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Python Fiddle, an IDE That Runs In Your Browser

timothy posted more than 3 years ago | from the virtual-guido dept.

Programming 113

An anonymous reader writes "The site Python Fiddle, like the similarly named jsFiddle, allows users to post code and share it with others. However, unlike jsfiddle, pythonfiddle brings a major advancement with the Python language, which fully runs in the browser."

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1st (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37236788)

1st!

Re:1st (1)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 3 years ago | (#37236942)

y, i say, this is quite a wonderful "first post", u must come join me for tea time this coming season, and it shall be a jolly good time

Re:1st (1)

Cryacin (657549) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237830)

He was too busy fiddling with his python.

Re:1st (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237742)

posting with the number abbreviation does not count.

Is everything migrated to the browser nowadays? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37236806)

We're all fiddling as /home/ burns.

Re:Is everything migrated to the browser nowadays? (1)

Lennie (16154) | more than 3 years ago | (#37236964)

Yes and on ARM-based devices.

Re:Is everything migrated to the browser nowadays? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37241956)

Yes and with the least amount of effort. On a desktop IDE I expect to have code generation, code completion and various refactorings and that's just before I've even ran the code once! Putting a text editor, console output and a run-button on a webpage and calling it an Integrated Development Environment is insulting.

Slow Loading (2)

FrootLoops (1817694) | more than 3 years ago | (#37236888)

At first I thought the interface was awful, but apparently it just takes a while to load.

It makes Eclipse with PyDev feel responsive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37236986)

My gosh, Python Fiddle makes Eclipse and its PyDev plugin feel responsive and lightening fast.

I never thought I'd consider Eclipse to be a "fast" IDE, but web developers have managed to prove me wrong!

Re:It makes Eclipse with PyDev feel responsive. (2)

oakgrove (845019) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237396)

I have a several years old Thinkpad R60 with a T7200 core2duo in it running Ubuntu 11.04 and eclipse/pydev is very fast. Maybe you are having a hardware issue.

Re:It makes Eclipse with PyDev feel responsive. (1)

Ice Station Zebra (18124) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238282)

Probably running on a corporate laptap.

Re:It makes Eclipse with PyDev feel responsive. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237412)

You know I keep hearing people criticize Eclipse for its performance, but it's always by the same people that don't seem to know how to configure it properly. They're usually the same ones that complain about missing features only to be told where to go to turn it on or off. It is interesting, though, that they never seem to complain about the gigabytes of space that bloated pig, otherwise known as Visual Studio, takes up. I guess it gets VS gets a free pass.

Re:It makes Eclipse with PyDev feel responsive. (3, Insightful)

FrootLoops (1817694) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238108)

You might have picked a better criticism of Visual Studio than "it takes up too much hard disk space." That's a pretty weak criticism in today's world of very cheap, very large drives.[on this scale].

Re:It makes Eclipse with PyDev feel responsive. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37238674)

Are you referring to the same world with cheap memory and fast CPU's? Yes, a weak criticism, indeed.

Re:It makes Eclipse with PyDev feel responsive. (1)

Robert Zenz (1680268) | more than 3 years ago | (#37239634)

No, using the cheap price of harddrives as an excuse for bloated software is weak.

The hardware is getting cheaper while delivering more performance, that doesn't mean that we (the coders) should burn it up as fast as the users can buy it. It only takes the pain away to turn every single byte around to see if it is really needed, it does not take the pain away to write good software and spend some time optimizing it afterwards.

Re:It makes Eclipse with PyDev feel responsive. (2)

Eskarel (565631) | more than 3 years ago | (#37239318)

The fundamental problem with Eclipse is that it runs on the JRE, which fundamentally makes its memory management bloody awful, that's not because Java is bad at memory, it's because the JRE is bad at memory. You need to specify the maximum amount of memory it is allowed to use, and the minimum amount of memory it has to start with. Get those numbers wrong and your performance in the application is fairly shocking for large projects because you page in and out all the time or the performance of your machine is fairly shocking because you've allocated too much memory. The JRE, at least on Windows, isn't super great at moving between those two numbers either.

Visual Studio runs as native code and so is both more responsive and takes absolutely no configuration to get up and running. Eclipse can be made to operate in a relatively efficient manner(depending on the JRE versions you have available to you), but it isn't like that out of the box, whereas VS is.

