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Hurricane Irene Threatens US Northeast; Cover Your Assets

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the oh-she's-always-theatening-people dept.

Data Storage 202

jfruhlinger writes "Hurricane Irene is bearing down on the heavily populated U.S. Northeast Corridor. If you work in IT, you know that there are few things that are worse for electronics than water; so, what's your plan? Tom Henderson has come up with a checklist, which sensibly includes backing everything up, twice; not that you have time for it now, but for future reference you might want to consider just moving your whole data center to a location that's been conveniently pre-hardened, like a water tower or a boiler room." Note that Irene has been no joke in the Caribbean; in Puerto Rico (with relatively modern infrastructure), about a third of the island lost power.

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No worries here... (5, Funny)

impaledsunset (1337701) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210450)

I don't worry about Hurricanes, I have TornadoGuard on my iPhone.

Re:No worries here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210564)

What you did there... I wish I had mod points so that I may rate it +1 funny.

Re:No worries here... (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210600)

After the earthquake, the server room floor has enough cracks to drain the flooding caused by the holes in the roof.

Re:No worries here... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210626)

https://www.xkcd.com/937/

Re:No worries here... (1)

Dyinobal (1427207) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210676)

What is TornadoGuard, I don't have an Iphone obviously it's some sort of software but what does it do?

Re:No worries here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37211732)

http://xkcd.com/937/

Re:No worries here... (3, Insightful)

jonadab (583620) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210814)

Yeah, no worries here, either. I live in central Ohio (close enough to the Mississippi/St.Lawrence continental divide that I've actually crossed it while walking the dog really -- yes, really), and I estimate that for a hurricane to get this far inland, this far north, and this far above sea level, not to mention crossing the entire Appalachian mountain system, with any significant punch left, the storm in question would have to be at least a category twelve, probably more like fifteen, on the scale where Katrina was a mere five. If that happens, keeping electronics operational will be the least of our worries. The whole eastern seaboard would be under more than a thousand feet of water.

Frankly, a severe blizzard in August is more likely.

Re:No worries here... (3, Informative)

camperdave (969942) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210894)

A hurricane is big enough to push normal storm cells around and disrupt local weather far inland. Just because the hurricane itself may not hit you doesn't mean you won't feel the effects.

Re:No worries here... (3, Informative)

bobdole369 (267463) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211348)

This is actually incorrect. Think of the atmosphere as the surface of a balloon, much like curved space. There are large "mountains" and deep "valleys" (ridges and troughs) - domes of high pressure and bowls of low pressure. When a massive LP system such as a hurricane creates a large dip in the surface, it is steered by (pointed in the direction by) high pressure cells, around the periphery of them, and powered by the general flow of air around them as well.

Low pressure systems are generally attracted to each other - but they are actually steered by the higher pressures around the individual systems. They'll even combine in severe instances.

A low pressure system cannot push ANYTHING around. It will only be moved around by the higher pressures, towards the areas of lower pressures. It doesn't have a mind of its own, and she obeys the laws of physics.

I will agree that it disrupts local weather far inland, as seen this morn in South FL. The first burst of energy that come to the coast sparked a convective line of storms that produced 40kt winds locally and a good amount of rain. The outflow has increased the local temps and humidity, and will likely leave an inversion layer in place as she leaves, thus we'll be hot, miserable, and it won't rain.

Re:No worries here... (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211286)

This hurricane obviously won't make it over the Appalachia mountains, it isn't even headed that way.

But a really strong gulf hurricane can affect places that far inland, causing thunderstorms and tornadoes. Hurricane Camille or Katrina for instance.

Obligatory XKCD (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210472)

Re:Obligatory XKCD (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210526)

Re:Obligatory XKCD (1)

slinches (1540051) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210588)

In what way is that particular XKCD obligatory?

An appropriate xkcd mention would go more like this:

I'm not worried. I think it's just that there's too many people constantly refreshing the weather radar. xkcd.com/831/ [xkcd.com]

Data centers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210544)

What about placing data centers in areas with no possibilty of earthquakes, hurricanes, floods or anything! Seems to work for some people. The only danger then are idiots, but that's impossible to run from.

