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Theoretical Shoe Inserts Could Power Your Gadgets

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the sole-source-of-energy dept.

Handhelds 210

In his first accepted submission, Anon8---) writes "As published on nature.com, a process called electrowetting, 'in which a conductive liquid droplet, placed on an electrode, is physically deformed by an applied electric charge,' could be used to provide 10 watts of juice to smartphones and other gadgets as you walk. 'The technique depends on the use of a dielectric material — which is usually an insulator but that can be polarized in an electric field — to coat the electrode. When the dielectric is charged the droplet can wet the surface more easily, and deforms. In his system, Krupenkin runs this process backwards, using the changing physical form of liquid drops between dielectric-coated plates to generate charge and therefore electrical power.' So far, Krupenkin and Ashley Taylor have been able to produce a few milliwatts of power along tiny channels a few millimeters wide. They have patented the idea and are now concentrating on scaling up the device and designing a shoe to contain it."

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Interesting idea (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219082)

Lots of potential, although I think the idea has no legs. Please let me know if you disagree and your reasons for doing so.

Re:Interesting idea (1)

ByOhTek (1181381) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219116)

I wouldn't say that, though with slashdot's view of patents, I'm sure the general population will think they are starting off on the wrong foot...

Re:Interesting idea (1)

trum4n (982031) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219150)

These puns are pretty stinky. Get you feet out of your mouths. That or Odor Eaters.

Re:Interesting idea (1)

ArhcAngel (247594) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219340)

You think this idea stinks you should get a load of the theoretical personal methane collection system. I hear it's very effective butt a PITA!

Re:Interesting idea (1)

quangdog (1002624) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219178)

With any luck, their first pair of shoes will provide a real kickstart.

Re:Interesting idea (1)

delinear (991444) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219240)

Unfortunately they're going to need a lot of investment if they hope to hit the ground running.

Re:Interesting idea (1)

squidflakes (905524) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219198)

I wouldn't sweat the details, I'm sure these researchers are putting their heart and sole in to the effort and with such dedication this product will be a shoe-in to be the must have item the year it is released.

Re:Interesting idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219554)

It's 'soul'

Re:Interesting idea (1)

quangdog (1002624) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219752)

Whoosh!

Re:Interesting idea (1)

silverglade00 (1751552) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219876)

Swoosh®!

FTFY

Re:Interesting idea (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219136)

I was caught flat-footed by this idea.

Crutches (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219200)

From the article:

He hopes a device like this could be useful in developing countries, where electricity isn't always as plentiful or accessible as it is in more industrialized parts of the world.

Anonymous Coward wrote:

I think the idea has no legs.

Incidentally, a lot of people in developing countries where landmines were used also have no legs. I wonder whether this could be useful for incorporation into crutches or walking gloves.

Re:Interesting idea (1)

Spectre (1685) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219358)

Eh, I think it'll work as long as the initial investors are well-heeled.

Re:Interesting idea (1)

Tehrasha (624164) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219886)

"Theoretical Shoe Inserts Could Power Your Gadgets"

To me, this reads very similar to 'Theoretical fusion reactor could power your city"

Won't work in LA (2)

gatkinso (15975) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219114)

For obvious reasons.

Re:Won't work in LA (1)

turkeyfeathers (843622) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219148)

If the patent's well written, it could cover tires (which are essentially just car shoes).

Re:Won't work in LA (3, Informative)

SlideGuitar (445691) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219212)

Hard to imagine that the conversion of gasoline energy to electricity could occur more efficiently through the tires than through the cars electrical system...

Re:Won't work in LA (1, Insightful)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219320)

It would be about recovering otherwise 'wasted' energy. And burning gas to create electricity isn't very efficient.

Use it like brakes that recover energy.

Re:Won't work in LA (1)

ArhcAngel (247594) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219414)

Burning gas to get its potential energy isn't very efficient period.

Re:Won't work in LA (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219524)

Clearly you are all too young to have listened to Missing Persons.

Re:Won't work in LA (1)

ArhcAngel (247594) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219826)

What r words for anyway?

