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Internet Restored In Tripoli As Rebels Take Control

timothy posted about 3 years ago | from the let's-see-where-things-stand-in-a-year-or-3 dept.

Networking 271

angry tapir writes "Internet connectivity was restored in Tripoli late Sunday local time, as rebel forces took control of many parts of the capital city of Libya. A new mobile network set up by the rebels in the east of Libya in April, called Libyana Al Hurra, and a similar network in Misrata, will soon also be linked to the Libyana Mobile Phone network in Tripoli, said Ousama Abushagur, a Libyan telecommunications engineer in the U.A.E, who led the team that set up Libyana Al Hurra."

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Do they allow everyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174562)

Or is the network only open to rebel causes, which is what I suspect.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (1)

siddesu (698447) | about 3 years ago | (#37174568)

You should read the FA. For now, it is restored, as in "available where it was not until recently".

Re:Do they allow everyone? (1)

Fluffeh (1273756) | about 3 years ago | (#37174598)

I would assume that there is no way to currently pick who is "with or against" the rebels too easily once you take the folks who appeared on the TV either for or against the rebel cause.

I am much more worried about all the tales of atrocities that will now no doubt come to surface as lines of communication are given back to the population.

Not worried that it is getting out, but more of what has been done no doubt.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174644)

It is very easy to pick who is against you -- everyone you did not authorize. If they aren't doing it, they are just stupid, or setting up traps for those who are stupid enough to fall into them. A country consisting of several tribes with the same culture as the Gaddafi's tribe hasn't gotten much of a chance for a "peaceful transition to democracy". If you need examples, just look at Iraq.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (1)

mywhitewolf (1923488) | about 3 years ago | (#37174662)

its a little different when you aren't invaded by a superpower who has decided "its time for democracy". but make the choice and act upon it out of mutual benefit to the society that is planning on the change.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174742)

How is it "a little different"? Is the Saudi government restricted in its ability to regulate shit according to the Sharia law because the US is propping it up? Are the other US-supported gulf regimes? Are the Iraqi separatist groups that rule the pieces of the country now? Are Afghans in the NATO-controlled ares free to do as they please?

Re:Do they allow everyone? (1)

khallow (566160) | about 3 years ago | (#37175072)

Sure, without an external power to bribe, cajole, or merely annoy, you have even less incentive to cooperate with everyone else.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | about 3 years ago | (#37175162)

I congratulate our brothers and sisters in Libya and wonder, what will be said when it happens here? Will they be called terrorists, or freedom fighters? Will our government do as old MoMo tried and do some mass slaughter to try to hang onto power, or will they slink away with their ill gotten gains like Mubarak did?

Don't say it could never happen here because I didn't think we'd be seeing tent cities and families living in cars like something out of the third world either. The bag of tricks at the Fed is completely empty now and congress can't keep up spending forever without our rating plunging further, and the teabaggers frankly can't stand anything given to the poor so they'll cockblock any aid packages anyway.

So I'd say its coming, probably in less than a decade. When the kids my oldest goes to school with at the local college are openly wondering if the shit will hit the fan before they even graduate? BAD sign. When the REAL numbers have one in three unemployed and their bullshit numbers have one in 6? BAD sign. When the government has blocked ALL COL adjustments while having the brass balls to say "there is no inflation" while they give THEMSELVES COL adjustments? Bad sign. I give us another decade tops. Then we'll either collapse or the government will try to take Poland for the resources (read South America) because one way to deal with massive unemployment is to have them build tanks or get killed at the front. Either way it ain't gonna be pretty folks.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175232)

So, are you ready to do your part? If you are, we will dispatch you a set of glasses. Please throw away the gum and procure a shotgun yourself, thank you.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (2)

LordLimecat (1103839) | about 3 years ago | (#37175282)

Don't say it could never happen here because I didn't think we'd be seeing tent cities and families living in cars like something out of the third world either. The bag of tricks at the Fed is completely empty now and congress can't keep up spending forever without our rating plunging further

Hate to burst your bubble, but the poverty rate is quite low in our country, and the bar for poverty is quite a bit higher in this country the average income for the majority of the world. For example, Cuba's average income is about 8k a year, and our poverty line is about $16k per year.

