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Wikileaks Reveals BitTorrent Lawsuit Background

Unknown Lamer posted more than 3 years ago | from the one-copyright-regime-to-rule-them-all dept.

Australia 209

daria42 writes "A US diplomatic cable published by Wikileaks has revealed much of the previously hidden background behind the BitTorrent court case currently playing out in Australia's High Court, including the Motion Picture Association of America's prime mover role and US Embassy fears the trial could become portrayed as 'giant American bullies versus little Aussie battlers.'' Oops. Looks like there's a little bit of egg on the movie studios' faces!"

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209 comments

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Oh gee (1)

AmonTheMetalhead (1277044) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263656)

I never saw that coming....

Re:Oh gee (5, Insightful)

azalin (67640) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263734)

But these studios are the victims here. Not the bullies.
Poor, wretched victims... Where is the MPAA relief fund when they are in such dire need.
*Glues plastic tear under left eye*

Re:Oh gee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264274)

pro tip: if you'd use a clear drying glue you wouldn't need the plastic tear ; )

Re:Oh gee (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264936)

Or he could put the glue in his eye and shed real tears.

Re:Oh gee (2)

Pf0tzenpfritz (1402005) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264980)

Or sniff the glue and become an MPAA supporter.

Re:Oh gee (0)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264344)

The ridicule is of course sure to garner an insightful mod; but I really dont see anything incorrect in what theyre saying.

If the accused in the case really are guilty (and Im not familiar with the case at all), their point is still valid, that it could become irrelevant and much could be made of the fact that its a big evil US corp.

As is in fact what youve just done; you didnt make a case that the laws were poorly written, or that there are issues with the prosecution, you focused on the fact that its the MPAA and they must therefore have no valid case. AKA the classic Jammie Thomas Apologist's Defense (also known as the Tenenbaum Gambit).

Re:Oh gee (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264638)

This! :)

Re:Oh gee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264998)

If you believe that the MPAA needs to go away and quit perverting society's laws via lobbyists and corruption for the sake of their obsolete business models, they are the bad guy in every story in which they appear. If they didn't exist, they wouldn't be a part of the case.

Re:Oh gee (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265674)

Just because theyre irresponsible and litigious and about as friendly as the Nazghul, doesnt mean that people are excused from following the laws of their land or from perjuring themselves; and it certainly doesnt mean that folks on slashdot are excused when THEY support such people as Jammie Thomas and Tenenbaum.

Good gracious, its as if, because MPAA commits one wrong, it excuses us circumventing the legal system just to spite them for that wrong. Illegal is illegal, whether or not you like the prosecution. Are people really pushing for anarchy and the abolition of the justice system?

Re:Oh gee (1)

MimeticLie (1866406) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265760)

If the accused in the case really are guilty (and Im not familiar with the case at all)

Perhaps you should have taken the time to learn what it was about, then. Even reading the summary of the previous /. story would have been enough. The case is about iiNet refusing to shut off the internet connections of its customers because AFACT tells them to. No guilt, no trial, no burden of proof.

As usual when dealing with the MPAA et al., even the kneejerk responses are well warranted.

Re:Oh gee (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264678)

A celluloid animated tear would also fit the purpose. Oh, look at that smooth and magical movement of the tear!

Forget about that (1, Offtopic)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263694)

Movies are old hat. Today insteadofseeing a movie my girldfreind came over to my houseand she letmeput my weiner in her !!!! It wasawesome. You all should do that insteadof watch movies they aredumbe.

Re:Forget about that (-1, Offtopic)

AmonTheMetalhead (1277044) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263798)

Your spacebar seems broken

Re:Forget about that (-1, Troll)

For a Free Internet (1594621) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263830)

Sorry I am too busy do9ing the awesomesexy with my girlfriend to press the spaces bar all the timeyou grammir nerd!!!!!! hahahhaqhaahahahahhahah

Re:Forget about that (0, Offtopic)

AmonTheMetalhead (1277044) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264272)

Calling your right hand Nancy doesn't constitute in a sexual relationship with a woman. Now let go & type with both hands already.

Re:Forget about that (-1, Offtopic)

Chrisq (894406) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263972)

Today insteadofseeing a movie my girldfreind came over to my houseand she letmeput my weiner in her !!!!

