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Akamai Employee Tried To Sell Secrets To Israel

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the nobody-does-it-like-nedry dept.

Privacy 172

CWmike writes "A 43-year-old former Akamai employee has pleaded guilty to espionage charges after offering to hand over confidential information about the Web acceleration company to an agent posing as an Israeli consular official in Boston. Starting in September 2007, Elliot Doxer played an elaborate 18-month-long game of cloak-and-dagger with James Cromer, a man he thought was an Israeli intelligence officer. He handed over pages and pages of confidential data to Cromer, providing a list of Akamai's clients and contracts, information about the company's security practices, and even a list of 1,300 Akamai employees, including mobile numbers, departments and e-mail addresses. Doxer delivered the information to a dead drop box 62 times. His motivation: To help Israel and to get information on his son and estranged wife, who lived outside the U.S., prosecutors said in court filings. Doxer faces 15 years in prison on the charges."

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172 comments

Well I guess that Doxer (0, Flamebait)

know1 (854868) | more than 2 years ago | (#37260836)

Just got doxed.

Re:Well I guess that Doxer (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37260912)

Where's the YEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAH? There was supposed to be an earth-shattering YEEEEEEEAAAAAAAAAAAAH.

Re:Well I guess that Doxer (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261464)

Yep, it is all in the surname. If it was Dreyfus or Dolinsky, or Ditzah, the government would have cooperated. But a Doxer? He'll have to be careful with the soap.

Re:Well I guess that Doxer (1)

Jeremiah Cornelius (137) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262056)

LET ME GET THIS OUT OF THE WAY:

"Anti-Semitic", "Anti-Semitic", "Anti-Social", "Anti-Semitic", "Paranoid", "Anti-Semitic", "Go back to your Area 54 ideas", "Anti-Semitic", "Do we have a Godwin?"

Tumbled (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37260842)

1) Find a an exploitable employee
2) Seduce them with hopes of seeing their child again this century
3) Collect incriminating evidence
4) Profit!

They'd be hard pressed to get a conviction out of me if they set this guy up. If he instigated this then I'll still be disinclined to convict as they could have smacked him down and gotten a felony.

So this wasteful agent spent how much time and how many millions of dollars building up this whoop de do case? Maybe they could have nailed the guy with the simple felony, got a plea, destroyed their career saved us some tax dollars to be used hunting real criminals and not distraught fathers.

Re:Tumbled (3, Insightful)

Jurramonga (1922438) | more than 2 years ago | (#37260924)

Seems it would have been easier (and cheaper) to just help the guy get some information on his family. Less likely to get you a promotion, I suppose...

Re:Tumbled (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261140)

In addition to logic in the "when all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail that you might get promoted for pounding" vein, I imagine that the FBI's counterintelligence office doesn't really want to court the potential moral hazard of providing assistance to people who might be moles in order to remove their incentive to sell out.

There is, one presumes, a very long list of people who would really like something in their life fixed up, and you don't really want to get into the business of having to fix things for them lest they go rogue on you...

Re:Tumbled (1)

SniperJoe (1984152) | more than 2 years ago | (#37260934)

Wouldn't that be the definition of entrapment?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Entrapment [wikipedia.org]

We also don't know the details of exactly how the offer was made. Of course, not that it matters now, as he's pleaded guilty.

Re:Tumbled (1)

DriedClexler (814907) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261062)

Yeah, I don't understand how it couldn't be entrapment. What, do they have undercover agents sitting in places where peddlers of secrets will mistake you for a foreign intelligence operative or something? Yeah fucking right: you don't get approached by someone wanting to sell you secrets on accident.

Re:Tumbled (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261106)

on accident

Arrrrrrrrrrrrggggggggggggggggggggggggggghhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh!

Re:Tumbled (1)

Artifakt (700173) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261358)

It's obvious (always assuming that what the article says is substantially correct), that Mr. Doxer had what the law calls a propensity to commit the first crime from before law enforcement entered the picture. The FBI didn't have to implant any ideas in his head for that to happen. But, what about the rest of the crimes? This guy was apparently looking for a contact with the Israeli government from the start. Maybe that's so he could get info on the estranged wife and child, but it also arguably could be because he figured that Israel would be unlikely to do any real damage to the US with the info. Maybe he genuinely thought that this would count as only corporate espionage, and not spill over into hurting the US economy or US interests as a whole. So the government should expect to have to prove for each charge after the first that they didn't talk Mr. Daxer into going down paths he would have never thought of on his own and might have been strongly reluctant to pursue unless they pressured him and persuaded him. I don't think there was any entrapment here, but for at least some of the charges or claims of aggravating circumstances, it is certainly possible. I guess we will have to see if his lawyer even raises that as a possible defense, and if so, whether the evidence the public and jury sees is all heavily redacted transcripts or something such as that, and even then, reasonable people may disagree over the outcome, whatever it is.

Re:Tumbled (4, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261090)

Depends on the details of the start of the affair: "However, there is no entrapment where a person is ready and willing to break the law and the government agents merely provide what appears to be a favorable opportunity for the person to commit the crime."

If the agent merely posed as the sort of consular person who the suspect was looking for, it's just a sting, not entrapment. If, on the other hand, the agent engaged in a prolonged campaign of grooming and cajoling to get otherwise upright and/or feckless people stirred up enough to do something, there would be a serious argument that entrapment was going on...