Thats not to say things are perfect, but there are an incredible number of people who pay no rent or pay no taxes and whose lifestyles are partly or wholly paid for by the government.

I might remark that THAT is a problem when we have trouble reining in our spending.

and the teabaggers frankly can't stand anything given to the poor so they'll cockblock any aid packages anyway

Such displays of eloquence do wonders for your credibility and the power of your argument.

But I will note that giving poor people loads of guarenteed no-strings money has never worked, not here, not in somalia, not pretty much anywhere. If you incentivize not working, people will not work, or will find a way to exploit the situation.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 3 years ago | (#37174606)

Why not?

Internationally, the "old regime" has little support. And our news took care that no reports from them would be taken at face value. If anything, it would create an air of "look, they still think they can fool us".

And I doubt that the internet is the communication means of choice for Lybia. It would probably be the only country I'd know of where you use the internet and not TV to reach the masses.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (2)

X.25 (255792) | about 3 years ago | (#37175020)

Internationally, the "old regime" has little support.

The "old regime" had lots of support until few months ago.

But Gadaffi was a tough guy to deal with, so oil and infrastructure companies will have much easier time by simply putting their cronies into new 'democratic' government.

I mean, I've lived in 2 such countries, I still find it amusing to see how ignorant westerners are about these issues - they still believe it's somehow all done because of people and their freedom. Hahaha.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (1)

khallow (566160) | about 3 years ago | (#37175172)

But Gadaffi was a tough guy to deal with, so oil and infrastructure companies will have much easier time by simply putting their cronies into new 'democratic' government.

I mean, I've lived in 2 such countries, I still find it amusing to see how ignorant westerners are about these issues - they still believe it's somehow all done because of people and their freedom.

So the West gets its oil and Gaddafi gets booted? Sounds good ending to me unless you should ever have a better idea than just sneering at the low-grade hypocrisy.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (2)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 3 years ago | (#37175422)

So the West gets its oil and Gaddafi gets booted?

The issue is not so much whether Gaddafi gets booted, but rather who comes in his place. Do you seriously believe that Libya will now become a secular democracy? What will happen to their quality of life (which was consistently highest on the continent)?

Contrary to popular opinion, people can get fucked just as well in a democracy. Even worse, an unstable democracy can easily give way to an even more brutal dictatorship - Nazis enjoyed broad electoral support, and Afghanis approved the constitution that contains clauses making Sharia above any other law of the land, and which are immutable and cannot be amended by the normal (or any other) process.

Re:Do they allow everyone? (4, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 3 years ago | (#37174622)

Do you imagine that, even if so motivated, they could have gotten ideological censorship up and running so quickly?

Long-run, the ISP and the censor have the upper hand, because they touch every packet; but it takes time, money, and expertise to get to the point where you can go from shoving packets down the line as fast as you can and start burning system resources on the task of making service work in some ideologically convenient way...

(More broadly, given that the Libyan government spent some decades showing no intention of going anywhere, and maintaining a fairly tight grip, there is probably a very long list of people whose now-inconvenient history of cooperation with the outgoing regime in no secret at all. If the new chaps are still unsatisfied after they've worked through that backlog, the actual witch-hunting might begin; but there are still loads of active armed remnants and former public officials to deal with first...)

Re:Do they allow everyone? (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 3 years ago | (#37175302)

If the new chaps are still unsatisfied after they've worked through that backlog, the actual witch-hunting might begin

The witch-hunting has been going on since the fighting broke out. Did you miss all the shootings / beheadings / burning alive videos by rebels on YouTube?