Your spacebar seems broken

I've never heard it called that before, but I'd blame his girlfriend

Re:Forget about that (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264178)

Moderated informative (well, it is informative)

Re:Forget about that (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37263800)

Hats are old. The new is Jackets.

Re:Forget about that (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264360)

You want us all to put our wieners in your girlfriend? That's a generous offer indeed.

Just go away Wikileaks (-1, Troll)

toddmbloom (1625689) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263698)

I'm sure everyone has grown tired of you and Big Giant Head, Assange.

Re:Just go away Wikileaks (4, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263740)

Is that the OFFICIAL response from the MPAA, or are you just speaking for yourself?

Re:Just go away Wikileaks (1)

pyrosine (1787666) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263878)

It's the official response

Re:Just go away Wikileaks (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37263846)

What's wrong, did Assange fuck your mom too or something?

Re:Just go away Wikileaks (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37263910)

Haven't been to Slashdot in awhile. I see the quality of comments has plummeted.

And what? (4, Insightful)

chuckymonkey (1059244) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263702)

Good, nice to see stuff like this. Although to be honest I don't really see anything changing. Really, what are the proles going to do? Protest? I'm sure the MAFIAA is oh so terrified of the protesters who after a day or so will get tired, go home, and watch a movie and listen to some music.

Re:And what? (4, Insightful)

Xest (935314) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263908)

To be fair I think it's more subtle than that. Each time people see something like this they feel ever less guilty about, and ever less desensitized to piracy.

Each time the MPAA does something like this, they push people further and further away from legitimate services.

I for one don't see why anyone should see the slightest guilt in downloading MPAA movies, frankly paying money to buy their product to support their existence seems more morally bankrupt than downloading, or ideally just simply not watching their content at all nowadays.

Really, all wars in whatever context rely on either winning the hearts and minds of the people, or brutally supressing them. The MPAA in it's war on piracy is attempting the latter, yet even the latter only works as a temporary stop gap, the former is the only permanent solution, yet that's a battle they've already long lost.

Re:And what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264000)

For me it has nothing to do with guilt. I just find it easier to see if a movie is on Netflix's streaming service before I bother with other (unauthorized) sources.

Re:And what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264358)

For me it has nothing to do with guilt. I just find it easier to see if a movie is on Netflix's streaming service before I bother with other (unauthorized) sources.

No Netflix in Australia. No Hulu either. Double screwed.

Re:And what? (2)

grub (11606) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264024)


Each time people see something like this they feel ever less guilty about, and ever less desensitized to piracy.

I think you nailed it.

Re:And what? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264102)

Except that he meant "more desensitized".

Re:And what? (2)

grub (11606) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264306)

Yeah, I didn't catch that but parsed it ;)

Re:And what? (0)

Runaway1956 (1322357) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264166)

"desensitized to piracy" Interesting concept. I presume that there are actually a few people who are sensitized to piracy? Who could that possibly be?

Oh! Silly me! That would be the authors, directors, actors, and assorted bungholes who depend on the industry for a living, because they mostly can't do honest work. All of those people who believe that they are valuable. Or, at least they believe that they are far more valuable than reality says they are.

Of course, there are a lot of treatments for various sensitivities nowadays. Maybe they should just visit their analysts?

Sensitized to piracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264652)

I presume that there are actually a few people who are sensitized to piracy?

Yes.

I don't ever pirate any music that is available on audio CD (and that's everything as far as I know, or at least everything I'm interested in) or FLAC. I don't ever pirate software (though under certain circumstances I would be willing to; it just doesn't happen to come up).

I am pirating video 24/7. This will continue, until it is released on normal (not streaming) downloads that mplayer can handle, or un-DRMed media like audio CDs are, or non-proprietary cable connections (no cable box; just plug your cable into your standard QAM tuner). When that happens, I will cease to be a pirate and will resume paying like all those years when they were willing to accept my money for VHS and analog cable. They had me as a customer and told me they didn't want me anymore.

Until then, I pirate and advocate piracy and lend flashdrives full of pirated files to people who don't want to torrent, etc. I spread piracy and create more pirates.

