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New USB 3.0 Flash Drive Has 2 TB of Storage

samzenpus posted more than 3 years ago | from the thumb-drive-of-holding dept.

Hardware 212

First time accepted submitter Dr Max writes "During Display Taiwan, Transcend and Taiwan's ITRI displayed a finger-long USB stick that reportedly offers 2 TB of storage. That's no typo. It somehow holds up to 2 terabytes worth of information. So far neither company has released anything official in regards to specs or a simple introduction, nor does the high-capacity USB 3.0 stick appear on Display Taiwan's website. But as seen in the video below, the 'Thin Card' thumb drive is even smaller than a thumb, measuring slightly thicker than a penny. It offers a minimum of 16 GB and a maximum of 2 TB."

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It'll store 2TB, however... (5, Insightful)

ByOhTek (1181381) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252612)

you can only read back the first 1GB...

Re:It'll store 2TB, however... (2)

wsxyz (543068) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252656)

Yeah, any run of the mill computer store in China will sell you whatever size you need: 2 TB, 10 TB, 1000 TB: If you name it, they'll sell it to you.

Re:It'll store 2TB, however... (1)

eviljolly (411836) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252824)

I bought my 1 Exabyte drive there a while back. For some reason it keeps overwriting my data though!

Re:It'll store 2TB, however... (5, Informative)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252874)

For those of you who dont get the jokes above... http://hardware.slashdot.org/story/11/04/08/170235/Magical-Chinese-Hard-Drive [slashdot.org]

Re:It'll store 2TB, however... (2)

ortholattice (175065) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253548)

It seems this kind of scam has been going on for at least 50 years. A friend from Rio (Brazil) told me that in the early 60's, you could buy cheap D cells that when you opened them up, inside was an AA-sized cell with the rest just loose filler like dirt or something. They'd pass the standard battery check when new but of course wouldn't last nearly as long. This was quite a rip-off of poor people who lived in areas with no electricity and depended on these for powering their radios, since the batteries were a significant expense given their meager incomes.

Re:It'll store 2TB, however... (2)

DrXym (126579) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253624)

EBay is full of fake cards too. I got stung for one a few years back - claimed it was 4GB but only the first 256MB worked. Packaging and card looked authentic including hologram but even so it was bogus as a test revealed. I initiated a fraud complaint and got my money back. The scam works (judging by all the A+++ comments) because very few other people bother to actually test the card so the fraudster gets away with it for a few months before being shut down. I assume they set up again with a new name and rinse & repeat.

Re:It'll store 2TB, however... (1)

CastrTroy (595695) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252998)

I'm using it for my database. Just make sure you use the Blackhole storage engine on MySQL. Otherwise the database may not work as designed.

WIC? (1)

Moraelin (679338) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252626)

Did they come up with a hardware implementation of the wavelet intelligent compressor? ;)

Why is this surprising? (1)

Joehonkie (665142) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252630)

We can fit 64MB on a microSD card, so why it it surprising that something much larger can fit 2TB?

Re:Why is this surprising? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252722)

64MB?

Re:Why is this surprising? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252730)

This is a joke right? 64MB anything havent been produced in a few years ;)

Re:Why is this surprising? (1)

meloneg (101248) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252756)

More likely a typo. The largest MicroSDs I've seen are at 64GB right now.

Re:Why is this surprising? (1)

Joehonkie (665142) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253368)

Yes. Ooops. Must be motor memory messing up my typing.

Re:Why is this surprising? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253502)

Because of how much larger ti is. You don't go from 60GB to 2TB. The there is the read mechanizes, and other data retention issue, so it's highly doubtful. If this is real,and it mass producible, it would change the SSD market; which would be fine.

IF you where using the same space between bit* it would need to be over 30 time bigger.

*yes, a very crude view,.

Re:Why is this surprising? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252752)

But we all know that 640K is all anyone will ever need.

Storage space increasing? (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252636)

Wow, and I thought we were done.

