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Adrenaline May Damage DNA

timothy posted about 3 years ago | from the why-I'm-younger-than-my-older-brother dept.

Medicine 173

Thelasko writes "Ever wonder why heads of statetend to age twice as fast as the rest of us? New research shows that adrenaline may damage DNA, potentially accelerating aging."

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173 comments

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In other news... (3, Insightful)

UnknownSoldier (67820) | about 3 years ago | (#37224414)

stress causes you to age...

Go figure!

Re:In other news... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224502)

Yeah, what they should really do is run an experiment to see once and for all if bathing in the blood of a hundred virgins keeps you young.

Re:In other news... (2)

guybrush3pwood (1579937) | about 3 years ago | (#37224784)

Probably not, but "eating" them sure does... *wink wink*

Re:In other news... (3, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224956)

To each his own, but I'd rather be bathed by a hundred red-blooded virgins, myself.

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37225540)

Rather than be all murder-y and wasteful, you could just hire 400 female virgins (better make it 600 to be safe) and put them on a rotating schedule. You'll have more than enough blood to go around. "The pay's not great, but I get three weeks off each month, and I save so much money not buying tampons!"

Re:In other news... (2)

V. P. Winterbuttocks (2246736) | about 3 years ago | (#37225654)

Your ideas interest me and I would like to subscribe to your newsletter.

Re:In other news... (1)

ohnocitizen (1951674) | about 3 years ago | (#37224580)

Actually the closer we get to pinning down the precise mechanism, the closer we get to figuring out ways to block/alter it.

Re:In other news... (1)

Stormthirst (66538) | about 3 years ago | (#37224648)

This is only any use if at the same time, they can cure all the other diseases that are truly debilitating - Alzheimer's being a prime example. I certainly don't want to be trapped in my body unable to die of other natural causes.

Re:In other news... (1)

0123456 (636235) | about 3 years ago | (#37224884)

This is only any use if at the same time, they can cure all the other diseases that are truly debilitating - Alzheimer's being a prime example.

Last I read the mechanism behind Alzheimers was becoming fairly well understood. I suspect that the vast majority of disease will be curable by the end of this century and probably before.

Re:In other news... (3, Insightful)

ohnocitizen (1951674) | about 3 years ago | (#37225464)

Why is this only useful if they can cure "diseases x,y,z"? Isn't aging the most debilitating disease of all? If it yields any insights into how we age, even those that don't lead directly to cures, there can still be much merit.

Re:In other news... (2)

repapetilto (1219852) | about 3 years ago | (#37225544)

Its also important to consider diminishing returns. Another thing to consider is that, in biology, many things are related in ways that are not immediately obvious. A third aspect is that researchers specializing in different fields will have different perspectives. So it is good to have a diverse field of study.

Steve Jobs' DNA test confirms. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224620)

http://images.4chon.net/new/src/1314388694458.jpg [4chon.net]
Above image is the test results of Steve Jobs.

http://4chon.net/new/res/787864.html [4chon.net]
I got that from this forum.

Re:Steve Jobs' DNA test confirms. (2)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about 3 years ago | (#37224634)

I think you may have the wrong picture, unless Steve Jobs has turned into Norse Mythology. Honestly, I don't want to acknolwedge the existence of iDin, which is 30% thinner and lighter than Odin

Re:Steve Jobs' DNA test confirms. (1)

staalmannen (1705340) | about 3 years ago | (#37225608)

I think you may have the wrong picture, unless Steve Jobs has turned into Norse Mythology. Honestly, I don't want to acknolwedge the existence of iDin, which is 30% thinner and lighter than Odin

The fun thing is that I read this wrong as Idun, who happened to be the norse godess who watched over the golden apples that made the gods immortal (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I%C3%B0unn)

iSorry. Wrong photo. Here it is again. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224662)

http://images.4chon.net/new/src/1314392992746.jpg [4chon.net]

This is Steve Jobs' DNA test. Certified, and leaked. He is verry stressed, butt has giver so much to mankind.

Re:iSorry. Wrong photo. Here it is again. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224692)

Dude, if that's real .... someone will be in a HUGE load of shit - hipaa violation

Re:iSorry. Wrong photo. Here it is again. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224772)

No shit sherlock?