It would be interesting to know if the feds just have undercover people swarming around likely defection loci, just hanging out and looking shady and approachable, or whether Akamai is considered cool enough to get investigations focused on its employees, or whether the fellow in question has something else that flagged him.

Re:Tumbled (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261210)

"However, there is no entrapment where a person is ready and willing to break the law and the government agents merely provide what appears to be a favorable opportunity for the person to commit the crime. For example, it is not entrapment for a government agent to pretend to be someone else and to offer, either directly or through an informant or other decoy, to engage in an unlawful transaction with the person (see sting operation). So, a person would not be a victim of entrapment if the person was ready, willing and able to commit the crime charged in the indictment whenever opportunity was afforded, and that government officers or their agents did no more than offer an opportunity."

Hellllooooooooooo....
Don't take my word for it, I might have just added that when you weren't looking. Use a credible source next time.

Re:Tumbled (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37262350)

"Apparently out of the blue, he decided to send an e-mail to Israel's Boston consulate on June 22, 2006, writing, "I am a jewish american who lives in Boston. I know you are always looking for information and i am offering the little i may have."

Seems his mail was intercepted or somesuch

Re:Tumbled (2)

Meshach (578918) | more than 2 years ago | (#37260986)

1) Find a an exploitable employee
2) Seduce them with hopes of seeing their child again this century
3) Collect incriminating evidence
4) Profit!

FWIW he wasn't trying to profit. The article explicitly says that he was trying to contact his son and estranged wife.

Re:Tumbled (1)

rthille (8526) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261098)

Um, the "profit!" (along with all the other points) were actions the GP attributed to the FBI agent, not the "exploitable employee" (the guy trying to see his wife/son). Also, the article explicitly says he asked for $3000, and dropped the hint that he'd be happy if his estranged wife turned up dead.

Re:Tumbled (1)

mabhatter654 (561290) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262014)

It's clear the US government won't go to bat for it's citizens in these custody cases, especially in countries that allow dual-citizenship... A CRIME had already been committed and they were looking to take advantage.

His plea to the government for help from a position like this is probably what got him flagged in the first place... There's some entrapment argument.. Guy should have volunteered to be a "consultant" ... Seems to work for companies sending the same tech jobs to Israel!! There's companies like IBM that outsource this stuff all the time for Fortune 100 companies. Akamati is far from a "national security" risk..

I'd guess the plea dropped the spying charge down to just the corporate charges (multiple computer trespass and trade secret charges would add up to 15 easily) or he'd be facing a lot more time. They can argue the charges down based on intent and circumstance. While he's in prison he can get the proper charges filed in the US court for his wife.. Then she won't be able to leave Israel without being on Interpol's kidnaping list. They can catch her flying across Europe or something.

Re:Tumbled (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261112)

'Contact' is one word for it. Using the phrase "His mother is a terrible human being and has caused me tremendous suffering. Not enough bad things can happen to her if you know what I mean." makes you sound like you do have a certain, er, mutually beneficial exchange of services, in mind...

Re:Tumbled (4, Insightful)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261124)

FWIW he wasn't trying to profit.

It's not about his profit.

It's about the fact that the world would end in a fiery wreck if anyone should get faster video over the internet without paying license fees.

We're talking profits here, man. What is the worth of a man's family in the face of lost shareholder value? Get your priorities straight!

I'm telling you this as a friend.

Plus, Akamai is an important part of the coming private Internet which is coming to replace the messy public internet. Don't you want a safer, more orderly Internet? And if Akamai's technology makes the new private Internet a "safer, speedier Internet" (as their marketing material says), obviously we can't have that technology falling into non-license paying hands. How can you have a "safer, speedier Internet" if a lot of people have access to technology that makes it "safer" and "speedier". That would be socialism, and you don't want socialism do you? Or do you, you filthy socialist? How would you like it if your family and employer found out that you were a filthy socialist who doesn't want a "safer, speedier Internet"? You wouldn't want that to happen. Bad things happen to filthy socialists who don't want a "safer, speedier Internet".

Re:Tumbled (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37262076)

I'd have no problem with that. The funny part of all this is I work for myself. I have 100% control of the company and doing quite well.

Re:Tumbled (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261280)

Whooosh! The profit is what the agent/agency got in bonuses, raises, budget increases and all those luscious donuts served by room service at $5.00 a piece.

Akamai Is An Expensive Waste of Electricity (4, Insightful)

curmudgeon99 (1040054) | more than 2 years ago | (#37260874)

For several years I worked in Manhattan for one of those large privately held media Companies, one with both magazines and magazine websites galore, including ones you would know. We used to use Akamai. Sure they could cache our content and then absorb a lot of traffic from our servers, but they were expensive as hell--especially for what they did, in my opinion. I do seem to recall that our big company eventually dumped Akamai and all the money that went with it. Why they still exist I will never know.

Re:Akamai Is An Expensive Waste of Electricity (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261056)

Really?

If not for Akamai, we'd need 3x the number of servers. Probably more considering certain things that don't scale linearly. That's space, cooling and power. Possibly more employees to manager the extra servers.

