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Did Apple Impersonate Police To Recover the Lost iPhone 5?

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the yes-no-maybe dept.

Iphone 233

zacharye writes "This whole lost iPhone 5 prototype story just got whole lot more interesting. According to SF Weekly, six investigators claiming to be members of the San Francisco police department descended upon one Bernal Heights, San Francisco man's home in search of a lost iPhone 5 prototype that CNET originally reported had been left in a bar. The scary part? The SFPD does not seem to be aware of such an investigation. Instead, it appears as though they may have actually been members of Apple's security team allegedly impersonating police officers." So far this claim seems to be developing solely through media communications; in order for the SFPD to start an investigation, the man whose house was searched would need to speak with the police directly. Update: 09/03 12:14 GMT by S : A later report indicates police were present, but they stood outside while Apple employees searched the house. No police report was filed because Apple wanted it kept a secret.

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233 comments

That's thilly.... (1, Flamebait)

grub (11606) | more than 2 years ago | (#37290900)


The San Francisco police and Apple lads at odds? I foresee a Sissy Boy Slap Party! [youtube.com]

Re:That's thilly.... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291130)

The SF police are no sissies. They are strong and tough, like pictured below (possibly not safe for homophobes, though fully clothed and just standing around):
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/1f/DaddyandTheMuscle.jpg [wikimedia.org]

Re:That's thilly.... (4, Insightful)

KingAlanI (1270538) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291314)

yes, many gays still act like males. (likewise for lesbians that actually act like females.) what a concept. :P

"Impersonate" is probably too strong (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37290920)

It all depends on what they said and did. A lot of people mistake private security for police, but it doesn't mean they're impersonating them.

Re:"Impersonate" is probably too strong (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291094)

He's claiming that they said they were SFPD. If they said that, or even suggested it, then there's a strong claim for criminal trespass. Privilege to enter a house cannot be gained through deception.

Re:"Impersonate" is probably too strong (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291134)

Sure it can. The police do it all the time.

Re:"Impersonate" is probably too strong (2)

icebike (68054) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291184)

Well if they searched the house, as the summary suggests, then it goes a LONG way past mistaking private security for police.

In this day and age, who is smart enough to pick up a lost phone in a bar and then try to sell it superstitiously and is still to dumb to tell a real cop from a rent-a-cop?

Not saying I believe any part of this story. The entire thing may be made from whole cloth since precisely one guy (Sergio Calderon, 22) is making this claim with nothing to back it up except a phone number that could easily be found via other means. (No business card, just a phone number).

No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (2, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#37290936)

Ha, the San Francisco Police Department WISHES they were as powerful as Apple security. Half the security guys at Apple have licenses to kill, and a pretty good portion of them are ninjas.

Re:No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (2)

jamiesan (715069) | more than 2 years ago | (#37290996)

Fruit Ninjas?

Re:No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (1)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291166)

Well, I guess that self-defense class will finally pay off.

Re:No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (1)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291486)

Ooh, ooh, ooh; want to learn how to defend yourself against pointed sticks, do we? Getting all high and mighty, eh? Fresh fruit not good enough for you, eh? Well let me tell you something my lad! When you're walking home tonight and some great homicidal maniac comes after YOU with a bunch of loganberries, don't come cryin' to me!

Re:No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291064)

On a serious note, impersonating any police officer is a BFD! As in, the employee will be facing jail time and the company fined.

Re:No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (3, Insightful)

elrous0 (869638) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291112)

This is Apple we're talking about. No one will do shit about it.

And I'm being serious in that part.

Re:No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291358)

That's exactly what I'm thinking will happen... It's a BFD if any of us "little people" do it. Apple? Not so much.

Re:No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (2)

tysonedwards (969693) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291332)

Assuming of course that Apple doesn't go in and provide them with the absolute best legal defense money can buy...
Seems more likely that they will simply discredit the guy who is making the claim that one of Apple's representatives were impersonating a police officer.
Plus, you gotta think about it from the simple perspective that they have iPhones, so it's not like their exact physical location isn't logged at all times to show *exactly* where their employees were at the time of this alleged act.

Re:No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (1)

boorack (1345877) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291140)

Being heavily pumped Wall Street Wonder Bubble and having newly assigned crap-MBA CEO they might assume that they can do whatever they want and expect impunity.

Re:No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291294)

Dude... Apple isn't a bubble, elsewise they wouldn't be over Exxon-Mobile in cap. Their stock has only one place to go, and that's up.

Apple has too many markets and too many loyal customers to fail in any way, shape, or form for the near (if not forseeable) future.

Re:No, Apple is WAY more powerful than the SFPD (0)

sribe (304414) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291302)

Being heavily pumped Wall Street Wonder Bubble...

What a ridiculous comment. A P/E ratio of And remember, that P/E ratio is today's price over trailing 4 quarters' revenue--even if the growth rate falls off quickly over the next several quarters the price will have to move up substantially just to maintain a P/E of 12 or better. And I'll bet you that the huge year-over-year gains in their 2 weakest quarters are just an early sign of an absolutely huge holiday season coming up. Wait, no, I can't take that bet--I already put all my money on it ;-) As I've said to posters on /. in other threads--you'd definitely better stick to indexed mutual funds if that comment is any indication of your analytic ability ;-)

There is no magic market indicator (1)

boorack (1345877) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291580)

You don't look where real bubble is. Apple P/E is misleading at best. Their market cap relies on inflated profits - mostly from iPhone and iTab 'luxury' products with monopoly-like profit margins on both. Take these margins away (hello, Android) and it will pop. With $350B invested into their stock it is clearly visible why not only Apple but half of Wall Street fights teeth and nails with commodization in this area in general and Google/Android in particular.