Re:iSorry. Wrong photo. Here it is again. (1)

Kreigaffe (765218) | about 3 years ago | (#37224940)

that image has been around since.. well since 04. i've seen it before.
the rumors that steve has / had AIDS predate that image.
it's very likely just a shoop. his horrid appearance over the majority of the past decade has likely only been due to cancer, not AIDS -- and we know for sure he had the former. I don't know what the outlook is for someone with AIDS *and* cancer, but I have a feeling living for 7 more years past the prognosis would be pretty damn miraculous.

Re:iSorry. Wrong photo. Here it is again. (1)

level_headed_midwest (888889) | about 3 years ago | (#37225126)

If you are going to leak something, at least make sure you don't have the test result date be two years [wikipedia.org] before the lab doing the testing operated under that name and offered their services to the general, non-porn-industry public.

Re:iSorry. Wrong photo. Here it is again. (1)

epyT-R (613989) | about 3 years ago | (#37225776)

Not saying it's real but someone like jobs could easily afford to pay his way in if he wanted their services.

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224712)

time causes you to age...

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224774)

Time only exists on a planet, space is timeless. Live forever?

Re:In other news... (1)

guybrush3pwood (1579937) | about 3 years ago | (#37224794)

Your time cube theory seems sound. Please tell me more! http://www.timecube.com/ [timecube.com]

Re:In other news... (1)

colinrichardday (768814) | about 3 years ago | (#37225010)

How is space timeless? Spacetime may be "timeless" in the sense of integrating space over time.

Re:In other news... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224848)

Can you tell how old one carbon atom is? What differentiates it from another carbon atom? Does it react slower? Does it have a counter, then stops reacting?

Re:In other news... (1)

repapetilto (1219852) | about 3 years ago | (#37225558)

Thats not a bad idea actually. I'm not a physicist so I can't weigh in on why noone thinks that happens, but its a good set of questions.

Re:In other news... (4, Insightful)

Dunbal (464142) | about 3 years ago | (#37224852)

Yeah it sounds really obvious, until you realize they're figuring out the actual biochemical mechanism behind it. Stress also increases the chance of heart disease and cancer. P53 (or specifically its failure) is also involved in many cancers.

It looks like useless research on the surface, for the lay person. But when you dig into it you realize that if you can map out the biochemical pathway, you can think about designing drugs to block certain parts of it - resulting in prolonged life or decreases tumor incidence, for example. Stuff like this actually is important.

Re:In other news... (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | about 3 years ago | (#37224882)

I think it makes sense that stress would promote mutations. Organisms which do not cope with their environment need to experiment with the genes of subsequent generations, to find a way to adapt.

Re:In other news... (2)

repapetilto (1219852) | about 3 years ago | (#37225574)

They would need to be mutating the sperm/egg cells. A mutation in a skin cell (for example) is not going to get passed on. That does make me wonder if stress level is related to birth defects or anything like that though. Maybe mutations elsewhere are just an unwanted side effect. I can't see how that would be selected for.

Re:In other news... (2)

repapetilto (1219852) | about 3 years ago | (#37225722)

Actually, here is the paper [extremelongevity.net] . They say it does occur in the testes.

Re:In other news... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224860)

Te be precise, no one wonders WHY leaders age faster, the question this may answer is HOW.

Re:In other news... (1)

duguk (589689) | about 3 years ago | (#37224950)

stress causes you to age...

Go figure!

See, I always presumed they were just using cocaine. Certainly would explain a lot.

Stress causes mutations that may remove aging. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37225006)

If someone is so stressed that their DNA mutated a gene sequence for them to live forever, then that means there could be one that mutates into god-like abilities.

http://abcnews.go.com/2020/Health/story?id=7880954 [go.com]
Meanwhile, this girl's parents may have caused her so-much stress that she will never grow-up: proving her parents are abusive.

Re:In other news... (1)

Jeppe Salvesen (101622) | about 3 years ago | (#37225968)

Adrenaline is not about stress. Adrenaline is more about panic.

But yes, your statement is correct: Stress is debilitating to the body. Being in a permanent state of stress means your body tries to put on weight, your state of mind is not easy-going like it when you're not stressed, your immune system is affected etc etc. (Also, there is good stress and bad stress. The stress you impose on yourself is not too harmful, which is why many highly driven people enjoy excellent health)

Adrenaline (1)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 3 years ago | (#37224426)

What does adrenaline have to do with heads of state? I mean unless you're Gaddafi and on the run from rebels.

