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Study Shows Dogs Can Sniff Out Lung Cancer

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the still-confused-by-pretending-to-throw-tennis-balls dept.

Medicine 78

cylonlover writes "Last year, researchers developed a cancer-detecting electronic nose inspired by dogs' ability to sniff out different types of ovarian cancer. Now a new study has found that sniffer dogs' abilities extend to reliably detecting lung cancer. The researchers say the results of the study (abstract) confirm that there is a stable marker for lung cancer, which offers the possibility that a 'breath test' for the early detection of lung cancer could be developed."

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THEN WHY THEY ALWAYS SMELL MY CROTCH !!?? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37148484)

Do I have lung cancer in my crotch ??

Re:THEN WHY THEY ALWAYS SMELL MY CROTCH !!?? (4, Funny)

YodasEvilTwin (2014446) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148510)

No, just several other diseases ...

Re:THEN WHY THEY ALWAYS SMELL MY CROTCH !!?? (2)

bongey (974911) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150044)

Actually it is because you scent is strongest there. Dogs primarily use scent to remember others, it is a dog hello. That is also why they sniff each others butts

Re:THEN WHY THEY ALWAYS SMELL MY CROTCH !!?? (1)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148520)

Do I have lung cancer in my crotch ??

Bend over to find out...

I chuckled.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37148536)

I guess I don't have the heart to mod AC down any further. We'll see how funny everybody else thinks that is.

Re:I chuckled.. (1)

LifesABeach (234436) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148844)

Let me understand this. Not knowing if I have Cancer; or a dog sticking its nose up my crotch. WAIT! I'm thinking.

Re:THEN WHY THEY ALWAYS SMELL MY CROTCH !!?? (2)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148570)

Just because the cancer is in the lungs doesn't mean that the odours are emitted from the lungs. As your body fights the cancer, wastes and byproducts from the struggle are eliminated through the...um... usual channels.

Re:THEN WHY THEY ALWAYS SMELL MY CROTCH !!?? (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148962)

Is your girl/boyfriend a smoker?

Re:THEN WHY THEY ALWAYS SMELL MY CROTCH !!?? (1)

Deus.1.01 (946808) | more than 3 years ago | (#37153682)

Oh you dirty dog you.

Re:THEN WHY THEY ALWAYS SMELL MY CROTCH !!?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37158914)

You might have testicular (or ovarian, if you're female) cancer....... :-(

Laaaassieeeeee (2)

Aighearach (97333) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148522)

I wonder how many dogs out there are sitting around mumbling, "I've been trying to get her to go to the doctor for 10 years!"

Re:Laaaassieeeeee (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | more than 3 years ago | (#37149000)

If a dog thinks his or her owner has had lung cancer for 10 years, something weird is going on...

Re:Laaaassieeeeee (2)

guybrush3pwood (1579937) | more than 3 years ago | (#37149874)

That's in dog-years, you insensitive clod.

Re:Laaaassieeeeee (1)

trytoguess (875793) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150240)

What kind of sadistic dogs would want their owners to go see a cruel creature who cuts off genitalia, and occasionally jabs them with pointy things?

Re:Laaaassieeeeee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37179772)

Why would they be going to my ex-wife?

Medical Tricorder (2)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148534)

You mean that device that McCoy waves over people before he says they're dead Jim is an electronic nose?

Re:Medical Tricorder (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37148592)

Among other things.

It also makes julienne fries.

Medical Tricorder Low Down (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37148642)

OK, here's the deal: In 1985, I was 15, *HOT* and had *RAGING* male hormones. I'd had enough of Bum Fuck Arkansas and decided it was time to empty my dad's secret hooker bank account and hop the first Greyhound to NYC. After a few weeks of hanging out on the street making a few bucks sucking the random cock, one day a stretch limo pulled up. I expected some crusty old rich fag to roll the window down and pick me up for a little cock sucking. These rich old fags just fucking LOVE to suck off hot young studs, which is what I was. But guess what? It wasn't some old queen. Well, actually it *WAS* some old queen, it was LEONA HELMSLEY ! The old bitch needed her dried-up snatch stretched out, and I was the lucky guy. I hopped in and the driver spent the next hour or so cruising Manhattan. What blew me away was that this cunt must have been older than dirt, but man she *KNEW THINGS*. So anyway, about an hour later, my Big Ten Inch was raw, and I was $1000 richer. I gave the bitch my pager (no cells in those days, ya know) and once a week would hop in LEONA *FUCKING* HELMSLEY'S stretch limo, and pound her twat into shape. Then, about 6 months after it all started (and about 25 grand later), she stopped calling. I figure she found another 15 year old hottie to do the pussy stretchingæ

Smell my ass (1)

scharkalvin (72228) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148588)

Will it work for colon cancer? (YUCK! Fart analyzer)

Re:Smell my ass (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37148620)

Will it work for colon cancer? (YUCK! Fart analyzer)

yeah, well about the ovarian cancer ... I think some chick got caught with a dog down there and said, "Uuuuhhh yeah, the dog can sniff ovarian cancer. Just making sure. Really! *Doesn't anyone fucking knock anymore?!*"

Re:Smell my ass (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#37149004)

Why do you think dogs are always sniffing people's asses?

