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Ask Slashdot: Could We Deal With the End of Time Zones?

timothy posted about 3 years ago | from the gedankenexperiment dept.

Earth 990

First time accepted submitter hairyfish writes "Do we still need time zones? Time zones are a relic of the past, when different parts of the world were isolated, and 12 p.m. was whenever the sun was directly above your specific location. Now, in the Internet age, time is just an arbitrary number, and time zones are just unnecessary complexity. Why can't we scrap time zones altogether, and all just use UTC across the board? So here on the eastern seaboard of Australia, lunchtime will now be at 2 a.m., In New York it will be 4 p.m., and in Moscow it will be 8 a.m. There'll be some pain with the initial changeover, but from then on it's all good. Got a meeting with colleagues on the other side of the world? 4 a.m. means 4 a.m. for everyone. Got a flight landing at 3 p.m.? 3 p.m. now means 3 p.m. for everyone. For DST, you simply change your schedule rather than the clock (i.e. work and school starts an hour earlier during DST months). No confusion ever again. For someone whose work involves travel or communication across time zones, this is the best idea I've ever heard. So why aren't we doing it?"

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"So why aren't we doing it?" (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37228966)

In the U.S. it is because the Federal Government oversteps its bounds on everything, including telling us what the clock shall say. [youtube.com]

Slow news day? (2)

Doctor Morbius (1183601) | about 3 years ago | (#37229028)

This story doesn't refer to an article? So Timothy just pulled this out of his ass because he's too dumb to figure out time zones? What an idiot.

Re:Slow news day? (1)

Pseudonym Authority (1591027) | about 3 years ago | (#37229132)

Actually, it was [f]irst time accepted submitter hairyfish, though Timothy did post it, so he clearly thought that this held some sort of merit.

Re:"So why aren't we doing it?" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229068)

"This video is not available in your country."

Evpxebyyrq. Shpx lbh NP. (3, Funny)

Pseudonym Authority (1591027) | about 3 years ago | (#37229092)

Yes, the time should be available on the free market. The companies that make the best time metrics will prevail and all others will fail.

telling us what the clock shall say

I, too, find it completely ridiculous that they actually TOLD people what their clock shall say. I heard about this one guy who didn't listen, they killed him, last I heard. Fucking fascist with their standards. I am interested to here what great insights the good roman_mir has to say on the subject.

Also,Qba'g guvax V qvqa'g frr jung lbh qvq gurer.

Re:"So why aren't we doing it?" (5, Interesting)

PopeRatzo (965947) | about 3 years ago | (#37229192)

In the U.S. it is because the Federal Government oversteps its bounds on everything, including telling us what the clock shall say.

Think about this: People this stupid have the right to vote.

The US is doomed.

Re:"So why aren't we doing it?" (0)

no-body (127863) | about 3 years ago | (#37229222)

In the U.S. it is because the Federal Government oversteps its bounds on everything, including telling us what the clock shall say. [youtube.com]

Ah - Tea Party airhead - right?

Is this even a real question? (5, Insightful)

BadAnalogyGuy (945258) | about 3 years ago | (#37228974)

Is this the type of crap we can come to expect now that CmdrTaco is gone?

Re:Is this even a real question? (0, Troll)

Reality Master 101 (179095) | about 3 years ago | (#37229104)

Whoa, Rob is gone? That's far more interesting news than this story.

Re:Is this even a real question? (1, Informative)

somersault (912633) | about 3 years ago | (#37229170)

CmdrTaco Resigns From Slashdot [slashdot.org] . There was at least one post from 3 of the editors saying goodbye as well, but that's the important one.

Re:Is this even a real question? (1)

zoloto (586738) | about 3 years ago | (#37229250)

You must be new here. I keed, I keed!

Why fix it? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37228976)

Why do we need to fix something that isn't broken?

Re:Why fix it? (4, Insightful)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | about 3 years ago | (#37229120)

Yeah. Why bother trying to improve anything? If it isn't completely broken, don't try to fix it.

Re:Why fix it? (2)

Warlord88 (1065794) | about 3 years ago | (#37229130)

If Time Zones in Indiana [wikipedia.org] are not broken, then I don't know what is. I mean, if the times could change if you commute from one place to another. Ridiculous.