A Tiny Looking Beowulf Cluster (1)

mfh (56) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252638)

Okay okay, I'll be quiet now. :D

For just... (1)

timmy.cl (1102617) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252640)

I bet this will cost you around $10,000.

Re:For just... (2)

Reverand Dave (1959652) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252728)

No, it's only $100.00, but that's only imaginary dollars. Also the only retail outlet is in Atlantis so we'll have to wait for the oceans to recede to buy one.

Re:For just... (1)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253036)

Item #1 on What are the good things to look forward to from global warming.

Re:For just... (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253516)

The waters aren't receding.

Re:For just... (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253572)

I thought global warming caused the oceans to rise...?

Re:For just... (0)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253740)

The oceans have been rising since the last ice age, and if you look at graph of past 10,000 years, there were thousands of years where it was rising at a much faster rate than now. But alarmists look at inhabited places essentially at sea level and get alarmed when they get overrun with water. Those places were doomed anyway, just as more of them will certainly be.

News is spam (maybe) (4, Informative)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252642)

From one of the comments on the linked site:

On the video it says "Actually the one that we looked at on display was only 16GB but the technology behind that particular 16GB stick is capable of scaling to 2 Terabytes." In other words they'll have to wait years for smaller manufacturing processes to occur before a 2 TB drive is made.

I cannot watch the video to verify it.. but if true, then the news is as good as spam

Re:News is spam (maybe) (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252742)

I used to sell floppy disks on the same principle -- the disks really only held 120k, but since the technology of reading data from a magnetized disk scales to higher densities, I'd sell them at 200MB floppies. People would sometimes bring the disks back and demand a refund because they got write errors after the first 120k, but I just pointed out to them that the problem wasn't the disks, it was the drive. It was a great business for a while.

Re:News is spam (maybe) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253258)

You are damn lucky you didn't sell one of them to the DA's wife.

Re:News is spam (maybe) (1)

RatherBeAnonymous (1812866) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252852)

I watched the video. That is what the reporter said. I'm guessing that someone off camera told her that the technology could scale to a theoretical or estimated 2 Terabytes. At only 16GB I can hardly see the point of putting it on a USB 3.0 interface, except as a proof of concept.

Re:News is spam (maybe) (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253030)

Of course it can scale up to 2 TB. Just put enough chips in a 3.5" enclosure with a USB 3.0 dongle...Nobody ever says that the 2 TB version will fit into the thumb drive form factor except the headline writer.

What a f-ed up reporting job by both Tom's HW and Slashdot. I expect better.

Re:News is spam (maybe) (2)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252894)

Something like that...

The video says they're waiting for the USB3.0 spec to be finalized before they can release a product.

If a 2TB version is available, why wait? Why not make a USB2.0 version of it?

Re:News is spam (maybe) (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253534)

Because at USB2 speed, you could never practically use all the data.

Re:News is spam (maybe) (1)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252900)

You are correct, the video just assumes 2TB sticks, why USB 3.0 is linked to this capacity as well, I do not know.

Anything for hype I guess.

Re:News is spam (maybe) (4, Interesting)

jimmyswimmy (749153) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253056)

As of right now the largest FLASH I can find is a 512 Gb unit from Micron (MT29F512G08CUCABH3-12) in a 100 ball LBGA. Couldn't find that package description but maybe a similar one is 9x15.5mm dimension. You'll need more than 32 of these to get to 2 TB, plus a couple of controller ICs.

In short, with tomorrow's technology (what Micron is still developing), you will need a 6" long stick, covered with ICs on both sides. This will not be an inexpensive device for at least a few years.

Cool. (1)

MetalliQaZ (539913) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252644)

USB3 devices exist. Thumb drives exist. multi-TB drives exist. With enough money, you could have all three. I looks expensive. Cool toy, though.

Re:Cool. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253160)

I looks expensive.

Have you seen your ass?