Add in the fact that Visual Studio has improved an awful lot over the last few iterations whereas eclipse hasn't(though to be fair it was a lot better to start with), .NET is currently beating the pants of Java, and you start seeing VS coming out on top for a lot of people. I personally love eclipse, it's the best Java IDE I've ever used, and I can make it do almost anything I want either with 3rd party plugins or if I'm desperate my own code. On the other hand, Visual Studio 2010 is a seriously nice IDE, and .NET has improved a lot while Java has been rotting in the JCP for the last 5 years. Java 8 which isn't due out till next year won't even catch up on what .NET has right now, and if you're running on Windows it performs better and is easier to configure.

I love Java, but Oracle has a long way to go to get it back up to snuff.

Re:It makes Eclipse with PyDev feel responsive. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37240682)

Well, given that Visual Studio, by default, has a lot more features than eclipse (built in language support, built in compilers, etc.), of course it's going to be larger. Mind you, Eclipse doesn't need most of those because it's target platforms tend to have them available externally, and eclipse can link to them. If you really want to compare, consider Eclipse + GCC + JDK+ JRE + plugins to give the game drag-and-drop gui design functionality + source control platform of choice + GUI frontend for source control platform of choice... Of course, you many not need all of those, but you don't have to install what you don't need in Visual Studios either.

That being said, I use VS for my own projects, and Eclipse for work. They have comparable speed, comparable configuration options, but Visual Studios seems to have a more intuitive configuration setup (ex: you can change all of your text color coding in one screen of the options window, rather than having to shift through several). It's much more concise. Also, the autocomplete in Visual Studio (at least with C#) is much better than that of Eclipse (at least with java). And the popup display of folded text is much more annoying in Eclipse than VS - you need to move the mouse a lot more to get rid of it if you accidentally make it pop up.

Re:It makes Eclipse with PyDev feel responsive. (1)

thetoadwarrior (1268702) | more than 3 years ago | (#37241920)

Works just fine on Chrome 13 in Snow Leopard. Of course I'll stick with PyCharm or Vim.

Re:Slow Loading (2)

Sarusa (104047) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237006)

For me it loaded almost instantly... but would never run anything. Even just
          print "hello"
would never enable the Run button.

Tried it in another browser and 'Oh sorry, that's not a supported browser.'

Re:Slow Loading (1)

elashish14 (1302231) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237236)

Refreshed a few times and the Run button started to work for me. Sometimes the page doesn't fully load

Re:Slow Loading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37239950)

Worked for me...

Re:Slow Loading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37241828)

Probably should try turning off NoScript dude.

Re:Slow Loading (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237570)

Oh you're evil. I let it sit for 20 minutes waiting for something remotely useful to load.

It's like a geeky rickroll. Well done sir.

Re:Slow Loading (1)

FrootLoops (1817694) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238122)

At first I thought it had finished loading (the status bar must have gone away, I suppose). So, I opened one of the links in a new tab. That may or may not have done something to make the original tab finish loading....

Re:Slow Loading (1)

dvdwholesale3 (2432850) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238518)

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wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

PJ6 (1151747) | more than 3 years ago | (#37236890)

'cuz ya know, when you migrate a UI to run in a browser, you get such a feature-rich, stable experience and it's so maintainable

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

greg1104 (461138) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237128)

Putting everything into your browser should work about as well as the first big Great Leap Forward [wikipedia.org] : "enormous amounts of investment produced only modest increases in production or none at all. In short, the Great Leap was a very expensive disaster."

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (2)

drosboro (1046516) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238544)

Actually, one really useful benefit of this will be for education. When my introductory programming class starts in a week's time, I'll be able to send them here for the first few weeks, while they're figuring out Python basics, and before they've got a proper Python installation on their own computers (high school kids, some of whose parents lock down computers pretty tightly). It should help us get around the "I can't do my homework, because my dad won't let me install software on the computer" nonsense. :)

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

justforgetme (1814588) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238950)

When I got my "introduction to programming" we brought our homework back on paper and were evaluated on how big our bugs were. That was about two decades ago. What is the problem with kids today bringing in their 10 line programs in on paper or a text file? I mean if they really want to they could.

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

drosboro (1046516) | more than 3 years ago | (#37241248)

The problem is that it's much more effective for them to get instant feedback from the interpreter. I'm not overly concerned if they mistype something on the first-go-round, just so long as they spot the problem and correct it before they submit.