Re:Why fix it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229252)

Wow, I knew that Indiana had two time zones, but I had no idea about the annoying history! Why are these last few counties even bothering?

Most people don't travel or do business so globaly (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37228978)

...that it would outweigh the inconvenience locally.

It's Internet Time all over again... (4, Insightful)

kaiidth (104315) | about 3 years ago | (#37229168)

First thing that came to mind on reading this article was "1998 called, they want their suggestion back".

Back in 1998 when the Web was new and cool, Swatch were attempting to market a metric alternative to the 24 hour clock, which they excitingly referred to as 'Internet Time'. It divided the day into 1,000 'beats', and was based around the Central European timezone (GMT + 1) on the basis that Swatch's headquarters are in Biel. Unsurprisingly, the concept went down like a lead balloon.

FWIW, you'd have to think about different timezones anyway. No amount of universally-shared timezones are going to change the physical reality, so they may as well reflect it.

Re:Most people don't travel or do business so glob (1)

interval1066 (668936) | about 3 years ago | (#37229176)

The inconvenience is completely self-imposed. Its very similar to the problem of English measure here; metric is a totally superior system in every way but people don't want to recognize it because they are simply too lazy to change. If i could put a proposal before the American people I'd say "Please lets all start using the metric system, and by the way, let's just not all times in GMT, and also do away with AM/PM and use the 24 hour clock." So much simpler, but people are people and by and large, they are stupid.

Before we ditch timezone...Let's kill DST first!! (5, Insightful)

sam0737 (648914) | about 3 years ago | (#37228982)

DST is a beast. Worse, the rules change over time!

Re:Before we ditch timezone...Let's kill DST first (1)

peragrin (659227) | about 3 years ago | (#37229038)

Only if we switch to DST completely. My summers would be completely ruined on the east coast if the Sun started setting at 6:30 in the afternoon in August.

People don't realize just how much they use DST's. especially in the northern latitudes.

Re:Before we ditch timezone...Let's kill DST first (3, Insightful)

impaledsunset (1337701) | about 3 years ago | (#37229144)

Uh, the clock is just a number, if you believe the day should start earlier, talk to your management. Your colleagues would most likely disagree, but if they don't, you might convince them. It makes most sense if 12:00 is exactly at noon and the time matches the sun, not your work preferences.

Re:Before we ditch timezone...Let's kill DST first (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229220)

People don't realize how annoying it is to have the sun go down at 10 in the night.
You expect me to pretend it's late when it's still light out?
This year the summer has been very rainy and cloudy so luckily it didn't stay very light until late.
But do you know what it's like when you go to bed at 11 and it feels like it's still the middle of the day because of the heat?

Yes, ditch DST, time zones are useful. (4, Insightful)

impaledsunset (1337701) | about 3 years ago | (#37229114)

With time zones you can simply look up the time at a given location to know which part of the day it is, time corresponding to a part of the day is extremely useful, especially when you're moving through different countries or working with foreign people. It's much easier to change the time zone of your clock than to adjust to a day that starts at 16 o'clock. The different time zones give you more information, and given that most electronic devices can convert between them easily and display multiple at the same time, it's not really harmful.

DST is the beast that needs to die, because it makes it hard to represent the exact time me with the local time plus a simple offset. After DST dies, we should try to deal with unusual time zones that do not match the local solar mean time that you have in countries like Russia or offsets that have half an hour in them like you have in Iran.

If time zones make it difficult for you, work on the better integration of the tools dealing with them.

Dates get confusing (5, Insightful)

crow (16139) | about 3 years ago | (#37228986)

Do we really want the date to change in the middle of the day? No, that is not practical. Most of the world still runs based on sleeping when the sun is down, so the time zone system still works.

Re:Dates get confusing (2)

exploder (196936) | about 3 years ago | (#37229108)

This single reason is more than enough to dismiss the idea.

Prime Hours (1)

Deltaspectre (796409) | about 3 years ago | (#37228988)

Alright then, who gets the prime hours? Where 12pm means noon and 12am means midnight?

Re:Prime Hours (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229074)

Submitter suggests using UTC. I would imagine this would be even more disruptive to the US than switching to metric.