(Score:-1, FAIL)

They aren't actually selling a 2TB flash drive (1)

Ryxxui (1108965) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252662)

From the comments on TFA: On the video it says "Actually the one that we looked at on display was only 16GB but the technology behind that particular 16GB stick is capable of scaling to 2 Terabytes." In other words they'll have to wait years for smaller manufacturing processes to occur before a 2 TB drive is made. Well, of course we'll have 2TB flash drives someday. Submitter and Tom's didn't actually watch the video before using this headline.

Compression? (1)

bigredradio (631970) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253348)

I wonder if they intend to incorporate an on-chip compression mechanism. In that case, if I have 2TB of text files or sparse files, it might compress down to 16GB. Doubtful, but in theory it could "scale" to that.

Excuse me (2)

paiute (550198) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252690)

Have you seen my Library of Congress? I dropped it around here somewhere.

lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253054)

Hahaha. That was really funny. Someone please moderate it as such. My sides are still hurting. Hahaha. Ha.

I was expecting someone to comment how this fit his entire pron collection, all the MPAA movies for a year, or all the various Firefox release for this year, but I was not expecting a LoC storage capacity joke.

You sir, are full of win. You have raised the standard by which future funny posts will be evaluated. If only CmdrTaco could see us now!

Re:lol (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253724)

No, it's waaay funnier the way you do it.

Re:Excuse me (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253396)

Here... use mine...

What market does this target? (4, Interesting)

Hadlock (143607) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252696)

What market does this target? In the past, removable solid state media like CF cards and SD cards (mostly CF cards) were well taken by professional photographers because it meant they could fit more pictures on a single memory card, which meant as long as their battery lasted, they could continue working uninterrupted.
 
I think everyone here agrees that the 2GB-8GB flash drive/thumb drive has completely replaced the floppy drive in this decade. People are still leery about keeping important data on a thumb drive for long periods of time, either due to ease of loss or possible read/write problems down the road (cue the know-it-all slashdotter telling me that they've solved all those problems despite continued miniaturization throughout the last half-decade.)
 
So who are these for? Eventually the 2TB thumb drives are going to drop below $500, then below $150, and be mass produced for $99 or less during a Thanksgiving Black Friday Sale in our near future.
 
Blu-Ray is only 50-60GB completely maxed out. That's the biggest common media I can think of that consumers have access to these days. Even all of Wikipedia will fit in a 60gb rar archive. Databases are bigger than 2TB. Or if you want a better reference, the plans for the Deathstar are bigger than 2TB. I'm not sure your sysadmin would recommend you walk around with your company's (or Empire's) most important IP in your pocket where it might get lost.
 
I'm not trying to say 640KB is enough for anyone.... but is it? How much space do consumers really need for portable, temporary storage, vs enterprise use? And do you really want your enterprise data on a portable, corporate espionage-sized device?

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252806)

Yes, especially the Chinese (but they are far from being alone) would pretty like your enterprise data on a portable, corporate espionage-sized device, thank you.

Re:What market does this target? (1)

manoweb (1993306) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252832)

You are right, data storage is overrated. Things should be put in the "cloud"...

Re:What market does this target? (2)

jittles (1613415) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252846)

What do you think Princess Leia was sticking in to R2-D2 man? That was a thumb drive w/ those Death Star plans...

Re:What market does this target? (5, Funny)

choongiri (840652) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253100)

What do you think Princess Leia was sticking in to R2-D2 man?

I think that what a galactic princess sticks into her droid in private is none of your business.

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253588)

pegging?

Re:What market does this target? (1)

m50d (797211) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252864)

When we can store more full-quality (we're talking 2880p and probably 120fps) video on a single drive than you could ever want, then it's enough. But you yourself say there are databases bigger than 2TB out there; of course people are going to want to transport them. Honestly 8GB is plenty for most espionage purposes already.

