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James Gosling Leaves Google

Soulskill posted more than 3 years ago | from the just-stopping-by dept.

Google 192

scottbomb writes "Well, that didn't take long: 'After only a few months at Google, Java founder James Gosling has left the search engine giant to go to a small startup company specializing in ocean-based robotics.' In a brief blog post about his new company, Gosling says, 'They have a growing fleet of autonomous vehicles that roves the ocean collecting data from a variety of onboard sensors and uploading it to the cloud. The robots have a pile of satellite uplink/GSM/WiMax communication gear and redundant GPS units. They have a bunch of deployments. For example, one is a set of robots patrolling the ocean around the Macondo well in the Gulf of Mexico monitoring water chemistry. These craft harvest energy from the waves for propulsion and can stay at sea for a very long time. The longest that one craft has been out is 2.5(ish) years. They can cross oceans.... Slowly. They only move at 1-2 knots, which is a great speed for data collection.'"

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Departing Letter to Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37259994)

Dear Google,

I believed you were different, but I was wrong.

Sincerely,
James Gosling

Boy, he really knows how to pick 'em.

Re:Departing Letter to Google (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261552)

Yeah, that's nice and all, but check out my doubles.

Anti-Skynet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260020)

Well, I can't say a fleet of autonomous robots roaming the world running Java would be a good thing...

But the Skynet scenario will be pretty much impossible at this point.

Re:Anti-Skynet? (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260056)

I've got some bad news for you about certain improvements made to the speed and efficiency of the garbage collection algorithm...

Re:Anti-Skynet? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260856)

Doesn't matter how much garbage you collect if everyone keeps forgetting to change the startup flags from the default of -XxxmMmfmmFMmmB 28.992 so you can use more than a few dozen megs

Re:Anti-Skynet? (1)

517714 (762276) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261334)

Not anti-SkyNet [lornameadna.com]

If we're going to follow this guy around 24x7 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260058)

... shouldn't we be using twitter instead of /.?

SkyNet (3, Funny)

Niomosy (1503) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260070)

At least we can take comfort in the robots likely getting a java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space error.

Re:SkyNet (1)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260112)

I doubt Gosling has problems managing memory in Java.

Re:SkyNet (3, Informative)

_xeno_ (155264) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260188)

I doubt Gosling has problems managing memory in Java.

I dunno, you've never run into the more infamous "java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: PermGen space"?

This is the error that's generated when the Java VM itself (well, the classloader, I guess) runs out of memory.

Because, unlike Java code itself, the Java classloader never frees memory it uses, which means that if you use a class briefly on startup, that code itself will be kept in memory indefinitely and never freed.

Which wouldn't matter as much, if there weren't this special "PermGen" space that used to default to 1MB. (It's slowly been increased as the versions go on and the size of Java programs continued to bloat, I think the default is now something like 16MB and can, as of five years ago, be user-set via a command line parameter.)

So what does this have to do with SkyNet? Well, if it's written in Java, it will run out of PermGen space well before its self-modifying code can accomplish anything.

And, given that PermGen space is never freed, apparently James Gosling does have problems managing memory in Java.

Re:SkyNet (5, Informative)

binarylarry (1338699) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260434)

PermGen is gone in newer versions of Java.

Re:SkyNet (1)

Dwonis (52652) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261264)

What newer version? It's still there in Java 6.

Re:SkyNet (2)

pavon (30274) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261318)

Larry is right. I have had to deal with this at work. Our applications create machine generated code, which is compiled and then loaded. I don't know about Java 1.7, but in 1.6 the default garbage collector does unload these classes when there are no more instances of them. The concurrent garbage collector doesn't by default but you can pass the "-XX:+CMSClassUnloadingEnabled" flag to the JVM to enable it.