I'm "sensitized" to piracy but that just means I'm aware of it and its consequences, so that I know that it is the best thing to do for both the people and the industry. It is very important that they stop receiving revenue, and lose money. The industry and the people need for the studios to be losing money right now. Even the stockholders of those companies need it, so that they can get their management replaced with DRM-hostile (i.e. pro-profit) leaders. With video piracy, everybody wins (right now).

But that's only for the video companies. If you are in the "IP" business I am not necessarily your enemy; I may even be your friend. Just as I encourage piracy of DRMed video, I discourage and shame people who pirate un-DRMed media. People know that if I find out they're pirating music, they will be treated with contempt. (Some of my friends are musicians. And even if they weren't my friends, I would want them to be able to get paid for their work.) They know that if they pirate non-user-hostile software, they will get righteous preaching for it. (I write software for a living.)

"Sensitive" probably isn't the best word, though it applies. It's rational.

Re:Sensitized to piracy (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264886)

So in an effort to bring an end to DRM, you act in a manner that does nothing more than give excuse to the industry to increase the use of DRM to stop you?

Re:Sensitized to piracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37265736)

Except increasing DRM doesn't work and only siphon their money into a black hole, increasing their loss.

Re:Sensitized to piracy (2)

wagnerrp (1305589) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265796)

Increasing DRM does work, you just fail to grasp what it is trying to do. DRM isn't supposed to stop pirates, or even the more technologically capable customers. DRM is to prevent the bulk of their customers from using their rightfully purchased content in a manner other than is desired by the publisher. In that sense, it is doing a great job.

Re:And what? (1)

Anonymus (2267354) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264736)

I buy and pay for music and games all the times, sometimes even just donating directly, but only when it's essentially direct from the artist (not via an *IAA) and free of DRM. I wish everyone would just put up a donation link. As it is, I feel more guilt in giving money to the RIAA than I do in pirating from artists, but I'd love to remove the guilt from that and then I'd feel proud to pirate things.

Re:And what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37265218)

I'm writing a game right now with the assumption that everyone is going to try to hack it, DoS the servers, fuck with it, and pirate it. If your shit is getting fucked with, pirated, etc. then you're not doing something right.

The problem is that all the fucks that feel entitled to profits with no work on security or DRM need to get off their high horse. It's their problem if they're software is being stolen.

Re:And what? (3, Insightful)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264270)

My favorite is the argument that downloading TV shows is stealing.
I pay for cableTV so I get all those channels. how the hell is it illegal for me to download a TV Show that aired on a TV channel I PAY FOR to watch it later? I'm just using the internet as a TiVo... which is 100% legal.

And how about all TV shows that are broadcast over public airwaves? Those are free to record.

So I gladly continue to download TV shows. and tell the MPAA,RIAA,WMAA, NCAA and WNBA to stuff it up their rectums.

Re:And what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264332)

Because you don't pay for the privilege of watching TV shows. The TV shows are paid for by the commercials; your contribution is just an administrative fee for your commoditization.

Re:And what? (0)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264402)

I pay for cableTV so I get all those channels. how the hell is it illegal for me to download a TV Show that aired on a TV channel I PAY FOR to watch it later?

Because the laws of the land, in combination with the terms you agreed to with your cable and internet service, say so.

Its like people think they arent responsible for the laws of their land or for the agreements they sign. If you dont like the terms, dont sign the agreement (regarding software licensing, DRM, etc). If you dont like the laws, change how you vote. But dont try to push some "I can do whatever I want and then act outraged when the courts disagree" nonsense, part of being an adult is that you put childish ideas behind you..

Re:And what? (4, Interesting)

Xest (935314) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264606)

"If you dont like the laws, change how you vote."

But this is equally a rediculous argument. When parties are too focussed on corporate interests at the expense of the voterbase, through, as we've seen recently in the UK, the likes of entire political parties running shit scared of the likes of Murdoch, then what use is voting when it comes to such things? On such issues most Western countries simply can't be classified as democracies as democratic principles are ignored when legislation is made surrounding things like saner copyright laws.

"But dont try to push some "I can do whatever I want and then act outraged when the courts disagree" nonsense, part of being an adult is that you put childish ideas behind you.."

Except many adults would disagree with you, and in fact, so would history.