I can do that. (1, Insightful)

trout007 (975317) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148596)

If your breath smells like an ashtray I'm pretty sure you got cancer.

Re:I can do that. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37148838)

You'd be right less that half the time.

Re:I can do that. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37148860)

But can you do this: I spent a few months in a hospital because of a serious injury some time ago. There was a dog in the garden, which would every day go around all patients out there, introduce itself, stay around for a while, then move on. Sometimes the dog just stick around a patient while that person was in the garden - just lie quietly next to the guy, with his head touching the leg or something just as cute. Invariably, the person died within a few days to a week.

Re:I can do that. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37148922)

Confirmation bias [wikipedia.org] .

Re:I can do that. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37149286)

Denial [wikimedia.org]

Re:I can do that. (1)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 3 years ago | (#37149296)

Confirmation bias [wikipedia.org] .

Except such stories are widely documented, tested, and shown to be more than people making something out of nothing.
The most recent ones I've heard of involved cats in hospitals sleeping on patients's beds.

Re:I can do that. (1)

leathered (780018) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150018)

Tell that to the 20% of lung cancer patients who have never smoked.

Re:I can do that. (1)

trout007 (975317) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150368)

I'd still be better than the 30% the dogs missed.

Not so surprising... (4, Insightful)

NerveGas (168686) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148662)

One of my dogs has, over the past six years, demonstrated an absolute 100% track record in sniffing out whether women are pregnant. He's never given a single false positive, or a false negative. It's not something I've trained, he does it on his own. And to make it even more impressive, at the point when he gave the earliest signal on one woman, we later found out (through the doctor's ultrasound and dates) that it was just three days after conception. As for cancer, they've been known to accurately sniff it out for years now.

The canine nose is an amazing thing. But that's not the entire story, the amount of their brain that they dedicate to processing smell is huge compared to humans. In terms of the percentage of brain dedicated, they use something like 10-30 times more of their brain for smelling than we do. Smell is, quite literally, their primary sense, in the same way that sight is ours. The saying that "Dogs don't smell a cake, they smell each ingredient" is, quite literally, correct. In using dogs for scent detection, the biggest challenge is usually just our ability to isolate the desired scent to present to the dog, doing the rest is easy for the dog.

The real oddity here is not that dogs have good noses... a ton of animals do. Humans are actually the oddity. There seems to be a negative correlation between intelligence and smelling ability, perhaps because having lots of rational thought takes enough brain space that smelling gets pushed aside. Whatever the reason, looking at primates, as you go up in intelligence, smelling ability goes downhill. We shouldn't be so amazed that dogs can do what they do, but saddened that we can't do the same.

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

danlip (737336) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148746)

Smell is often described as the most emotional sense - and instinct is pretty similar to emotion. Being able to override instinct and emotion with reason is pretty damn useful. Also humans have excellent vision and visual processing abilities, which maybe pushed out smell as the primary sense.

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37148924)

If you didn't train him, how does he let you know?

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

NerveGas (168686) | more than 3 years ago | (#37243024)

One lucky "recipient" described it like this:

"It was like I was riding his nose around the house."

Re:Not so surprising... (2)

Rei (128717) | more than 3 years ago | (#37149026)

Yeah, but how creepy is it, having a doctor tell you, in as couched terms as possible of course, "The dog smells death on you"? I mean, I guess it could be worse; they could bring in a vulture to do the job (most vultures have an excellent sense of smell as well). Or the doctor could name the dog after the Cn Annwn [wikipedia.org] ;)

As for the whole intelligence/smell inverse correlation, it seems to hold with parrots. The research I've read suggests that parrots (among the most intelligent of birds, up there with the corvids) have no better of a sense of smell than we do, and that seems to hold true in my household. But don't corvids (ravens, crows, etc) have a good sense of smell, too? Yet they're better tool-makers/users than parrots (although not as good at communication).