Re:Adrenaline (1)

Riceballsan (816702) | about 3 years ago | (#37224524)

Stress of all kinds cause adrenaline. You banging your head while you are stuck in traffic, or opening a bill you cannot afford to pay, still releases adrenaline. It isn't the same quanity of adrenaline you get if say a bear was chasing you, but it is adrenaline none the less, and living in that state for a long time, will have similar effects on the body. I can't vouch for what goes on behind whitehouse doors because IANAP, but I would imagine despite how much we assume these guys are playing golf and flipping coins to make decisions, they actually do have difficult situations bombarding them nonstop.

Re:Adrenaline (3, Insightful)

Dyinobal (1427207) | about 3 years ago | (#37224536)

I thought the president just got messages from the big corporations as to what decision to make.

Re:Adrenaline (4, Informative)

optimism (2183618) | about 3 years ago | (#37224568)

Yeah, but it's gotta be stress-inducing when he gets conflicting directives from different banks.

Re:Adrenaline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37225780)

Yea, but there's stress in lying to all the american public when you know the truth about how you're raping them in the ass.

Re:Adrenaline (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 3 years ago | (#37224868)

Presumably being told the results of the latest polls saying how badly you suck tends to take its toll, no matter how many rounds of golf you play.

Re:Adrenaline (1)

flyingsquid (813711) | about 3 years ago | (#37225362)

What does adrenaline have to do with heads of state?

Okay, imagine someone going up to you and yelling the following, REALLY LOUD: "The economy is falling apart!!! Everyone thinks you're a Muslim born in Kenya!!! We're spending billions in Afghanistan propping up a failed state and getting U.S. servicemen killed!!! Nobody can find jobs!!! Wikileaks just released our diplomatic cables! Still no jobs! We found Osama Bin Laden but he's in Pakistan so either you tell them and he may get away or you don't and basically invade Pakistan! Jobs, jobs, jobs! Our strategic alliance with Egypt is threatened by a democratic uprising so choose one!!! The European economy is in crisis! There's a revolution in Yemen! Republicans are risking a default! Now Libya is revolting! Still no jobs! Time to run for re-election so you can get FOUR MORE YEARS of this!!!!"

Imagine that every day, see if you don't feel a bit stressed out.

Re:Adrenaline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37225484)

The economy IS falling apart. And as much as he likes to blame it on Bush, he made it ten times worse.

Re:Adrenaline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37225490)

Imagine that every day, see if you don't feel a bit stressed out.

I took your challenge. I think imagining that actually relieved stress for me. ...Of course, I should state that my brief daydream led to purges that made Stalin look like a social worker. :)

first (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224434)

first post

Re:first (-1, Offtopic)

Stormthirst (66538) | about 3 years ago | (#37224664)

No - just a first fail

What about Military Members? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224454)

I know a lot of 1St Sergeants and LTC's who look fantastic for their ages. And they have had more then their fair share of adrenaline rushes...

Re:What about Military Members? (2)

Riceballsan (816702) | about 3 years ago | (#37224562)

I have a feeling it is more about consistant stress rather then extreme bursts. I have a feeling the aging comes more from a stress scale on an 6 of 10 24/7 for 8 years moreso then a burst of addrenaline at a 9 of 10 twice a day for 2 years. I also have to wonder if it is unused adrenaline, when an adrenaline burst is caused by say a granade going off 10 feet, that burst is used to help you run/jump/dive etc... When you are stressed out in a meeting, all it can do is make your heart race, mess with your breathing etc... maybe that energy turning inwards is what causes the damage. So people who can spend more time exercising, shouting etc... when under stress, take less damage then ones who have to sit at a desk smile and pretend they have things under control.

Exercise, order, natural selection (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224582)

That's easy: they get more exercise than a lot of civilians; there's a funny kind of order to the military that gives someone punctuated stress and relaxation instead of constant stress; and those guys who move up the chain are often just naturally gifted at remaining calm and dealing with what would be considered stressful conditions.

Re:Exercise, order, natural selection (1)

Larryish (1215510) | about 3 years ago | (#37224854)

I was going to post the same thing.

Somebody please mod the parent up.

Keep an active body and an active mind and you'll be getting carded for tobacco into your 40's.

Re:What about Military Members? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224728)

I know a lot of 1St Sergeants and LTC's who look fantastic for their ages. And they have had more then their fair share of adrenaline rushes...

Great genes.