Re:SkyNet (3, Informative)

GodfatherofSoul (174979) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260922)

Correct me if I'm wrong, but while the JVM doesn't free memory, it does recycle memory from it's allocated space. So, just because you might have accumulated the max memory your JVM might allocate, that doesn't mean your app isn't releasing memory back to the JVM. Kind of like super fetch except allocation is passive.

Re:SkyNet (1)

dshk (838175) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261048)

I wonder how this post could be moderated informative. It is simply not true. If you have thought about that it is possible to reload Java web applications, then you would see yourself that the permanent generation is garbage collected as well. However, everybody experiences that it is hard to do well in practice, often the culprit is a third-party library. But I agree with grandparent, if somebody, James Gosling can do it right.

Re:SkyNet (0)

_xeno_ (155264) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261242)

If you have thought about that it is possible to reload Java web applications, then you would see yourself that the permanent generation is garbage collected as well.

Uh, that right there is the number one way to generate a "java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: PermGen space" error - reloading web applications. The number one cause of that error is when trying to run a Java web server that runs out of PermGen space because the classes loaded into it are never freed.

And I can guarantee that this bug isn't solved in the latest version of Java 1.6, because it still happens to me fairly frequently while writing Java web applications. As far as I know, the only solution is to increase the size of the PermGen space.

This is not a new problem and I still encounter it almost daily, so if you have a solution that magically fixes Java so that reloading web applications doesn't eat up all the PermGen space, I'd love to know about it!

Re:SkyNet (2)

dshk (838175) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261282)

I do not know a solution. But I know that Apache Tomcat developers made an effort to eliminate all class loading leaks from Tomcat itself, moreover in the last versions there is a mechanism in Tomcat which tries to detect and log possible class leak issues. It indeed show a few problems in my code.

Re:SkyNet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261420)

given that PermGen space is never freed

Not true. PermGen space is freed when a classloader is garbage collected.

Re:SkyNet (1)

Ossifer (703813) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260274)

I'm still wondering why I can't -Xmx"as much as you bloody well need"...

Re:SkyNet (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260692)

I'm still wondering why I can't -Xmx"as much as you bloody well need"...

It's the joy of garbage collection. If you did that then your system would run out of RAM whenever you ran two Java programs at the same time.

Oracle? (4, Interesting)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260084)

Makes you wonder if the whole Oracle patent shitstorm around Java is making Google reconsider its reliance on that technology. If so, would be interesting to see what they bring forth instead.

Fail Troll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260140)

3/10

Troll harder next time.

Re:Oracle? (1)

JianTian13 (525365) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260144)

http://golang.org/ [golang.org] ?

Re:Oracle? (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260186)

Go is an interesting language, but there hasn't been much effort from Google to provide adequate tooling for it so far (IDE, debugging etc). Also, its lack of generics in this day and age is quite surprising - even Java had those.

Re:Oracle? (1)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260382)

Add more and more junk like generics and you'll end with languages as byzantine as C++ or Java.

KISS.

Re:Oracle? (2)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260424)

Add more and more junk like generics and you'll end with languages as byzantine as C++ or Java.

Java is a "byzantine language", really? You must be a C coder if you seriously think so.

KISS.

Keep it Simple and Slow? ~

Re:Oracle? (2, Informative)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260704)

Java is a "byzantine language", really? You must be a C coder if you seriously think so.

I'd say Linus Torvalds described this well enough.

KISS.

Keep it Simple and Slow? ~

Well, we're talking about Java vs C...

Seriously, there's a bad trend among some "modern" languages of piling up constructs without regards for efficiency, simplicity or sanity. For example, you can write a non-optimized compiler for languages I'd call sane in a week while for some a team in five years can't be expected to fully implement the standard. There is not a single compliant compiler of C++, and for Java it's only because of a skewed definition of "compliant" Sun has. And if you can't write a compiler reliably, how can you program in it?

The language with best balance between simplicity and featuritis I know is LPC. It has things sorely missing in C, like strings (something that C++ scrrewed in epic ways...), refcounted structures (arrays, mappings), closures, rudimentary OOP.