Re:Prime Hours (1)

Relayman (1068986) | about 3 years ago | (#37229086)

England! The Queen has dominion over time!

zero longitude (2)

nten (709128) | about 3 years ago | (#37229142)

Zero longitude gets noon at noon, date line gets new day at noon. He said UTC which would make it thus.

Re:Prime Hours (0)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 3 years ago | (#37229178)

Greenwich. They basically invented the modern concept of time. That is why they have the prime meridian running through the royal observatory.

Universal Time. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37228990)

Because time is arbitrary, anyway. And not everyone uses DST, for that matter. There are some countries that dont use it, and there are states within the US that dont use it.

Re:Universal Time. (1)

OzPeter (195038) | about 3 years ago | (#37229088)

Because time is arbitrary, anyway. And not everyone uses DST, for that matter. There are some countries that dont use it, and there are states within the US that dont use it.

(without digging up the info) I think there is even a county or two that is inconsistent wrt DST/timezone of the state they are in.

AM & PM (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37228992)

Scrap AM & PM - most people can figure out a 24 hour clock. Time zones, on the other hand, make perfect sense.

So why aren't we doing it? (5, Insightful)

Ark42 (522144) | about 3 years ago | (#37228994)

So why aren't we doing it? Because it's a stupid idea. We still want noon to be when the sun is overhead, and midnight to be the middle of the night. Internet be damned, it's arbitrarily more convenient for most people, because most people don't travel all that often, and spend most of their time in their local time zone.

Re:So why aren't we doing it? (1, Insightful)

lattyware (934246) | about 3 years ago | (#37229044)

But noon and midnight can still mean those things - they just don't have to mean 12am and 12pm any more.

Re:So why aren't we doing it? (1)

LowlyWorm (966676) | about 3 years ago | (#37229082)

I agree. Many concerns were raised with Y2K. I can't even imagine the bedlem.

Re:So why aren't we doing it? (3, Insightful)

Baloroth (2370816) | about 3 years ago | (#37229240)

Yep. If you need to communicate a certain time to someone around the globe, you just list the time in UTC (basically what this idea is anyways). Or they could just, you know, look up the time difference, this being the Internet and all.

Why not (1)

Allen Zadr (767458) | about 3 years ago | (#37228996)

It worked so well with the Metric system conversion.

Re:Why not (4, Insightful)

YodasEvilTwin (2014446) | about 3 years ago | (#37229052)

The rest of the world had no problem...

This is a joke right? (1)

Doctor Morbius (1183601) | about 3 years ago | (#37229000)

this is the dumbest idea I've ever heard of. Time zones are very useful and easy to use. Having people use UTC for local time is utterly stupid.

Re:This is a joke right? (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 3 years ago | (#37229034)

The only value UTC has is as a standard time for people working across timezones. It's a useful reference point that's well known and well understood.

Noon should mean that nothing is casting any shadows. Ideas get progressively more stupid, the longer the shadows are at noon.

Re:This is a joke right? (1)

SuricouRaven (1897204) | about 3 years ago | (#37229200)

It only means no shadows if you are on the point of the earth's surface closest to the sun. That can only happen in the tropics, and even then only at a specific latitude that varies throughout the year.

Re:This is a joke right? (1)

tepples (727027) | about 3 years ago | (#37229228)

The only value UTC has is as a standard time for people working across timezones.

Anyone who provides goods or services for export works across time zones.

End time zones but not DST? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229002)

Let me get this straight. You want to get rid of time zones worldwide, but not the arbitrary idea of Daylight Savings Time? I think you have things backward.

Re:End time zones but not DST? (1)

SQLGuru (980662) | about 3 years ago | (#37229056)

+1 for common sense. I'm all for shifting clocks 30 minutes to split the difference and calling it done. Time Zones are still useful because we are driven by the sun......and you need to know whether your colleague in India will be up or not if you schedule a meeting a 5pm local time (hint, probably not).

Why not? Change is baaaad, uhkay? (1)

SgtXaos (157101) | about 3 years ago | (#37229004)

We couldn't get the country to adopt metric measurements fer chrissakes. No way we could convince bubba that 2 AM is lunch break.