Re:Won't work in LA (2)

TheCRAIGGERS (909877) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219808)

It would be about recovering otherwise 'wasted' energy. And burning gas to create electricity isn't very efficient.

Use it like brakes that recover energy.

From what I'm imagining, the energy would come from the force of the tire meeting the pavement as it rotates. If true, that is not wasted energy- that is the energy that makes your car go. It now takes that much more energy (plus some!) to rotate that tire.

In the case of regenerative brakes, you are leaching energy from the car's momentum when you're actively trying to slow it down. Usually that energy would just be converted to heat via the brakes- which indeed wasted energy.

Re:Won't work in LA (1)

Megane (129182) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219276)

I'm more interested in how well it will go over in LV. [wikipedia.org]

Re:Won't work in LA (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219364)

Why won't you work in LA? Your reasons aren't obvious to me. What has this to do with the story posted? I'm so confused. Please help me understand!

Theoretical (1)

oojah (113006) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219156)

A theoretical shoe insert won't power anything.

Re:Theoretical (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219258)

Maybe not the sort of gear that DC-weenies churn out; but AC systems should be familiar with the imaginary power produced by theoretical generators.

Re:Theoretical (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219284)

It will power theoretical devices.

Re:Theoretical (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219360)

By the way, have you heard of my awesome My Bloody Valentine cover band, "Theoretical Shoe Inserts"?

Re:Theoretical (1)

Yamioni (2424602) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219880)

Do you mean Bullet For My Valentine? My Bloody Valentine was a movie. Both are terrible.

Re:Theoretical (2)

Pope (17780) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219386)

Well, not with that attitude, mister!

Re:Theoretical (1)

jamiesan (715069) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219822)

It's just so the scientists feet are theoretically comfortable, and their phones are theoretically charged during thought experiments.

These boots are made for (4, Funny)

elcid73 (599126) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219160)

...chargin'

one of these days these boots are gonna charge your gadgets too.

Comparison (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219164)

What's the cheapest food source in $/calorie, and how does it compare with the cost in $/kWh from the electrical grid?

Re:Comparison (1)

ZeroExistenZ (721849) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219380)

What's the cheapest food source in $/calorie, and how does it compare with the cost in $/kWh from the electrical grid?

That sounds like you're going to have a bunch of Ethiopians run in circles to power your IPhone in promises for food...

Re:Comparison (3, Informative)

DrgnDancer (137700) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219424)

Somewhat immaterial. Unless you are taking a walk specifically to charge your devices (possible I suppose, but probably unlikely), most of us spend at least several hours a day moving around via a foot power. The energy created by our our regular controlled impacts with the ground is normally simply lost; this would allow the capture of at least some of it. In the third world environments they're targeting, people walk even more. I can also see this being great for hiking, camping, and all sorts of outdoor activities that can leave you far away from power sources.

Re:Comparison (1)

wsxyz (543068) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219648)

most of us spend at least several hours a day moving around via a foot power.

You'd better watch what you say. You're posting to slashdot, you know.

Hmm... Idea could use some revision (1)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219166)

Could they maybe put this in my chair? I don't think putting it in my shoes would do very much good.

Re:Hmm... Idea could use some revision (1, Funny)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219262)

I read your sig and had an idea. /. needs stupid tagging. Not moderation, just a +1 stupid.or -1 stupid. let the most stupid comments rise to the top. Maybe some humiliation* will calm these people down.

*HUMILIATION!

Parenting use. (4, Interesting)

JustAnotherIdiot (1980292) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219182)

I can see this being used to get kids off their asses and at least moving around some.
Confiscate your child's phone charger, and make it so this is the only way they can charge said phone.

Re:Parenting use. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219460)

parenting? confiscate?

holy shitballs these nanny parents fucking suckass these days.

PUNISH your children's offensive behavior and temper their character with chores. lazy kids don't get fed.

great rules to live by i tell ya hwhat.

Re:Parenting use. (1)

ELCouz (1338259) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219502)

Good luck confiscating a USB phone charger ;)

Not in America! (1, Funny)

girlintraining (1395911) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219216)

Warning: Blatantly stereotyped joke ahead. The easily offended should stop reading now.