Who is the new dictator? (4, Insightful)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 3 years ago | (#37174594)

I know I shouldn't be so cynical but I have to ask who is the new dictator? It seems like every time I read about some rebel group over throwing some government things really never get better. It's just a new dictator in place of the old. Maybe I'm wrong and Lybian's will get a government that is fair and some what workable but I'm not going to put money on it.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174612)

Same as the old one... the U.S.A.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (1)

BlackTriangle (581416) | about 3 years ago | (#37174664)

Mod up for truth... they're even up front about it (NATO involvement) meet the new boss, same as the old boss.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174704)

Actually no. France, with NATO backing and U.S. participation will be in charge from here on out. The problem with Libya was that it had a stable, successful socialist economy - and was doing too much business with China. That's been fixed now, thanks to an insurgent force recruited, funded, trained, armed and directed by a NATO coalition, operating under active air cover and full spectrum propaganda provided by the aforementioned foreign powers.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (4, Interesting)

khallow (566160) | about 3 years ago | (#37175040)

The problem with Libya was that it had a stable, successful socialist economy

Doesn't look stable to me. Recall that the rebellion predated the foreign powers.

Where does the fact that Libya was a tyranny fit into your explanation?

Re:Who is the new dictator? (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 3 years ago | (#37175414)

The problem with Libya was that it had a stable, successful socialist economy

Doesn't look stable to me. Recall that the rebellion predated the foreign powers.

Well, it was stable in the sense that without the help of NATO, Gaddafi would probably have been able to stop the rebellion. Yes, it would not have been good for the people, but since when do any governments care about the people (except for those of their own country, as far as they need them to get re-elected)?

Where does the fact that Libya was a tyranny fit into your explanation?

Well, it already was a tyranny before that. Yet nobody in the west seemed to care too much as long as they got a net benefit.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (1)

khallow (566160) | about 3 years ago | (#37175478)

Well, it was stable in the sense that without the help of NATO, Gaddafi would probably have been able to stop the rebellion.

So in other words, not stable.

Well, it already was a tyranny before that. Yet nobody in the west seemed to care too much as long as they got a net benefit.

Guess they changed their mind. Seems to bother them now.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174848)

libya... the new iraq.

Re:Competition (1)

essayservices (2242884) | about 3 years ago | (#37174962)

Malcolm go and give your mate Neville a cuddle and join Labor officially This is a pretense or are you waiting to cross the floor when a labor crook is caught to save Juliar?

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174778)

This wasn't a rebel group, though, this was a spontaneous uprising involving numerous people across the country. It started with peaceful protests, and escalated from their.

You want a nation to be free from dictatorship, this is how it happens: when the citizens of a nation decide they are willing to take matters into their own hands. Unlike Iraq, you don't have the leading military power pushed slightly aside, and a government propped up by foreign occupying armies. That's just leaves total reliance on foreign powers, or a completely ineffective government (likely to be overthrown once the invading forces are withdrawn).

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174886)

If you honestly believe that tripe, I've got a bridge to sell you !

It will be interesting to see how the previously free healthcare, free education, free housing/utilities and subsidized products like motor vehicles are handled by the "new" regime.
Libya had ZERO international debt and a massive sovereign wealth fund, that owned things like 50% of the main bank in Bahrain.
With the cheapest oil production costs for the highest quality oil in the world, ordinary Libyans will probably be lucky to afford food for the next ten years.

While the US, France and the UK now fight over the wealth, the Islamic Brotherhood and the Benghazi Royal Family will no doubt fight over domestic control.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (1)

elsurexiste (1758620) | about 3 years ago | (#37175034)

Bold assertions. Care to show some sources?

By the way, Lybia had 6,378 million dollars of external debt... at the beginning of this year. Finally, the National Transitional Council is led by Mahmoud Jibril, who as far as I looked wasn't affiliated to those factions.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (1)

X.25 (255792) | about 3 years ago | (#37175094)

Bold assertions. Care to show some sources?

Do you live in Libya? Or did you, at least, live in Libya for some time?

Or just you are another internet wikipedia detective?

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175198)

External/International debt would not be something you need to be in Libya to learn about.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (1)

khallow (566160) | about 3 years ago | (#37175230)

previously free healthcare, free education, free housing/utilities and subsidized products like motor vehicles are handled by the "new" regime.

You sound just like a capitalist. They should be happy because we give them free stuff with only a few strings attached! All I can say is that the spontaneous revolt indicates to me that all wasn't well in Libya. Maybe those freebies weren't as generously distributed as you claim they were? Maybe Gaddifi was bad enough that bribes of free stuff weren't covering it? Maybe someone else is offering more in their local cargo cult?