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

cbiltcliffe (186293) | more than 3 years ago | (#37241532)

Damned kids. GET OFF MY LAWN!!!

(Filter error: Don't use so many caps. It's like YELLING.

No shit. It's supposed to be yelling. That's the whole point.

STUPID FILTERS!!!)

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#37239670)

You send computer homework home with the kids? That seems counter intuitive. In my part of the world, there are homes that don't HAVE computers! Kids are sent to school, expecting that whatever computer education they get can all be done at school!

Those people who do have computers in their homes, generally lock them down, if they are smart. Kids do the darndest things - at least that was the name of a television show when I was growing up. I have repaired a number of home computers that kids (and sometimes idiot dads with a taste for porn, but no common sense) had really screwed up. Then, I have proceeded to A: start locking those computers down and B: show Mom and/or Dad how to lock it down.

As for anything that requires bandwidth, the school blows everyone in the area away. The high school has at least triple the bandwidth of all the rest of the town, combined!

I think that if teachers sent computer homework home around here, the teacher might be lynched!

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

SteveFoerster (136027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37240330)

Even in areas where home computer ownership is a reasonable expectation or where students are issued a laptop it would still make sense for a teacher to send parents a list of expectations on the first day so that there's no confusion about what's required.

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

drosboro (1046516) | more than 3 years ago | (#37241226)

It's not so much that I "send homework home with kids", as that some kids always seem to push up against the limits of the amount of class time I'm able to give for a project. Having an easy way for them to keep working at home gives them an option that they may not have had. We're a private school that requires all of our students to have some sort of web device (iPad, laptop, etc) - clearly, things would be different in a situation where we had to assume someone may not have access.

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

SteveFoerster (136027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37240440)

Yes, I could also see using this in distance learning courses on programming, particularly in situations where students aren't using their own machines, as with many students in low and middle income countries.

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

cbiltcliffe (186293) | more than 3 years ago | (#37241514)

http://portableapps.com/apps/development/geany_portable [portableapps.com]

Doesn't require installation, as it's portable, and I'd guess it runs a lot faster than a browser-based version.

It also supports Python, plus a whole bunch more languages.

Re:wow, this is a great leap forward (1)

drosboro (1046516) | more than 3 years ago | (#37241822)

And it's Windows-only, which is going to exclude a good chunk of my students. The browser-based version beats it on that count - although it would seem to only support Chrome and Firefox, so it doesn't win quite as soundly as I'd like. Also, for introductory-programming-course purposes, speed really doesn't matter much (if at all).

Dear Developers.. (2, Insightful)

Severus Snape (2376318) | more than 3 years ago | (#37236896)

Stop trying to reinvent the wheel, my applications work just fine without the need for a web browser.

Re:Dear Developers.. (3, Insightful)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237060)

But everyone has to jump in on the latest fad, don't you know that? I remember the "it'll all be thin clients all the way down!" fad, the grid computing fad, and now the "all you need is a browser and the magical perfect cloud!" fad.

The fads they come, the fads they go, but there is a damned good reason why desktops have been virtually unchanged in the past twenty years design wise, and that is because they WORK. Having lots of processing power, memory, and storage, all at the user's fingertips? it is nice, it makes things faster and works even without the magic cloud. But everyone needs to jump on the fads or else they wouldn't be fads now would they?

But hey, if making an IDE run really REALLY slow by sticking it in a browser gives them a happy? More power to them I say. Some make models, some play guitar, if jamming an IDE in a browser is what they like to blow their weekends on different strokes.

Re:Dear Developers.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237240)

Your "damned good reason" is the reason why Windows maintains a failed security model. 15 years ago it was stupid for applications to have access to the whole user account. Today, unchanged after all this time, it's mindbogglingly stupid.

For fucks sake, Windows can't even do trivial software firewalling. It shows no popup request for outbound connections, so you're forced to add manual fw rules to blanket-ban all outbound connection attempts.

Props to the author of this experiment for getting me to try it, because I sure as fuck wouldn't have if it required an executable download.

Re:Dear Developers.. (5, Interesting)

FlyingGuy (989135) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237352)

Dear Anonymous COWARD

If software developers actually wrote and deployed their applications correctly a lot of whats broken in Windows would actually be fixed!