Re:Not so surprising... (2)

pauljlucas (529435) | more than 3 years ago | (#37149344)

The real oddity here is not that dogs have good noses... a ton of animals do. Humans are actually the oddity. There seems to be a negative correlation between intelligence and smelling ability, perhaps because having lots of rational thought takes enough brain space that smelling gets pushed aside.

According to Neil Shubin, author of Your Inner Fish, the trade-off that human ancestors made was the ability to have better color vision (not intelligence) than smell.

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

The_mad_linguist (1019680) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150360)

Actually humans have a pretty decent but not spectacular sense of smell.

The biggest issue is having a nose that's over a meter off the ground.

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

Gaygirlie (1657131) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150598)

The biggest issue is having a nose that's over a meter off the ground.

That matters only if the object you're sniffing is on the ground. But very often the object is way above the dog yet they can still very precisely smell it.

I don't know how well humans fare against the whole of animal kingdom, but atleast compared to dogs our smelling capabilities are literally laughably poor. My family has always had dogs ever since I was small, and I even have a dog right now myself, and I've seen some of the stuff they can pull off: humans can't get even near.

Re:Not so surprising... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37151210)

The biggest issue is having a nose that's over a meter off the ground.

That matters only if the object you're sniffing is on the ground. But very often the object is way above the dog yet they can still very precisely smell it.

Bzzt. The ground is extremely smelly, to smell something far away you would need a powerful sense of smell to 'smell through' the noise that you don't care about to the something interesting.

Also, why would dogs be smelling things above them all the time? Dogs are descended from wolves who use their noses to find tracks and follow them to prey, being close to the ground is quite important. Humans aren't close enough to sniff the dirt for tracks without putting ourselves in a vulnerable crouching position that would allow something to sneak up on us. (Also, humans are descended from apes who generally live in trees, not on the ground so you can double up evolutionary selection against smell tracking)

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

The_mad_linguist (1019680) | more than 3 years ago | (#37153136)

Comparing against a dog for smell is like comparing against a cheetah for burst speed.

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

Urkki (668283) | more than 3 years ago | (#37155216)

Actually humans have a pretty decent but not spectacular sense of smell.

The biggest issue is having a nose that's over a meter off the ground.

Considering where dogs (and many other animals) set the bar, humans do not have "pretty decent" sense of smell. Humans maybe have "not the worst" sense of smell, but it's not very decent. I mean, just observing dogs, there's an entire world we're oblivious to. It's more than seeing just black&white versus colors, it's probably more like... being able to enjoy fine nuances of music versus being able to notice Richter 3 earthquake.

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

dkf (304284) | more than 2 years ago | (#37162626)

Humans maybe have "not the worst" sense of smell, but it's not very decent.

Actually it's pretty good. It's just that we mostly ignore it and our noses are usually not that close to where the scents are. Perhaps if you paid more attention to what you've got and weren't so stuck up with your nose in the air, you'd figure things out better. Yes, dogs are still better at scents. So? We see better than dogs. It doesn't prove that much other than relative acuities in two senses between two species.

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

Urkki (668283) | more than 2 years ago | (#37162964)

"So" nothing special, it's just biology. I guess if you drew a suitably logarithmic scale for sense of smell based on whatever measuring method, you could drag human sense of smell into "pretty good" region, but then practical difference between "good" and "excellent" becomes ridiculously large. But meh, this level of classification is of course subjective, matter of opinion.

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150414)

The real oddity here is not that dogs have good noses... a ton of animals do. Humans are actually the oddity. There seems to be a negative correlation between intelligence and smelling ability, perhaps because having lots of rational thought takes enough brain space that smelling gets pushed aside.

This is going to come off wrong, but I can tell when a woman is on her period. To say it's a "smell" is a bit offensive, it's more like a pheromone. It's just sort of an emotion/feeling. Akin to my feeling of where North is. I can't describe it, I can't explain it, but it's 100% dead on. (Hardest time is getting close enough friends to ask the question).

Re:Not so surprising... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37150588)

i can do the same thing, and it's kind of an odd thing. it's definitely a scent, of sorts, that i can best describe as "spicy". not chili pepper spicy, but sort of sharp/piquant, like the spiciness of ginger. it's actually pretty unmistakeable. i've only confirmed this with about half a dozen women, but for some, on several occasions over many years. some probably think it's creepy... but then i can smell all sorts of things that other people don't notice. usually that means smelling things like rotting food or something else that drives me up a wall but no one else can detect. i guess it's moderately cool, but has yet to produce any concrete benefit. *shrug*

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

phantomfive (622387) | more than 3 years ago | (#37151172)

Yup, and I can sense heart problems. It isn't so much a smell for me, it's a sense of taste. Weird that people can develop these capabilities as well.

oddity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37151788)

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Re:Not so surprising... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37155224)

Yeah sure

Re:Not so surprising... (0)

sohare (1032056) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150528)

One of my dogs has, over the past six years, demonstrated an absolute 100% track record in sniffing out whether women are pregnant. He's never given a single false positive, or a false negative.