There is more to life than just the internet (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229006)

I.e. farms, and people.

Re:There is more to life than just the internet (1)

lpp (115405) | about 3 years ago | (#37229048)

Yeah... those damned chickens absolutely REFUSE to alter their method of timekeeping. Always checking the clock, looking over calendars... makes one wonder if maybe chickens built Stonehenge or something... damned chickens...

No (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229010)

Timezones are useful, more useful than any benefit that you'd get from using UTC everywhere. It is easier to set a clock than having to relearn at what time things are done when you travel. Daylight will continue to determine the daily schedule. Until that changes, timezones will stay with us.

Agreed. (1, Informative)

lattyware (934246) | about 3 years ago | (#37229012)

I fully agree - and have been saying this for some time.

The reality is though, it's very hard to get people to give up an old thing and move onto the new - look at the metric system in the UK, it's been mandated as the official thing for some time, and it's still not completely overtaken the imperial (even if only for road signs - another thing I argue, why are we not using both metric and imperial units on signs we are putting up now? It's insane to expect it to happen all at once, so why not start using dual system signs, then when most signs have both on, replace the last few and swap over, then start using metric only).

Re:Agreed. (1)

lattyware (934246) | about 3 years ago | (#37229076)

On a note I forgot, I'm sure the only time this will happen is when we start colonising other planets on a large scale, and universal time becomes necesary as converting local time becomes awkward - although then we'll probably see a metric time too.

Re:Agreed. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229152)

Have you heard of UTC?

Re:Agreed. (1)

lattyware (934246) | about 3 years ago | (#37229204)

Yes, but UTC isn't used for most things - most people use timezone-adjusted times.

Might as well start then. (1)

nten (709128) | about 3 years ago | (#37229182)

If it will take us a century to switch, it a reason to switch sooner not later. Best get the pain out of the way. It will make things easier and less arbitrary, what scientist/engineer could be against that? Hmm...

Not enough benefit (2)

Arlet (29997) | about 3 years ago | (#37229014)

Got a meeting with colleagues on the other side of the world?

99.9% of the people never have a meeting with people on the other side of the world. Changing time zones would bring them only confusion.

Re:Not enough benefit (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229256)

I suggest we shelve this idea until a significant number of people live off-world.

Can't screen such trolling? (0)

JayHades (2046584) | about 3 years ago | (#37229020)

What kind of daft thought is that? Seriously?

No (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229032)

Most of the time people don't travel out of their zones. It's really not that difficult to deal with people in different zones. There are just 24 zones, so it's not that big a deal.

The alternative? My clock is wrong because I drove across the bridge. Wow, that's a world of suck. People have a hard enough time keeping their appointments when everybody in the same metro area is on the same clock. Get rid of the unified zone and it's a world of excuses and/or confusion. We'd all end up on "cowboy time". Yeah, some parts of the world are already "laid back" like that; but the US would be in a major uproar if we did that.

seriously this is stupid (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229040)

this is just stupid! its better to have the different time zones because its still convenient AND its just a stupid idea

No. (1)

Sfing_ter (99478) | about 3 years ago | (#37229042)

No. That is all. Now go back to playing with yourself.

We already use UTC! (5, Insightful)

FranTaylor (164577) | about 3 years ago | (#37229050)

Our computer clocks are all using UTC already

The displayed time is adjusted to local time for the benefit of us humans

We can say "the best time to feed the animals is at 4 PM" and that applies to everyone on the planet. With your scheme we would have to give a much longer-winded explanation.

Re:We already use UTC! (1)

lattyware (934246) | about 3 years ago | (#37229128)

Well, not really, because what you are giving there is a relative time. The best time to feed the chickens is +4h from mid-day. Then everyone knows what time mid-day is in their zone, job done. Absolute time being absolute seems like a good plan. Your issue is you are confusing the two.

Re:We already use UTC! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229174)

"+4h from mid-day. Then everyone knows what time mid-day is in their zone, job done."

You're expecting a lot and that was a long winded way of saying 4pm.

Re:We already use UTC! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229206)

+4h from mid-day

which we can then shorten to "4 pm" since people talk about relative time more frequently than absolute time.