Re:What market does this target? (1)

realityimpaired (1668397) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253104)

When we can store more full-quality (we're talking 2880p and probably 120fps) video

Why on earth would you want to store video at a resolution greater than the number of photoreceptors in the human eye? You've only got 6 or 7 million cones combined between the 3 colours in your eye, and even (good) 1080p is indistinguishable from reality at a distance of 10 feet. 2160p would be 4x the number of pixels of a 1080p screen, and more than a million pixels more than you have cones. And that's assuming you're able to use all 7 million cones at the same time, which you can't because of the chemical reactions that need to take place in the eye before a cone is refreshed.

I could see wanting to increase the framerate to reduce motion blur and avoid jitter (though most people can't see jitter at rates higher than 60Hz on an LCD), but the pixel density you're talking about is basically pointless, at least for consumer applications. We don't really need to increase the pixel density... if you want to improve the quality of the image at this point, you need to increase the amount of information that's stored in each pixel... things like luma, hue, contrast, and spin in addition to the traditional RGB values, but commercially available displays that can reproduce that kind of information are a decade off at best.

Pan and zoom (2)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253218)

Why on earth would you want to store video at a resolution greater than the number of photoreceptors in the human eye?

Control of pan and zoom at playback time, perhaps?

Re:Pan and zoom (1)

uncledrax (112438) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253492)

It's true, How else do you think those CSI folks are able to zoom in so much all the time?

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253512)

That makes no sense. All of those are tied to pixel size, not absolute resolution. On a 100' screen at 10 feet 1080p would look terrible. The ideal would be a display that does exceed human vision, we are no were near that today, if you are at the correct distance from the display.

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253542)

Why on earth would you want to store video at a resolution greater than the number of photoreceptors in the human eye? You've only got 6 or 7 million cones combined between the 3 colours in your eye, and even (good) 1080p is indistinguishable from reality at a distance of 10 feet.

I've never understood this argument, because eyes don't hold still - they move in saccades, allowing us to perceive more detail than a single "snapshot" image on the retina can absorb.

I can't find the article right now, but some researchers a while back did the same thing with a CCD, capturing a high-resolution image with a low-resolution sensor by vibrating it and interpolating the differences between frames.

Re:What market does this target? (1)

Megane (129182) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253570)

Why on earth would you want to store video at a resolution greater than the number of photoreceptors in the human eye?

So that CSI can zoom and enhance to read the license plates of that car that happened to drive by at the right moment.

Re:What market does this target? (1)

rickb928 (945187) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253448)

4320p/120fps is the grail, equivalent to Red Digital. After that, we're facing more-than-film quality, which some will buy, just not me. And already,there are prototypes beyond that [solidlystated.com] .

I know, IMAX in the home is the ultimate, until something else comes along. Sharp is already hitting that.

Re:What market does this target? (1)

vlm (69642) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252876)

People are still leery about keeping important data on a thumb drive for long periods of time, either due to ease of loss or possible read/write problems down the road (cue the know-it-all slashdotter telling me that they've solved all those problems despite continued miniaturization throughout the last half-decade.)

More like, for the last decade (not half decade), on roughly 3 month intervals, alternate between stories about how they fail at the drop of a hat, and stories about how they've fixed all the problems and they'll never fail again in the future nope never again.

So who are these for? Eventually the 2TB thumb drives are going to ... be mass produced for $99 or less

Sneaker-net once again becomes faster and more convenient than trading online. Imagine every star trek episode and movie from any series and all 12 hours of LotR and the Matrix movie (2+3 never happened, right?) and all the SW, indiana jones, and james bond movies all on a tiny keyring...

Copyright (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253232)

Imagine every star trek episode and movie from any series and all 12 hours of LotR and the Matrix movie (2+3 never happened, right?) and all the SW, indiana jones, and james bond movies all on a tiny keyring

It probably won't happen for another century because the copyright owners would object. Can you think of a scenario where data created by home users would top 2 TB?

Re:Copyright (-1, Flamebait)

Dog-Cow (21281) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253354)

I can.