Re:Data centers (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210612)

And where would that be? On the Moon perhaps?

Re:Data centers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210706)

In Europe. Only idiots here!

And floods are solved easily everywhere - place it high enough.

Re:Data centers (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210750)

So, north sea storms are just imaginary?
What about Ice storms, are those imaginary as well?

Re:Data centers (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210908)

Yes. Here, in Central Europe, yes.

Re:Data centers (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211036)

Name the location. I bet we can find a nice natural hazard.

Re:Data centers (1)

EvanED (569694) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210898)

A hate to disappoint, but the moon is clearly out [nasa.gov] .

Re:Data centers (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211672)

The poster I responded to didn't say anything about moonquakes, so, the moon is still a possibility (although quite likely not much of an improvement).

Re:Data centers (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210620)

Please name such a place.
Is there anywhere that has no natural disasters?

Re:Data centers (1)

Coren22 (1625475) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210796)

I used to say Maryland...but it looks like we are right on the path. The earthquake was interesting, but didn't do anything out here...

Re:Data centers (4, Funny)

hesiod (111176) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210802)

The virtual world has no natural disasters!

Just virtualize your virtual servers so your system is 100% virtual with no hardware, and you have a completely unusable system that can't be damaged because it doesn't exist! Wait, what was the question again? ...to the cloud!

Re:Data centers (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211530)

Isn't it funny how all the cloud spin states that there'd never be a problem with spinning clouds?

Re:Data centers (1)

hesiod (111176) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211700)

Yeah, I'm not a big fan of all this "cloud" stuff, especially after the Amazon outage... They should be incredibly embarrassed about that.

Re:Data centers (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211290)

Arizona seems to be pretty safe from natural disasters. It's too dry for tornadoes to form (we do get "dust devils" frequently, but those are harmless). We're not close enough to the east coast to be affected by any hurricane. We don't seem to get any significant earthquakes, though it's conceivable we could get some very minor tremors if any big quakes hit California which isn't that far away. It's much too hot for any ice storms or other winter weather (in fact, it almost never snows). As long as your equipment can handle 120-degree ambient temperatures, it's not going to fail due to a natural disaster (and you can always avoid the temperature problem by placing it underground, if you don't want to have to worry about the A/C failing and ruining everything)

Of course, this place is full of morons, and it's right on the border of a country that's descended into anarchy, so it's definitely not safe from the human element. Any data center here needs full-time security to keep copper thieves from breaking in and stealing everything. Public schools are frequently hit by copper thieves who steal the pipes and wire.

Re:Data centers (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211546)

Arizona seems to be pretty safe from natural disasters.

What about wildfires [kold.com] ?

Re:Data centers (1)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211648)

Wildfires, by definition, happen in the wild, not in cities.

I'm talking about southern Arizona, which as you may or may not know, is a desert. There are no significant trees here, and predictably, there's no wildfires. Those happen in the parts of the state which have trees. Take a look at that link of yours. Notice all the fires on the map are in places that are green. Those are places where trees grow. The brown parts are desert; that's there Phoenix, the capital city with 4+ million people, is located. The green parts with forests have an almost insignificant portion of the states' population.

Believe it or not, when an area is mostly sand and has no trees, fires don't happen.

Re:Data centers (1)

peter303 (12292) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210754)

They been siting them in locations with abundant cheap energy. Unfortunately things that make energy abundant can make it too abundant at times, e.g. hydroelectric.