Pirate radio in the UK in the 60s and 70s was instrumental in creating the UK's thriving private and public sector radio broadcaster market today. At the time law meant that radio was limited to literally only a select few stations, but because pirate radio persisted, government finally, over 20 - 30 years eventually realised that the only way to solve the problem was to give consumers what they want, not to fight them, because it's a fight that government and other vested interests cannot win.

The ideas you see as childish are the types of ideas that have kept democracy thriving. Bowing down blindly to government and putting faith indefinitely in a corruptible political system is naive at best.

Re:And what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264830)

You say that like the voting thing is so simple.

I defy you to find me one, high-ranking, honest politician who does everything legitimately and cares about absolutely everyone and their interests/rights. Also, they have to be able to be able to actually *do* something, be intelligent, have good problem solving skills. Sometimes those types get elected in smaller positions but they tend to get shafted by the ranking politicians who aren't as benevolent. Even their own staff don't tend to take them seriously. They rarely last.

If you can find someone like that, I'll put all my weight behind them, and I don't get behind much.

Re:And what? (1)

introcept (1381101) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265020)

If you dont like the laws, change how you vote.

Right, so which of the two parties is pro-copyright reform? Voting doesn't make a lick of difference when the laws are being written by the MPAA.The price of digital media in Australia is extortionate and in many cases content is not available at all legitimately. As long as US media companies treat Australian consumers like shit and try to manipulate government policy, they don't deserve to be paid.

Re:And what? (3, Insightful)

RearNakedChoke (1102093) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265276)

I pay for cableTV so I get all those channels. how the hell is it illegal for me to download a TV Show that aired on a TV channel I PAY FOR to watch it later?

Because the laws of the land, in combination with the terms you agreed to with your cable and internet service, say so.

Its like people think they arent responsible for the laws of their land or for the agreements they sign. If you dont like the terms, dont sign the agreement (regarding software licensing, DRM, etc). If you dont like the laws, change how you vote. But dont try to push some "I can do whatever I want and then act outraged when the courts disagree" nonsense, part of being an adult is that you put childish ideas behind you..

There's many times where you SHOULD say fuck the law. It was the LAW that made slavery legal. And it was "illegal", "lawbreaking" slaves that dared escape from their masters. And it took a damn war to make change, not stupid letters to their congressman. And It was the fucking LAW that made Rosa Parks a criminal. It wasn't the fucking voting booth that made change. It was people breaking stupid ass laws and going to jail that did it. And don't try to argue that slavery is different than corrupt copyright law. Of course it is dumbass. The point isn't the level of injustice, but rather that injustice is sometimes best overcome via civil disobedience.

Re:And what? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265774)

There's many times where you SHOULD say fuck the law. It was the LAW that made slavery legal.

Why not Godwin the conversation while we're at it?

I mean, this isnt slavery we're talking about. The gross, heinous travesty is that an artist signed a contract with a company for money, agreeing that the company owned the rights to the results of their labor; and that company released it under certain licensing terms. At any time you can choose not to purchase that license, but I fail to see in what way you can claim "you not getting the latest work from Justin Beiber" is any different than "you not being entitled to a free copy of Microsoft Windows", or how you can possibly compare it to "forcible enslavement of a people".

The sense of entitlement here is overwhelming; someone did work to produce the music, and unfortunately for you you simply dont have a claim on it for free.

Re:And what? (1)

LordLimecat (1103839) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264372)

Each time people see something like this they feel ever less guilty about, and ever less desensitized to piracy.

You mean "more desensitized" i think, which is ridiculous, since noone gives a crap about piracy now anyways.

I mean, I think a lot of the laws suck too, but to watch people honestly defending perpetually using pirated games and defending Joel Tenenbaum and Jammie Thomas, is ridiculous. As bad as the laws (and their requisite punishments) might be, I dont think anyone can make the case that people care too MUCH about piracy and copyright. One might remark that that is in fact the reason that MPAA is reacting so violently, because they recognize that noone really cares, and emotion on the subject ranges from general apathy to violent opposition.

Re:And what? (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265374)

Really, all wars in whatever context rely on either winning the hearts and minds of the people, or brutally supressing them. The MPAA in it's war on piracy is attempting the latter, yet even the latter only works as a temporary stop gap, the former is the only permanent solution, yet that's a battle they've already long lost.

