thinking ahead for GoogleTV protection as well.

As far as M$ goes... well... breaking everyone's legs is equal treatment too. Just sayin'.

Re:Given how in bed MS and noikia are (1)

i_b_don (1049110) | about 3 years ago | (#37109010)

Patents were important, but I think they were not the core issue. Peopel here on Slashdot get too hyped up about patents. Yes they're important, but they are no where near as important as actually being successful in the market place. Motorola adds a much needed hardware component to the google lineup. They have kicked ass with Android, but their aspirations are more to move into the tablet and TV markets and to do that they need successful hardware. It's been pretty obvious that they have had issues with the partnering approach and having a large mature and skilled partner like Motorola pulls the pieces together. As long as their managers and engineers can get everyone in sync, this will be a powerhouse combination.

But again, the goal is selling stuff people want to buy. Patents are not the do-all and end-all.

d

Re:Given how in bed MS and noikia are (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37109226)

It also adds something Google does not have. A relationship with all the cell carriers. A support eco system for fixing phones...

There is more there than just hardware and patents. They bought a business... If they didnt buy it for the business and just something in particular they would have just cross licensed it or something...

Microsoft's Infighting & Corporate Schizophren (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108910)

Has any phone ever cost more than $1000? I've always seen the really top end hardware debut around $700 but rapidly fall to $500.

M$ hasn't always treated their strategic partners very well. Palm, SGI, etc. M$ might well end up ultimately strangling Nokia, even if Nokia gets paid for distributing WP7, hosing any other WP7 distributor. M$ can definitely screw everyone.

Re:Given how in bed MS and noikia are (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37109014)

According to Gizmodo, Whoever releases the next Nexus phone (rumored to be named Nexus Prime) will still continue to be the next Nexus phone manufacterer. Futhermore, moto still has to bid on the phone like everyone else. Obviously this can change with time but that was what was apparently reported on an investor conference call.

http://gizmodo.com/5830887/where-the-next-nexus-is-coming-from

Re:Given how in bed MS and noikia are (1)

J0nne (924579) | about 3 years ago | (#37109376)

There are phones that cost more than a $1000? I've never heard of such a thing, excluding those gimmicky luxury phones that have diamonds laid into them and have some fashionable brand on them.

Like Microsoft cares (5, Interesting)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | about 3 years ago | (#37108692)

Once they ran Palm into the dirt, they basically ignored Windows Mobile developers. Now that new competitors have arisen, they act like they care about the mobile segment. You can't poop on developers and expect them to put any faith in your platform again.

That and Windows Mobile sucks as a mobile or embedded platform. My cable box is WM based and it sucks too!

Waiting for Nokia to tank... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108708)

M$ is simply waiting for Nokia to tank further. When the price is right they to will own a phone maker.

Re:Waiting for Nokia to tank... (1)

lsolano (398432) | about 3 years ago | (#37109484)

Absolutely.

I can not understand how Nokia insists on WP7 when users everywhere want to buy the N9 with meego.

It's even funny when users are asking for something they want to buy and the CEO thinks they're all wrong, that WP7 is the way to go. It is the easiest business: people is already telling you what product they want, you just to produce it and sell it.

Only platform that does so with equal opportunity? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108718)

Wasn't part of the Nokia/MS announcement that Nokia would be the only OEM allowed to change the WinPhone UI in any significant way? Hardly equal is it. I can't see partners jumping ship, and if they do certainly not to WinPhone.

Let compare:

Android - free, dominant market position, highly customisable, allowing own branding or even own UI (like Sense)
WinPhone - non-free, next to zero market penetration, no customisation allowed, and MS have had epic fail after epic fail in the mobile space

From what I've heard Mango is a great OS, but as an OEM would you want to pay for it, knowing it has next to no market presence and is from a company that had failed to gain significant market presence with any mobile product it has ever produced, and who will almost certainly give Nokia preferential treatment to you, and might revisit the Kin strategy at a later date, putting you in a worse situation than you are now with Google.

Wait, what? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 3 years ago | (#37108720)

By " Windows Phone is now the only platform that does so with equal opportunity for all partners." he means "Well, except for Nokia, who is our pet OEM, with whom we have a cozy special alliance [microsoft.com] ..."

Obviously, the biggest potential downside of the Google/Motorola acquisition is the effect on other current Android device producers, so MS can reasonably be expected to say something like that; but come on. It was not so very long ago that Microsoft and Nokia were shamelessly leveraging one another's dynamic synergies, right there in public, and now they want us to believe that Windows Phone is all equal opportunity for everyone and fuzzy kittens?

Microsoft talking about Open? (1)

Superken7 (893292) | about 3 years ago | (#37108728)

Can Microsoft really say they provide a truly open mobile ecosystem? There are a lot of closed doors in the WP7 platform, starting with its source code NOT being available, which is all that's really open about Android.

Re:Microsoft talking about Open? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108870)

Source to Windows Mobile is available to OEMs, and source to the underlying operating system (Windows CE) is available to everyone.

Re:Microsoft talking about Open? (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | about 3 years ago | (#37109438)

Maybe they mean the source to applications sold for the WP7 platform will be freely visible and open to the public. I mean, aren't they all going to be HTML and Javascript?