We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

Sable Drakon (831800) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210558)

The Northeast? Threatened? I wholeheartedly guffaw at the though. Hurricanes end up in the New England area whenever they don't sputter out on the way up. They're shadows of their former selves when they get here as cold northern waters neuter the hurricane. We get 1-2 days of rain and that's it. The storms are never anything we have to feel threatened by here. Call again in winter, we'll show you the storms we New Englanders actually fear.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

BradleyUffner (103496) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210614)

The Northeast? Threatened? I wholeheartedly guffaw at the though. Hurricanes end up in the New England area whenever they don't sputter out on the way up. They're shadows of their former selves when they get here as cold northern waters neuter the hurricane. We get 1-2 days of rain and that's it. The storms are never anything we have to feel threatened by here. Call again in winter, we'll show you the storms we New Englanders actually fear.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Agnes [wikipedia.org]

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

Sable Drakon (831800) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210688)

If you want to call New York a true member of New England, ok. But you've also got to admit that Agnes was a very weak storm compared to everything that's come up this way since.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (4, Informative)

toastar (573882) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210850)

As a Texan, I consider New York to be part of New England, They're all yanks to me.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (4, Funny)

Alien Being (18488) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210890)

That's ok. We think of Texas as a part of Mexico.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37211108)

No, Mexico is just part of Texas. :)

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37211190)

So do us Texans.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

RoverDaddy (869116) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210836)

He mentioned New England specifically, not just the whole Northeast. Agnes did damage in Pennsylvania, not up here. We haven't been hit by anything all that serious since at least Hurricane Carol (1954):

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Carol [wikipedia.org]

BTW: As far as I am concerned no hurricane in my entire lifetime has had a major impact on the 'Northeast' (i.e. the 6 New England states). This trolling guy from Massachusetts says Pennsylvania is about as much 'Northeast' as Westchester County is 'Upstate New York'. Pennsylvania and anything south is at best 'Mid-Atlantic'.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

NiteShaed (315799) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211186)

BTW: As far as I am concerned no hurricane in my entire lifetime has had a major impact on the 'Northeast' (i.e. the 6 New England states). This trolling guy from Massachusetts says Pennsylvania is about as much 'Northeast' as Westchester County is 'Upstate New York'. Pennsylvania and anything south is at best 'Mid-Atlantic'.

"Northeast" and "New England" really aren't the same thing. The northeast region [wikipedia.org] is New England, plus N.Y., N.J. and Pennsylvania.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

icebrain (944107) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211258)

And as far as this deep-south trolling guy is concerned, anything north of Virginia is "The Northeast".

So there.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

Altus (1034) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211788)

To a New Englander, Pennsylvania is practically the deep south.

Western Pennsylvania actually kind of feels that way in some places.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

Megahard (1053072) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210854)

Even better, this is what the news people are mentioning for historical reference
1938 New England hurricane [wikipedia.org]
Some pretty good stories in the article.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210648)

Humans are not being threatened - but the elecrical distribution and cable communication systems are. One tree can take down a whole street of poles. This storm could cause quite a large outage, which equates to hours or even days of downed servers, etc. depending on the extent of the damage.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (2)

JustSomeProgrammer (1881750) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210678)

It's predicted to be a category 1 or 2 when it hits NJ and could still be a hurricane when it hits NYC. Although it could be *just* a tropical storm which only causes heavy rainfall and moderate to sever flooding.

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/graphics_at4.shtml?5-daynl?large#contents [noaa.gov] And NYC is already developing an evacuation plan in case the storm does come close.

http://gothamist.com/2011/08/25/hurricane_irene_is_coming_heres_a_m.php#photo-1 [gothamist.com]

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

bobdole369 (267463) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211408)

Regardless of what category the storm is as she arrives, the storm surge height will lag far behind. It's expected to bring more than 10-30 feet of water up wherever she lands.

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210748)

It has been a long time but there have been occassions of Category 3 and 4 Hurricanes making first landfall in New England. When that happens they are just as devastating as those winter storms you fear. Although it does not happen very often and it appears that this one will be below, or barely at, Category 3 by the time it hits New England. There was a stretch from 1938-1960 where New England was hit by Category 3 every couple of years (with the 1938 storm reaching Category 5 level gusts at some places).