Okay, the rest of you: This is America! Forget shoes, we need to attach these things to forks!

Re:Not in America! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219318)

Don't quit your day job.

Re:Not in America! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219644)

It's one thing to tell a stereotypical joke, but if you're going to take the risk, at least make it funny.

Re:Not in America! (4, Funny)

wsxyz (543068) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219784)

Comedy in 21st Century America:

"Stop me if you've heard this one... disclaimer: this joke may be offensive to teachers, goats, bar owners, and priests... and to anyone related with or friends with, or otherwise associated with any of the above. Furthermore this joke involves subtle sexual innuendo. Anyone offended by sexual innuendo, especially that which involves teachers, goats, bar owners, and priests, may wish to refrain from listening to this joke. Furthermore, I wish to assure the audience that nothing in this joke is meant to imply support for any political ideology you may oppose, nor to imply opposition any political ideology you support... Now, as I was saying, a teacher and a priest walked into a bar..."

Re:Not in America! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219890)

That was slightly more entertaining than the original joke. Eddie Murphy r is rolling in his grave. What, he ain't dead yet? Well, once he reads this thread I'm sure he will keel over and die now. That is after making another crappy movie where he plays a misunderstood individual who is put in a situation that seems hopeless, yet after various trials and tribulations (especially with his token white friend/neighbour/relative) he persists and saves the day.

Re:Not in America! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219896)

If I had mod points, I'd mod this "very unfunny".

The book "Dune" kills this patent? (1)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219228)

They have patented the idea and are now concentrating on scaling up the device and designing a shoe to contain it

Robert Heinlein's Stranger in a Strange Land (plus some of his older books as well) helped kill a patent for waterbeds IIRC. Perhaps Frank Herbert's Dune can be used to help kill this patent. Fremen stillsuit boots generated power from walking.

Re:The book "Dune" kills this patent? (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219270)

I know the USPTO is fucked up but I don't think even they'll make a decision on the basis of "a sci-fi writer once conceived of an object which did the same thing by a completely unexplained means".

Re:The book "Dune" kills this patent? (2)

Khashishi (775369) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219314)

I expect that the technology that enables this function would be patentable, and the technology is not described in any sort of detail in Frank Herbert. This is very much contrasted with Apple's Ipad patent which is just a guy holding a rectangle.

Re:The book "Dune" kills this patent? (2)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219374)

Even then, Stanley Kubrick's production designers already came up with the same rectangle.

Re:The book "Dune" kills this patent? (0)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219450)

Even then, Stanley Kubrick's production designers already came up with the same rectangle.

Maybe the patent did not use the dimensions 9x4x1.

I think Heinlein used it as far back as the 1940s in his books. Of course others actually built them a century earlier, at least.

Oops, reply to wrong post (1)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219494)

Sorry, I thought the above was responding to my original post. Slashdot somehow managed to list it as such. First time I ever noticed such a bug.

Yes I am aware of tablets used in 2001.

Re:The book "Dune" kills this patent? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219464)

That's not true.

Re:The book "Dune" kills this patent? (1)

Chris Mattern (191822) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219612)

Fremen stillsuit boots generated power from walking.

No, Fremen stillsuit boots pumped water from walking. They didn't generate or store electricity.

Re:The book "Dune" kills this patent? (1)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219834)

Fremen stillsuit boots generated power from walking.

No, Fremen stillsuit boots pumped water from walking. They didn't generate or store electricity.

"... using the changing physical form of liquid drops ..." Not a pump but still pushing around water.

"Patented the idea" (2)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219672)

You don't patent fucking idea. You patent inventions. You patents processes.

YOU DO NOT PATENT IDEAS

Too complex (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219242)

Can't we just get a wireless charging standard for mobile devices? Ubiquitous charging stations located everywhere from Starbucks to the waiting room at the doctor's office to your friend's house will provide enough opportunity to charge a heavily used device.

Ssssh....I'm working on a beanie hat to harness portable wind power for charging my phone. Please forward all VC checks to anonymouscoward@slashdot.org

Re:Too complex (1)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219382)

If/when inductive charging becomes ubiquitous (RIP Touchstone) I hope that'll be the case.

endless energy! (1)

mtrachtenberg (67780) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219256)

Hook this up to a robot and use the generated power to power the robot. Name the robot Perpetua.