Let me ask you, what do you think the purpose of DRM is? Go up to a dozen people on the street and ask them the same thing. Nearly all of them will tell you DRM is to prevent media theft. With how quickly TV and movies show up on the internet, surely someone, somewhere in the industry would have realized all their efforts aren't doing a damn thing, and perhaps they should not spend all that money developing such measures.

DRM has nothing to do with anti-piracy measures. It exists to assert control over the consumer, and the consumer's rightfully purchased product, long after they have relinquished ownership of it. It exists to take away the rights and capabilities of the legitimate paying customer, so they can only consume their media in approved ways on approved hardware. The have sidelined the real issue, distracting people with this piracy red herring. The HAVE already won the hearts and minds of the people. It's a battle we've already long lost.

If you want to continue promoting the illegal duplication and distribution of copyrighted works, they you're just a dirty thief who wants all the things you don't want to pay for. If you actually want to "win the war" against the MPAA, find a way to campaign to the public about the real use for DRM. No on cares what happens to the pirates, but they will care when they understand how their own rights as law-abiding citizens are being taken away.

Re:And what? (1)

rocket rancher (447670) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265766)

To be fair I think it's more subtle than that. Each time people see something like this they feel ever less guilty about, and ever less desensitized to piracy.

Each time the MPAA does something like this, they push people further and further away from legitimate services.

I for one don't see why anyone should see the slightest guilt in downloading MPAA movies, frankly paying money to buy their product to support their existence seems more morally bankrupt than downloading, or ideally just simply not watching their content at all nowadays.

Really, all wars in whatever context rely on either winning the hearts and minds of the people, or brutally supressing them. The MPAA in it's war on piracy is attempting the latter, yet even the latter only works as a temporary stop gap, the former is the only permanent solution, yet that's a battle they've already long lost.

right -- do I really need to remind you that if you grab them by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow? You protect profits by whatever means necessary. Failing to do so is immoral, since the only morality in business is a comfortably darwinian one.

Re:And what? (2)

tpgp (48001) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264052)

I'm sure the MAFIAA is oh so terrified of the protesters who after a day or so will get tired, go home, and watch a movie and listen to some music.

You know, what? I reckon the people behind AFACT are truly terrified of people getting tired, going home, and watching a movie and listening to some music that they've downloaded from a non AFACT site.

Re:And what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264840)

I'm sure the MAFIAA is oh so terrified of the protesters who after a day or so will get tired, go home, and watch a movie and listen to some music.

You know, what? I reckon the people behind AFACT are truly terrified of people getting tired, going home, and watching a movie and listening to some music that they've downloaded from a non AFACT site.

And then talk up said movies and music to their friends, who will be more likely to buy said movies legitimately. Thus giving the MPAA/RIAA more money to sue the first group for more money.

Yeah. I'm sure they're reeeeeeeeal terrified that the people they sue money out of indirectly advertise for them, and that said people never seem to notice or care.

liars touts & shills resurgent on /. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37263704)

you may continue to call this weather, if it suits you to do so.

as for the agenda bearing corepirate nazi shills; nothing new here.

disarm. tell the truth. feed the hungry. the only mathematically & spiritually correct options now.

hang on to your hemoglobins, the test has yet to come.

Re:liars touts & shills resurgent on /. (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264008)

I completely hedgehog with you.
I think that it's about triangle that we bananapatch these walking.

beans. purple. the sun is made partially of hydrogen. there is also helium.

tldr; What the hell are you trying to say??

Well, misery loves company I guess (1)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263714)

I guess it's nice to know that the U.S. isn't the only country whose leaders are just slavish lapdogs for the MPAA/RIAA. Goodday mates!

The Truth (4, Insightful)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263816)

US Embassy fears the trial could become portrayed as 'giant American bullies versus little Aussie battlers'.

So they are worried about the truth getting out. That is a warning flag that you are on the wrong side of an argument.

Re:The Truth (4, Informative)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264038)

Fear of being "portrayed" as giants bullies is a far different thing than actually being giant bullies. Now while I think the MPAA are giant extortionist bullies, but this cable is less fear of leaking the truth and more simple image management. And the Embassy doesn't really have anything to do with the case, it looks more like they were briefed simply because it's an international case, and what they fear is America looking bad. It's not like the US Embassy is trying to defend their own actions.