I take it you have not heard about confirmation bias [wikipedia.org] , have you?

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

Khyber (864651) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150850)

I take it you haven't seen the multiple studies that show that this isn't some bias but an actual demonstrable ability?

Re:Not so surprising... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37156372)

I hate that some slashdotter clued in the masses to the phrase "confirmation bias". It's like the new, cool replacement for, "anecdote is not evidence".

Dear readers, please avoid using either phrase unless you ACTUALLY know what it means.

Re:Not so surprising... (1)

geekmux (1040042) | more than 3 years ago | (#37151932)

...The real oddity here is not that dogs have good noses... a ton of animals do. Humans are actually the oddity. There seems to be a negative correlation between intelligence and smelling ability, perhaps because having lots of rational thought takes enough brain space that smelling gets pushed aside. Whatever the reason, looking at primates, as you go up in intelligence, smelling ability goes downhill. We shouldn't be so amazed that dogs can do what they do, but saddened that we can't do the same.

Not so sure it had to do with intelligence as much as it had to do with evolutionary needs. A caveman's sense of smell was directly tied to his ability to survive and hunt/find food. Today, we go to Wal-Mart to "hunt", where all we smell is the stench of cheap imported goods. No wonder our sense of smell kind of died off.

Interesting... (1)

imyy4u3 (1290108) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148674)

If dogs can sniff out cancer, than that means that certain cells have a "scent," otherwise the dogs are probably just smelling cigarette smoke. But say they can "smell" certain cells and differentiate them from others. Well, there is a lot more research to be done there...can they sniff out heart-attacks before they happen, by smelling someone's breath and determining their risk factor? Can they sniff out diseases and prevent epidemics by someone's breath? Smell may in fact be the key to the next-generation of preventative medicine and curing illnesses before they take hold.

Re:Interesting... (4, Informative)

reverseengineer (580922) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148956)

Cancer cells are known to be different in terms of having a scent. Cancer cells tend to have deranged metabolic processes as a result of keeping up with the demands of uncontrolled growth, and as a result often spew free radicals and reactive byproducts that damage compounds in the cell, breaking them down to simple alkanes and alkenes which are vanishingly scarce in healthy cells. These compounds are volatile enough to be detected by gas analysis methods, or by scent, if you happen to have a dog available.

Big Al says dogs can't lookup... (1)

Assmasher (456699) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148726)

...so it's not like they're all powerful.

At Steere House in Providence... (3, Interesting)

bmo (77928) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148748)

....Oscar the Cat is still sniffing out dying people.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2010/02/02/us-cat-death-idUSTRE6115QB20100202 [reuters.com]

Sniffing out cancer in the breath of someone who has lung cancer does not surprise me.

--
BMO

Re:At Steere House in Providence... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37149072)

It's been shown by study that this cat only likes warm places to lie. It will find a heatpad next to the dying person in bed, that is all. I saw it on the telly, I did. While waiting to get me teeth fixed, I did. God save queen, I did.

This could be socially valuable... (1, Troll)

Genda (560240) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148854)

Now if we can teach them to sniff out stupid and criminally inclined, we can run all our politician through and subsequently assign them tasks according to their level of reliability. With this technology we could have put George Bush Jr. in charge of the White House garden, and Dick Cheney in charge of the White House laundry (no you don't need Haliburton to get clean white sheets!)

. . . and more cancers (1)

godel_56 (1287256) | more than 3 years ago | (#37148908)

I've also seen multiple reports of dogs detecting early-stage malignant melanomas (virulent skin cancer) on their owners.

The person finds the dog is suddenly licking a particular spot on their arm or leg. They go to the doctor and find themselves being sent to surgery ASAP.

Also, not quite colon cancer, but there have been successful tests on the detection of bladder cancer by a dog sniffing urine samples. I hope they give that doggie some extra treats.

Re:. . . and more cancers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37149572)

I've also seen multiple reports of dogs detecting early-stage malignant melanomas (virulent skin cancer) on their owners.

The person finds the dog is suddenly licking a particular spot on their arm or leg. They go to the doctor and find themselves being sent to surgery ASAP.

Also, not quite colon cancer....