Re:endless energy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219666)

In this house we obey the laws of thermodynamics!!!

Re:endless energy! (0)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219676)

Please mod up!

remember, there's no free lunch (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219266)

or free energy. Why do people keep looking for ways to power stuff by (inefficiently) robbing it from other places? The last two posted here were shirts that flexed to power gadgets, and roads that had bumps in them to run road lighting.

However you do this, (1) you're going to make something else require more energy, and (2) introducing additional energy loss due to conversion. In this case, if you put some material in the soles to gather mechanical energy it's just going to make your feet a little more tired.

I see something of a relation between this and sales tax... sales taxes are applied to when you're already spending money and it just shaves a little off that doesn't look like it mattered too much. Same thing here, just making your commute a little more tiring with the idea that you won't really notice. Shoe power doesn't create energy any more than sales taxes create money.

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219332)

I make your shoes power my gadgets - it doesn't cost me anything!

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (1)

ccguy (1116865) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219354)

you're going to make something else require more energy

Indeed. I see myself in a walk to vending machine - back to chair loop already.

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (2)

Sockatume (732728) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219356)

You're looking at the problem the wrong way. If you want people to power up their gizmos by using their chemical energy (which by all accounts they have too much of) then having them wear a pair of slightly inefficient shoes is more practical than giving them a hand crank and telling them to get on with it.

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (1)

inputdev (1252080) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219392)

Good point, I would probably prefer the cushion to help me bounce back up for my next step, not sap the energy from my step and trickle charge my phone. I'd be willing to try it out, though.

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (1)

Riceballsan (816702) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219610)

Well woudln't it have to have a spring device of some kind to reset the generator back to a nuetural point to prepare for the next step? I believe this would mainly be taxing and adding work to earths gravitational forces. We can get hypothetical free energy by harvesting energy that is currently not of particular extra use to us, same reason why wind and solar are functional, we are draining energy from forces, but picking forces that aren't of particular use to us as they are.

Lunch is free for dumpster divers (1)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219436)

Oftentimes, the energy we "steal" from someplace else would have gone to waste anyway. Perhaps the energy here is normally dissipated as heat? If so, reclaiming it won't make you any more tired, and may even make you more comfortable.

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219526)

(1) That's ok. And to be pendantic, there are ways that capture waste energy. I mean, so I burn and extra 5 calories a mile? big deal.

(2) again, That's ok. If I have to burn 20 watts worth of calories in order to get 10 watts, I'm OK with that.

Look at dams: It takes less energy to build one, then you will get from them. Why? because it is exploiting a system outside itself, rain.

Exploiting source outside the system, or source leaving the system as waste, is a good way to get energy.

There is no free lunch, most of us know that. The question is: Is the lunch worth eating?

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (1)

digitallife (805599) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219542)

This device is below your foot, and doesn't require your foot to do crunches or anything. Your foot isn't going to get more tired. It works by using the already existing energy in the compression of your soles due to gravity and a humans need to lift a little with every step. Ths is actually the perfect place to get energy which is currently being wasted. You could potentially do something similar in a cars suspension or braking (it's already done in the braking in some cars, actually).

I have to ask though: why do you feel the need to criticize things that have no real impact on you?

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (2)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219852)

Jog in place on concrete, jog in place on a trampoline, and jog in place in some thick mud. There's a difference in the amount of work.

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (1)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219566)

or free energy. Why do people keep looking for ways to power stuff by (inefficiently) robbing it from other places? The last two posted here were shirts that flexed to power gadgets, and roads that had bumps in them to run road lighting.

However you do this, (1) you're going to make something else require more energy, and (2) introducing additional energy loss due to conversion. In this case, if you put some material in the soles to gather mechanical energy it's just going to make your feet a little more tired.

I see something of a relation between this and sales tax... sales taxes are applied to when you're already spending money and it just shaves a little off that doesn't look like it mattered too much. Same thing here, just making your commute a little more tiring with the idea that you won't really notice. Shoe power doesn't create energy any more than sales taxes create money.