Re:Who is the new dictator? (3, Interesting)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 3 years ago | (#37175360)

UN HDI [wikipedia.org] map is one interesting data source. See that huge green blob at the top of Africa, the only one on the continent? That's Libya. For all that can be said about Gaddafi, he really did make a working welfare state, head and shoulders above all his neighbors, and in many aspects on par even with some European countries.

As for spontaneous revolt, well... it may be true, but the fact that rebels - from the get go! - included high-profile people [wsws.org] and organizations [wikipedia.org] strongly affiliated with CIA - excuse me if I find it dubious.

Even if true, that grassroots movement seems to have just as strong radical Islamist component as the liberal one. If Iran is anything to go by, once the dictator is overthrown, the groups will inevitably start to fight between themselves - and Islamists are much more likely to win due to their determination and willingness to sacrifice.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175170)

Escalated from their what?

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175176)

It started with peaceful protests, and escalated from their.

It escalated from their what? Come on, don't leave us hanging like this!

Re:Who is the new dictator? (1)

khallow (566160) | about 3 years ago | (#37175216)

It's worth noting that Germany and Japan both had democracies forcibly imposed on them and they worked. Iraq and Afghanistan seem to working along the same lines. Whether they ultimately stick around or transition to something else remains to be seen, but it's not a path with sure failure.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175312)

Bollocks. Both Japan and Germany had established democracies before the WWII. These fell as a result of economic hardships that happened when a certain country chose to export its financial collapse abroad in the late 1920s, but before that they were doing well, or not that bad. Both countries had managed to build nation states on home-grown bourgeois ideologies about their national identity and values. Democracy seemed to fit with those. Comparing Japan or Germany to any of the territories that emerged on the maps drawn by the retreating British Empire post WWII only shows your lack of anything resembling a historical perspective.

Iraq is nothing like either Japan, or Germany. Iraq was moving towards a secular nationalist and socialist state before Saddam was encouraged to attack his neighbors in the 70s and got the appetite for more. Now in place of Iraq you have a large Kurdish with gas, which is at low-intensity war with Turkey; a huge pro-Iranian area where all the oil is, and a well-armed, pro-Saddam smaller area in the central and Western part of the territory that was formerly Iraq.

As for Afghanistan, it was always a source of cash for the British military in the region, and a way for them to annoy Russia. The US overtook Britain, but little else has changed. NATO is there only because US can't afford to fight a war on its own.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175350)

And by "cash" I mean opium cash. In the past it was opium for silver, silver for tea. Now, of course, the opium is not shipped to China, due to its government not totally cooperating, but there are other, doubly lucrative markets, where the opium derivatives are pushed, and where the dealers stand on both sides of the trade.

Re:Meanwhile, in Damascus... (4, Funny)

taiwanjohn (103839) | about 3 years ago | (#37174782)

Bashar al Assad is thanking Allah that there's no oil under his country.

Re:Meanwhile, in Damascus... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174954)

But they've got a small neighboring country, which can order NATO's strongest about as they wish. So, maybe, not so lucky after all.

Re:Meanwhile, in Damascus... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175026)

Really? Last time I looked Syrias main export was crude oil.

Re:Meanwhile, in Damascus... (2)

Dahamma (304068) | about 3 years ago | (#37175462)

"Although Syria is not a major oil exporter by Middle Eastern standards, oil is a major pillar of the economy. According to the International Monetary Fund, oil sales for 2010 were projected to generate $3.2 billion for the Syrian government and account for 25.1% of the state's revenue. Syria is the only significant crude oil producing country in the Eastern Mediterranean region, which includes Jordan, Lebanon, Israel, the West Bank, and Gaza. According to the Oil and Gas Journal, Syria had 2.5 billion barrels of petroleum reserves as of January 1, 2010"

Syria has a fair amount of oil... enough to get its neighbors interested, at least...

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174784)

Maybe they 'won't get fooled again'.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (3, Interesting)

kbahey (102895) | about 3 years ago | (#37175122)

There is no guarantee.

But there is hope for change to the better, where there has been none at all for 42 years.

-- An Egyptian ...