The cable doesn't actually seem to contain anything scandalous, it just comfirms that the MPAA is the primary motivator behind the case. IANAL but that doesn't seem like either a surprise or a problem (legally speaking. Of course the MPAA are a bunch of scummy bastards who should be banned from legal filings pretty much period.)

Re:The Truth (0, Troll)

AmonTheMetalhead (1277044) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264320)

what they fear is America looking bad.

They shouldn't worry, America hasn't looked good in ages.

Re:The Truth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37265230)

... It's not like the US Embassy is trying to defend their own actions.

Right.
Also, given the current trend of affairs there isn't much it can do/say to defend it anyways, is there?

Re:The Truth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264544)

Someone should tell ALL Americans to pull their head in and leave other countries to rule their citizens how they like.

Re:The Truth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37265720)

We're trying.

Dinosaurs (5, Insightful)

Severus Snape (2376318) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263836)

The most worrying part of the cable is they admit one of the main reasons behind the higher rate of piracy in Australia is due to wait for content to broadcast in Australia and in some cases TV series and such never been released on DVD at all. They accept this, why the hell don't they tackle the real problem then instead of sueing everybody into oblivion just because their business model fails?

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

Jarryd98 (1677746) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263994)

This would require some form of proactive, and morally decisive entity. The MPAA are not qualified to act in such ways.

Re:Dinosaurs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264530)

The MPAA are not qualified to act in such ways.

Yeap, I googled for "MPAA TAFE degree" and nothing relevant came out. Would there be some apprenticeship opportunities?

Re:Dinosaurs (2)

am 2k (217885) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264002)

Those aren't the same people. It looks to me like the diplomats of the US embassy are more on the intelligent side compared to the MPAA decision makers.

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

powerlord (28156) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265370)

Those aren't the same people. It looks to me like the diplomats of the US embassy are more on the intelligent side compared to the MPAA decision makers.

I'm not sure that's saying much.

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

blahplusplus (757119) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264016)

"They accept this, why the hell don't they tackle the real problem then instead of sueing everybody"

Businesses have no business running a good business! Truth be told it's about control the rather not 'compete' they rather try to find a way to create a walled garden to keep their control. We're seeing the beginning of this in videogames where many games are becoming free2play mmo's and are DRM'd with steam or an always online connection.

Re:Dinosaurs (2)

JustAnotherIdiot (1980292) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264046)

Because that would
A. Require they admit fault on their part and
B. Require they do some sort of action other than a lawsuit.

Re:Dinosaurs (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264078)

Because the MPAA, being a shield organization, can't really change that. Its members have to come to the same realization, but they're paying the MPAA dues to keep from having to confront reality.

MPAA is paid to shield the movie studios from the reality that their business model is broken. When these things "hit the fan" so to speak, the MPAA takes the flak and the movie studios hype their next release. How many people gripe that Sony, Universal, or Disney do these things? None. They blame the MPAA. Thus the real culprits never face the wrath they deserve. And because of that, they never learn the lessons they need to learn.

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

kevinNCSU (1531307) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264152)

Because the US Embassy in Australia doesn't produce and own TV shows?

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

powerlord (28156) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265422)

Because the US Embassy in Australia doesn't produce and own TV shows?

Really?

I thought they were behind that hit Beijing Show: "Big Brother: US Embassy - Australia"

Re:Dinosaurs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264208)

The bit I've never understood about this is, just what do the copyright holders gain from such delays?
How does not selling something improve the companies' bottom line?

Re:Dinosaurs (3, Informative)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264394)

Under the(now broken) assumption that "not selling" means "the consumers just have to suck it up and wait", it can be a useful price discrimination tactic. If one market is willing to pay more, you release there first(so that if there is any uncontrolled intra-market flow, remember kids, free trade is only for corporations, not for you!, it is more expensive copies flowing to rabid fanboys in lower-price countries, rather than low-price-but-legitimate copies being imported into higher priced regions). NTSC/PAL differences and DVD region coding are also directed at stopping that; but those are mostly a dead letter at this point.

There are likely also delays that stem simply from the transaction costs and delays involved in the hellish morass that is international licensing contracts; but those aren't really the product of intention, just inertia.

