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Gut Bacteria Exert Mind Control

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the lactobacillus-colbertsus dept.

Science 221

sciencehabit writes "Hundreds of species of bacteria call the human gut their home. This gut 'microbiome' influences our physiology and health in ways that scientists are only beginning to understand. Now, a new study suggests that gut bacteria can even mess with the mind, altering brain chemistry and changing mood and behavior (abstract)."

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my bacteria (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246204)

got me frist post

Re:my bacteria (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246594)

my nigger picked my cotton. at least they're good for something other than basketball and crime and eatin fried chicken and making liberals make excuses for their utter failure to achieve anything. your point?

Already knew that... (3, Funny)

SpasticWeasel (897004) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246212)

Re:Already knew that... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246304)

We don't want to know wikipedia.org anymore, so that uses your "mind" for storage. Thanks.

Well (1)

The_mad_linguist (1019680) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246214)

I, for one, welcome our microscopic overlords.

Re:Well (4, Insightful)

hrvatska (790627) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246392)

I think these are more like innerlords.

Re:Well (4, Funny)

Sulphur (1548251) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246710)

I think these are more like innerlords.

This too shall pass away.

--

Never let a computer or a cat know that you are in a hurry.

Re:Well (1)

flyneye (84093) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246562)

I for one keep the lil bastards a bit drunk.
Worked for Fields. Good nuff.

vastly outnumbered by our bacterial overlords (2)

nido (102070) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246574)

There are more bacteria in our intestines than cells in the body, by some estimates. I was disappointed by this comment:

The findings "open up very exciting speculation" about using probiotics to treat mood disorders in people, says Emeran Mayer, a gastroenterologist at the University of California, Los Angeles.

The types of bacteria in one's intestines are highly dependent on the substrates available. A person who eats a vegetable-rich diet every day - especially grated carrots with salt and vinegar or jerusalem artichokes (rich source of the prebiotic carbohydrate inulin) - will have a totally different types of bacteria in their intestines than those who survive on Big Macs, Fries and carbonated beverages, with or without the probiotic supplement.

  It's sorta like... growing a garden. If your plants don't have nutrients, they won't grow very big... But add the right kind of fertilizer, and they'll really take off.

Interesting. (2)

mevets (322601) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246600)

I've always thought of Big Macs as being quite similar to fertilizer. Do you think they have some benefit?

Re:Interesting. (2)

nido (102070) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246702)

depends on what kind of bacteria you want to feed. If you want to cultivate bacteria that produce "signs of stress and anxiety", big macs are exactly what you're looking for. :)

Re:Interesting. (0)

budgenator (254554) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246932)

Artificial Fertilizers tend to distort the natural soil microbiology, and cause stunted root development so i guess the answer is yes; BigMacs tend to make you gassy and ADD. Don't get me wrong, I like a Big Mac every once in a while even considering it's not the healthiest meal, balance and moderation is the key.

Re:Interesting. (3, Insightful)

Belial6 (794905) | more than 3 years ago | (#37247126)

I know it's fun to make fun of the big bad corporation, but really. Gassy and ADD? If you are getting gassy from McDonald's food, it isn't because the food is bad. It is because your digestive system is broken. And ADD? That is just pulling things out of thin air.

Re:vastly outnumbered by our bacterial overlords (3, Funny)

thunderclap (972782) | more than 3 years ago | (#37247082)

So you are saying that Vegans are crazy because they don't eat meat and those microbes exert a greater influence because of it?

Overlords oblig! (0)

Acapulco (1289274) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246220)

Obviously we all welcome our new bacterial overlords, no?

Re:Overlords oblig! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246234)

Obviously we all welcome our new bacterial overlords, no?

No.

Re:Overlords oblig! (2)

tibit (1762298) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246370)

No, yes or no, no?

Re:Overlords oblig! (2)

Acapulco (1289274) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246416)

No, no. No?

Re:Overlords oblig! (2)

treeves (963993) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246812)

Yeah, yeah. Whatever.

Re:Overlords oblig! (1)

angiasaa (758006) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246274)

Well, technically, they're not all that new. But yes, we're now obliged to recognize our gut dwelling overloards. :)

Re:Overlords oblig! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246716)

Obviously! And equally obviously, we should never, ever get any new jokes. If it was funny a decade ago, it is STILL SO DAMN FUNNY WE SHOULD POST IT EVERY CHANCE WE GET!