I did not get to learn golang yet, but it looks promising. I do have a bit of beef with some details, but nothing that'd make me vomit.

Re:Oracle? (2)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260838)

Seriously, there's a bad trend among some "modern" languages of piling up constructs without regards for efficiency, simplicity or sanity.

You have a point with respect to C++, though I think that's precisely what makes it invaluable for certain tasks - sometimes you do have a team that knows what they're doing, and they can do it so much better with that pile of features.

But what about generics that makes you lump them into the same category? Efficiency? - but C++ std::sort will beat qsort any day precisely because all polymorphism there is compile-time, and can be fully optimized. Simplicity? Granted, C++ templates are very complicated, but e.g. C# has a much simpler model for generics (it's also correspondingly feature-limited, but it covers most common cases like generic collections and algorithms well) which could be easily ported on top of C. Sanity? I'd argue that it's insane to have a statically, strongly typed language where all that strong typing goes out of the window, and you start scattering casts all over the code, the moment you start dealing with rich collections rather than atomic values or arrays.

Actually, my long-standing wish was to have well-designed generics added to C in a clean way. I'd take something like OCaml functors as a model for that - they're fully type safe, and also have to be explicitly instantiated before use; they cover all practical use cases; and they can be optimized as well as the corresponding manually written (separately for each instantiation) strongly typed code.

Another thing I'd kill for in C is a limited form of RAII, namely scope guards - the ability to say at any given point, "when the scope ends, run this before leaving it". So that you could do something like "FILE* f = fopen(); cleanup { fclose(f); }", and know that the handle is properly closed on all code paths, regardless of "return" or "goto" or whatnot.

Re:Oracle? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260452)

Go is interesting, but there are a couple things that turn me off. One is the optional semi-colon and required indent rules. And the Go-routines are interesting, but they should have studied up on erlang message passing.

Re:Oracle? (4, Interesting)

dudpixel (1429789) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261338)

Are you surprised?

Google is pretty poor at supporting anything longer than a week past the initial launch date.

The whole Google business model appears to go like this:
1. Invent cool tech
2. Make it into an awesome product. Functional, and working, but not finished.
3. Dump it on the public (as a "beta") with a half-hearted launch effort.
4. Start on next project.

For GMail - it worked, partially because a functional product is really all most of us want.

Search is one of the few projects they continually work on - because its what makes them money.

For many of their projects, including Google+, they fail because Google fails at marketing and seeing a project through. Have a look at how Apple launch a product, compared to Google. Apple are often still telling us how wonderful they are even years later, while Google seems to forget about its own achievements after a week.

I like Google - I use many of their services, and have and Android phone + tablet and develop Android apps...but its just plain disappointing to see how little effort is put into their products post-launch. I'm specifically talking about marketing effort, as I'm sure they are working hard behind the scenes.

Re:Oracle? (2)

Digi-John (692918) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261406)

I have helped write non-trivial programs in Go. It's quite pleasant. I think the big reason Google hasn't bothered to provide "adequate tooling" is the developers. That is, I think many of the creators and big users prefer to just work with a plain text editor rather than an IDE. There's a reasonably decent Emacs mode for Go, but it's readable enough without any syntax highlighting, and gofmt will fix your indentation and such for you. As for the debugger, well, there's http://blog.golang.org/2010/11/debugging-go-code-status-report.html [golang.org] (very old but even then they already had GDB support going), but as the first line says, "When it comes to debugging, nothing beats a few strategic print statements to inspect variables or a well-placed panic to obtain a stack trace", which is all I ever used to debug my Go code--and found it reasonably painless! Oh, and regarding generics--I'm not sure they'll ever go in. It is proposed CONSTANTLY on the mailing list, and Pike et al always indicate that they're not interested.

Re:Oracle? (2)

khr (708262) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260506)

... If so, would be interesting to see what they bring forth instead.