Not in all cases. I didn't RTFA, but if done correctly, no, this may not be as you are claiming. In the case of conventional brakes a lot of inertial energy is thrown away as heat. Regenerative brakes convert this energy into electricity (and considerably less heat). No extra useful energy is lost in this case. Plenty of shoes are designed with gel and other material that lessen the immediate.impact of walking. If some device or material can have this same effect but convert the motion into energy, then no additional energy is needed. It will simply be making use of energy that would otherwise be wasted as heat. Again, I didn't RTFA, so I can't say for sure if this is the case, but if it is, then it seems viable at least. Besides, shoe companies are already selling shoes that make you burn more calories as you walk. I think it's cool that eventually people could do this and use the extra wasted energy to power their mp3 player or other devices.

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (1)

ibwolf (126465) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219692)

In this case, if you put some material in the soles to gather mechanical energy it's just going to make your feet a little more tired.

Or more accurately you will need to burn a few extra calories, which, in the western world, is a good thing!

If there is a surplus of energy that can be tapped that will otherwise go to waste, why not use it.

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (1)

BradleyUffner (103496) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219698)

or free energy. Why do people keep looking for ways to power stuff by (inefficiently) robbing it from other places? The last two posted here were shirts that flexed to power gadgets, and roads that had bumps in them to run road lighting.

However you do this, (1) you're going to make something else require more energy, and (2) introducing additional energy loss due to conversion. In this case, if you put some material in the soles to gather mechanical energy it's just going to make your feet a little more tired.

I see something of a relation between this and sales tax... sales taxes are applied to when you're already spending money and it just shaves a little off that doesn't look like it mattered too much. Same thing here, just making your commute a little more tiring with the idea that you won't really notice. Shoe power doesn't create energy any more than sales taxes create money.

Actually, using more energy for walking is great, it makes walking for exercise more efficient.

Re:remember, there's no free lunch (1)

The Grim Reefer2 (1195989) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219828)

or free energy. Why do people keep looking for ways to power stuff by (inefficiently) robbing it from other places? The last two posted here were shirts that flexed to power gadgets, and roads that had bumps in them to run road lighting.

However you do this, (1) you're going to make something else require more energy, and (2) introducing additional energy loss due to conversion. In this case, if you put some material in the soles to gather mechanical energy it's just going to make your feet a little more tired.

I see something of a relation between this and sales tax... sales taxes are applied to when you're already spending money and it just shaves a little off that doesn't look like it mattered too much. Same thing here, just making your commute a little more tiring with the idea that you won't really notice. Shoe power doesn't create energy any more than sales taxes create money.

This is not necessarily the case. Conventional brakes convert inertia into heat. Regenerative brakes convert it into electricity (and less heat). Most shoes have gel or some other type of material in them to absorb and lessen shock. If these can function in the same way but convert that motion into electricity then no additional energy is needed. So no there is no "free" energy, but there is plenty of energy that is wasted as heat. Besides, some shoe manufacturers are marketing shoes that cause the wearer to exert more energy while simply walking as a health benefit. If you are already running and listening to an mp3 player, wouldn't it be nice to save a couple of bucks a year in electricity and burn more calories too? I didn't RTFA, so I don't know if this is that case, but it's a novel idea.

Resistors change DC to AC now? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219268)

To test his idea, Krupenkin placed patches of electrodes coated very thinly with the dielectric tantalum oxide along tiny channels a few millimetres wide. Using a resistor to convert electrical charge to alternating current, Krupenkin was able to harvest electrical energy from drops of either mercury or galinstan, a gallium-based alloy as they were moved along these channels and over the electrodes.

Ummm. A resistor? What?

Toys! (1)

Tarlus (1000874) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219298)

Remember those children's sneakers from the 90's that would flash LED's as the wearer walked?

Walking on sand (1)

ByteSlicer (735276) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219300)

There's a reason we walk on rubber soles instead of wooden. A rubber sole deforms, and stores energy in the rubber. A bit later it releases that energy again, and pushes your foot back up.