This is not to say that Windows does not have problems, it has TONS of them, but many many of them would be resolved if the idiots actually wrote applications that did not:

  • Put their data files in "/program files".
  • Fail to set the correct rights to the registry keys they create on install.
  • Require "power user" or above permissions.
  • Scatter their damn DLL's all over the fucking hard drive, then rely on the OS to track them down and do the loading for them instead of keeping them with their main executable and loading and unloading them explicitly with their program.
  • Put all sorts of shit in the system or system32 directory.

That is but a tiny sample of the brain dead shit that application programmers do which in turn causes all sorts of chaos in windows. YES Microsfot did build a whole shit load of supidity into Windows but the people who write software for it are even worse since they simple never do it correctly.

Re:Dear Developers.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237530)

Developers like you are why Windows is so dangerous. You're focused entirely on system integrity. You're thinking, "will this program infect the machine" instead of asking the correct question: "will this program steal the data that's on this machine." Linux and Windows both fail to seriously address this issue.

Proving correctness (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237546)

15 years ago it was stupid for applications to have access to the whole user account. Today, unchanged after all this time, it's mindbogglingly stupid.

For fucks sake, Windows can't even do trivial software firewalling. It shows no popup request for outbound connections, so you're forced to add manual fw rules to blanket-ban all outbound connection attempts.

If software developers actually wrote and deployed their applications correctly a lot of whats broken in Windows would actually be fixed!

A lot, but not everything. I wouldn't have to sandbox each application if I could be sure that it was written correctly, but how can I be sure of that? As I understand it, formal verification [wikipedia.org] is still perceived as cost prohibitive for most software distributed to the public. The Windows security model assumes that all applications that I run have complete read-write access to all files and folders that my user account owns. I can't be sure that a program won't overwrite my documents unless I either formally verify it or sandbox it. And if "make no unnecessary outbound connections over any network interface" is part of correctness, then publishers of software distributed to the public have a perverse incentive to make their programs incorrect so that they can sell demographic information about users to advertisers.

Re:Dear Developers.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237686)

well m$ shouldnt have made it possible

Re:Dear Developers.. (2)

Nimey (114278) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238266)

I actually had a discussion with a vendor whose code put their data in Program Files, which I had bollocked him for. IIRC his reason was because he wanted to coexist well with Terminal Services or Citrix summat.

Assuming he was correct, then that's a Microsoft and/or Citrix problem - they shouldn't write their stuff to require storing data /there/ of all places.

Re:Dear Developers.. (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238566)

Oh don't even get me started on douchebag programmers friend! That is why i can't just "nuke it from orbit" when a home user box is brought in, because not only does the crap that come with consumer devices shotgun files and reg keys all over the damned place, but you NEVER know where the fuck they are gonna put user files!

Since Win2K programs are SUPPOSED to put user files into a folder under my docs, but I've found them on the C: drive in some funky named folder, dropped on the desktop, again with a funky name, hell even a couple that stuck user files like pictures in fucking Win32!

That is why I'm glad I've just about got all my users switched over to Win 7. Not only does it have better security but for shitty programs it just lies its ass off with file and registry virtualization to enforce data sanity. But I have to agree that a hell of a lot of what went wrong with WinXP was MSFT bending over backwards accommodating badly written programs. Sadly even today I see programs acting like everyone should run as admin and it should have access to anything and everything. You'd think in nearly 5 years programmers could get their shit together?

Re:Dear Developers.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37239020)

Dear Anonymous COWARD

I see what you did there...

Dear Microsoft SHILL (1)

mangu (126918) | more than 3 years ago | (#37239854)

When I started using Linux, back in 1998, I did what Microsoft had got me used to do. I used only one account, root, and did everything as root.

Then I installed one application, I don't even remember which one, that wouldn't run as root. It demanded a non-privileged user to run.

I was astonished to find that I could do anything, except fuck up the system, as a normal user. I didn't need admin privileges at all. Only when installing new applications or configuring the system I had to log in as root.

Next step was learning how to use the sudo command. No more worries about malware for me. I still have a backup CD-RW from 1999 with the /root directory that had all my files back then. I look at my multi-terabyte disks toady and wonder how I could have been so naive once.

And there are still people who say Microsoft systems only have more malware because they are the most used...