Dunno, maybe they'll switch to Forth as their language... That'd be pretty cool...

Re:Oracle? (4, Funny)

lennier (44736) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260802)

Dunno, maybe they'll switch to Forth as their language... That'd be pretty cool...

FORTH GO MULTIPLY AND

Re:Oracle? (1)

JamesP (688957) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260896)

IMHO slightly better than

(AND (MULTIPLY (GO (LISP))))

blah blah slashdot filter mary had a little lamb

Re:Oracle? (1)

Eponymous Coward (6097) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260540)

If I were an expert kremlinologist, I would think that you are suggesting Google will dump Java for Forth.

Re:Oracle? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261510)

I got it!

I take out Gosling's trash (1, Funny)

TheModelEskimo (968202) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260092)

It would be cool if they had a job opening for like, a janitor. I'll bet there would be some incredibly bright programmers applying for that janitor position. :-)

(Only annoyance: Manual garbage collection)

P.S. your logo is straight out of a Saturday morning cartoon

Re:I take out Gosling's trash (1)

supaneko (1019638) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260346)

His logo looks stoned................man.

Re:I take out Gosling's trash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260364)

Logo?

Who's logo? Can you link to a jpeg or png of it or something?

Re:I take out Gosling's trash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260634)

Who is logo? Can you point to where anyone said logo was a person, and why would you call him "something"?

Re:I take out Gosling's trash (2)

qxcv (2422318) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261148)

Linky [nighthacks.org]

(From here [nighthacks.com] )

Re:I take out Gosling's trash (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260534)

Matt Damon beat you to it. [youtube.com]

hmm (3, Interesting)

nomadic (141991) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260094)

Definitely sounds a lot more interesting than working at Google.

Re:hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260128)

Definitely sounds a lot more interesting than working at Google.

It's a geek's wet dream - well, if it had beautiful naked girls in it too.

Back to the business programming for me: data in, data out, data update, data delete, data sort, data report, *snore*

Re:hmm (1)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260232)

> data in, data out, data update, data delete, data sort, data report,

sounds like a typical use case for a robot scanning the oceans...

Re:hmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261444)

Definitely sounds a lot more interesting than working at Google.

You Right ...

Underwater Street View? (1)

Kylon99 (2430624) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260126)

Maybe once they've started gathering data, they can share it with Google, and I can drag that Street View icon into the ocean and see what life is like down there...

Or not.

Re:Underwater Street View? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260898)

The could actually implement that now. Just throw a bunch of black tiles on top of topography data. BAM! Google Ocean View.

Or were you expecting to actually see something below 100 ft?

Re:Underwater Street View? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261038)

Or were you expecting to actually see something below 100 ft?

Not really; I'd probably have drowned after the first few feet.

... just like Java (5, Funny)

ccr (168366) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260142)

The first thing that popped out as I glanced through the post was:

"They can cross oceans.... Slowly. They only move at 1-2 knots, which is a great speed for data collection."

And I thought to myself, "slowly? .. well, it's father of Java, after all."

Re:... just like Java (1)

DCFusor (1763438) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260252)

Yeah, a couple knots is all Java can keep up with (if that). That garbage collection really screws up anything with realtime involved. On top of the basic slowness, that is. It's a great excuse for hardware designers to overbuild everything with tons of buffers, though.

Re:... just like Java (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260550)

Did Java fuck your mom or something?

Re:... just like Java (0)

xaoslaad (590527) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260904)

Sysadmins are just sick of being fucked by java in general. You need jvm 1.4 for this 1.5 for that 1.6 for yet another app and soon we can add 1.7 to the monkey fucking. No 3 apps work with the same version. And forget using an IBM jre in place of a sun jre or vice versa. Q opening every jnlp with a different javaws and opening your browser with a different version of the plugin. And fuck tour life if youre going to try to load virtual media shitware from a drac imm rsa mm or ilo - nope go find a tar.gz or ff and use a 32-bit jvm in a clusterfuck setupmthat just shouldnt have to exist. Yes we get fucked by java all too much. Probably our moms too.