That is energy efficient, and also the reason why the Achilles tendons are so important for running. They too deform end store/release energy.

So what happens when you tap into this energy? Well, then the rubber would no longer make your foot bounce back. So you'd have to put more effort in your leg muscles to move your foot back up and forward. I imagine it would feel like walking on sand: easy to step into, but more effort to step out of.

Re:Walking on sand (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219378)

Yes, we will need to expand some more energy in our walking. Big deal.
Also, the could put it in the toes, and not on the heel and exploit the stretching of the sole.

Re:Walking on sand (1)

Grizzley9 (1407005) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219442)

So what happens when you tap into this energy? Well, then the rubber would no longer make your foot bounce back. So you'd have to put more effort in your leg muscles to move your foot back up and forward. I imagine it would feel like walking on sand: easy to step into, but more effort to step out of.

Considering the linkage between geeks-that-would-use-these and obesity, I fail to see a problem here.

Re:Walking on sand (2)

immakiku (777365) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219578)

You make a good point, but there's two things I don't think you considered deeply enough: 1. It might not be a noticeable difference. Phones don't need much power. It could be millimeter depressions that generate this energy. 2. People, especially in this country, voluntarily get on treadmills to make their leg muscles use more effort. This can certainly be a win-win situation.

Piezoelectric Gel (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219302)

You gellin'?
Yeah man, I'm gellin'.

In all seriousness, this might be exactly what we need to do that PAN thing people are always going on about. (Technically we already have this with NFC and tethering, but ... PAN, man!)

Some one please (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219330)

poor some money into this.

Finally! (1)

hyperion2010 (1587241) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219394)

Amazing! This must be the first time that raw theoretical power has been harnessed to do something! If this works we should finally be able to get something useful out of all those academics.

Revolutionize the shoe industry (1)

DeeEff (2370332) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219404)

No we can all act like Thor with our lightning drop kicks!

not practical (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219412)

solar has been around for ages and could power stuff... people just don't bother when grid power is so cheap, and not worth the hassle & expense of other devices.

not going to work for me (1)

venicebeach (702856) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219466)

I wear actual shoes.

And in practice... (1)

louic (1841824) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219492)

I would love to have my theoretical gadgets powered with theoretical electricity from these theoretical shoe inserts.

that would be awesome for us new yorkers!!! (1)

reh187 (182368) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219558)

I walk 3.2 miles round trip every day for my commute... Maybe I could plug my shoes in at the end of the day and sell that back to the electric company?

WoW! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219582)

> Theoretical Shoe Inserts Could Power Your Gadgets

Wow, who said things work only in theory but not in practice?

Cables in my pantlegs (1)

Cruel Angel (676514) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219598)

I'll pass on this technology for shoes. I'd either have to strap my phone to my shoes, or run cables in my clothes. Either method doesn't impress me.

Re:Cables in my pantlegs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219750)

They have wireless charging nowadays. Check out the power mat.

if they're able to up the effeciency and output... (1)

binary_slim (2447364) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219602)

power armor shouldn't be too far behind!

Wet Feet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219606)

And what happens when you get your feet wet?

Better as an insole (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219710)

Making it a shoe binds you to just one pair. With insoles, you can use them all the time.

Stilgar will not be amused... (1)

rocket rancher (447670) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219718)

...stillsuits really should be open hardware.

Cost? (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219818)

How much will these cost?

Can they cope with getting wet? Of course ahoes get damp and sweaty anyway, but in the case of a rainstorm and deeper than you think puddles they can get soaked.
For me, walking is not just a means of exercise , it is a means of transport - I don't own a car you insensitive clod.

wont work in america. (1)

nimbius (983462) | more than 3 years ago | (#37219866)

in a country where obesity stands at more than 30% of the population and overweight citizens comprise 70% of the population,
you'd be crazy to think this "energy source" was capable of generating 3 watts of electricity, let alone 10.

Sell it to india, most americans cant eat lunch without breaking a sweat.

Patent (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37219898)

Uh oh...this sounded like a good idea at first. But this guy went out and got a patent on it. Obviously patents are just a way to restrict technology. We should pressure this guy to give away his idea for free.

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