Re:Who is the new dictator? (4, Interesting)

timeOday (582209) | about 3 years ago | (#37175124)

In the beginning, Khadafi himself was a well-meaning rebel with real credibility. Same old story. The US really owes a great debt to George Washington, rarely do you find a powerful man who doesn't think he'd make a fine benevolent dictator.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175144)

Looks like the constitution the rebels posted online says their going with Sharia law.

Oh well.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 3 years ago | (#37175368)

Not that I would be surprised (see sig), but... link?

Re:Who is the new dictator? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175276)

Who can tell? In 1917 or so a russian king was deposed/abdicated and a republican (small r) government sorta was going but then was quickly executed (along with the king and his entire family) by the bolshi who were better organized which then ruled for a long time. In 1776 a king of a remote satrapy was replaced by a revolutionary republican (small r) government oddly in part with the support of a 'divine right of king' monarchy (France, which itself soon imploded) who didn't like the brits. The USA per se finally became a republic in 1790 and persisted, with a few road bumps like the 1860's "federal war of aggression' until 1913 when it finally degraded into farce with it's former republican legislators buying votes from it's citizens 'with citizen's own money' as predicted by ironically a frenchman- taken from them in the form of a 'progressive income tax' - the more fecund you are, the more you have to pay to live. (kinda seems counter-darwinian to me)

Anyways, I predict a sharia based dar al-islam state will result in Libya. And generally hostile, and probably with good reason, to the US.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175408)

The new government will be IMF flanked by oil companies. For show, they'll setup the classical red/blue government with a flavour of sharia to cater to the freedom loving brave people of USA and their puppets.

Then it will all be great.

Re:Who is the new dictator? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175424)

As The Who put it: Meet the new boss...Same as the old boss!

I am curious what the residents think (4, Interesting)

wierd_w (1375923) | about 3 years ago | (#37174602)

Not about the retun of internet services, but about the entire affair of their dictator and the uprising against him.

Up until now our reports are essentially the press releases of the rebel faction and quadaffi's, respectively.

Unrestricted internet access would grant a wealth of on the street reports on civilian sentiment about these events.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174636)

judging by the internet logs, they're thinking about some scat porn.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174852)

Does it matter if the 'general population' supports the uprising?

Even if 80% of the population were supporters of the Gaddafi regime, that there is a part of the population with no political or economic freedom and influence would in itself be a justification for changing the system. It does not matter if it is a majority or a minority representing the tyranny, it is still tyranny.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174944)

So we can definitely mark you down as one of the members of the "no democracy, please" camp, then.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (1)

khallow (566160) | about 3 years ago | (#37175248)

Depends what you think democracy means. I live in a constitutional republic (the US) which isn't always considered a democracy depending on the definer. Tyranny by a majority was one of the supposed evils that the elaborate and segregated structure of the government was supposed to guard against.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175328)

Tyranny by a majority was one of the supposed evils that the elaborate and segregated structure of the government was supposed to guard against.

How is that working out? Because *cough*Tea Party*cough*, it looks like you can't even prevent tyranny of the minority.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 3 years ago | (#37175374)

What if the repressed 20% would prefer Sharia law as a constitution, complete with burqas and death penalty for adultery and apostasy - as seen in "liberated" Afghanistan? Isn't that just another kind of tyranny?

Re:I am curious what the residents think (5, Insightful)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 3 years ago | (#37174878)

My guess would be they are glad to see Ghadaffi go, but nervous. The guy is an unmitigated asshole who has ruled with an iron fist and severely curtailed personal liberty, executed political dissidents, and taken most of the country's wealth for him and his family. You can bet he's not real popular, and I'm sure most people that aren't his cronies would love to see him gone.

However I'm sure they are also worried. I mean who knows what kind of government the rebels bring? Maybe things become free and open, maybe they turn out to be even worse. Also war is always worrying because innocents get hurt, no way around it. You can mind your own business, strictly not take sides, and still get killed.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (1)

X.25 (255792) | about 3 years ago | (#37175080)

My guess would be they are glad to see Ghadaffi go, but nervous. The guy is an unmitigated asshole who has ruled with an iron fist and severely curtailed personal liberty, executed political dissidents, and taken most of the country's wealth for him and his family. You can bet he's not real popular, and I'm sure most people that aren't his cronies would love to see him gone.