Now i took a java course in college and from that perspective it is great. But as a syadmin and not a developer it's a flat out pain in my nut sack.

Re:... just like Java (3, Interesting)

Miamicanes (730264) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261060)

Honestly, JVM hell is caused more by Sun's shitty documentation on how to properly specify JVM versions in a manifest or applet CLSID. Sun historically did a crap job of explaining how to specify things like, "Use the newest version of Java installed on this machine, as long as it's 1.6 (or 1.5, or 1.4) or newer", and instead gave examples that induced people to create needless dependencies on old versions of Java for no real reason besides lack of proper documentation. The fact that Oracle now owns Java makes things worse, because Oracle software was historically the worst of all about creating stupid dependencies on old versions of Java for no real reason (or because for political reasons, they wanted you to use the "thick" OCI drivers that tied you down to a specific runtime environment instead of the "thin" type 4 drivers that would "just work" on anything with a JVM).

The truth is, as long as an Oracle native-code database driver isn't involved and the developer doesn't go out of his or her way to needlessly specify some specific, arbitrary version of Java, 99.999% of anything you write in Java will work on any JVM that's as least as new as the one you compiled it under. I have 9 year old jarfiles built with pre-alpha 1.4 JDKs that still work fine under 1.6.0.${whatever}.

True story: at work, we had a notorious internal application whose development team bent over backwards to make users with newer JDKs and JREs installed miserable. Basically, it used the CLSID that told the JPI, "ignore the user's Java control panel settings, and always use the latest version of Java installed on this machine". Then, a few HTML lines later, used Javascript to commit suicide if that version of Java happened to be newer than 1.6.0.18. Sigh.

Re:... just like Java (1)

DiegoBravo (324012) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261104)

For server apps I haven't had any issue when going to the last official Sun JVM (of course, avoiding the first and buggy releases like the 1.7.0 and other jre vendors.) IMO the technical issues were frequent up to the 1.3 days. The real problem I had was related to the JVM app vendor "certified version" which forced us to carry several versions at times. Of course, that's not a Java problem per se. For example, exactly the same issues arise about the operating system version. Fortunately I never had a vendor requiring C99 libs which potentially could conflict C90 apps.

BTW I totally agree about the plugin issues; seems like Sun screwed the thing for ever.

Re:... just like Java (1)

dshk (838175) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261182)

I accept that what you wrote is your experience. In the last 10 years I had no problems with upgrading Java from 1.2 to 1.3, 1.4, 1.5 and then 1.6 for our web application. I also used several versions of Apache Tomcat, even the predecessor of it, Apache JServ and another one, I don't even remember. It runs both on Windows and Linux. I never had to change a single line because of the upgrades. For me it was really a "write once, run everywhere" experience. With our client application, there are occasional problems with some specific Java bugfix versions on some client computers, but the client has a few hundred thousands deployment base.

Re:... just like Java (1)

codepunk (167897) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261492)

Not this sysadmin, I frigging love java it is the greatest platform in existence. Not really it is rather damn stupid to run a vm to abstract the hardware when everyone runs it on the same architecture.

The real reason I love it is it takes a ass ton of hardware to run even the most simplistic applications. It may be a pain in my nut sack but my wallet frigging loves java.

Re:... just like Java (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260918)

What in the holy fuck are you talking about you ass hat! Go back to your Ars comment addiction and get the hell out of here.

quit saying the cloud (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260172)

unless the entire fucking thing sits in your couple of boxes at the lab where the data is actually going.

Re:quit saying the cloud (1)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260314)

It's a startup maybe they are really using the cloud...

Re:quit saying the cloud (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260748)

first of there is no "the cloud" theres google's cloud apples cloud amazon's cloud ubuntu's cloud the cloud is meaningless

Re:quit saying the cloud (1)

ThatsMyNick (2004126) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260902)

Okay, make that "a cloud". Now it could be anybody's cloud. Happy?