Commonwealth countries are, presumably, hit particularly hard by this sort of thing because they are more likely to get english-language releases, which would be generally quite acceptable to customers in the US and UK, which are prime early-release markets. Markets with less common languages may see a delay for dubbing; but it is less likely that studios would be worried about those being imported, except by relatively small expat populations.

Re:Dinosaurs (0)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264292)

This would require the Executives to have an IQ above 82.

Currently it is a requirement that to be an MPAA or RIAA executive you must have a IQ no higher than 85 or have suffered repeated serious head injuries.

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

N!k0N (883435) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264566)

This would require the Executives to have an IQ above 82.

Currently it is a requirement that to be an MPAA or RIAA executive you must have a IQ no higher than 85 AND have suffered repeated serious head injuries.

FYP :)

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

Nadaka (224565) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264996)

That isn't really fair. It takes a reasonable amount of intelligence to lie manipulate people.

Re:Dinosaurs (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37265154)

It requires more intelligence than the person you're fooling. Therefore you only need to be a little over average to fool at least half the people....

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

halowolf (692775) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264414)

It'is why I've always stated that people should stop piracy, so that the business models of studios can be allowed to fail leaving them with no more excuses to hide behind. That they may actually be able accept that they are behind the times and no longer meet consumer needs.

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

Type44Q (1233630) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264598)

...why the hell don't they tackle the real problem then instead of sueing everybody into oblivion...

That would be because "winning the war against piracy" isn't the end, it's the means...

Re:Dinosaurs (2)

RogerWilco (99615) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264646)

Yeah. I don't live in Australia, but in Europe. But the problem is the same: A lot of media content is not released globally (not just MPAA, also Japan, India, China) but with the Internet the borders between countries no longer exist.

If I could buy what I want and play it on any device I own, then I would.

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

dintech (998802) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264930)

Reason being, companies want to squeeze the maximum possible revenue out of every individual region. This is why some products are more expensive than the US in Europe but cheaper in say China or India. People get a stronger sense of unfairness when it's something like an mp3 or movie and they pay more for the same digital bits transferred from the same server.

Fix the problem (2)

mu51c10rd (187182) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264852)

That was my take on this as well and what was most glaring. They admit to knowing what the problem is, yet take no steps to fix it. Instead, resorting to questionable legal tactics. Is there any business roadblocks to having movies/ TV shows released globally at the same time?

Re:Fix the problem (2)

rocket rancher (447670) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265650)

That was my take on this as well and what was most glaring. They admit to knowing what the problem is, yet take no steps to fix it. Instead, resorting to questionable legal tactics. Is there any business roadblocks to having movies/ TV shows released globally at the same time?

Well, yeah, there are, and it's all about profit. For example, a studio won't go to the expense of distributing a product to a different region until they are reasonably certain that there is a profit to be made, ie, demand is high enough that they will be able to sell enough units to cover the cost of localizing for that region. I work for a company that assumes that risk, and gambles that the demand is out there, or can be created if it isn't. We acquire licenses for Japanese manga and anime, then localize and distribute them in the US and Canada. We make fucking fantastic amounts of money when we get the timing right, and we lose fucking fantastic amounts of money when we don't.

Re:Dinosaurs (1)

rawler (1005089) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265010)

Q: Why does a dog lick his balls?
A: Because they can

They need no reason other than that. Fix the legal system and they'd have to shape up, but as long as RIAA/MPAA is allowed to heavily influence the WTO, I think they'll prefer to adapt the legal systems rather than their business models.

wow (1)

RyanCheeseman (1180119) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263838)

with a leak like that the MPAA must be just about out of gas!

Nice work (1)

boxxa (925862) | more than 3 years ago | (#37263942)

THIS is what Wikileaks should be doing. Helping expose corrupt organizations that push government to act and pursue certain things.

Re:Nice work (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264548)

THIS is what Wikileaks should be doing. Helping expose corrupt organizations that push government to act and pursue certain things.

Do you suggest Wikileaks better keep their mouth shut about governments gladly falling to the push?

What a surprise (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264006)

How surprising, the MAFIAA wanted to make sure they could sue someone who wouldn't be able to argue their way out of it.

In other news, America thinks it can rule the world. More at 11.