Set up our own CDN? There's no way we could match the extensive network of edge servers Akamai has. And again, we'd have to employ people to make it work and manage these extra servers. Accountants too to pay all the different DC operators.

We get some security as well. Our name servers can hide and Akamai can front any DoS attempts. Additionally, if we so choose (I believe) we could restrict access to our servers to -only- Akamai.

Routing "strangeness" happens on the internet more often than you'd (well, I'd) think. With our local ISPs, we shrug our shoulders. Akamai it either doesn't happen, or in the rare case when it does, they "fix" it. "People from Singapore say our site is down" just doesn't happen anymore.

No doubt, it's expensive (REALLY expensive), but it's oh-so-nice to sit behind Akamai and deal with problems that don't involve stupid amounts of traffic.

Where have you been? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261100)

CDNs are a nickel a dozen these days. Akamai has certain advantages - they're absolutely huge and thus have presence in the ass end of noiwhere - but companies that actually need what Akamai offers? Those are very, very, very few and far between.

Everything else? DoS prevention? Restriction of access? You've just described every CDN provider, even the vast majority of the bargain basement, el cheapo mom-and-pops.

Simply put, Akamai is the commercial Unix of CDNs. Good luck with that.

Re:Where have you been? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261260)

You are spot on. I deal with many CDN's and what I once admired about Akamai has now become a basic service.

That all said Akamai holds a special place in my heart http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daniel_M._Lewin

AKAMAI's banner ads slow the web down (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261336)

Block them in HOSTS files or firewalls & you go 100% faster websurfing, and easily noticeably so.

62 times? (0, Flamebait)

zill (1690130) | more than 2 years ago | (#37260916)

Doxer delivered the information to a dead drop box 62 times.

That's ironically inefficient for an employee at the world's largest CDN.

Doxer worked in the finance department at Akamai's Boston headquarters.

Ah, that explains everything.

An engineer wouldn't have been caught because he would be behind 7 proxies and only accept payment in bitcoins.

Re:62 times? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261094)

Ah, that explains everything.
No engineers have been caught because they are behind 7 proxies and only accept payment in bitcoins.

FTFY.
On a second thought... no, it can't be: engineers can't access data of any value, can they now?

uhh (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261356)

On a second thought... no, it can't be: engineers can't access data of any value, can they now?

That's a joke, right?

Re:uhh (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261398)

On a second thought... no, it can't be: engineers can't access data of any value, can they now?

That's a joke, right?

For you to sleep better: yes, it is... or at least an attempt to make one.

Re:uhh (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261414)

On a second thought... no, it can't be: engineers can't access data of any value, can they now?

That's a joke, right?

On a second thought... comparing the salaries of MBA graduates with those of engineers, maybe is not so funny anymore?

Stupid? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37260930)

Was the guy stupid? No real Israeli intelligence official would approach him like that in a million years. They'd pretend to be FBI/CIA instead. ;)

Re:Stupid? (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261950)

You'd be surprised. There's a surprising number of people that will hand that information over to Israeli agents that would never do so to American agents. Additionally, neither the CIA nor the FBI would be willing to assassinate a couple nobodies just to collect that information.

With Jews you lose (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37260946)

I've said it before and I'll say it again.

You can't trust the Jews.

Re:With Jews you lose (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261028)

You can't trust anti-Semetic shitbags on slashdot either.

Re:With Jews you lose (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261192)

Truth hurts hey AC? Poster is correct. Reality it seems is Anti semetic

Re:With Jews you lose (1)

mabhatter654 (561290) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262072)

In this case you're totally correct. They meddle in HIS marriage by allowing the wife to "jump citizenship" to get preferential treatment because of her RACE. the man's wife committed a CRIME and the Jew government is hiding her because she's a Jew and not honoring the LEGALLY BINDING contract she made in the USA with this man.

Nominative determinism strikes again. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37260988)

So the name of this guy who exposed a bunch of people's private info is really "Doxer"?

Funny (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261044)

ROFLMAO telling Jews about praise offerings to God.

utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (3, Informative)

decora (1710862) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261070)

we have moved just about every last fucking factory to China, along with all of the computers that control them. Then we sent the manufacturing of those computers to China too. All of the corporations made massive amoputns of money off of this. Do you think the Chinese PLA just sat back and didn't study anything? They are pulling the same game they did on the high-speed rail experts they 'contracted' to build the rail system.

And yet its all perfectly legal, because rich people are getting even richer off of it. Chinese workers arent getting rich - instead the government keeps the money and sticks it in Fannie and Freddie bonds and Treasury debt.

oh

but you want to possibly in theory sell a few secrets (like an email list... oh my god, how on earth did such a dangerous hacker acheive such a brilliant coup as an internal email list) to israel, which is a US ally... and youd think the world had come to a fucking end.

the whole country has gone ape shit, back asswards insane. people are just fucking stupid anymore. no fucking sense, not a drop left. sell the entire manufacturing and industrial base to China, a communist government that killed our own 'brave men in uniform' in the Korean War, but theoretically sell a few tiny corporate "secrets" to Israel and you get 15 years in the slammer.

how many secrets do you think are being funneled through our multinational corporations like , i dont know, chrysler? hummer? you know hummer is owned by the Chinese now right? the same hummers that our troops are driving around in Iraq and Afghanistan while they get blown up? Why dont we put the CEO of hummer in fucking prison for corporate espionage... he didn't sell a few email lists, he sold the whole fucking company!