It's like how everyone knows someone who smokes like a chimney and drinks like a fish a lives well into their 90s, but what you don't know is how well they would have lived if they didn't drink or smoke. Same goes for those Sergeants. I wonder how good they would have looked if they had a low stress career with the same physical fitness.

Then you have folks who just love the stress .....

Too many variables to make any conclusions.

Re:What about Military Members? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224994)

Especially situations where someone practices EVERY potential advantage, ignores all forms of fun, eats a regimented diet, and all that jazz....

Then their below-average overly conservative driving style (driving 15 under in the fast lane without yielding) causes someone to murder them during rush hour in their early 30s.......

What I know is that I have today, I *might* have tomorrow. Any form of intelligence recognizes you're a fool to forfeit a solid guaranteed thing, for a promise you might get a "better" thing. Some call it investment, I call it gambling.

Live it up, or you're a fool. (Note I said live it up, not utterly destroy yourself with drugs/lack of work/hippie drum circles. Balance the risk/reward.)

Adrenochrome (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224498)

It's extracted from the pineal glands of dead junkies, and did it ever hurt anyone? Well did it?

Ever read "Fear and Loathing in Los Vegas" ??? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224672)

Nothing worse than a man in the depths of an ether binge

Any stress can be damaging (2)

whiteboy86 (1930018) | about 3 years ago | (#37224512)

I thought it was a common sense that any physical, mental or biological (food) stress can lead to DNA damage and wear out.

Re:Any stress can be damaging (2)

martas (1439879) | about 3 years ago | (#37224972)

I thought it was common sense that cancer kills. Why are we doing so much research on these things? And with taxpayer money, too!

Re:Any stress can be damaging (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37225282)

The question is how things work. By what mechanism does adrenaline lead to DNA damage.

For example, the entire theory about free radicals is potentially backwards. The highest free radical stress we get is from heavy exercise, but take antioxidants (eg. vitamin C or E) during or after exercise, and you might as well remain on the couch as most of the benefit of exercise is gone. We are starting to understand that presence of radicals is not damaging in itself - it's a signaling mechanism used for repairs. Free radicals tend to indicate damage was already done and needs repairs (stem cells, white blood cells, etc.), not about to happen. Basically, people taking lots of antioxidants could be killing themselves instead of increasing their lifespan.

Pro athletes? (1)

artor3 (1344997) | about 3 years ago | (#37224558)

If adrenaline causes rapid aging enough that presidents seem to age ten years for every four in office, then how does one explain professional athletes who compete (or at least practice) almost every day for 10-20 years and come out of it looking, if anything, young for their age?

Re:Pro athletes? (1)

vranash (594439) | about 3 years ago | (#37224594)

It's obviously adrenaline combined with a sedentary existence.

Re:Pro athletes? (1)

king neckbeard (1801738) | about 3 years ago | (#37224618)

So, sitting around and watching scary movies is really awful for you?

Re:Pro athletes? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224688)

It's because sports actually relieves you of built-up adrenaline. (Or to be more exact: ...relieves you of constant stress, which itself causes constant secretion of adrenaline.)

But of course I didn't expect you to know that, considering that a soft chair in the basement is probably where you can be found 16 of the 24 hours of each day. And the bed right next to it in the other 8. ;)

Re:Pro athletes? (1)

guybrush3pwood (1579937) | about 3 years ago | (#37224856)

And the bed right next to it in the other 8. ;)

Do you know who else releases adrenaline in my bed? YOUR MOM ;)

Re:Pro athletes? (1)

mbkennel (97636) | about 3 years ago | (#37224974)

a) extremely good trainers & dieticians making food for them.

b) very hot young girlfriends.

c) a much better win/loss record than political leaders

Re:Pro athletes? (1)

artor3 (1344997) | about 3 years ago | (#37225528)

c) a much better win/loss record than political leaders

Have you seen the Astros?

Other side effects include: (1)

grumling (94709) | about 3 years ago | (#37224560)

Green skin, gigantic muscles, and torn clothing.

go47 (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224566)

for trool5'

SO MAY COFFEE, SO MAY EATING SHIT, SO MAY (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224656)

So may I ask who gives a flying fuck ?? Am I supposed to excise may adrenals so your motherfucking stupid-ass story has some relevance? My fucking god, The Taco moves his fat ass to Tahiti and this place still is full of shit ass crap !! Not metaphorically !!

Live fast... (1)

dristoph (1207920) | about 3 years ago | (#37224668)

...die young.