A better scenario: Can you think of a situation where you aren't an unmitigated jackass?

Re:Copyright (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253434)

I can.

Please explain it.

Can you think of a situation where you aren't an unmitigated jackass?

I can: the situation in which you would have helped me stop acting like a donkey by giving advice in a polite manner.

Re:Copyright (2)

NatasRevol (731260) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253404)

A few weeks of HD video of your kids?

I have 2 boys playing hockey. If I'm obsessed, I video every practice, 3-4x per week, every game, 1-3x per week.

That's up to 14 hrs/week of HD video for 2 kids. At 11GB/hr, that's about 150GB per week.

Hockey season is 5 months long, or 20 weeks.

That's 3TB. Every season. For 10+ years.

I'm not obsessed like this, but there are LOTS of parents who are.

Re:Copyright (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253618)

because the copyright owners would object.

And, so what? Copyright holders were probably not too happy either when we traded music cassettes in the schoolyard...

Re:Copyright (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253766)

Were publishers in the mainstream media as ready to sue their own customers in the Compact Cassette era as they appear to be now (Capitol v. Thomas)?

Re:What market does this target? (1)

neokushan (932374) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253582)

To be fair, I think you could fit all that into 64GB, providing you're not talking about HD quality.

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252878)

60gb for wikipedia??? LOL maybe if you ONLY backed up one language. Most estimates are closer to 100TB

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252884)

I'm not trying to say 640KB is enough for anyone.... but is it? How much space do consumers really need for portable, temporary storage, vs enterprise use? And do you really want your enterprise data on a portable, corporate espionage-sized device?

Look at this from another point of view. With a 2 TB USB memory stick, I could easily put a backup of my home system in a safe deposit box.

Re:What market does this target? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252890)

Why would you ever want to leave anything at home if you could take it all with you? Dump your entire music collection on one of these and you never have to worry about which 64GB subset you want to bring with you.

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253022)

How many CD's do you own? 50 gig is nearly 800 CD's worth of mp3s ripped at a high rate... I know Ive done it...

Also if you can tell the difference between flac and high ripped mp3s on headphones without listening to them back to back I will eat my headphones.

Also the target market is people with video. I have 10TB of video in DVDs (yes I own that many).

Re:What market does this target? (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253636)

Hopefully you still keep a backup at home, or there goes your lifetime data collection if ever you get mugged...

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252904)

What if it is not intended for business customers (who probably can't carry company files around in portable drives anyway), but for home users who download tons of movies, porn, software and games. One of my close has already maxed out his 1 TB portable hard drive, and is looking to get another one. This sort of thing is quite common in many Asian countries.What if it is not intended for business customers (who probably can't carry company files around in portable drives anyway), but for home users who download tons of movies, porn and games. One of my close has already maxed out his 1 TB portable hard drive, and is looking to get another one.

Re:What market does this target? (1)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252938)

Video is the most likely consumer target for that much flash. As you point out, a whole wedding in hi-def will fit on 16 or 32GB so not much reason to spend an exorbitant amount to get more than that.

Back when DRAM was driving technology there were companies doing exotic stuff like putting multiple dies in a package or stacking packages to get double density. Could do something like that with flash -- put 32 64GB flash chips on a substrate and get 2 TB. It would be fantastically expensive, tho. For the consumer flash market it doesn't make sense to sell above the commodity price level.

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253020)

So who are these for? Eventually the 2TB thumb drives are going to drop below $500, then below $150, and be mass produced for $99 or less during a Thanksgiving Black Friday Sale in our near future.

I work at a medical research facility where we sequence DNA of various genes. We have researchers doing HPC generating 12 TB in one file for every run of their R statistical computational job.

2 TB would be very handy to ship data to remote collaborators instead of running an S/FTP transfer for a few days/weeks. Sometimes we currently use hard drives (using True Crypt where necessary), but flash has fewer/no moving parts that can break during shipment, which is useful for piece of mind. It's also usually smaller, so it's cheaper to ship (or, for the same price, you can ship it quicker).