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210752)

Never say "never" - it's only a matter of time.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1938_New_England_hurricane

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (1)

Jason Levine (196982) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211012)

Well, I feel threatened, but that's mainly because Irene is due to hit exactly where and when I planned on driving for vacation. It's altering my vacation plans and that's majorly annoying. We're taking a 10th anniversary trip without the kids. Do you know how RARE trips like that are? (No kids, not 10th anniversary.)

Re:We're not shaking in our boots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37211746)

While mostly I agree, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hurricane_Gloria [wikipedia.org] was a pretty memorable event if you were in the right places in new england. Though its really the only named storm from the 20 years I lived on the south shore of the boston area that was more notable than the serious winter storm season. Still, it probably caused more damage/time than any other storm I can remember (The blizzard of 78 was before my time)

Puerto Rico (3, Informative)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210584)

Yeah right, power and telecom frequently go out in a moderate thunderstorm down there. I have a coworker that's dealt with many offices at three different employers over the last 15 years and they've all had the same kinds of problems. The solution is to UPS everything and just not sweat it when the offices down there lose internet because you will NOT be able to get someone to respond in under 4 hours like you will stateside.

Re:Puerto Rico (4, Informative)

madhatter256 (443326) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210686)

No one in Puerto Rico panics like they do in the US when it comes to Hurricanes. 99.9% of buildings are concrete.

My grand parents live down there and went a whole month without power and electricity during the 2004 hurricanes. They have a cistern in the back that collects rain water in case the water supply gets tainted and generators in case electricity goes out.

Lots of people do and live with it. Hurricanes and mudslides are no problem for us.

Re:Puerto Rico (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210824)

"99.9% of buildings are concrete."

As they should be. Wood is fine for furniture and camp fires.

Wood is a shitty construction material.

Re:Puerto Rico (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37211020)

"99.9% of buildings are concrete."

As they should be. Wood is fine for furniture and camp fires.

Wood is a shitty construction material.

Tell that to Florida "builders". Block is used at ground level only on new houses, and then only on the outside. All support is wood. Any floor above ground, on say McMansions/HOA cookie cutter homes, is basically a shed with stucco.

Re:Puerto Rico (1)

s122604 (1018036) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211030)

Unless you are in a Earthquake, then wood as damn awesome

Re:Puerto Rico (1)

Coren22 (1625475) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211342)

The concrete with steel roof I work in held up pretty good to the earthquake. I had a portable hard drive fall over at home, but I hardly count that as damage...more poor design.

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Seagate+-+FreeAgent+GoFlex+Desk+2TB+External+USB+2.0/3.0+Hard+Drive+-+Black/1335107.p?id=1218251232104&skuId=1335107 [bestbuy.com]

Re:Puerto Rico (4, Insightful)

Grishnakh (216268) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211366)

Wood is a shitty construction material.

Tell that to all the people in Haiti, who still haven't recovered from the earthquake there a couple years ago. Or the people in various other 3rd-world cities where everything's made of concrete and they didn't think earthquakes were a concern until one hit.

Concrete is a terrible construction material, unless you reinforce it with a lot of steel. But steel's expensive compared to plain concrete.

Re:Puerto Rico (1)

MaWeiTao (908546) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210902)

That's the same thing my friends who have family there tell me. And it's generally the same thing I've seen with typhoons in Asia. Most destruction comes from landslides and biblical amounts of rainfall that result in flooding. But otherwise the vast majority of buildings weather the storm unscathed.

I don't understand how the hell it is that states like Florida permit people to build homes out of lumber or live in trailers. Then there's the whole thing of people building homes along the water, having them destroyed in a hurricane, then being able to rebuild them again on the same spot. It's not like hurricanes in Florida are a rare occurrence.

Re:Puerto Rico (1)

bobdole369 (267463) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211436)

We don't. At least not in the lower 4 counties. Live in trailers are few and far between here.

Re:Puerto Rico (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211010)

I'm assuming that those occasionally killed in mudslides(though the last properly dramatic one was in '85, so it's been a little while) would beg to differ; but are unlikely to be able to...

Re:Puerto Rico (2)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211064)

99.9% of buildings are concrete.