Re:We already use UTC! (1)

FranTaylor (164577) | about 3 years ago | (#37229226)

The chickens do not care about a few minutes here and there. We use local time because it is useful. I can call my neighbor in the next town and say "let's meet at 4" and we do not need to get into a long winded discussion about what that means

Re:We already use UTC! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229246)

"The best time to feed the chickens is +4h from mid-day."

So...4 PM, then?

Sounds good but... (1)

Zakabog (603757) | about 3 years ago | (#37229060)

Sounds good but we (the US) couldn't even successfully switch over to the metric system. Yes it will be easier in the future but most people don't seem to care about long term goals when it means in the short term they'll have to remember that work is from 2-10 not 9-5. Also while we're at it we might as well switch to the 24 hour clock.

No (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229066)

for someone who lives in one time zone and doesn't travel i say no.

And this changes what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229070)

I don't understand, It just a fucking number. So we should all get up at 9:00 AM UST regardless it's in the middle of the night? STUPID! Rob, Please come back! mod this shit out.

Cost (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229078)

Do you realize how much it would cost for companies to change their policies to say get to work at 1am and leave at 9am, instead of 9am to 5pm?

Do it if you want ... (1)

Dr. Spork (142693) | about 3 years ago | (#37229080)

Everyone is free to express time in terms of GMT: You, your business contacts, your boss, etc. If you find it useful, do it! Many people already do. The vast majority of people have never been inside an airplane and have no need for such silliness.

Killing time zones makes it more arbitrary (1)

countertrolling (1585477) | about 3 years ago | (#37229096)

Why set it to UTC? Still trying to keep the British Empire alive? If they were to do this, set the zero point at the International Date Line, something a little more neutral, and just makes more sense. But I'm for keeping time zones. The sun still makes the best, most logical clock, and it's solar powered

It's a stupid idea that's why (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229102)

Just image you want to call someone in country where there would normally be a 9 hour timezone difference.
Now you can just calculate what time it is over there and say well now is probably not a good time since it's 4 AM there.
With this new system you say well it's 7PM everywhere. How does that help me? Since there is no more time difference I can't even calculate what I would be doing 9 hours from now (sleeping? working?). Now I have to know that where I'm calling sleeps from 3PM to 1AM. How does that help me?
Sure we could keep around the old time differences for this kind of thing, but then there is no real difference with the current system.

I do agree on DST.
But every airline I have ever used uses the local time of your destination to indicate your arrival time so I really don't see the problem you have there.

No, it would lead to confusion (2)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | about 3 years ago | (#37229110)

The function of time zones is that humans generally operate on Diurnal schedule. So wherever we are, we are going to wake in the morning and sleep at night. As such it makes sense to calibrate time to that. 08:00 is "morning", 20:00 is "evening". Change that, and it gets confusing any time someone travels. Even just across the US and you'd find everything gets thrown off.

What we have right now works well. Local time is always similar in terms of what is day and night. In the event you are communicating across time boundaries there's a simple answer: Specify the time zone. UTC is a good choice, or depending on what you are doing something else might be convenient. In online games it is usually "server time". The game server maintains time in the timezone it is physically located and will tell the player what it is. So you just reference to that.

Eliminating time zones wouldn't work mostly because people just wouldn't listen. They'd still use their time zone. If you desire universal time, just use it, use UTC. I do when I'm posting something to people from multiple time zones. However if you walk around and try to use it in daily life, people will just ignore you.

Re:No, it would lead to confusion (1)

lattyware (934246) | about 3 years ago | (#37229184)

Again, you are thinking of it wrong. You'd still know that place X is in that timezone, and they are X hours ahead or behind. Instead of going 'so the time there is x o'clock' you go 'so morning there is x o'clock' and adjust that instead. The issue is the way you think about it. All the things you use the time for in local terms is relative - morning is realtive to the sunrise, breakfast is relative to morning, work is relative to morning, etc... But the time of the place should be absolute. The suggestion is totally wrong in that it would get rid of the need to know how far ahead or behind a place is - that's still information you'd need to know, but instead of adjusting the time, it'd just adjust the named times we have (noon, midnight, morning, work start etc... would change), but this way, you don't have to worry about timezones when someone gives you an absolute time: see you at 8:00 means 8:00 everywhere.