Now don't get me wrong. I love China and it's culture, literature, people, etc. I'm just saying. Look at the fucking hypocrisy of these 'espionage' cases. Look who it benefits. the rich and the corporate elite. Look who it harms - the peons who want to give out information.

Now, I know this particular peon wanted to sell information, for money. But that is not what precedents like this get used for in the future. He is the 8th in history. 8th. The 8th guy is prosecuted for selling info. The 9th guy is prosecuted for thinking about selling info. The 10th guy is prosecuted for giving out info for free. The 11th guy is prosecuted for journalism.

That's the slippery slope of all this maniacal overcontrol of information, this obsession with secrecy... its not about secrecy, and it's not about protecting important information from espionage activity. It's about pure, blatant, bloody power, and who controls it, and who gets shafted. Espionage is a ruse. It's a red herring. The whole law is fucking corrupt to the point of banality.

Bradley Manning is being charged under Computer Espionage. For what? For "leaking" a gunship video. You know how many gunship videos are on youtube right now? You know there's a website that specializes specifically in gunship footage, all gunship footage all the time?

That's great. We now have three different kinds of Espionage - - - Plain old Espionage, Corporate Espionage, and Computer Espionage. How many more do we need? How many more can we invent? Well, just count the number of government agencies and power centers in the military industrial complex and then you will find out how many variations of thought-control law will be promulgated under 'national security'.

Its all a lie. Everything we see here is junk. It's all junk.

We have to save Toby.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261152)

I really shouldn't feed a troll, but you really think the 300 million people that have moved off of subsistence farms to move to the city in the last generation haven't become richer? Sure their life sucks compared to a middle class westerner but damn is it an improvement over breaking your back to barely avoid starvation with no hope of improving your situation.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (5, Interesting)

Kreigaffe (765218) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261354)

Is it? Is it really? Do you know this?

I sure don't. I don't know that farming in China is worse than living in "corporate cities". It could be worse.

It could be better, but only because of social policies enacted by the Chinese government to ensure that they have a large population of workers desperate enough to take any work they can, a virtual slave class who are not allowed freedom of travel, who very well could have led a more happy and healthy and stable life as simple subsistence farmers. Of course, that wouldn't be as good for The State, so it's discouraged.

Don't ever underestimate the evil of the Chinese government. Their population, to them, is not people but a resource. Look at their treatment of other resources and you will see how they will treat their people-resource. Its only value is to be exploited as harshly as possible for the benefit of the State.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (3, Interesting)

afidel (530433) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261378)

Having worked on both a farm and in a factory for just above minimum wage, hell yeah factory work is a hell of a lot better, and I was on a midsized US farm with tons of machinery to help me out, not doing everything with hand tools. A week of doubles running a machine is still easier than working nearly as many hours doing manual labor.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

dbIII (701233) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261562)

Is it really? Do you know this?

Yes, and you can too if you walk down the street and talk to a former Chinese peasant. It's not as if they are hard to find no matter where you are on earth. I'm not saying China is ideal in any way and neither will they (they would have moved near you for an even better life), just that you are wrong.
Also China is so big that anything you've every heard of it is probably true somewhere. Slavery happens as does every other crime you can think of, just as it does in the USA with criminals keeping women working as slaves. That doesn't mean the place is like the Alabama a couple of centuries ago.

You overreact (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261898)

It may be about corporate bullshit; or maybe about one thing:
you don't spy on your own country.

Like you don't shit in your own nest.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261372)

Our company has a Chinese division that sells our product. We sell a substantial quantity of our American made product, for various legal definitions of "American made". We brought some manufacturing back from China due to of all things transportation costs.

One of the reps visited, a kid about 25 fresh out of college. He's tall, right at six feet. Not skinny. His pay on the Chinese economy is as good as our local salesman , not the same dollar value but the same purchasing power. He said he had a large apartment, usually rides a bike or scooter and food is readily available. His biggest gripe is having a hard time finding a girlfriend.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261686)

The one-child policy has resulted in baby girls being aborted (or killed after birth) leading to a shortage of women. And the women that are left generally prefer white dick. You need money, a house, a car, etc, to get any pussy.

So that leaves two options: buttfucking other dudes or invading other countries to steal their women.

Now, I'm not going to argue that being gay is a choice or not a choice, but I will point out that people in prison or the army or all-boys school have no problem achieving pleasure with another man. Also, consider ancient Greece (or even modern day greece) where virtually all men have a male lover yet they don't consider themselves gay or even bi-curious.

AS for the next option, they could invade Vietnam, the Philippines, Thailand, etc and bring back some women (or lady boys), but I have a better idea: We (the US) could trade our negress women to help balance the trade deficit. They'd get pussy, we'd get cheap shit (and get rid of negro she-cows). I'm sure there would be some cultural adjustments (although the big black dick is a myth, asians are, in fact, hung like a hamster).

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261394)

I lived for a few years in China, and returned to the US a few years ago because I still see some economic benefit to my kids in their growing up as native English speakers. Here some observations, although perhaps people living in China should reply, as I realize my view is still that of a naive outsider.