Well, I guess 'consumers' in Libya will soon find out how it looks like when you have to start paying bills for everything, and when 'democratic' government is not giving out subsidies anymore (but money goes to themselves and their cronies).

Mind you, I really don't like Ghadaffi, but Libya is now going to end up like Iraq.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (1)

khallow (566160) | about 3 years ago | (#37175258)

but Libya is now going to end up like Iraq.

Which would be terrible if Iraq were doing badly.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (1)

tqk (413719) | about 3 years ago | (#37175292)

Well, I guess 'consumers' in Libya will soon find out how it looks like when you have to start paying bills for everything, and when 'democratic' government is not giving out subsidies anymore (but money goes to themselves and their cronies).

So, we can put you down as synic, yes?

Damnit man, they're restarting their country with intentions toward freedom, and that's all you can come up with?!?

Re:I am curious what the residents think (1)

CodeBuster (516420) | about 3 years ago | (#37175272)

You can mind your own business, strictly not take sides, and still get killed.

At the signing of a charter establishing the German Peace Corps in Bonn, West Germany on June 24 1963, John F Kennedy referenced Dante's Inferno when he remarked that, "The hottest places in hell are reserved for those who, in periods of moral crisis, maintained their neutrality." The people of Libya and especially the youth, who with neither training nor experience and at great personal risk, took up arms to liberate themselves from decades of brutal oppression deserve the highest praise for their actions. Although, revolution is and always should be a last resort, it's refreshing to see that there are still some people left who are willing to stake everything they have, including their lives, for a real chance at freedom and a brighter future for themselves and their children. That was the same sort of spirit that got America started 235 years ago and we could all stand to be reminded of that by the courageous example of the Libyan people. I salute them.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (2)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 3 years ago | (#37175384)

The people of Libya and especially the youth, who with neither training nor experience and at great personal risk, took up arms to liberate themselves from decades of brutal oppression deserve the highest praise for their actions.

Yeah, especially those valiant freedom fighters serving under this guy [telegraph.co.uk] .

Re:I am curious what the residents think (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175278)

The whole thing is a farce. "Rebels"? They're jihadists. Gaddafi and anti-Gaddafi forces readily kill civilians, they yell "allah hu ackbar!" when firing their weapons. Terrorists all around, including NATO. We should GTFO at once, Obama got us into another mess we shouldn't be involved in.

Re:I am curious what the residents think (1)

twocows (1216842) | about 3 years ago | (#37175036)

Really? Because I've been following the coverage on NPR, BBC, and Al Jazeera since about the time it started.

The reactions are mixed, though it seems like there are a lot more people who disliked Quadaffi. Back before Triploi was taken, a reporter who snuck away from his chaperone managed to get an interview with someone who basically said "when the rebels come, they'll all have our support." And a lot of that happened. However, there were a few pockets of die-hard Quadaffi supporters who still resisted.

I think the coverage was pretty good. Al Jazeera especially did a great job (I subscribe to their RSS feed [aljazeera.net] ) and BBC had a lot of great coverage as well.

Missing the point (3, Insightful)

wanzeo (1800058) | about 3 years ago | (#37174634)

I think rebel forces finally taking the capital qualifies as "...stuff that matters". Do we really need to search for a tech angle just to talk about it on Slashdot?

As for the rebels, I have been impressed with how they have persisted despite awful organization and very weak help from the West. I am happy to see them finally prevail.

Re:Missing the point (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174794)

and very weak help from the West

Yes, "very weak" indeed. Pounding the ridiculous army of Gaddafi from the air with everything Nato's got in the Mediterranean (hell, even the Bulgarian navy sent ships there), dropping ammo and having "advisers" on the ground ... Gaddafi couldn't have it had easier, really.

Re:Missing the point (1)

khallow (566160) | about 3 years ago | (#37175052)

Gaddafi is still alive. If I were doing the bombing, he'd be among the first dead. So yes, he does have it easy.