Nope (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | about 3 years ago | (#37229112)

"4 a.m. means 4 a.m. for everyone. Got a flight landing at 3 p.m.? 3 p.m. now means 3 p.m. for everyone"

Unfortunatly now at the top of my head I don't know whether 3pm means I'm going to land in broad daylight or in the middle of the night.

Maybe we should have an ADDITIONAL time (call it Standard Internet Time) or whatever, but for day to day use its silly.

Shops here open at 8 and close at 7. I can assume in most countries its the same. So if I go on a holiday with the new system I need to either convert EVERYTHING in my head or remember that in country A shops open at 2am and close at 5pm.

No thanks. Its rather silly. I'd go for an ADDITIONAL clock, but not a reaplacement.

Re:Nope (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | about 3 years ago | (#37229180)

To explain my point better.

I travel to the other side of the world. I shift my clock. Done.

I know that if I set my alarm for 8 am it'll be morning or so. If I need to buy something from a shop, I know when I can go, because I know already.

I just change ONE reference point (my clock) and I'm done. WIth this new system I need to convert for EVERYTHING.

Really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229116)

1. What a stupid idea
2. Some stupid idea counts as news now?
3. What a stupid idea

Seriouisly, slashdot? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229118)

This is the stupidest article I have ever seen on this site.
Along with the other crap that has been posted in the last while,
along with stories from 09, I think I have had enough of my time
wasted here.

Goodbye.

There is such a thing (1)

Phibz (254992) | about 3 years ago | (#37229134)

see http://ebeats.org

I've got a few better ideas (1)

AvderTheTerrible (1960234) | about 3 years ago | (#37229136)

I think having everyone use UTC would be impractical. If the sun is out and its 2am UTC, someones gonna be confused, somewhere. And its gonna just be a giant pain in the rear end for everyone that isn't already using UTC to begin with. And even if you eliminate time zone boundaries, you still kind of need date boundaries. At one point do we say that monday is done with and tuesday begins? Is that a local thing? Do we keep time zones and just have them define the start and end points of the local day now?

And then theres all the technology that we use. Sure, disabling DST and just setting everything to UTC would be easy, but then every scheduled process has to be converted over to UTC. And then new rules for DST have to be implemented and its all a big pain in the you no what. Why don't we just go ahead and implement metric time while were at it just to make sure everyone's sense of time is sufficiently scrambled? Ugh...

I think something that would be much more practical would be to simply eliminate DST worldwide, and for countries that span multiple timezones to simplify. As far as the US goes, it would be easy to get the lower 48 on the same schedule. EST just falls back 90 minutes, CST falls back 30, MST jumps ahead 30, and PST jumps ahead 90. Bam, one unified timezone and no ones off by more than 90 minutes.

then why all of those phony borders? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229158)

unless we were created to be separated, based on the fear & hate trainings of the highly profitsized never ending genocidal holycost?

tell the truth. disarm. the only spiritually & mathematically correct options considering who we are supposed to be. read the teepeeleaks etchings. the native elders advise that the same less life stuff is still happening, except to more of us.

Re:then why all of those phony borders? (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | about 3 years ago | (#37229244)

Whatever it is you're smoking, I want some.

So Midnight would be at 2pm ? (1)

craznar (710808) | about 3 years ago | (#37229160)

... and midday at 2am ?

So when the hell is noon ?

Not a relic of the past (3, Insightful)

John3 (85454) | about 3 years ago | (#37229162)

Wasn't time based on the rotation of the earth and the relative position of the sun in the sky? The hours of the day were tracked long before people started setting up multiple time zones...look at a sundial and there are numbers and those numbers were pretty much same. Time zones only date to the mid-1800's so they certainly aren't a "relic of the past".

Don't get me wrong, there certainly are advantages to using a standard time (and plenty of scientific, military, and technical applications use either UTC or GMT), but the average person will want to track time in relationship to their day as they experience it. And face it, the average person does very little traveling, very little interaction with people outside their time zone, and probably never interacts with someone in a significantly different time zone (i.e. on the other side of the world).