Truly breaking news. (0)

Bruce McBruce (791094) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264086)

In other news, fish swim, horses eat hay and I'm posting this comment through use of a computer. Or is it news when what we already knew about a case is proven to be totally correct?

Movie Studios Don't Care (4, Insightful)

organgtool (966989) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264196)

Oops. Looks like there's a little bit of egg on the movie studios' faces!

There's no egg on any movie studios' faces. The MPAA is used as the tool to deflect hatred away from the groups it represents. If consumers directed their anger squarely at Sony, Universal, et al, then those people would likely consume fewer of their products. But since it's the MPAA we hate, we don't think anything of buying the products of the companies they represent.

In addition to that, the cables state that the US Embassy is the one who fears the image of the United States. The MPAA doesn't care because they're used to be hated - that's become their primary purpose.

Re:Movie Studios Don't Care (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37265640)

Then why aren't you referring to them as "MPAA(Sony, Universal, et al)"?

At least its a change (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37264334)

At least its a change from the Bush/Clinton era where the US govt could care less about what overseas companies.

Now if only they could get their priorities and targets right and go after the right targets.

MPAA and bad PR (4, Insightful)

cain (14472) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264490)

.'' Oops. Looks like there's a little bit of egg on the movie studios' faces!"

The movie studios do not care that the MPAA looks like goons and everyone hates them. That's what the MPAA was created to do and that's why the studio keep them funded: they take all the bad PR on behalf of the studios. They are a front to take the bad PR.

I will get moded into oblivion.... (3, Interesting)

FlyingGuy (989135) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264760)

But the simple answer is, stop pirating content and they will stop taking you to court.

Regardless of peoples "I want it therefor since they are not providing it I will find a way to get it without their consent and give it away to all my friends" actions and attitudes the content is the property of the creators and it is their right to distribute it in the manner and time of their choosing and no one elses.

AND (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37265144)

DONT buy there crap keep what ya got everyone go silent for a few years and then they will cry its piracy when its not

Re:I will get moded into oblivion.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37265172)

But that 'right' was granted to them for a certain purpose, and that purpose has nothing to do with withholding the work.

Re:I will get moded into oblivion.... (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37265324)

Is that like:

"don't let anyone know you're homosexual, if you don't want to be persecuted for it"

"don't dress like a slut if you don't want to be raped"

"don't make a fuss if you don't want to be hammered down" ?

Yup, I can totally see your point..... If I disagree with your actions than have no proven effect on me, and you have every natural right to be doing (which we do in this case, even if it's not legal, it is bloody moral) I should hit you as hard as I bloody well can.....

 

Re:I will get moded into oblivion.... (1)

minio (1640735) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265686)

MPAA is taking ISP to the court not me.

Re:I will get moded into oblivion.... (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 3 years ago | (#37265706)

They're not taking the pirates to court. They're taking the ISP to court for failing to play enforcer for the MPAA and its sponsors.

You steal content, you get charged. I'm fine with that. But the economic burden for enforcement isn't being borne by the studios. They are pushing part of the cost of their doing business out onto others. And its quite possible that, if the studios incurred these costs, they would revisit the economics of an outdated distribution system. And then we'd see some changes in their pricing structure and business model and less motivation for piracy. And if governments looked at the public's cost incurred to protect copyrights and patents and weight these against the true benefit to the public, they'd revisit the exclusive terms granted for such rights.

Re:I will get moded into oblivion.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 3 years ago | (#37265742)

All we're asking for is reasonable distribution practices and an end to mafia-style tactics in the courtroom. You are simply parroting the MPAA's propaganda.

...the content is the property of the creators and it is their right to distribute it in the manner and time of their choosing and no one elses.

I agree, give the creators back their work! Down with the *AA!

Cable author (2)

geogob (569250) | more than 3 years ago | (#37264838)

The author of the cable seems pretty lucid about the whole copyright/piracy situation (I doubt the ambassador redacts the cables himself). Sadly, the people behind the movie associations do not share that lucidity.

From TFA:

[...] Australia, which does have very high rates of illegal movie and television show downloads, in part because of the sometimes long gaps between their release in the US and their arrival in Australian theaters or on local television.

Oh! Did we just mention a probable (reasonable?) cause for increased piracy... which can be very easily solved?

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