Re:Missing the point (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175078)

Well, then, Internet Tough Guy, maybe you should get a job in your military, because Gaddafi isn't alive for lack of trying on the behalf of the US.

Re:Missing the point (1)

khallow (566160) | about 3 years ago | (#37175192)

Looks who's talking AC. Me? I'm not tough, I just know something about how to fight. And to correct a mistake on your part, aside from time back in the 80s when the US dropped some ordnance on Gaddafi's tent, there's never been an attempt (at least with US military forces), serious or otherwise to kill Gaddafi.

Re:Missing the point (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 years ago | (#37174830)

Do we really need to search for a tech angle just to talk about it on Slashdot?

It's pretty common for Slashdot to highlight the tech angle of world stories, because they are interesting things that get lost in other reports. It gives us a chance to talk about Libya, and see a different side of the situation. Ousama Abushagur is now a hero, at least to fellow geeks.

Re:Missing the point (1)

gman003 (1693318) | about 3 years ago | (#37174870)

Exactly. If we want some armchair general's view on the battle, or a politicians view, we check CNN or BBC or even Wikinews. If we want a comedian's view, we watch Colbert. If we want a moron's view, there's Fox. If we want the tech angle, we've got /. They all start from the same core story, but each specializes in a particular set of details.

Re:Missing the point (1)

adamofgreyskull (640712) | about 3 years ago | (#37175068)

HAH! You FOOL! You can get all of those angles from FOX!

Palin/Bachman 2012

Re:Missing the point (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174968)

Bombing of Libyan military forces, sending hires satellite imagery exposing Libyan troop positions to NATO special forces units on the ground who were directing offensive operations for the "rebels", multiple failed attempts at direct assassination of Kadafy, etc. etc. "Very weak" indeed!

Re:Missing the point (1)

X.25 (255792) | about 3 years ago | (#37175058)

As for the rebels, I have been impressed with how they have persisted despite awful organization and very weak help from the West. I am happy to see them finally prevail.

Ahahahahaha. Very "weak help from the west"?

Holy crap, that universe of yours is amusing...

Re:Missing the point (1)

tqk (413719) | about 3 years ago | (#37175140)

I think rebel forces finally taking the capital qualifies as "...stuff that matters". Do we really need to search for a tech angle just to talk about it on Slashdot?

Yes. Libyan freedom is a good thing. /. is about tech. What's wrong with discussing the intersection of the two? If it's not relevant to both spheres, we waste others' time or abuse their patience.

It's not like we're ignoring the "African Spring" by focussing on its tech. corollaries.

Syria next! Woohoo! :-)

With a 6-digit UID, you should know better. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175330)

Slashdot is "news for nerds," and DOES NOT necessarily have to pertain to technology.

Thank heavens!! (2, Funny)

Rakarra (112805) | about 3 years ago | (#37174666)

Achmed will be able to make his 7pm WoW raid on Ragnaros in the Firelands.

Re:Thank heavens!! (0)

Co0Ps (1539395) | about 3 years ago | (#37174702)

lmao

Re:Thank heavens!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174846)

Achmed will be able to make his 7pm WoW raid on Ragnaros in the Firelands.

You're closer to the truth than you know.

To borrow an image from a revolution ago (Unintentionally-ironic CAPTCHA: "macros"!), the folks that turned "If the government shuts down the internet, shut down your government [dweebist.com] " into a meme are now batting .750 - three out of four.

(No, really, here is some dude from some internet company being quoted on CNN [cnn.com] as drawing inspiration from - and I quote - "someone who anonymously advocated for change")

Bouazizi? Down. Mubarak? Down. Gadaffi? OK, so he went full retard and it took a little longer and the Internet needed some help (in the form of bombs) from NATO, but down is still [i]down[/i].

Iran? Well, you always plan to throw one away [c2.com] . But even there, the regime's time is limited.

Are they Legion? Hell if I know. At three governments out of four, Anonymous is learning [youtube.com] .

Re:Thank heavens!! (1)

Darinbob (1142669) | about 3 years ago | (#37175028)

Dammit, he went afk again!