You're obviously... (1)

falken0905 (624713) | about 3 years ago | (#37229164)

You're obviously a time traveler from some long past century. Time zones are modern, man. Get with the program if you want to fit in.

pointless. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229194)

Considering 99% of people do not travel regularly, and for the most part deal with other people in their own timezone a change like this would not be beneficial to them in any way.

Timothy? What the heck? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229202)

This is one of the stupidest flame-bait blog-posts i've ever seen. Are you trying to troll us?

Disappoint.

We'll get right on changing to this.... (1)

sshuber (1274006) | about 3 years ago | (#37229214)

...as soon as the US switches to using the metric system that the rest of the civilized world uses.

every time asking what locally is luchtime?? (1)

kirthn (64001) | about 3 years ago | (#37229216)

and all the other things...the best way for people to fall back to timezones :p...everyt timezone luchtime would be different ....lol!!

AM, PM? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229224)

While you are at it, get rid of AM and PM too.

yes! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229232)

I live at 0, almost, I would certainly like that!

Not Broken Don't Fix (1)

NoMercy (105420) | about 3 years ago | (#37229234)

I can look at my clock, see it's 9:20am in New York, and feel safe calling them or setting up a transatlantic meeting at that time..... Now, roll everyone onto the same clock, and I'll have no idea! I'd have to remember lots of stupid times or do some mental gymnastics to understand that calling at 22pm is a bad idea as that's lunch time in Singapore.

Want to fix something, make it a global standard when the clocks move for daylight savings... that really confuses things so meetings which don't normally collide between the USA and Europe, suddenly hit but only for one or two weeks until the other side moves into daylight savings.

Why this makes no sense (1)

wickerprints (1094741) | about 3 years ago | (#37229236)

A little thought shows why this isn't a good idea.

Say this idea is implemented worldwide. You've lived in a particular place most of your life. You're accustomed to waking up at what is now called 3 pm. You eat breakfast at 3:30 pm, get to work by 4:30 pm, have lunch at 9 pm, and dinner by 4 am. All is well.

Now say you move to another city. Now your entire concept of when things are scheduled to happen, has to change. Furthermore, the magnitude of the change depends on the change in longitude--so whereas you were eating at 3:30 pm, 9 pm, and 4 am, now suddenly you find yourself eating at completely different hours of the day. Same goes for sleeping and waking. Each time you travel, it changes.

The point is that the hour of the day is strongly associated with specific activities. "Noon" in any part of the world tells us when most people are having lunch. It gives us a mental marker to synchronize our activities. To have to change that every time you move to a different time zone, rather than simply adjusting your watch, is backwards, and doesn't lessen the burden of having to keep track of something. It is easier to adjust our clocks than our internal concepts of when we do very basic and regular things--especially in this day and age, when we have phones capable of using GPS to automatically adjust the time zone.

try 24h first (1, Insightful)

Goalie_Ca (584234) | about 3 years ago | (#37229238)

How about we first try and get america on the 24h clock. I noticed that even this crazy posting still listed things in am/pm.

What does yesterday or tomorrow mean? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37229248)

So what would yesterday mean? or tomorrow?
People refer to these concepts before or after sleeping.
With this concept in place we could have a meeting "tomorrow in 30 minutes" in the middle of the day?
Moreover, discussing about what you've done a couple of days ago with someone who's used to live in a different time would not make sense as they could not rely on the time (ie: 4pm 2am, etc) you are referring to. It just doesn't make sense
That does not seem right...

good luck with that.. swatch tried that (1)

youn (1516637) | about 3 years ago | (#37229254)

they had a very interesting concept called "internet time", they even came out with watches that displayed internet time... no time zone, only a number between 1 and 1000... each unit would be about a minute, each 10 units , would be 1/4 of an hour, each 100 units, about 2 hours... could have worked... never caught on though.

as one person posted already, do you really want your day to change in the middle of the day? :)... though it would be fun to say let's meet tomorrow, later today :)

Nice try! (1)

no-body (127863) | about 3 years ago | (#37229258)

How about getting the US folks to use the metric system first?
 
How long is it now? 25+ years or so...
 
You can measure success rate on that one.

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