Are you pondering what I'm pondering? (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246250)

In this case, the side effects appeared to be beneficial. Mice whose diets were supplemented with L. rhamnosus for 6 weeks exhibited fewer signs of stress and anxiety in standard lab tests, Cryan and colleagues report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

...

"This was really exciting because it tells us the animals are more chilled out and don't mount the same stress response," Cryan says.

Or maybe the mice just felt good after having taken a really satisfying dump.

Brain: Are you pondering what I'm pondering?
Pinky: Uh, I think so, Brain, but burlap chafes me so. NARF!

Unnerving (3, Funny)

Verdatum (1257828) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246256)

I liked the bit where they cut the vagus nerve. Before I got to that point in TFA, I was thinking "Well sure, rats fed lactobacillus will have lower stress levels! Life isn't as stressful when you poop good!"

Re:Unnerving (1)

jklovanc (1603149) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246566)

I think you were right in you initial assessment. If the vagus nerve is intact signals of well being could be transmitted to the brain and reduce stress. There is a difference between no signal and good signals.

Re:Unnerving (1)

Verdatum (1257828) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246762)

Yeah, I considered that bit too. But I still say it's a decent start at trying to sort out causality.

Potential Zombie Virus (1)

cyberchondriac (456626) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246262)

..you know someone was gonna say it

Re:Potential Zombie Virus (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246436)

Gutssssssssssss...

Impossible! (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246270)

The assumption that I posses a mysterious "free will" that is somehow divorced from cause and effect(except in that it causes me to act) is simply too convenient to abandon!

Re:Impossible! (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246412)

Laws of physics not withstanding, I think it's a bit presumptuous to conclude our universe can be predicted with the right computing hardware in calculating every sub-atomic particle in motion down to the quantum level. We have no proof one way or another that the universe has a predictable non-random outcome. And even if it it did, how do "you" know what multi-verse you exist in should there be divergence at every universal fork (permutation)? Of course, that's another big assumption in of itself.

Re:Impossible! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246496)

Random is not free.

Re:Impossible! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37247056)

>Random is not free.

Are you talking about GNU/Random or Ayn Random?

Re:Impossible! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37247200)

Pretty sure Ayn Random will cost you...

Re:Impossible! (2)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246722)

Free will is just as incompatible with a random universe as it is with a deterministic universe. Random events are statistically deterministic. We know that quantum events are truly random, and not affected by hidden variables (such as "will"), due to Bell's theorem. Free will is simply incompatible with what we know about physics.

Re:Impossible! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37247250)

Free will is simply incompatible with what we currently know about physics.

Which, all things considered, is very, very little.

chemicals (4, Interesting)

Haven (34895) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246286)

There is far more serotonin present in your gut than in your skull.

Re:chemicals (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246590)

There is far more serotonin present in your gut than in your skull.

And in this book [amazon.com] , the author points out that the link between serotonin levels and well being has never been proven - the drug companies guessed that is how their drugs work.

I wasn't going to post anything (3, Funny)

SmurfButcher Bob (313810) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246288)

but I just had this gut feeling that something bad would happen if I didn't.

No Futurama love yet? (1)

sconeu (64226) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246508)

OK, it's worms [wikipedia.org] instead of bacteria, but still....

Re:No Futurama love yet? (1)

Riceballsan (816702) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246700)

umm... you were beaten by like the 2nd post. titled "already knew that"

Re:I wasn't going to post anything (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#37247222)

but I just had this gut feeling that something bad would happen if I didn't.

See what happens if you let your ass think for you?

Hence the phrase (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246296)

"You are full of crap!"

Makes sense. (1)

ajyasgar (2449448) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246302)

Is this why I get angry when I haven't eaten?

Re:Makes sense. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246354)

That sounds like something different...

Re:Makes sense. (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246366)

No

Re:Makes sense. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246390)

That's likely more of a blood sugar issue.

Re:Makes sense. (1)

nospam007 (722110) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246544)

...and why you're in a better mood if you poison the bastards with ethanol.

Set the precedent (1)

Master Moose (1243274) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246336)

How long until someone tries the "It was the bacteria that made me do it, so I am not culpable" defence in court?

In scarier thoughts, how long until it works?