I see, you have a very low level of abstraction in your buildings. :-)

Re:Puerto Rico (1)

kilodelta (843627) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211616)

I'm up here in RI and honestly all I see us getting is a little rain with some wind. We did have a hell of a T-storm earlier this summer that ripped a few trees up, and I don't expect this to be much worse to be honest.

Already prepared! (1)

EvilSS (557649) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210608)

My company ordered all of our servers Scotchgarded last year for just such an emergency!

Re:Already prepared! (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210642)

Pschaw! Everyone knows you protect things by wrapping them in tin foil. Then buried. Then lost. Then found. Then put up for public comment. Then buried again.

Re:Already prepared! (1)

kilodelta (843627) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211656)

Or you do it the right way. Raised floor in the room housing the servers and absolutely no terminations under the floor, cabling is ok, but no terminations.

Re:Already prepared! (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211288)

You misunderstood, the CEO just wanted an IT peon to guard his Scotch until the servers could bring it to him.

Re:Already prepared! (1)

jeffmeden (135043) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211776)

Let me guess, you also waited until today in order to call all your hardware vendors to ask "how do I set up email alerts?"

God Apparently For Gay Marriage (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210672)

Irene gets weaker as she crosses more states with gay marriage, and apparently stops dead at the US/Canada border. Googling for Santorum confirms.

Re:God Apparently For Gay Marriage (1)

lrobert98 (1936734) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211434)

Googling for Santorum

Eww. Now go wash your hands.

Re:God Apparently For Gay Marriage (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211606)

"Googling for Santorum confirms"

The thinner you spread Santorum the weaker it gets.

Irene (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210674)

Puertorican here, and yes, Irene didn't even hit us directly and caused MAJOR damage. I'm talking about landslides, rivers going crazy, floods, trees falling, and all the disaster you can imagine, plus no water and electricity for days (at one point 92% of PR was without power). Puerto Rico builds it's houses and buildings out of cement, not wood (rural areas are most likely to be made out of wood, but rarely), so this is just crazy weather we're having. Hope you guys up there hang on tight.

I'm ready (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37210744)

I have plenty of grits stored up to help handle the hurricane. I can pour hot girts down my pants for at least two weeks without having to go to the store.

Re:I'm ready (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | more than 3 years ago | (#37210922)

Well, cue the mob scene at the grocery stores. It'll be a madhouse. People act like it's the end of the world in my neighborhood whenever any storm is coming.

Re:I'm ready (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37211184)

screw that, I'm hitting up the liquor store

Goodnight Irene. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37211006)

I'm going to sleep.

Irene? (1)

hemp (36945) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211044)

I thought it was Ilene?

That brings up an interesting question (1)

Cro Magnon (467622) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211072)

Where are the "cloud" servers located? It would suck if you backed to Dropbox, Google Docs, or whatever, and Irene wiped THOSE out, along with your local hardware.

Re:That brings up an interesting question (4, Insightful)

characterZer0 (138196) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211242)

If you cannot restore your backups without an Internet connection, you do not have backups.

Re:That brings up an interesting question (1)

Cro Magnon (467622) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211496)

If your onsite backups just got blown into a REAL cloud by Irene, you don't have backups either.

We'll be just fine (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211084)

you know that there are few things that are worse for electronics than water

That's such a crock. Saltwater is actually an excellent conductor of electricity. Electronics need good conductors. Hence, electronics need saltwater.

So relax and stop it with all that plywood and tarp. Have a beer instead.

Re:We'll be just fine (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211296)

you know that there are few things that are worse for electronics than water

That's such a crock. Saltwater is actually an excellent conductor of electricity. Electronics need good conductors. Hence, electronics need saltwater.

So relax and stop it with all that plywood and tarp. Have a beer instead.

Idiot. Modern electronics need SEMICONDUCTORS. Salt water soaked plywood is an excellent semiconductor so it's just perfect. Add the silvery duct tape and you're ready to power up and rock and roll.