BACKUP! (1)

DarthVain (724186) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253078)

Well I know I plan on backing up all my future data on easily portable and concealable high capacity thumb drives! I'll just have a drawer full of them!

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253214)

possible read/write problems down the road (cue the know-it-all slashdotter telling me that they've solved all those problems despite continued miniaturization throughout the last half-decade.)

It's more like they've never had any of these problems. Ok, they can develop write problems, because there's a limited number of rewrites. They fail safe though, you can never be left unable to read something off a flash drive short of physically damaging it (or if by 'down the road' you mean 30-something years without use). This includes the very first flash-based technologies and whatever else they do in the future as they miniaturize it. It's related to the physics of how they work.

Re:What market does this target? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253274)

A device with larger space, if used for backups and what-not, lends to "putting all your eggs in one basket". I had a 500gb drive a while back I used mostly for back-ups. Good thing, too, because the internal drives with the original data all eventually failed - unrecoverable by me. Accidents happen, though, and the 500gb got damaged. It's one thing to lose music, another thing to lose important school work - all the disparate kinds of data I was storing, should have been stored on separate media. I now backup to DVD for archive (and re-burn these every so often, I find DVD-Rs even if unused don't consistently last long enough to rely on.), an internal hdd, and an external hdd for the backed up DVD ISO's as well as individual files. I use a high capacity flash drive for transporting "backed up" files.

Re:What market does this target? (1)

Stray7Xi (698337) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253616)

One use would be to store media libraries. It could eliminate the need to decide which dvd's to bring because it could bring them all. Could bundle with a media player and even put an autorun frontend to select show. The kids go to grandmothers and have every movie/tv show they want.

How often do you end up somewhere and decide to watch a movie where it turns into find something on netflix.

Re:What market does this target? (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253634)

Smart phones, lap tops, tablets. Possible ever home computers. Nice and quite, and at USB 3 data transfer rates.

The next HD format is twice Blu-ray size, and will probably be closer to 2.5 times.

Yeah, what corporation would want their data on a HD that use a lot less energy, would require smaller server room, cheap to replace and could be easily locked up~

DVR tech would certainly improve. Every cable box and TV would have on. Console device would get smaller and use less energy.

I mean, even if you never use more the 500GB, the energy saving alone would make it worth it, eventually.

Of course, this doesn't actually exist, so none of that will happen.

Storage 'à la Gmail' (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253720)

Don't delete anything ever. There is one basic principle in domestic computers: you will never have enough disk space. Every fucking time I acquired a new hard disk several times bigger than the previous I thought it would enough... and it was. For a few months.

I've worked with disks from 20 MB to 2 TB the last I acquired. There is always something that leads you to need to acquire something bigger. My multimedia HD (2 TB) is already at nearly 80% of capacity, which basically means I will have to start deleting files from it soon. It won't be a drama, there are lots of movies or series that I won't care deleting, but if I don't need to, why should I care?

Don't get excited yet. (1)

whitedsepdivine (1491991) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252746)

First she shows a 16GB card, and only says that the technology supports 2TB. She never said they have one that exists or plans to release a 2TB version. Just that the technology supports it. It is like me saying a 64bit OS supports 8TB of RAM. It may happen in the future, but not any time soon.

Re:Don't get excited yet. (2)

beelsebob (529313) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253058)

A 64 bit OS supports 18 exa-bytes of RAM, it just happens most "64 bit OS"es, CPUs and chipsets we have today may use 64 bit pointers, but they tend to ignore the high 16 bits on them, resulting in support for up to a bit more than 200 terabytes in theory. Your point in general stands though.

Re:Don't get excited yet. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253436)

Why did they pick her as their rep when she's got circles under her eyes?

Sounds like vaporware to me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252754)

However, if it is or will be true in the near future, then that would be incredible. What would happen if you married this with the raspberry pi computer?