Re:quit saying the cloud (1)

ls671 (1122017) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261016)

Nowadays, almost every big provider is using the word "cloud" to offer small to medium companies managed services and they even propose it to bigger corporations. "The cloud" is a lot more convenient for them because it means that you do not know where your data is located.

As for "the cloud is meaningless", well not exactly, it is just less precise. You could say:
-The Ford engine blew up
-The Mercedes-Benz engine blew up
or just: The engine blew up

Same for the cloud:
-The Google cloud
-The Amazon cloud
or just: the cloud

Plus what is telling you they do not have peering agreement to use each other resources and both save money on operating cost ? ;-)
http://xkcd.com/908/ [xkcd.com]

What do you wanna bet... (4, Interesting)

interval1066 (668936) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260194)

...that the REAL reason Gosling left was because the google execs were like "Ok Jimmy, here's your office, lets tuck you in... all nice and comfy? Good... now just rest here until we need you." I think the coolness of having the inventor of Java trolling 'round the office was greater than any expectation that he'd actually invent something for Google.

Re:What do you wanna bet... (1)

Bing Tsher E (943915) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260248)

My theory is that he needed a place of refuge after Larry's barbarians took over his company. For someone of Gosling's standing, a short term job at Google could be used as a lateral move. So he took the time to figure out what he really wanted to do and has now found it.

Google gains from the prestige of having hired him, and now he's free to do what he really wanted.

Re:What do you wanna bet... (5, Interesting)

martin-boundary (547041) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260430)

I doubt it. If you read Gosling interviews from the past few years, one of the ideas he likes to talk about a lot over and over is embedding millions of sensors into the world - in roads, walls, etc. Tiny little bugs that measure something, which can be combined into a completely novel picture of the world.

That's not really what Google does, they're an advertising company whose primary inputs are words and human behaviours.

The first is closer to hands on lab work, while the second is pure data munging, and my impression is Gosling's not that interested in the latter.

Re:What do you wanna bet... (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260466)

Mod this man informative!

Re:What do you wanna bet... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261316)

See, mods! This is what happens when you get this confused with that.

Re:What do you wanna bet... (4, Interesting)

TubeSteak (669689) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261164)

I was in Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD) a few months ago and sitting right behind me was a salesman from Liquid Robotics* giving his pitch to a potential client.

I'll admit, I listened in. The technology he was describing sounded amazing.
Alternative solutions are crazy expensive or have limited range/loitering/real-time capabilities,
while this thing can stay out more or less indefinitely if you pay for a big enough battery pack.

I recall something that a quick google search doesn't turn up in any articles:
The salesman mentioned that Liquid Robotics keeps their costs down by contracting fishing boats to drop off and pick up the Wave Gliders. Because, while you could wait for it to come home at 1.5 knots/hr, it's a lot faster (and not very expensive) to have it swim to/from a spot that someone was going to be at anyways.

By the time I had to leave, I was ready to buy one and I don't even need it.
I seriously feel that their technology is going to be the future of unattended oceanographic research
and if I had a million dollars to invest, I would.

*I never actually caught the name of the company, but from the /. summary, I immediately recognized the technology being described.

Re:What do you wanna bet... (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261218)

Tiny little bugs that measure something, which can be combined into a completely novel picture of the world.

Google doesn't do it yet at full scale, they're an advertising company whose primary inputs are words and human behaviours.

FTFY (remember Google maps with satellite pictures?)

Re:What do you wanna bet... (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261224)

Money can corrupt one's vision of what they really want in life. Once he figures out how much money he can earn by scanning and selling side scan bathymetry data, he'll make a killing reselling this to the oil and gas industry. But then again, I suspect that's his real goal. The Gulf of Mexico is rather convenient isn't it? Not that it hasn't already been mapped before, but high resolution data that's up-to-date is always in demand.