Re:Live fast... (1)

wrencherd (865833) | about 3 years ago | (#37224760)

. . .but then you'll leave a good-looking corpse . . . unless "live fast" also means you'll be traveling at a high rate of speed when you die.

Re:Live fast... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224828)

The grammar Nazi in me gets really wound up by "...high rate of speed..."

Speed already is a 'rate'. Why not just say "... high speed..."
Saves ink, trees, fingertip blisters and greatly reduces my stress-induced adrenaline rush.

thanks

Re:Live fast... (1)

guybrush3pwood (1579937) | about 3 years ago | (#37224878)

Live fast enough, and you can travel back in time. Sounds cool.

So being President... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224744)

is the ultimate adrenaline rush? I guess they're supposed to be high on power all the time?

No, it's other stress-related issues that accompany adrenaline. Correlation/causation/zzzzz.....

Endurance Athletes, etc (5, Interesting)

ItMustBeEsoteric (732632) | about 3 years ago | (#37224766)

If this were true in all cases, people like me would be in trouble. I run 50+ miles per week and the runner's adrenaline high is a part of my daily life. However, it has to be balanced with the benefit of aerobic exercise: http://www.natap.org/2011/HIV/081911_03.htm [natap.org] That said, I'd imagine most heads of states don't put in those kind of miles, and the CNN article (mostly about Obama) is far from scientific. "Looking older" has shit to do with overall health in many cases. However, the study seems to imply chronically elevated adrenaline levels--and athletes have anything but. Catch us before or after a workout, and many of us* are some of the most mellow people you could meet (because the stress relief offered by heavy exercise is a hell of a boon). Personally, I think that's the key that many people who "read" this article will miss: stress keeps adrenaline *chronically* elevated.

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (1)

tyrione (134248) | about 3 years ago | (#37224782)

Agreed. The claims that adrenaline is the cause is going to be proven false. However, I wouldn't doubt that adrenaline under severe stress becomes the transport agent for the real culprit that causes one's DNA to weaken and cause accelerated aging, whereas, adrenaline under sports, sexual intercourse [both emit large quantities of endorphins] will be found to strengthen one's defenses against such attacks on one's DNA and thus slow the aging process. Yogis have long attributed Tantric Sex to very youthful appearances in those far beyond their youth.

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (1)

ItMustBeEsoteric (732632) | about 3 years ago | (#37224988)

Next step: find a woman who shares my interests and is willing to, erhm, work with me to live forever. :)

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (1)

Larryish (1215510) | about 3 years ago | (#37224862)

Smoking cigarettes is a big part of early aging.

Switch to spitless tobacco pouches

Or maybe have a good cigar now and then.

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (1)

ItMustBeEsoteric (732632) | about 3 years ago | (#37224986)

I quit smoking all together after having done it (though admittedly lightly--like 1-2 packs a week) for a few years. I did it in baby steps, even using one of those atomizer things for a while, but the final push was actually wanting to up my physical activity more than anything else. The boosted lung capacity is well worth the occasional craving I get now and again.

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37225156)

Are you joking?

Chewing tobacco gives you all kinds of oral cancers.

That's why hardly anybody chews tobacco anymore.

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37225818)

Tobacco does not "cause" cancer. You're free to draw your own conclusions from statistics and studies, but please don't hop on /. and give advice on something you obviously know nothing about.

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (2)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 years ago | (#37225024)

I am wondering why you think running causes you to experience adrenaline. Everything I've seen suggests it's caused by something like dopamine or endorphines [wikipedia.org] , not adrenaline. The most likely way you would experience an adrenaline rush while running is if a giant dog were chasing you. Which it probably isn't.

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (1)

ItMustBeEsoteric (732632) | about 3 years ago | (#37225058)

1. Adrenaline rush of a start of a race. 2. Glancing at the GPS, realizing I'm close to some speed goal kicks up my "fight or flight" to push after it. 3. I have been chase by dogs more often than I would like! 4. Competing with/trying to pass a friend/other runner/person walking a dog that's barking at me. Etc. There's plenty of things running that get the adrenaline up, too. It is a distinctly different feeling that the floating, rewarding, I-could-go-on-forever endorphin high. Perhaps I should have termed it the rush. Heck, even challenging terrain that I worry about losing footing on trails does it to me.