The technical professionals in big cities in China live like US college students. Some have cars, most don't. They usually have TV's, DVD players, cell phones and sometimes older model computers. DSL is common. Their clothes are almost never old (but perhaps counterfeit or unauthorized overproduction). They make much less money, but lower local prices make up for much of it. Remember: 100% of the cost of everything is labor. For example, a one bedroom condo might cost $50k instead of $200k.

Maid services, food delivery, foot massagers, places offering to wash cars, etc. seem to be more common. I believe that this is because minimum wage in China is low (varies by province), so there is less artificial unemployment, so it is easier for someone doing a manual labor service job to hire assistants and become an entrepreneur.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261186)

"you know hummer is owned by the Chinese now right? the same hummers that our troops are driving around in Iraq and Afghanistan while they get blown up?"

That's wrong. GM sold the hummer brand to a Chinese company
http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/industry_sectors/industrials/article6415642.ece

What you are thinking of is the Humvee
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Humvee

which is still being made by AM General which is still an American company
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AM_General

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261212)

We may be allies with Israel but they also attract a lot of unwanted attention. Akami also does some work for the US government, giving reverse proxy destination IP's to a foreign government, ally or not, is a security risk - with the shit they are stirring up with Iran do you really think it would take long for that info to land in their hands? Besides, Akamai probably does a lot more than just reverse proxy for uncle sam.

Your argument about hummers is juvenile and asinine. I'm hoping that was your point. Espionage has it's place and it's important in most cases, but when the motive is profit and the information gleaned from said espionage is only viable to a competitor, then the "spy" really deserves what he gets.

That said, the manning incident is unfortunate, and I appreciate the fact the information is out there in the open, but I appreciate Wikileaks even more for discretionary leaks of information, something Manning did NOT do and something that he probably deserves his jail time for. Lives were at stake for very little interesting data in that whole dump, and probably not worth it. If he had gotten an illegal order, or an order that was highly immoral, then I think I would be more behind him. As it is, he seems like the type of guy who wanted to prove to some guy he met an irc how 31337 hax0r he is and did the dump to prove it. I don't insist on that, and maybe that's the media's influence on me making me say that, but there it is.

"its all a lie". This is pure hyperbole, and you really oughtta go back and reconsider your mental health and happiness level if you really get that out of this story. Sure, there are lies here, and sure the media will twist it, but part of analytical thinking is examining your own bias towards either side of the story. The fact you've already taken a side without insider knowledge of this event discredits you, which is unfortunate because you had some really good things to say in that post. Please reconsider how you approach topics like that in the future, otherwise you will be just as dismissed as the rest of the roadside prophets.

Not from Israel (1)

KiloByte (825081) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261252)

Since when spies (as in the one who contacted this crook) say truth about whom they really work for? It's in their benefit to be able to shove the responsibility onto someone else when caught. That "israeli" spy would really work for China or Iran... or, in this case, FBI.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261232)

"Look at the fucking hypocrisy of these 'espionage' cases."

You should have started with that sentence and then built a coherent argument around that.

Your cluttered mess is almost unreadable. You have some good points in there (I think?), but it's all cluttered up with a bunch of crazy prose.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

shadowofwind (1209890) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261248)

A part of me agrees with you. A part of me is thinking "damn, I wonder if I could make his head explode...."

In any case, the Chinese mostly just make plastic utensils and stuff, no great loss. It frees us up for innovation. And although the law does protect a lot of secrets, I'm more comfortable trusting those in the know to do the right thing than risk having it fall into the hands of terrorists. Industrial secrets such as are going to China don't matter as much because technology changes so fast anyway.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261314)

Wow dude. Off the meds, eh.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

compucomp2 (1776668) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261400)

So commerce with China is bad, while selling private information to Israel is OK. Is that it? So because Israel is an "ally", means that selling people's phone numbers and addresses is just fine, and somehow trading with China is selling out to the "evil communists?"

Why don't you just admit that you are only interested in what's good for Israel and not what's good for the US or the rest of the world?

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261470)

"Why don't you just admit that you are only interested in what's good for Israel and not what's good for the US or the rest of the world?"

I am not the parent poster, but everything that he said would be equally valid if we were talking about selling phone numbers to France instead of Israel. Israel, France, England, etc. are democracies. China is not.

So your accusation that the the parent poster is "only interested in what's good for Israel and not what's good for the US or the rest of the world" fails the test of replacing Israel in the argument with another democracy.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261560)

you need to reread decora's post, slowly.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261548)

U mad?

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261726)

Hey, it was a beautifully crafted troll post. Just... beautiful.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261564)

you know hummer is owned by the Chinese now right? the same hummers that our troops are driving around in Iraq and Afghanistan while they get blown up? Why dont we put the CEO of hummer in fucking prison for corporate espionage... he didn't sell a few email lists, he sold the whole fucking company!

Um, wow, where to begin. Okay, how 'bout this... (1) Military HMMWVs ("hummers") are /not/ made by General Motors, who made the civilian Hummer and the laughable looks-vaguely-like-a-hummer-body-kit H2 (aka GM 2500) and H3 (aka Colorado). The military's M998 is, and always has been, made by AM General, which is still a U.S. company (Indiana).