Re:Set the precedent (1)

budgenator (254554) | more than 3 years ago | (#37247086)

Studies have been conducted that show the toxoplasmosis parasite may affect behavior and may present as or be a causative or contributory factor in various psychiatric disorders such as depression, anxiety and schizophrenia.[10][11][12] In 11 of 19 scientific studies, T. gondii antibody levels were found to be significantly higher in individuals affected by first-incidence schizophrenia than in unaffected persons. Individuals with schizophrenia are also more likely to report a clinical history of toxoplasmosis than those in the general population.[13] Recent work at the University of Leeds has found that the parasite produces an enzyme with tyrosine hydroxylase and phenylalanine hydroxylase activity. This enzyme may contribute to the behavioral changes observed in toxoplasmosis by altering the production of dopamine, a neurotransmitter involved in mood, sociability, attention, motivation and sleep patterns. Schizophrenia has long been linked to dopamine dysregulation.[14] Toxoplasmosis [wikipedia.org]

It works now, schizophrenia that is.

That explains... (1)

Firemouth (1360899) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246350)

... how White Castle has stayed in business for 90+ years...

Re:That explains... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246474)

No, pot explains why it has stayed in business for 90+ years. (indirectly of course) ;)

Re:That explains... (1)

nomadic (141991) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246524)

Let's be fair, alcohol too.

Gives new meaning to the term 'brain food' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246362)

nt

Is it too late, there's 15 billion of them in me? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246400)

I started taking a probiotic supplement yesterday (that contains Lactobacillus), how long until I'm under control?

So, when I eat French Fries... (1)

MindPrison (864299) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246430)

...I feel like an American!

No wait...

Re:So, when I eat French Fries... (1)

lakeland (218447) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246688)

If it makes you feel better, you can call them frenched fries.

Re:So, when I eat French Fries... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246946)

Also, calling them frenched fries prevents the Belgians being insulted.

Re:So, when I eat French Fries... (1)

MindPrison (864299) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246964)

Also, calling them frenched fries prevents the Belgians being insulted.

LOL! Excellent comeback. :)

Was this unexpected? (2)

Obfuscant (592200) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246442)

This was unexpected?

There are millions of people every day dependent upon manufactured medications to maintain mental function, and millions more who are taking medication because someone else thinks they need mental function adjustement. Those medications are, for the most part, administered orally.

What, does it surprise anyone that a bacterium producing a mind altering compound in the gut would have that compound absorbed and transported via the bloodstream, when we depend on exactly that transport method for manufactured drugs?

Re:Was this unexpected? (2)

Muros (1167213) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246720)

I don't think it's particularly surprising either. However, I would be interested in seeing research into what common gut flora & fauna produce what effects, and how particular dietary elements influence population sizes of those specific organisms.

Re:Was this unexpected? (1)

si3n4 (540106) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246850)

not unexpected but unexplored I think. The impact of our digestive zoo seems more revealed each day - impacts on creating and suppressing disease , impact on the amount of nutrients we can get from the foods we eat , now perhaps contributions to our mental functioning. Maybe this got over hyped a little but I think the work is still interesting.

Re:Was this unexpected? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37247102)

The article seemed to state that the vagus nerve was part of the observed afect. So absorbed and transported via the bloodstream isn't relevant to the study.

That's the most interesting part to me.

everything goes somewhere (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246450)

if one eats crap....

as for mind pollution; if we weren't poisoning ourselves voluntarily, we could be forced to watch more mainstream media hypenosys.

disarm (weapons, media, atmostfearinc etc...). tell the truth about everything. the only mathematically & spiritually correct options. see you there.

Who Farted? (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246484)

For years we've been taking the blame for our farting. Now, with this research, we can blame mind control!

And I'm not even kidding. These critters are indeed controlling our minds in flatulence. What more - or less - subtle means do they exercise?

Metaclorians...? (1)

jpiratefish (1690054) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246494)

Okay, so what do I eat to get my metaclorian count up?

Re:Metaclorians...? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246676)

Jedi, of course.

Watch out, though - the little green ones are kinda stringy.

Midi-chlorians (1)

Jennifer3000 (921441) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246736)

It's spelled "midi-chlorians", dumbass. You don't have time for a .001 second Google search?

Re:Metaclorians...? (1)

rts008 (812749) | more than 3 years ago | (#37247022)

Wookies.
I'd advise caution, though...

This is nothing new (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246502)

According to my acupuncturist, the Chinese have been using the gut-brain connection in the healing arts for about 5000 years. But what would they know compared to our few hundred years of research in Western medicine?

Re:This is nothing new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246616)

Indeed. Marvel in awe at their advanced political system.