Re:What do you wanna bet... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260432)

What did you expect Gosling to magically produce at [insert_company]? Language inventors aren't known for creativity. Most spend their life energy on a personal quest for the programmer's Holy Grail. Compare him to a counterpart, Bjarne Stroustrup. Bjarne knows the finer details of C++ better than anyone. But compared to other renowned C++ programmers, Bjarne is not considered a brilliant C++ programmer by many.

Re:What do you wanna bet... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260438)

Speaking of trolling, I think both parties were mutually interested in trolling Oracle.

Re:What do you wanna bet... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260446)

The image of Larry, Sergey, and Eric tucking "Jimmy" Gosling into his retirement-home-ish office / bedroom / pasture is pretty funny. Thanks for that.

100% on his own project, the downside? (1)

perpenso (1613749) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260464)

So you are saying the normal Google employee gets to work on what they want 20% of the time but Gosling would get to work on what he wants 100% of the time in his comfy Google office, what is the downside you care claiming for him to be at Google? :-)

Yay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260270)

Maybe now people will forget he ever did anything with computers and kick Java to the curb.
It was nothing special back in '95 when I first looked at it and it's nothing special now.

Can we all please move on?

Re:Yay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260840)

I guess we can't all be prodigious creators of excellence like you...

Re:Yay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261322)

No, you can't.
I've written the graphics back-ends for numerous console games that have sold millions of copies.
Back in '95 the V.P. of the division asked me to evaluate it to see if the company needed to jump on it.
My response after doing some research was "It's just another programming language. If we care about things it's good at we should use it, but we don't."
That was back when I was doing the streaming AV engine for kids games, writing custom codecs for video compression.

I'm no Knuth, t but I've designed and written some pretty amazing things in the last twenty four years.

Re:Yay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261544)

Good for you. Don't be a douchebag about it.

Re:Yay (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261010)

Here here! Anyone with half a brain knows Ruby is the future of programming. It does everything faster and with more precision and expressiveness than any other language. Java, C/C++, Python, all these idiotic moron languages that are too complex for anyone to understand properly will fall by the wayside as Ruby takes over.

Gosling leaving? (3, Funny)

the_humeister (922869) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260336)

So, that means Kate is staying then?

No change (3, Funny)

jdavidb (449077) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260440)

Now he's just doing Google Streetview underwater!

Re:No change (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260656)

I understand the "growing fleet of autonomous vehicles that roves the ocean collecting data" is going to be gathering and storing wifi data.

Too evil: (1)

Hartree (191324) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260486)

"Gosling has left the building!"

gold in them there oceans (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260508)

Imagine autonomous undersea robots scanning the ocean floor for the 1000's of sunken vessels long unreachable by treasure hunters. At $2000+ an ounce one of those little robots could earn it's keep by finding just one bar of gold....

Re:gold in them there oceans (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260702)

I think you are highly optimistic and don't really have a clue about how expensive these things are to run. You think it's going to bring the gold up for you? Then who will? And what about the other robots that find nothing? Do these robots got that deep? What if someone else hacks them and finds that gold before you do? And why did you write it is when its is what you needed?

Is this the guy from... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260520)

...Jon & Kate Plus 8? Man I'm gonna miss him in that show, he was the most talented member!

Follow the money! (1)

Anachragnome (1008495) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260722)

It could be he simply realized there was more money in creating off-the-shelf technologies before the Navy does it themselves, and simply contracting out his little data-sniffers for huge sums.

UAVs(Unmanned Aquatic Vehicle), anyone?

The Water Cycle - Smart (1)

Master Moose (1243274) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260730)

"They have a growing fleet of autonomous vehicles that roves the ocean collecting data from a variety of onboard sensors and uploading it to the cloud"

Utilising the natural formation of clouds from the ocean. Collecting it again no doubt when it rains.

Imagine the future where we can all harness this sort of force of nature. I cant wait for the (bit)torrential downloads. Irene will be nothing.