WTF, don't you people have windows? (1)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211098)

i've been through a few hurricanes in NYC and we have these things called windows to keep the water out. it's a rectangular hole cut into the building with multiple panes of glass with a metal frame and some sealing material around it.

in some instances if there are extremely high winds predicted we put packing tape on the windows in an X shape in order to prevent shatter

Re:WTF, don't you people have windows? (1)

bws111 (1216812) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211274)

It is stupidity like this that gets people in trouble. The last hurricane of this size to come near NYC was Gloria in 1985. It did several hundred millions of dollars of damage to NYC. If it had been a little closer to NYC and hit at high tide it would have been catastrophic.

Your nice little X of packing tape is going to do a whole lot to stop a tree limb or 2x4 that is carried in 90MPH winds.

Re:WTF, don't you people have windows? (1)

alen (225700) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211310)

i remember Gloria. we put some tape on the windows and stayed home watching TV. the damage was probably in the burbs or the burb parts of NYC. believe it or not most of NYC by area is private homes where you can't see manhattan at all. the part where all the work gets done is completely hurricane proof

Re:WTF, don't you people have windows? (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211676)

Except all the financial computer systems that rely on power and other utilities that are housed in the basements of the buildings which could get swamped by the storm surge. I know a lot of that stuff has moved to Jersey, but I'm not sure how vulnerable that area is to storm surge.

Re:WTF, don't you people have windows? (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211640)

You have to get a bit above 90mph before significant sized limbs get carried, heck we had 75 mph winds in the thunderstorm last night and while it will uproot some trees you don't see it carrying branches across yards.

Re:WTF, don't you people have windows? (1)

bobdole369 (267463) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211506)

You haven't been through a few hurricanes in NYC. Christ you still think taping windows works? Don't you see how unprepared you are??! It just makes the shards stick to you! Don't do that. Put up plywood. Or leave.

Gloria 85, Agnes 72 are the only ones that came close - and agnes 72 was 50ish MPH winds in the city. It's likely to bring 100-120mph winds up there so be ready guys.

Our servers are flood-proofed (4, Funny)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211210)

Our IT guys assured us we are OK. Cheetos absorb 47 times their weight in water.

Don't Forget . . . (1)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211228)

Lay in supplies of wadded beef, creamed eels, and corn nog to feed the IT staff shackled to the A/C units.

Re:Don't Forget . . . (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211318)

... wadded beef, creamed eels, and corn nog

Are those porn euphemisms?

D'oh! (1)

StefanJ (88986) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211726)

Obligatory Simpsons References.

pre-hardened locations? (1)

egburr (141740) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211280)

"consider just moving your whole data center to a location that's been conveniently pre-hardened, like a water tower or a boiler room."

So, move it to a place where if something does go wrong, in addition to the disaster you also have a huge tank of water nearby to douse your whole center? I'm not so sure I'd like that idea.

Re:pre-hardened locations? (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211432)

Well the article got it wrong.
They moved it to an old water tank. It was not a tower.
Those tanks are all concrete 8" thick actually and are ground level.
They never fail and yes I am in Florida and been there and done that. I fear that New York is going to be an epic disaster since they have NO clue how to deal with this.

wow (1)

loconet (415875) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211422)

So .. in the last few days we've had Tornados, Earthquakes and now a Hurricane? Someone is pissed at us.

Re:wow (1)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211492)

Yeah, this is exactly what happens if you don't make the proper offerings to Poseidon. Well, except possibly the tornado part.

Re:wow (1)

drobety (2429764) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211518)

Yep, Earth has had enough. This week is just the first audible sound emitted from the first 'F' of 'FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU...'

Re:wow (1)

SeximusMaximus (1207526) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211708)

Confirmation bias is a great thing

Not a water tower... (1)

Beorytis (1014777) | more than 3 years ago | (#37211478)

...Altamonte Springs, FL put their data center in a decommissioned concrete water tank, located at grade, not an elevated tower.

personally I'm excited (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37211564)

yay hurricane season, exciting! *gets popcorn* great to be a european!

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