Re:This is nothing new (2)

MaWeiTao (908546) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246692)

It's true that they've made some very insightful connections long ago. But so have the Europeans. It's just that it's the current fad to be into Chinese medicine. And from experience I've found a lot of it to be flat out wrong or at least misguided.

I mean, if they had it all figured out China should have the longest life expectancy on earth, and they don't. Although, I'm not discounting Chinese doctors either, because much of what they do is indeed effective. But I wouldn't be surprised if more Americans got acupuncture than Chinese did. The fact is that when someone in Asia gets sick, they go to a regular doctor like us and get prescribed the same kinds of medicine we get.

If anything, they medicate even more heavily than American doctors do. Get a cold here and the doctor tells you to take tylenol. In Asia you get a cold and they'll give you several different pills; aggressive fever reducers, sleeping pills, a couple of others for various symptoms and antibiotics for good measure

Re:This is nothing new (2)

ChromeAeonium (1026952) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246886)

But what would they know compared to our few hundred years of research in Western medicine?

Not enough to know that there's no such thing as chi/ki/prana apparently. As for this mind-gut connection, enlighten me, does it say anything specific or relevant to anything related to gut flora? Or is it just that eating good food makes you feel better (which falls firmly into the no shit category), mixed with a heaping helping of nonsense about 'yin foods' and 'yang foods'? I'm not making that up; TCM practitioners actually believe that some foods have magical heating (yang) or cooling (yin) abilities, and that eating too much of the one or the other will screw you up. And before you say 'well yeah, cucumber is cool and pepper is hot' take note that the lychee (one of the best foods most westerners have never heard of, tastes kinda like a grape, but grows on a tree and has a hard red skin) is one of the yangiest foods (cherries and pineapples are also yang). Could there be a scientific basis behind it? Dunno, maybe a thousand years of anecdotes amounts to something. But given the complete lack of actual science to back those points, and the plethora of just plain stupid things TCM guys also believe in (ever seen the dried lizard/worm/wood/who-knows-what-else infusions they make?), I sure as hell don't buy it until someone gives me more than the Chinese equivalent of the four humors (which, I have no doubt, if some magical foreigners [cracked.com] had invented, these morons would be buying that too, but since it's European then it is just dumb).

Re:This is nothing new (1)

Muros (1167213) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246996)

Your acupuncturist? I shudder to think what some Chinese guy 5000 years ago was trying to achieve when he discovered sticking needles into a particular part of someones gut had possible unforeseen therapeutic value. Western society had it's own brand of voodoo medicine with a tradition stretching back as far as the Chinese one. I'll stick to the bits that started out a few hundred years ago with things like keeping wounds washed. Forgive me if I don't trust tossing a coin into a sacred well in the middle of an oak and blackthorn grove, then waiting for a pin in a bottle of water from the well to rust, to cure me of my woes.

Bacterial language deciphered (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246510)

Bacteria's first words.

"Eat Cheeseburgers, Eat Cheeseburgers, Eat Cheeseburgers, Eat Cheeseburgers, Eat Cheeseburgers"

Another sensationalistic headline (2)

jklovanc (1603149) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246532)

When did /. become a tabloid? This has nothing to do with "mind control". Control implies intent and I am pretty sure that a bacteria in the digestive tract have no intent to "explore narrow walkways".

The bacteria makes the stomach feel better and the vagus nerve transmits this feeling to the brain thereby reducing stress. There is a funny thing about stress. The response to stress is not linear it is exponential. If someone under no stress has a little stress added they can deal with it. A person under a lot of stress has the same amount add it can push them over the edge. A good example of this is losing keys. If you are about to leave the house to go for a walk and cant find you keys it is not a problem; most people just delay the walk until they find their keys. Now lose your keys when you are trying to get to the airport with 4 excited children. That small stressor can drive you insane. Same stressor, different initial stress level, different response. So the stomach feeling good lowers stress levels and allows the rodent to handle added stress better. Animals under stress avoid stress.

Do bacteria in the digestive tract affect animals? Yes, by making them feel better and having less stress. Do bacteria in the digestive tract control the mind? No, that do not make animals do things they do not want to do.

Re:Another sensationalistic headline (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246672)

You have a very strange definition of "same".

Not being able to find the keys isn't the stress inducer, they're just reasonably cheap replaceable objects. The stress in the first case is "damn it where are those keys". The stress in the second case is "damn it where are those keys", and "shit, we are going to miss the plane", and "I can't leave the house unlocked for the entire trip". Completely different things.