Autonomous data-collecting robots. (1)

devphaeton (695736) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260738)

I don't blame him. The robots sound like an awesome project, IMHO. When I was a kid (say 11 or 12, so mid-1980s) I used to dream of something similar. I drew up all kinds of plans and pictures and routes of autonomous robotic water craft that would run on sea water and traverse the Pacific ocean from my home state to Japan and back.

Were I him, I would be all up in this stuff. Just saying.

Re:Autonomous data-collecting robots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37260784)

If you still want to build AUVs, it's never too late. I do underwater robotics as a hobby and will help in any way I can.

GerryAUVGuy@gmail.com

Re:Autonomous data-collecting robots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261116)

Jimmy was just a bit preceding generation for goo (gray hair you know). But he's really into the next big thing here. There is a link in TFA, but for those to lazy to RTFA: http://liquidr.com/. If you really want to know what the real folks are doing check out:
http://www.auvsi.org/Home/

Re:Autonomous data-collecting robots. (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261238)

I drew up all kinds of plans and pictures and routes of autonomous robotic water craft that would run on sea water and traverse the Pacific ocean from my home state to Japan and back.

Let me guess: your parents moved in Montana shortly afterwards, amiright?

Re:Autonomous data-collecting robots. (1)

dudpixel (1429789) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261392)

No kidding.

Everyone's talking about reasons for leaving Google, as if Google is a bad employer.

Lets put thing in perspective here...

A job at Google would be great as far as large companies go. Good work-life balance, great work conditions, great benefits etc.

But come on, he's going to be working on high-tech robots! Nothing is cooler for a developer (well, most anyway) than robotics!

I dont blame him at all!!

Underwater research, hmm? (1)

lennier (44736) | more than 3 years ago | (#37260818)

I suppose Google hasn't also just started a project codenamed Azorian [wikipedia.org] ?

Java (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37261082)

FTA "They can cross oceans.... Slowly." Perhaps they are already running Java?

Suspended (2)

BluBall (16231) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261092)

Truth is that he was suspended for failing to sufficiently prove he was *the* James Gosling quickly enough.

once you hit it big, you can be this scaterbrained (2)

buback (144189) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261172)

If I told my parents I was leaving google to go start my own undersea data collecting company, they'd look askance at one another and wonder what type of mid-life crisis i was having. But I guess once you start something like java, you get free rein to do whatever-the-hell crazy-assed thing you want, even if it means leaving a steady job behind, and nobody thinks it's that crazy.

Re:once you hit it big, you can be this scaterbrai (2)

macshit (157376) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261438)

Er, yes, once you become super famous and renowned, the concept of a "steady job" loses some of its allure, and you can do cool-but-risky things instead if you want to. The parameters of your risk equation change. But note that such behavior is not at all uncommon even amongst the non-famous — I know tons of people who left "secure" jobs with big companies to join startups — though it's easier when you're young (e.g., no family to support), and perhaps somewhat more attractive for the middle-aged (there's a sense of "now or never").

You can hardly blame Gosling — he's spent 20 years as "big name at big company", with all the crap that entails (even at "good" big companies), and is probably quite sick of it by now. Given that he does have the ability to do more quirky and interesting things without undue personal risk, and apparently hadn't put down any roots at Google, it doesn't seem particularly surprising that he made this choice.

Can you say "Hazard to Navigation"? (1)

SwedishChef (69313) | more than 3 years ago | (#37261194)

A bunch of autonomous boats moving around the ocean at 2.5 knots with no one or nothing on watch seems a bit dangerous to me. I know most of you think there are nothing but container ships on the oceans but there are about 3,000 cruising sailboats with families aboard out there on vessels that are at risk of these sorts of unmanned vessels. These are often in the 30-foot range and seldom have the power to run radar all night. Most of them keep a lookout but I wonder if these "autonomous" boats have navigational lights showing at night.

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