(2) The (civilian, cheesy) Hummer brand was to be sold to a Chinese manufacturing company, but the deal fell through. http://www.reuters.com/article/2010/02/24/us-gm-hummer-idUSTRE61N5XE20100224 [reuters.com] GM just dismantled it. The Chinese don't own it. GM still does, for whatever it's worth, in its defunct state.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261578)

how many secrets do you think are being funneled through our multinational corporations like , i dont know, chrysler? hummer? you know hummer is owned by the Chinese now right? the same hummers that our troops are driving around in Iraq and Afghanistan while they get blown up?

Well, partly right - but also gloriously wrong. The company that manufactures the *Hummer* is indeed owned by the Chinese - but our troops don't drive *Hummers*. They drive *Humvees*/*HMMWV*- which are manufactured by a different, US owned, company.
 
Time for a new layer of tinfoil.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261650)

Chinese workers arent getting rich

So all the Chinese workers stopped sustenance farming to enamor themselves in US culture by working in US dollar lead factories? I think your logic may be a little faulty.

As global demand for electronics grows China's workforce is shifting to higher paid better positions. The garment and toy industries have significant labour problems in manufacturing as they cannot match the enumeration offered by Hon Hai and friends.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

ScentCone (795499) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261818)

You are wrong on basic facts, wrong on premises (which are mixed, and self-contradictory while also being wrong), and certainly wrong on the basic ethical issues related to whether a business owner does, or does not have a say in how information is sold. Basically, you're a rambling tin-foil troll. Get a grip.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (1)

evilviper (135110) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261830)

sell the entire manufacturing and industrial base to China, a communist government that killed our own 'brave men in uniform' in the Korean War

Hmm, as opposed to our friendly relationships with Germany, Italy, and Japan (WWII was only a few years earlier). Through the 80s and early 90s it was Japan we were all afraid of, because they were taking all our manufacturing (becoming the #2 economy) and were going to buy out all the US corporations and take over.

Even Vietnam is our valuable trading partner these days, with the same old communist government, and much more stigma about Vietnam than Korea...

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261890)

Don't get you wrong? You obviously do hate China. You are mad about their part in a war that took place 60 years ago. Anyone in power in China at that time is dead now. You are the junk.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (2)

AlphaWolf_HK (692722) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262122)

how many secrets do you think are being funneled through our multinational corporations like , i dont know, chrysler? hummer? you know hummer is owned by the Chinese now right? the same hummers that our troops are driving around in Iraq and Afghanistan while they get blown up? Why dont we put the CEO of hummer in fucking prison for corporate espionage... he didn't sell a few email lists, he sold the whole fucking company!

This is bogus.

The military doesn't drive "hummer." The military uses HMMWV, which stands for High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicle, not "hummer." The name hummer is what happened when us military folk didn't want to spell out the acronym HMMWV, so instead we just say humm-vee. If you'll also notice, the predecessor to the HMMWV was the GP, for General Purpose, but military folks of that age decided to call it "jeep" rather than spell out GP.

Much like the "jeep" Crystler decided to repeat that with the hummer. One day they said "Gee, such a nice name, I think we'll make a suburban look similar to an HMMWV on the outside, while still being a turd on the inside, and then sell it to the public under the name 'hummer' and people will buy it just for the name." Yeah, I really don't care if china makes "hummers," they're pieces of shit anyways.

HMMWV's on the other hand are made in the US.

Re:utter, complete hypocritical bullshit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37262264)

A hummer is different from a HMMV.

Selling phone lists is espionage? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261180)

I guess I better check the citizenship of all those recruiters I sell ours to...

Anyone else worried that this was a criminal case? (4, Insightful)

Beryllium Sphere(tm) (193358) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261258)

The Uniform Trade Secrets Act makes trade secret "theft" a civil matter between the secret holder and the leaker. Apparently something went through in 1996 making it a Federal crime. The economy went fine for hundreds of years without the threat of jail for leakers -- why change? Especially since trade secret law can be and has been abused.

On another subject, there's a gaping gap in the story as we've seen it. How did the FBI know about his email to the Israeli consulate? Why did it take years before they followed up?

what worries me was that he "knew they wanted it" (1)

SuperBanana (662181) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261786)

That's what worries me. I mean, Israel is second only to the russians and chinese for technology theft, but...good grief. He didn't have anything of interest, so they forked him over to the feds to look like they don't Do That Sort of Thing...

Re:what worries me was that he "knew they wanted i (1)

gl4ss (559668) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261918)

well, didn't it turn out that they didn't want it?

only one who wanted anything was the guy doing the leak, . and those secrets don't seem much like secrets, unless you're a recruiter.

but 15 years? couldn't he have gotten away with manslaughter for less?15 years for imaginary totally undefined damages? and espionage wtf? it's simple enough to see if some company is using akamai and akamai is itself exporting the technology so wtf does the usa government have to do with it.. except it was the usa government which created the oppurtunity and motive for this guy(by letting him understand that he could get info on his wife). the operation could've done with much less time probably too, but the agent got a nice year and half of simple work from this(and the time to do in prison is a multiple of that, to justify the cost for operation).

Re:what worries me was that he "knew they wanted i (1)

CodeBuster (516420) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262008)

so they forked him over to the feds to look like they don't Do That Sort of Thing...

The lesson: If you have nothing to offer but yourself, maybe you should keep it to yourself.