Doesn't refute your exponential idea, but that example doesn't provide any evidence for it either.

Re:Another sensationalistic headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246744)

These bacteria can produce substances that alter the recipient's mind state, for instance a panic attack or hunger. Genetically enhanced these bacterias can be very powerful as a weapon. Since nobody would expect such an attack vector, bacterial warfare is viable this way and remain undetected and ethically unchallenged, if these bacterias cannot survive for long. And if this goes wrong, you get people who have Gulf war syndrome ..

Re:Another sensationalistic headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246842)

Take some strong antibiotics and see if you can control when you shit or not. That's close enough to mind control for me.

Re:Another sensationalistic headline (2)

Livius (318358) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246854)

It's an issue of adaptation, not intent. Lots of parasites alter their hosts' behaviour, which is mind control by definition. The control may be crude but that's not the point.

Re:Another sensationalistic headline (1)

avandesande (143899) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246878)

Or to go a little further "I get grumpy at work if I miss lunch"

Re:Another sensationalistic headline (1)

Aighearach (97333) | more than 3 years ago | (#37247262)

A couple digits before you got here, Sonny.

Neuropeptide Y or S or CCK (2)

JonySuede (1908576) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246546)

This bacteria must interfere with possibly a combination of the Neuropeptides Y, S and CCK pathways. The CCK-4 neuropeptide is pretty nasty, it cause instant panic attack reliably at 75ug.

Innocent, by reason of Gut Bacteria (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246550)

How long until the Gut Bacteria Mind Control defense appears in a courtroom near you?

On a completely unrelated note (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246556)

the Toxoplasma gondii in my gut would like to ask you to please lick the ass of the nearest cat.

Thank you for your cooperation.

Re:On a completely unrelated note (2)

treeves (963993) | more than 3 years ago | (#37247014)

Funny you should mention those specifically. I remember hearing a story about Toxoplasma causing people to behave in higher-risk ways, like driving faster.
As for how that relates to how it makes mice (that may be harboring Toxoplasma) attracted to the urine of cats that will want to eat said mice (to aid its spread), I cannot imagine.

Charles Dickens nailed it (4, Insightful)

FranTaylor (164577) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246612)

"You don't believe in me," observed the Ghost.

"I don't." said Scrooge.

"What evidence would you have of my reality, beyond that of your senses?"

"I don't know," said Scrooge.

"Why do you doubt your senses?"

"Because," said Scrooge, "a little thing affects them. A slight disorder of the stomach makes them cheats. You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of an underdone potato. There's more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!"

Gut Feeling to Eat Fried Peanut Butter & Banna (1)

curmudgeon99 (1040054) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246618)

I don't know what it is--but I get this gut feeling that I should eat one of those Elvis favorites: Deep-Fat-Fried Peanut Butter & Bannana sandwiches. I know it's horrible for me but... I can't explain it... it's just a gut feeling I get.

My Gut Reaction (3, Funny)

ichthus (72442) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246660)

My gut tells me this story is complete nonsense. Yep, nothing to see here. Move along.

Re:My Gut Reaction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246764)

These are not the bacteria you are looking for.

My gut tells me this story is complete nonsense. Yep, nothing to see here. Move along.

Stephen Colbert's.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246766)

claims that we should "think with the gut" are validated!

Love potion (1)

cormander (1273812) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246782)

It seems now that we're that much closer to making a love potion.

Asimov did it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37246830)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hostess_(short_story)

Duh! (1)

Quantum_Infinity (2038086) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246864)

I am grumpy when I am constipated.

For some speculative applications... (1)

Allen Akin (31718) | more than 3 years ago | (#37246882)

Try reading Vitals by Greg Bear.

Dude! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37247094)

Dude! I saw that on Futurama like two years ago.

Remember how Fry got all smart and shit?

So there is a secret world government after all (1)

Lazy Jones (8403) | more than 3 years ago | (#37247232)

... and it's a bunch of gut bacteria. Well, somehow it figures with all the shit that's been happening lately.

Less stress, or less fear? (1)

jeffeb3 (1036434) | more than 3 years ago | (#37247272)

Both the examples of less stress involved the mice being less fearful. Wouldn't that make sense, in an evolution sense for the bacteria? Mice with less fear get eaten, by something that will then host the bacteria that reduce fear in their host, so that host will get eaten...
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