Open? Huh? (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 3 years ago | (#37108730)

Did I wake up in an alternate universe this morning? The Windows Phone 7 platform is not only closed source but also a walled garden just like iOS and others. I knew I shouldn't accepted that drink from that gray goblin last night. Everyone knows you can only trust green goblins.

Re:Open? Huh? (1)

bonch (38532) | about 3 years ago | (#37108972)

Microsoft is referring to the fact that Google withholds Android source from non-privileged partners. You don't hear about it much on Slashdot because this is vehemently pro-Google territory.

Re:Open? Huh? (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 3 years ago | (#37109142)

Does MS treat all of their partners equally? The Nokia deal seems to suggest otherwise. It reminds me of the FUD Linux TCO argent they used saying that Linux would cost more due to migration costs while not acknowledging that migrating to Windows also incurs migration costs even migrating from one version to another.

Not. (5, Funny)

wsxyz (543068) | about 3 years ago | (#37108736)

That's not true.

Google is firmly committed to a vendor neutral policy with Android and the Motorola Mobility subsidiary will be firewalled off from Google and independently managed to ensure that stays true.

In fact, Google would be happy to see their own investments obliterated by their handset competitors... eh, I mean partners... and their own handset division becoming a bottomless cash sink, as long as it helps advance the Android platform.

So, Microsoft really needs to stop with the FUD and accept that Google really is an altruistic and idealistic organization that truly cares only about making life better for everyone.

Re:Not. (1)

pak9rabid (1011935) | about 3 years ago | (#37109270)

So, Microsoft really needs to stop with the FUD and accept that Google really is an altruistic and idealistic organization that truly cares only about making life better for everyone.

Even more than making money? Somehow I doubt that.

Re:Not. (2, Insightful)

bonch (38532) | about 3 years ago | (#37109352)

What a bunch of fanboy nonsense.

Google isn't an "altruistic and idealistic organization that truly cares only about making life better for everyone." They're a multi-billion-dollar megacorp whose business is based on a closed-source search-and-advertising platform dependent on selling your personal data to advertising partners. They make sleazy non-neutral internet deals with vendors just to push Android. They withhold Android source from non-privileged partners and ship closed technology like Flash, AAC, and MP3 support in Chrome, even as they preach about openness. Android is a free product pumped into a new market to maintain the dominance of the core business and kill off competitors who can't afford to compete with an artificial price, the same way Internet Explorer was pumped into the browser market to kill off Netscape and keep the Windows platform relevant.

The benevolent little tech company from ten years ago is long gone. In its place is a gigantic advertising conglomerate under investigation around the world for antitrust violations and privacy breaches. Google is another Microsoft and is no better.

Microsoft still elicits a predictable reaction on Slashdot, repetition of the term "FUD" as if it automatically counters all arguments. And, as always, there will be mysterious Underrated moderations to such comments because Overrated/Underrated moderations aren't subject to meta-moderation, a loophole that Slashdot has left unclosed for years. I think what has happened to this community is that Reddit and Hacker News drew most of the more objective posters away, leaving the hardcore ideologues behind who automatically stand behind Google and automatically hate Microsoft, Apple, Sun, and anything else that competes with Google. Slashdot's overall position was always skewed by default, but there was actually a degree of objectivity that used to shine through in the comment sections. That very rarely occurs today.

It's really quite fascinating that there isn't more outcry over the fact that a closed-source product from a corporation has become the gatekeeper for the web, but apparently, if you use Linux for your business, all is forgiven, and you are a pack of angels trying to make the world a better place rather than another scum-sucking corporation leveraging their monopoly to make a dollar.

Liars (3, Informative)

pavon (30274) | about 3 years ago | (#37108746)

Straight from their own mouth [nokia.com]

* Nokia will help drive and define the future of Windows Phone.
* Nokia and Microsoft will closely collaborate on development, joint marketing initiatives and a shared development roadmap

They are both in bed with a hardware manufacturer now, have both claimed it won't affect other licenses of the OS, and both have something to loose if they alienate the other OEMs.

Not Going to Happen (1)

segedunum (883035) | about 3 years ago | (#37108760)

Nice try, and I suppose they had to, but there are two premier platforms in the mobile world in iOS and Android and one is demonstrably closed and the other mostly open and free for manufacturers to put on their devices despite the Motorola takeover which I suspect has more to do with other reasons than Google wanting to make phones. Two platforms are more than enough, and there were even question marks for a while as to whether Android would gain traction and have the developer base of iOS. I just don't see what Windows brings. It's neither one thing nor the other.

some are more equal than others (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108762)

"Windows Phone is now the only platform that does so with equal opportunity for all partners."

*cough*Nokia*cough*

Windows Mobile Sucks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108788)

No matter what happens, Windows mobile still and always will suck. That is until phones and pcs start to share an architecture and Microsoft bases its mobile platform off its desktop. In which Windows mobile would win be default do to the large amount of applications and development support.