Re:Sounds like vaporware to me... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252808)

You'd have a raspberry pi computer with 2TB of storage.

Re:Sounds like vaporware to me... (1)

Smallpond (221300) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252954)

However, if it is or will be true in the near future, then that would be incredible. What would happen if you married this with the raspberry pi computer?

I think that's now legal in Iowa.

Lzip rizes from the dead? (1)

balbord (447248) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252760)

Hmmm. I thought Lzip was no more! Kudos for a unexpected development! Can't wait for hardware enabled >99.9% compression!

Hope they've ironed out the decompression bugs, though.

This makes me sick (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252772)

Do these technology companies have no shame? Don't they know that employees will put in some mission-critical and highly-sensitive documents and data files on these devices.
This will increase the impact of data disclosure incidents. E.g. someone places all Macromedia Directory video files on this stick. Goes to a bar. Takes out his wallet and the stick falls on the floor. BOOOOOOMMMMM! Major incident! It's all over the news!!!11

This concerns me greatly. Help me mitigate this risk by boycotting this vendor. They should at least make this device Open Source or make it available via the App Store where the developers are not constrained.

I don't even know how many Libraries of Congress this device will store so that I quantify the risk to senior management.

Thank you for your time.

Easy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252800)

Just increase the size of a finger to 4 in × 1 in × 5.75 in

Toms Hardware sucks (1)

Lunix Nutcase (1092239) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252840)

This article highlights exactly why Toms Hardware sucks so much for the better part of a decade. The video in no way says they have a 2TB thumb drive just that when the flash gets scaled down further it could support 2TB. And as always, the Slashtard "editors" make no effort to actually find any of this shit out before posting a misleading summary to a stupid and misleading article.

A rather crappy sales pitch, really (4, Informative)

damn_registrars (1103043) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252924)

I actually bothered to watch the video. She said "imagine this as 2tb", amongst other things. She finished with "the usb association hasn't finished 3.0 so we haven't released this product yet".

So really she was just selling what could happen, some day. She could have just as well promised 2pb or 2eb instead, and promised it inside a postage stamp.

So in summary:
  • It isn't 2tb
  • It isn't usb 3.0
  • You can't buy it

However

  • They managed to fool the slashdot editors and get on to the front page

Re:A rather crappy sales pitch, really (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253038)

I couldn't quite here on the video, but I think she said it supports Thunderbolt and Lightpeak as well with a 2.3 Gingerbread update coming after Toshiba and Verizon approve the firmware.

2Tb Filesystem limit :p (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252966)

Sure with a 2Tb FS limit it's a nice way to put how much data they can put on it.
It's a pity they didn't use Ext4... with Ext4, I can put 1 Eib on a micro SD!

I have no doubts 2TB is real (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37252978)

I am absolutely sure that they can make the 2TB drive. If you do some research, you can find the details on their proprietary write-only drive technology.

Re:I have no doubts 2TB is real (1)

rubycodez (864176) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253798)

they've advanced on the just the write-only part, now they can read endless zeroes too. Just think, an operating system and computer have been required to have a /dev/zero up to now, but now you can have a 1.936 T of /dev/zero plus 64GB of read/write in a miraculous little stick.

Liars, damned liars and marketing folks... (3, Informative)

gweihir (88907) | more than 3 years ago | (#37252996)

There is no 2TB drive. This is a 16GB with an _interface_ that could support 2TB. But wit present FLASH chips that cannot be fit into the case shown. May take another 5 years or more. Incidentally, old USB2.0 can already interface 2TB.

So this is really a rather nomal-sized 16GB USB3.0 stick, or in other words nothing special a all.