Re:Dear Developers..Dear Managers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237782)

Personally, I feel like the web is something that managers like, and developers don't. My 2 cents. The web is where it is today because of managers. Almost the real thing, but not quite. Probably managers invented multitouch just to have zooming in a web browser--lame feature.

Re:Dear Developers..Dear Managers (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237812)

We're dealing with apples and oranges, documents and applications. Documents != applications. Documents shouldn't have behavior, that's the task of the application, and one shouldn't have to build an application out of a document. What we need is a real application object model, not a document object model. The data types should serve as the schema, not some crappy XML schema.

Re:Dear Developers.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37238820)

But everyone has to jump in on the latest fad, don't you know that? I remember the "it'll all be thin clients all the way down!" fad

To be honest, the only things I thought about was: does this work on a tablet PC and how can I convince IT to let this run on an internal server.

Not that one should ever stoop to taking a computer to do hack...er, work on email during a 3 hours sales presentation on a product nobody is going to buy.

Re:Dear Developers.. (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237104)

Try doing some quick changes to code on an iPhone or iPad. With the current restrictions in place and the popularity of these devices, I can see these kind of platforms having some value on occasion. Also for shops that are trying to virtualize desktops, although I still think forcing that on developers is a mistake.

Don't do stupid things and you won't have pain. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237288)

Sometimes, when you do stupid things, you suffer some sort of pain as a consequence. Trying to develop software on a mobile phone or a tablet is a good example of this. It's just something that sensible people don't do. In fact, it's much like crushing your own penis and testes with a brick. Sure, you can do it, but it's not a particularly good idea. The pain is your body's way of telling you that what you're doing is a pretty fucking stupid thing.

If you need to be making changes to code, just do the right thing and use a real desktop, or even a laptop.

The alleged death of the PC (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237602)

Sometimes, when you do stupid things, you suffer some sort of pain as a consequence. Trying to develop software on a mobile phone or a tablet is a good example of this.

Tell that to some pro-"death of the PC" posters who seem to think that affordable laptops need no longer be manufactured now that tablets with keyboard docks, running smartphone operating systems, allegedly satisfy the needs of those home and business users who aren't programmers, graphic designers, or other creative professionals. The idea is that the majority can use tablets, and creative professionals can afford to pay more for niche hardware once the economies of scale on commodity PC hardware start to diminish. Without affordable hardware suitable for programming, people would be discouraged from learning to program as a hobby.

Re:Dear Developers.. (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238902)

dunno, iphone and ipad have ssh clients, vnc clients and other remote computing clients. it's the lack of keyboard that's the limiting thing there, not the sw.

however - these kind of platforms provide the reasoning that it's just favoritism to ban some apps from running on native interpreters when they in fact bundle a web browser with js with which you can emulate anything(albeit slowly) - so it becomes yo dawg we heard you like vm's so we put a vm in your vm.

it's useful for guys who need some code hacking ability while working in an office where all the computers are in kiosk mode though, but might just as well just write javascript then.

ln -sf browser operating_system (3, Insightful)

smoothnorman (1670542) | more than 3 years ago | (#37236898)

and in the end, (which, of course, is a "new beginning") what was the browser will want to be able to run a new and shiny alternative browser...

Re:ln -sf browser operating_system (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37236944)

b = webbrowser.get('lynx')
b.open('http://docs.python.org/lib/module-webbrowser.html')

Re:ln -sf browser operating_system (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37241972)

Yup. We now have a Javascript VM within a "regular" OS within a "bare metal" VM. Am I the only one to consider this a failing of regular Operating Systems on both ends? Neither of these VMs would be necessary if an OS would really be a multi-user, multi-program environment.

It would be a lot easier... (3, Interesting)

drb226 (1938360) | more than 3 years ago | (#37236976)

...to just build the Python interpreter right into browsers, like JavaScript.

Re:It would be a lot easier... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237726)

And increase the attack surface even more? Not to mention that Microsoft will insist on their proprietary implementation (Microsoft Python) with subtle, yet numerous differences from the standard implementation.

Re:It would be a lot easier... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237828)

"increasing the attack surface" is the modern luddite's catch phrase. and there's no such thing as "microsoft python"

Re:It would be a lot easier... (1)

qxcv (2422318) | more than 3 years ago | (#37239034)

Increased attack surface is the reason sane people don't run Adobe's PDF browser plugin. And "microsoft python" does exist - it's called "Iron Python" (i.e. Python for .NET).