Poor Nokia suffered the Osborne effect (3, Informative)

bogaboga (793279) | about 3 years ago | (#37108790)

Poor Nokia suffered the Osborne Effect [wikipedia.org] , whereby sales of current available products plummet after the announcement of un-available 'future' products.

Things have changed a lot! In my little world, Microsoft is of no consequence, and that's a good thing. I will not touch Microsoft products (including NOKIA), as a matter of principal.

Re:Poor Nokia suffered the Osborne effect (3, Interesting)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#37108970)

No, poor Nokia suffered the effect of taking MS's money.
They kill everything they touch.

Nokia had a good platform and good phone, they gave that away for a little bit of free money now at the expense of their future.

So where can I download the source code (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37108842)

So I can root and build my windows phone without all the cruft I don't want?

LOL LOL ROTFL LOL (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about 3 years ago | (#37108858)

yep, LOL is appropriate for this.

wp7 is open equally to everyone - that is it's equally closed to everyone not picked by random chance of circumstances. it's miles more closed than windows ce. and don't get me started on 3rd party devs- basically for symbian, android and even palms there were(are) 3rd party products which simply will not be possible on wp without getting first party involved if you were to port them over to windows phone. and that's not open, that's opposite of open. and open platform is where you can just go ahead and change/hack whatever you want to achieve some new functionality - not so on wp.

just the minimum hw requirements on wp7 say that it's not open - if it were, there wouldn't be those restrictions(which are bendable of course, if you somehow manage to manage the ms managers to allow it).

which 3rd parties are then happy about this new development? well those which manage to bag coding deals to clone more features into wp, as they get to bill MS for them dearly and that group of companies is a very limited party(too bad temptation of VM only 3rd party apps was so big when they lined up the current windows phone - sure, the windows mobile wince phones sucked, but they had ample possibilities for 3rd party developers besides coding solitaire and minesweeper for the 45th time).

Windows Phone 7 Quality, Security, Reliability (2)

DickBreath (207180) | about 3 years ago | (#37108948)

Only Windows Phone 7 has the kind of Quality, Stability, Security, Reliability and Robustness that you have come to expect from the Microsoft name.


(I'll pause for a moment so you can stop laughing.)


Remember Windows Mobile?

Sidekick / Danger?

Windows Kin Phone?

Remember Microsoft and Sendo? (You can google for it. I said google, not bing.)

Google obviously bought Motorola for one reason (1)

DickBreath (207180) | about 3 years ago | (#37108980)

No matter what Microsoft says, it is obvious why Google bought Motorola.

Patents.

Of course MS is well known (1)

Anomalyst (742352) | about 3 years ago | (#37109038)

For the fair and even handed way it treats third parties with which it supplies its crufty "solutions" and the people who have the misfortune to purchase the resulting products.

Start the Pool (2)

chill (34294) | about 3 years ago | (#37109078)

Considering MS is second only to Apple in outright denials of things they're actively pursuing and ready to pull the trigger on, how long until Microsoft just outright buys Nokia?

Open (1)

BabyDuckHat (1503839) | about 3 years ago | (#37109164)

They keep using that word. I do not think it means what they think it means.

PCMag Analysts? (1)

mevets (322601) | about 3 years ago | (#37109274)

Prostitutes is closer to the mark. The referenced article contains this doozy:
"How would they know for sure that they're getting all the same OS updates as quickly as Motorola?"
Could the same FUD not be directed at the MS/Nokia love-in?

The sad part is that Motorola Mobile should now be on death watch.

Oh Oh. (1)

sgt scrub (869860) | about 3 years ago | (#37109290)

The most popular rap artist is white. The tallest man in the NBA is Chinese. Microsoft is lecturing people on fairness.

I believe I know why it is so hot in Texas. I'll know for sure if Perry and Buchanan win.

Equality for all partners (1)

DrXym (126579) | about 3 years ago | (#37109342)

How is bankrolling Nokia equality for all partners? Does anyone seriously think Nokia flipped over to Windows Phone without some substantial financial incentives and preferential treatment?

I think its right to raise concerns about what happens to Android but it's laughable for any analyst to pretend Microsoft is any better.

Equal opportunity.. (1)

Bert64 (520050) | about 3 years ago | (#37109358)

Actually, Meego is arguably the only "neutral" mobile OS these days, since Nokia dropped it there's only really Intel pushing it, and they don't make phones.
Windows may or may not have a special deal with Nokia...
Also, Google haven't even completed the purchase of Motorola yet, and who's to tell what their strategy will be once they have?
They might have bought Motorola purely for the patents, and shut down their (unprofitable) phone design and manufacture business, which would actually benefit rather than harm the other Android OEMs.

15th Aug 2011 - The real day Ballmer lost his job (1)

phonewebcam (446772) | about 3 years ago | (#37109434)

Coiffin, meet nail [gigaom.com] . He just blew the m$ mobile plan B: extortion through litigation, since plan A - a quality mobile OS - is clearly dead in the water [tomsguide.com] .

Hahahaahah (1)

unity100 (970058) | about 3 years ago | (#37109472)

Windows Phone is now the only platform that does so with equal opportunity for all partners - of microsoft

-> until microsoft tries to screw its partners over, that is.

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