Re:Thank heavens!! (0)

Sasayaki (1096761) | about 3 years ago | (#37175430)

/g brb bombing

Premature Celebration (2)

relikx (1266746) | about 3 years ago | (#37174686)

The dubious rebel claims have been inflated in the past, it's great they are controlling the infrastructure that exists but it could easily be fleeting. Gaddafi's son Khamis and a group of 10,000 well-trained troops happened to "just disappear" when the rebels got to Tripoli. I have a sneaking suspicion a terrible brand of urban warfare emerges before the internet is anywhere near reliable. Still, the article doesn't mention that the site for Libyan Telecom and Technology posted a congratulations message so - for the time being - it was restored on a national level.

Re:Premature Celebration (1)

james.mcarthur (154849) | about 3 years ago | (#37175032)

"Gaddafi's son Khamis and a group of 10,000 well-trained troops happened to "just disappear" when the rebels got to Tripoli."

Its a trap!

Re:Premature Celebration (2)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 years ago | (#37175166)

Gaddafi's son Khamis and a group of 10,000 well-trained troops happened to "just disappear" when the rebels got to Tripoli.

They were mercenaries (or at least, that's the report, which is as reliable as anything out of Libya). They were there because Gaddafi paid them, not out of some misdirected belief in a God that will reward them for brutality, or out of a cause like freedom, or love and desire to protect their families.

They are mercenaries. Money can buy a lot of things, but you will never find someone willing to sacrifice their life for a monetary reward. When things go really bad, the mercenaries leave.

Holy Crap! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37174850)

Verizon's strike has been over for like two days, and we've still got locations with no connectivity! These guys finish lobbing grenades and bullets at each other, and in less than a day they've got networks back on line? I'm seriously impressed.

With our... (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | about 3 years ago | (#37174866)

...combined strength, we can end this destructive conflict and bring order to the galaxy.

Oh thank god, (1)

shugah (881805) | about 3 years ago | (#37175126)

At least now they can Facebook.

Ooh! Proposed Constitution Amendment! (1)

Greyfox (87712) | about 3 years ago | (#37175130)

Oil revenue profits will be distributed equally to all citizens of Libya on a quarterly basis.

You might want to mumble vaguely about presidential term limits, checks and balances, etc, depending on what you guys find valuable. Best of luck, hope you don't find yourself under a new brutal dictator next year.

Re:Ooh! Proposed Constitution Amendment! (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 3 years ago | (#37175202)

They had better hope it's gross profit, otherwise I suspect that the oil business will suddenly become highly unprofitable. Hollywood-style.

Re:Ooh! Proposed Constitution Amendment! (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 3 years ago | (#37175402)

Oil revenue profits will be distributed equally to all citizens of Libya on a quarterly basis.

That's essentially what Gaddafi did (after pocketing a fair bit for himself... but still plenty to pass around). Somehow I think the new guys will not want to be seen as "commies".

wow (1)

Aaron87 (2435078) | about 3 years ago | (#37175142)

it's good

So let's start the clock until..... (1)

Eightbitgnosis (1571875) | about 3 years ago | (#37175158)

These rebel forces decide they don't like America, and then use the training and weaponry we provided against ourselves.

Re:So let's start the clock until..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175308)

Don't put your dirty hands on their oil, and everything will be alright.

Re:So let's start the clock until..... (3, Interesting)

shutdown -p now (807394) | about 3 years ago | (#37175410)

That clock has been started a long time ago [telegraph.co.uk] (also see sig).

Whatever (1)

oldmac31310 (1845668) | about 3 years ago | (#37175210)

The new guy will be 'our' guy and the people will be just as fucked as ever. Who the fuck cares? With the new guy they'll be able to use Bacefook, Witter and eBay. AWESOME! Triumph for...ah fuckit...

Juicy Couture Outlet (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175268)

The Juicy Couture Outlet [fashionjui...outlet.com] offerings range from perfume,watches,sunglasses,Juicy Courue tracksuits,Juicy Couture handbags [fashionjui...outlet.com] to toiletries, Juicy Couture Bags [fashionjui...outlet.com] , and so on.

The Real Libya (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37175288)

Libya only had the best living conditions in the region. The UN won't be far behind, since they can't feed themselves.

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