Re:It would be a lot easier... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37238148)

Google seems to be pretty satisfied [google.com] that they can safely sandbox a python interpreter. Maybe they could put it into Chrome safely as well.

Re:It would be a lot easier... (1)

thiswillbegreat (2448736) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238338)

Hmm, maybe so. I wonder if some of the newer Python implementations like PyPy or Jython would make that simpler. I know that one of PyPy's vaunted features is a webkit bridge, though that github repo is currently showing a 404.

Re:It would be a lot easier... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37241040)

http://wiki.python.org/moin/WebBrowserProgramming

There but for the grace of God go I...

Works Well! (1)

amaupin (721551) | more than 3 years ago | (#37236978)

Loaded quickly and code seemed to execute quickly. Some sort of documentation/about/FAQ would be nice.

Sadly I'll probably use this neat tool because of Windows 7... You see, in Windows XP I could click Start, navigate quickly to All Programs > IDLE, and have a Python command line to do simple math or quickie calculations. However Windows 7 makes me click on Start, click on All Programs, click on the scroll gadget to scroll down to Python 3.2, click on Python 3.2 to open its directory, and finally click on IDLE.

Yes, I am lazy.

Re:Works Well! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37236990)

guess what, next time you find your IDLE shortcut, right click on it and go send to desktop. Magical new icon appears on the desktop!

Re:Works Well! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237004)

even xp is too slow for me.

http://www.launchy.net/

Re:Works Well! (2)

kbolino (920292) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237014)

You know not only can you pin it to your Start Menu (which you've been able to do since Windows XP), but you can also pin it to the freakin' taskbar! Right click on the icon, click "Pin to Taskbar", and voila it will always be on your taskbar, even when it's not open.

Re:Works Well! (1)

amaupin (721551) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237368)

You know, I actually never thought about pinning it to the Start Menu. Pretty stupid, as I've done that with the DOS prompt and a few other programs I use often. Thanks for the reminder!

I'm fairly anal with my desktop. I limit the taskbar pinned programs to a few specifics (Putty, WinSCP, Thunderbird, etc.) and IDLE just isn't used enough to warrant inclusion.

Re:Works Well! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37238252)

Also, you can search the programs installed by just typing into the Start Menu, and I imagine IDLE wouldn't get confused with anything else.

Re:Works Well! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237436)

So, you are suggesting I fix Windows' brain dead menu by pinning my programs to the task bar? Well, that's just stupid. What happens when the task bar is cluttered up with 15 different pins? How about this for an idea? THEY FIX THE FUCKING START MENU!

Re:Works Well! (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237614)

What better user interface would you prefer to use to choose among 15 different programs that you use?

Re:Works Well! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237980)

The Windows XP dual pane start menu was the easiest fastest way to manage 15 different programs I've ever used. Just mouse over the menus and they quickly fan out. Very efficient. The Vista and Windows 7 click rests are abominations. Now when I use windows, I just use classic shell. Brings back the goodness of XP.

Re:Works Well! (1)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237750)

You could also just click Start and type Idle, and utilize the "Gnome-do" functionality that they finally have.

Re:Works Well! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237028)

or even hit [windows], type IDLE [enter]

Re:Works Well! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237040)

Why not just pin IDLE to the start menu or even just type it in the menu's search box?

Re:Works Well! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237166)

Yes, I am lazy.

And retarded.
You can just type IDLE and find it.

Re:Works Well! (1)

JohnnyBGod (1088549) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237250)

It's actually Windows key -> Type "idle"<enter>. Which is a lot faster. Or you could pin it to the taskbar, as some have also suggested.

Also: click on the scroll gadget? No mouse wheel? :s

Re:Works Well! (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237618)

Also: click on the scroll gadget? No mouse wheel?

Not all laptops have the scroll band at the right side of the trackpad. Mine does, but my last one didn't.

Re:Works Well! (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238082)

No no

In Windows Vista and up you type. If anything I thought more DOS and Linux users would be happy as you can use Office 2007 ribbon and Windows 7 without a keyboard. Hit the Windows key and type whatever you want. I have not scrolled in 3 years. It is great. Need to find MSconfig on a client? Just hit the Windows key and type MS ... and intellisence will do the rest for you.

In Office, hit alt and numbers and letters will appear on the ribbon to access them on the next keystroke.