Re:what worries me was that he "knew they wanted i (2)

euroq (1818100) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262028)

I mean, Israel is second only to the russians and chinese for technology theft, but...good grief.

Uh, third?

Re:what worries me was that he "knew they wanted i (-1)

mabhatter654 (561290) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262128)

He married a Jew girl.. They weren't ever going to give him a visa to see his kid as he's obviously not a Jew, not in the club. Now they dont have to worry about the state department constantly filing paperwork for yet another parent to get back their stolen kid.

My whole problem is that if the guy DID do the right thing and turned in the contact, would the US Govt taken in that contact as an "enemy combatant" and used that spy to trade for his kid back? Whoever RECIEVED 62 drops needs the "public brains on concrete" approach.. Because WE'RE STILL AT WAR in that region, and they are an illegal foreign agent. Remember, summary execution of foreign agents is LEGAL internationally.

the 9/11 hijackers were spot on (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261450)

I know I should be ashamed to say this, but when the first reports came out that Akamai's CTO was onboard AA flight 11, the first thing that came to my mind was 'BOOM, HEADSHOT'.

Reading reports like this one [cnn.com] are really sobering. I mean look at this guy:

  • Daniel Lewin, co-founder and CTO of Akamai Technologies
  • Previously, Lewin worked at IBM's research laboratory in Haifa, Israel
  • Born in Denver, Colorado, and raised in Jerusalem (seriously America, what the fuck. how is "and" an appropriate conjunction here)
  • Lewin is an officer in the Israel Defense Forces, having served in the country's military for more than four years.

it's shit like this that makes me think there may actually be a god. if there is one, though, he's fucking loopy.

10 years on and here we are with a company that could hardly be more jewish prosecuting an american citizen that could hardly be more jewish for stealing "secrets" that only a retarded monkey would believe were not already in israel anyway.

what's really funny is that now the US legal system gets tied up with another bullshit case like this one. "TERRORISTS WIN"

Re:the 9/11 hijackers were spot on (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261876)

Danny was a friend of mine in graduate school. He was a really great guy. Somebody from India showed up in Boston in winter without a coat, so Danny gave him his. And it isn't like he was rich then, with coats to spare. He had two kids and did chores around the married-student dorm to cut a little off his rent, but he was still going deeper into debt. He just went without a coat that winter. I also remember him complaining about how the daycare wanted him to get a brand new lunchbox for his kid. Obviously, he loved his kids, but that would be a few more dollars he just didn't have, so he just repaired it as best he could, which didn't please the daycare.

Then he became a billionaire one day. You sort of think every billionaire has to be a money-grubbing scumbag. But Danny was generous even when he was broke.

He not only served in the Israeli military, he was an officer in an elite "anti-terrorism" unit. (I'd probably call it a "state terrorism unit"-- we disagreed about politics, but whatever.) He lived through firefights with Hezbollah then left all that behind, came to the United States, and became a technology executive. But-- what are the odds?-- he was seated in first class with Mohammad Atta and was probably the first to die on September 11.

Re:the 9/11 hijackers were spot on (1)

acoster (812556) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262386)

Lewin is an officer in the Israel Defense Forces, having served in the country's military for more than four years.

Service in the IDF, for men, is usually 3 years. Those in special forces might serve for 4, 5 years. Nothing really special to see here.

doxed (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261580)

so doxer was posting dox

Why I'm not sympathetic with Doxer ... (1)

MacTO (1161105) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261588)

The article suggests that Doxer initiated contact, which is a solid strike against him and I think I agree with how the counter intelligence unit handled it because of that.

Now if Doxer had been contacted because he had a known weakness, that would be a different story. That is especially true since his weakness was knowing the condition of his son and to dig up dirt on his estranged wife. In that case, I would be concerned about a case of entrapment and how it would be easier to resolve the situation by providing him with information without blackmailing him. But that is not the case, and he simply should have used family contacts or hired someone to investigate the situation.

Re:Why I'm not sympathetic with Doxer ... (1)

mabhatter654 (561290) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262174)

But in these family cases you CAN'T even set foot in the country because the spouse flags you as a "stalker" and you're denied visas or turned away at customs. Unless you can get somebody in the other government to "accidentally" drive your spouse and child to the US Embasy where the FBI can detain them under the USA law that was broken you'll never see them again. You might also catch a break if the spouse leaves the country and your "friend" can get their plane grounded in a US extradition country for an hour...
The only way to get justice in these cases is to get somebody in the hiding country to break their laws or misuse authority.

what the official filing is, isn't the whole story (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261628)

Anyone who thinks that what the indictment says is the whole story in an espionage case is foolish. It's what is sufficient to convict without revealing other things the guy might or might not have done.

Hague Treaty (1)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261640)

And once again, the Hague Treaty on abduction [wikipedia.org] is ignored. Is it because the absconding parent is the mother? Or is it to avoid ruffling the feathers of Israel? Do I fucking care which it is?

Men, please, take the red pill [singularity2050.com].

Re:Hague Treaty (1)

Elbereth (58257) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261892)

That second link was hilarious. Thanks for the laugh.

That was possibly the whiniest rant I've ever read in my life.

Re:Hague Treaty (0)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262010)

It's a bit over the top, but it's completely true.