It holds for colon cancer as well - I saw a dog licking and chewing a man's colon, and he had to go into surgery too....

which offers the possibility that a 'breath test' (1)

Random Destruction (866027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37149204)

It sounds like the breath test already exists. How hard is it to train these dogs?

What about my Dog? (1)

Charmonium (2441996) | more than 3 years ago | (#37149576)

My dog can give you lung cancer if you sniff him out.

Big Bad Government Funding this research (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37149590)

CUT Government FUNDING!!!! Government is bad!

Patent trolls on the move (1)

guybrush3pwood (1579937) | more than 3 years ago | (#37149988)

Now that this has been confirmed, the trolls will file patents for dogs, and we all will be screwed.

a breath test? (1)

DragonTHC (208439) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150030)

why not just use highly trained dogs? They're far more accurate. and far cheaper.

A box of milk bones is cheaper than a $900 test for my insurance company.

sniffing out rotting meat is easy for dogs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37150260)

the recently born millions of babys that are being starved & murdered on this day have advanced dna that would allow their senses to detect, & intentionally heal, illness in any of us. what a shame, pity that we cannot see them again ever, here. for each one of the creators' innocents harmed in any way... you know the rest.

where it's (body rot) coming from, is the chemicals we so love to ingest, & in the lifestyles to which we tend to regress. dogs won't even eat some of that crud we suck down all day every day. not that it's anything to do with stuff that really matters... here, or that all the poisonous junk that goes on/into us is voluntarily ingested.

confusion surrounds abrupt unannounced cancellation of promised $.5m per citizen terror tolerance stipends

the usual rumours; that we're going to get it, or nothing at all, on the
backend of our terror. so, once one lie is 'infactated', the rest becomes
just more errant fatal history.

disarm. tell the truth. the sky is not ours to toy with after all?

you call this 'weather'? what with real history racing up to correct
itself, while the chosen one's holycostal life0cider mediots continually
attempt to rewrite it, fortunately, there's still only one version of the
truth, & it's usually not a long story, or a confusing multiple choice
fear raising event.

world wide disarmament is taking place based on the pure intentions of the
majority of the planet's chosen to be depopulated, population. as the
biblical fiction based chosen ones have only one ability, which is
destruction for personal gain, they just don't fit in with all the new
life extending stuff that's we're being advised to ignore. life likes to
continue, advance etc... deception & death appear to have similar
ambitions. with try terror first on every day ending in y upon us, wouldn't this be a great
time to investigate the genuine native elders social & political
leadership initiative, which includes genuine history as put forth in the
teepeeleaks etchings. the natives still have no words in their language to
describe the events following their 'discovery' by us, way back when. they
do advise that it's happening again.

Due to excessive bad posting from this IP or Subnet, anonymous comment
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Weird (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37150334)

Wasn't Stephen King's (for lack of a better word) dog kid in 1984 - The Talisman able to due this? Called it "black death" wow ahead of his time I guess.

biTcH (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37150816)

num3ers. The loss its cmorpse turned

about 16 years ago. (1)

kentsex (2433846) | more than 3 years ago | (#37150930)

Interesting, but there was a similar story about training cancer sniffing dogs [goo.gl] in Tallahassee about 16 years ago.

My grandmother's miniature schnauzer (1)

ToddInSF (765534) | more than 3 years ago | (#37151766)

would occasionally bark and paw at her side, we'd laugh, crazy dog. But then she started having pain in the same area. About a year and a half later, she was diagnosed with lung cancer (she never smoked). The schnauzer died of leukemia before she passed away. I miss them both horribly.

dogs (1)

GioBulia (2442630) | more than 3 years ago | (#37157140)

In recent years, skin diseases in dogs and cats occupy a leading place among the diseases that occur in these species

My Dog RIP (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37157154)

My dog recognized himself in the mirror; arrogant humans. He also had a very powerful nose, literally waking from a deep sleep when his favorite chocolate was moved 4 feet over him in a closed box; the nose moved first then the sleepy eyes opened.

Hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37157906)

"which offers the possibility that a 'breath test' for the early detection of lung cancer could be developed" Apparently the marker smells something like cigarettes

Glad i have dogs (1)

hesaigo999ca (786966) | more than 3 years ago | (#37167888)

I am glad I have dogs that will let me know if i have cancer...now if i can just get them to sniff out my buried treasure which i forgot the location...

Hunting the infected ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37181924)

"Sniffer dogs would find them, and handlers with silenced weapons would drop them. We didn't want to attract too many till we were set. We wanted this to be on our terms." -- Max Brooks, World War Z.

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