Do that and after a week you never want to go back to XP again. It was that feature that finally won me over with the ribbon over the menus. When I go on an XP machine it drives me crazy to use the mouse at all to scroll.

Re:Works Well! (1)

Jackmn (895532) | more than 3 years ago | (#37241960)

Try adding the directory that contains the IDLE executable to your path.

Editing your path is fairly convoluted. Run 'SystemPropertiesAdvanced', navigate to the 'advanced' tab, and click the 'environment variables' button. From there edit the PATH environment variable for your user profile.

Then you can quickly run IDLE by pressing [WinKey]+R, then typing the name of the executable.

There is a method to access system properties without running 'SystemPropertiesAdvanced' directly, but it's even more convoluted.

standard lib doesnt even work (2)

rla3rd (596810) | more than 3 years ago | (#37236982)

import datetime print datetime.datetime.today()
Traceback (most recent call last): File "", line 1, in ImportError: Could not evaluate dynamic lib: //lib/python2.7/datetime.so

Oh great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237086)

I just wrote a browser that runs in the Python GUI.

More browser use (1)

lavagolemking (1352431) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237266)

I'll bet Richard Stallman would have something to say about this...

Source code? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237360)

Is this technology FOSS? Where can I get non-obfuscated sources for this? There isn't even a copyright notice or any information about the developers anywhere on the page...highly unusual.

Re:Source code? (1)

Sinthet (2081954) | more than 3 years ago | (#37237426)

They secretly steal the tons of high quality and inventive code people choose to develop in the cloud instead of on their relatively safe computers. DON'T DEV ON THERE PLZ.

Re:Source code? (1)

kripkenstein (913150) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238114)

Is this technology FOSS? Where can I get non-obfuscated sources for this? There isn't even a copyright notice or any information about the developers anywhere on the page...highly unusual.

I can't get this website to work, and have no idea what technology they use. But if you want an open source way to run Python in your browser, you can check out this demo [syntensity.com] (source code and build instructions are in the emscripten source code on github).

Re:Source code? (1)

vtcodger (957785) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238216)

"I can't get this website to work,"

Me either. I think we need a secret decoder ring or something. They probably don't want idiots like us desecrating their site.

Re:Source code? (2)

MaxShaw (1151993) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238966)

This is using my Empythoned [github.com] build, which is CPython compiled using Emscripten [github.com] . The version up on the repository is a little outdated, and the one the PythonFiddle guys are using is even older, which is why a lot of the standard library doesn't work on theirs.

in pygtk+webkit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37237652)

Does it run in pygtk+webkit?

jsFiddle? Now THAT sounds cool. (1)

SanityInAnarchy (655584) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238206)

But using it for Python? I don't really see the point, unless you're actually planning to deploy Python-on-Javascript, in which case, I'd say you're Doing It Wrong.

Hard to handle bugs here... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37238366)

Try a simple:

while True:
        print "Hello, world!"

On OS X Lion/Chrome, it locked up the page. This is a simple example; but code is not perfect, and bugs happen, and in a terminal you can simply ^C an infinite loop. Here, you'd lose everything, since the page becomes unusable.

Similar Projects (1)

William Stein (259724) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238614)

Both the Sage notebook [sagemath.org] and codenode [codenode.org] are similar projects that support development of Python programs via a web browser interface. They have been around for about 4 years, and full source code is available for both in case you want to setup your own server (there are dozens of Sage notebook servers used at universities around the world).

sweet! (1)

jon3k (691256) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238706)

now they can steal all your source code! awesome! i have an ide in "the cloud" too its called ssh+screen+bash+python

mod hup (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37238852)

PyPi? (1)

cheaphomemadeacid (881971) | more than 3 years ago | (#37238960)

anyone got pypi to work? Else it would be _just_ python and none of the goodies :P (and mostly useless for real purposes)

Om nom nom nom... (1)

Kwpolska (2026252) | more than 3 years ago | (#37240000)

It looks like it (and an extension, which pretty much sits there and does nothing) took over 46 percent of my memory. That's a bloody gigabyte. ARE YOU SERIOUS?!

This isn't anything new... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37241204)

Apparently, ideone.com has browser support and an API for 60+ languages (including different compiler/interpreter versions). I don't see how difficult it would be to write a multi-lingual IDE that uses their API.

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