Rape, sexual abuse, domestic violence, cancer, homelessness, those are all things for which society provides resources above and beyond what men receive. In the case of domestic violence, it's especially egregious seeing as women make up a full half of all abusers and yet are rarely targeted by public awareness campaigns.

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSPAT97046720080520 [reuters.com]
http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/nationworld/2013743521_domesticviolence26.html [nwsource.com]

What's worse is that schools are continuing to indoctrinate men with the notion that they are in some fashion inferior to women and that they are less valuable than women are.

The danger of the Mossad (1, Troll)

Dainsanefh (2009638) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261766)

Mossad agents are walking all over the USA unchecked and unchallenged, thanks to their Jewish buddies who controls all branches of Government, Federal Reserve, Facebook, Google, Goldman Sachs etc etc.

Re:The danger of the Mossad (0)

catmistake (814204) | more than 2 years ago | (#37261872)

Practically speaking, I'm not sure the US has much to fear from Mossad. Mossad only seems to be effective at revenge.... at least that's all we hear. Fuck with Isreal, they will go to any lengths for however long it takes to hunt you down and assassinate you with some Q-like device like an umbrella or lethal contact lens thrown like a Frisbee. Unless the US starts killing Israeli olympians, I really doubt they'll be taking any action against the US or its citizens.

You don't have a clue, "catmistake". (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37262070)

"Unless the US starts killing Israeli olympians, I really doubt they'll be taking any action against the US ..."

Your personal doubt is not the sort of data which will convince an intelligent and impartial observer of anything relative to what Israel may or may not do to the US.

The truth is, you don't have any idea what Israel would do, and your set of beliefs about Israel causes you to be childishly naive with respect to what you imagine Israel might do to the US.

Israel doesn't give a damn about the US, and uses the US only as long as it is expedient to do so. There is no
doubt in the minds of US personnel whose business it is to know what Israel might do that Israel is not really
on the side of the US, and that Israel cannot be trusted with anything significant. If you think the US doesn't
mind Israel getting its hands on classified US info, Google "Jonathan Pollard" and see how just much the
US doesn't mind. Pollard's relatives keep trying to get Pollard released from Federal Prison, and the US
government keeps saying "hell no".

As for what Israel "might" do against US citizens, Google "Rachel Corrie" to see what the Israeli
government is capable of doing to US citizens who are unarmed and present no threat.

You also ought to take some time and look into a certain disappearance of fissionable material within the US some years ago, for which the Mossad is almost certainly responsible. There is info out there on this, but I am not going to
spoon-feed you because your stupid ass doesn't deserve that much help from me.

Just because you are ignorant and stupid doesn't mean Israel is a true friend of the US, it only means you are ignorant and stupid.

Re:You don't have a clue, "catmistake". (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37262238)

Dear Mossad,
Please ignore the AC parent. Poster is obviously a wildly-confused and paranoid racist troll and presents no legitimate threat to Israel.

Re:The danger of the Mossad (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37262066)

I knew there would be some paranoid anus who would make a comment like this.

Israeli Spyring Scandal (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261788)

Only because it's so close to the anniversary: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_k0e8_sff44&feature=player_embedded - Has been quite buried over the years.

Details of the Israeli spyring, which was censored and removed from the Fox News archives. Definitely IT- related

NAIL HIM TO A CROSS !! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261958)

Seems only fair !! Eye for an eye and all that !!

Beward the dutch doperz !! for they are really, really stoned !!

Bad place to work (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37261982)

To be honest, Akamai is a terrible place to work. Literally, they have a manager-engineer ratio of 10 to 1.

I really have no idea why the 20 or so people who actually keep the company running don't leave for higher paying jobs elsewhere.

18 months? 62 drops? (5, Interesting)

hrtserpent6 (806666) | more than 2 years ago | (#37262222)

A guy tries to sell inside corporate information to Israel in exchange for $3,000 and information on his ex-wife and son. The FBI gets involved, and they set up a sting operation. The guy then proceeds to provide some fairly weak-sauce information: client lists, contracts and employee information. The whole ordeal is clumsy and sad.

How it should have happened:
After a few transactions, the FBI realizes this guy is zero threat. They refer the case to the Massachusetts Attorney General "for further joint investigation". Based on the evidence, the AG charges the guy with larceny or embezzlement or whatever, Akamai takes their civil remedies for breach of contract, etc, and the FBI declines to prosecute. The guy loses his job, pays $150K in fines and does 6 months in minimum security + probation. His life gets pretty hard.

How it actually happened:
After a few transactions, the FBI realizes the information sucks. No source code, no proprietary technology, no M&A data, no insider-level financials. It's client lists, contracts and internal employee information. The information is so weak, they can't even charge him with anything under existing Federal statutes. But there's a foreign government involved, so all sense of proportion is lost. They keep asking the guy for more information. And more. 18 months and 62 transactions later, they finally get to a point where:
  • a) they get one or more specific pieces of information that qualify as 'trade secrets'
  • b) the data in aggregate can qualify as 'trade secrets'

Now they can charge him under the Economic Espionage Act and prepare to drop him in a very deep, very dark hole. Slam dunk. Promotions all around for stopping a 'grave threat to U.S. economic security'. The guy loses his job, pays $400K in fines and goes to Federal prison for 10 years. His life is over.

Insane.

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