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 years ago | (#37225098)

ok, sounds like you're probably describing adrenaline. Might want to consider figuring out a way to not get so excited about all that that stuff. Apparently it is damaging your DNA, and keeping you from living as long as if you had a more Zen-like attitude towards running.

Although I'd guess running is still better than not running, and who'd want to live without running anyway? ;)

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (1)

ItMustBeEsoteric (732632) | about 3 years ago | (#37225178)

I'm an adrenaline junkie, fortunately or unfortunately! That's the reason I dig rock climbing and roller coasters, too.

That said, I am trying to learn to be more Zen about running, especially as I'm transitioning to marathon-and-ultra distances. I even run with my mala [wikipedia.org] for my long runs these days to keep myself mentally calm and collected. This came as a result of reading both Zen Mind, Beginner's Mind and Barefoot Running.

I still love the rush of pushing through shorter runs in the ways I described above, though!

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 3 years ago | (#37225626)

It very well could be hurting you.

Re:Endurance Athletes, etc (1)

msheekhah (903443) | about 3 years ago | (#37225816)

The runner's high is endorphines, not adrenaline.

Excellent (1)

ildon (413912) | about 3 years ago | (#37224810)

My plan of hiding in my house and doing nothing exciting or stressful ever is working out perfectly.

Ho hum. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37224834)

Yup, I aged 20+ years after 10 years in the hedge-fund business.
But,... I retired at 46 so net-net I win.

...but Dr. McCoy says adrenaline reverses aging! (2)

rocket rancher (447670) | about 3 years ago | (#37224844)

I'll trust Starfleet medical [memory-alpha.org] on this one.

Next they'll be telling us... (1)

Mr0bvious (968303) | about 3 years ago | (#37224952)

That being alive increases the likelihood of death.
 

Re:Next they'll be telling us... (1)

White Flame (1074973) | about 3 years ago | (#37225194)

Life is a sexually-transmitted disease with a 100% mortality rate.

Alternative (1)

PPH (736903) | about 3 years ago | (#37224996)

Adrenaline may do some damage to your DNA. But nothing like what the bear will do to it if it catches you.

I knew being a nerd was good for something! (1)

Compaqt (1758360) | about 3 years ago | (#37225102)

Not too much adrenaline in this here basement ....

Legal implications (1)

sjames (1099) | about 3 years ago | (#37225162)

If it can be scientifically proven that stress causes premature aging, will workplace stress become the subject of OSHA regulations and workman's comp litigation?

Re:Legal implications (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37225260)

Oh dear god. Are shark lawyers ever going to disappear? I just got settled in with the:

"Were you injured in your workplace? Was it your own damn fault? Did you just ignore safety regulations and now you want compensation? Call us Now!"

Now we have to worry about getting sued for premature aging... Another reason as to why I don't want to live on this planet anymore.

Re:Legal implications (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | about 3 years ago | (#37225348)

Another reason as to why I don't want to live on this planet anymore.

Whats makes you think other planets are better?

Re:Legal implications (1)

bky1701 (979071) | about 3 years ago | (#37225882)

Well, most are uninhabited.

Prop 65 (1)

EvilSS (557649) | about 3 years ago | (#37225310)

So now my adrenal glands are going to be required to carry a warning label?

It's not adrinaline (1)

Opportunist (166417) | about 3 years ago | (#37225432)

I mean, didn't Star Wars teach you anything? It is a sign of the dark side–all your choices, they affect the flesh, rotting it, as the dark side rots you from within.

Wrong headline (1)

drolli (522659) | about 3 years ago | (#37225860)

AFAIU

a) Adrenaline was not involved in this experiments

b) no word that the compound use directly attacks the DNA, but only blocks pathways.

That is interesting and makes sense. Evolutionary stress was a mechanism which was active only in emergency situations to provide all resources to muscles and movement. In this terms reducing accumulation of unwanted substances in cells (e.g. oxidants) would have never payed off, especially if your maximum age was limited due to other things.

From linked summary:
In the study, mice were infused with an adrenaline-like compound that works through a receptor called the beta adrenergic receptor that Lefkowitz has studied for many years. The scientists found that this model of chronic stress triggered certain biological pathways that ultimately resulted in accumulation of DNA damage.

The light that burns twice as bright . . . (1)

NicknamesAreStupid (1040118) | about 3 years ago | (#37225880)

. . . burns those little DNA strands twice as fast.

Better to live large and die young that to live small and suffer long.
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