Consider the data transfer times... (3, Interesting)

Tsar (536185) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253206)

USB 3.0 supports a MAXIMUM throughput of 5.0Gbit/sec, and even at that insane rate it would take one hour (with 10% protocol overhead) to read or write two terabytes. We're lucky though; at USB 2.0's best rate it would take over 10 hours, with Full Speed USB 1.0 it would take 2½ weeks, and good old Original USB would literally take from now until late evening of January 14, 2012. Nostalgic for floppies? Using a fast backup program, you could do the job in 3½ years with 1.39 million 1.44MB coasters. Watch out for fridge magnets though!

Re:Consider the data transfer times... (1)

John Napkintosh (140126) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253374)

Yeah, 2TB would take too long to read/write at even at USB 3.0 speeds, so we should even bother being excited about the idea of a high-capacity, fast, small form factor removable storage device. Because everyone who will use it will always read or write a full 2TB at a time.

China Sticks - painfully slow (2)

MindPrison (864299) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253352)

It's an old but clever China Hack.

I worked for a merchandise company, I was the graphic artist, and had to design numerous USB-memory sticks in all shapes, beer bottles, dolls, ice-cream...you name it, fun stuff to... but there's where the fun ended:

Most of the cheaper sticks we got from China was fakes all the way, but they where SMART fakes. Yes, they where re-programmed 1-8 gb sticks, sold as 16-32 gb sticks back then, but programmed in a way so you...the user...never would find out that they're fakes, how? you may ask... ...simple and smart - the more you load onto the stick, the slower it will operate, the nearer you come it's actual size limit, the slower it will add files, at first...most people don't suspect a thing, they just think...oh what a slow stick...bummer...but it works, and let's face it...the average user NEVER exceed 1-8 gb with their personal stuff, you think average joe runs around with a collection of DVDs on their sticks... NO! Take it from me...I've delivered THOUSANDS of these sticks in all varieties to all companies, big or small....we get VERY few returns despite this.

I know...because I just took a look at the boss of our company, he uses those sticks at work too...of course...we use what we sell, but he didn't discover a single thing, but I could hear him swear and curse the memory stick or the computers for being too slow... ...and it took me AGES to explain to my non technical boss that this was a programming trick inside the memory stick, he just couldn't understand how that was done, he said...but it's 32GB LOOK...and then he'd take the time to show me the properties of the drive etc...specs...etc...oh dear...all over again.

And he's an advanced user, what do you think the average joes out there figures out. Nothing!!! And the China factories gets away with it ALL THE TIME!

Re:China Sticks - painfully slow (1)

bkmoore (1910118) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253480)

An acquaintance imports and sells garlic and other spices. He tried importing from China a couple of times, but always got burned. Shipments came late or not at all and what did come he was not able to sell. He gave up on China. China is probably ok if you have deep pockets or have family connections in the right place. Otherwise it's buyer beware.

Re:China Sticks - painfully slow (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37253598)

This guy I was chatting on IRC sells t-shirts and stopped importing them from China due to the lack of quality control, especially typos in the graphics even when they supplied the graphics. He mentions that once he order 1,000 units with a dolphin splashing in the ocean that said "Venice Beach, FL". It came back with a picture of a sad kitten with the caption "Capitalism corrupts". He wasn't able to sell even half of them.

I'd buy that for a dollar! (1)

Thud457 (234763) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253818)

a picture of a sad kitten with the caption "Capitalism corrupts".

Dude, hook me up!

Same as SDXC (2)

JStyle (833234) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253454)

The latest version of SD cards (XC) also have the capacity to scale to 2TB.

"SDXC, the latest SD memory card standard, dramatically improves consumers’ digital lifestyles by increasing storage capacity from more than 32 GB up to 2 TB." Source: https://www.sdcard.org/developers/tech/sdxc [sdcard.org]

Move along, nothing to see here.

Has:I think that word does not mean what you think (1)

padplaygames (2450142) | more than 3 years ago | (#37253584)

I think that word does not mean what you think it means The title "New USB 3.0 Flash Drive Has 2 TB of Storage" is blatantly wrong. Unless the word "Has" has suddenly changed meaning in the English language.
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