Ha ha ha (2)

bigsexyjoe (581721) | more than 2 years ago | (#37290942)

This is hilarious! Why do they give out these phones anyway? Besides, Apple is a religion. The security team should have impersonated priests to get the phone back.

Apple is the most powerful company in the world. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37290968)

I think the fact that Apple is the most powerful (in market cap :P ) in the world speaks for itself. They might have their own security team to carry out FBI style raids.

Like in the raids of the counterfeit stores.

Re:Apple is the most powerful company in the world (1)

v1 (525388) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291066)

Actually they usually go with hired private security for things like this.

"FBI style raids"? seriously, lose the drama.

None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37290974)

There's a reason the SFPD doesn't know about it. It never happened. The entire incident, from the loss to the "search" is a story designed to generate hype for the iPhone 5.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37290990)

too bad it's just generating anger toward Apple.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291074)

too bad it's just generating anger toward Apple.

Never heard the quote "any publicity is good publicity" before?

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (5, Insightful)

KDR_11k (778916) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291104)

Would Apple really need such a stunt to get publicity for the next version of iProduct? People will line up around the whole block the moment Apple announces an iPhone 5.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291136)

People will line up around the whole block the moment Apple announces an iPhone 5.

Only if The Jobs is still around to use his alien mind powers on them.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (1)

MichaelKristopeit355 (1968164) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291222)

Would Apple really need such a stunt to get publicity for the next version of iProduct? People will line up around the whole block the moment Apple announces an iPhone 5.

i seems to me that such a stunt would constitute such an announcement just as well as any other type of arbitrary announcement would.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (1)

Pharmboy (216950) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291122)

Yes, it is an overused cliche that is wrong as often as it is right.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291258)

That was my thought, Apple might want to consult with Netflix and Comcast if they're under that delusion. Somebody selling service for Comcast seriously came to my Dad's door and pitched them them the service as not being as bad as previously.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (1)

RightSaidFred99 (874576) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291124)

Yeah, because nobody knows about Apple already. That idiotic saying only applies to some entity with low name recognition or stale name recognition. Once literally every person who could conceivably buy your produce knows you exist, it's not true at all.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291146)

that's a hugely stupid response.

Ever hear of OJ Simpson? Tell him that. Or how about Casey Anthony?

suck it, anon

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (1)

Mikkeles (698461) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291226)

Never heard the quote "any publicity is good publicity" before?

Yeah, tell that to Bonnie and Clyde.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (1, Troll)

icebike (68054) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291234)

More likely, Mr Sergio Calderon realized this is the perfect time for a sequel to the iPhone 4 found-in-a-bar story and simply made the whole thing up, and Apple had nothing to do with the story at all.

There isn't a shred of proof the visit or the search ever happened.

I'm pretty sure Apple would come up with something more clever than this juvenile stunt which serves go give them a black eye rather than build demand for the iPhone 5.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (1)

Intrepid imaginaut (1970940) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291532)

Awww that's a pity. It kinda hits all my cyberpunk buttons, I was just about ready to jack in and do a netrun for the latest blueprints. Sure the rest of the group may have been sitting around twiddling their thumbs for half an hour, but I call that a feature.

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291562)

There isn't a shred of proof the visit or the search ever happened.

How did Calderon get the persona phone number of the Apple Security guy?

Re:None of it ever happened. Marketing Hype. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291592)

Of course. Because the only thing missing from the release of a new Apple product is "hype".

How could the suspect not have known? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291020)

Six guys in black mock turtlenecks, round rim wireframe glasses and blue jeans weren't enough of a giveaway?

Most Probably Inaccurate Reporting (-1, Troll)

BBF_BBF (812493) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291032)

Just because somebody "wrote it" online, doesn't mean it's true. Most probably, CNET just published a quote from "some guy" without verifying the facts first.

Re:Most Probably Inaccurate Reporting (2)

sjames (1099) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291176)

You mean other than talking to the actual SFPD that does indeed have a report of the incident? That and calling the number the man was given and finding out it goes to Apple security.

Re:Most Probably Inaccurate Reporting (1)

Caerdwyn (829058) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291230)

Or is it more likely that rather than having a company commit very-easily-provable felonies, the person who claims he was "raided by Apple security pretending to be cops" is just plain lying, and that he dug up Apple security's phone somewhere to attempt to lend credibility to an otherwise unbelievable story?

Re:Most Probably Inaccurate Reporting (1)

sjames (1099) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291322)

It is possible, but surely that would come out pretty quickly when the actual SFPD has a look. If he was just looking for some publicity, you might think he would call CNET, but NOT the actual police.

Of course they did.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291034)

They need to take the farse at least one tiny step further than last year in order to make shitty hearlines like this.

Also where is the astroturfing tag?

Apple markets them as (5, Funny)

cyberchondriac (456626) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291036)

iPigs

Steve Jobs has just issued an Executive Order... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291070)

not to talk about this. Luckily he will never press "The Button". He hates buttons.

Re:Steve Jobs has just issued an Executive Order.. (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291278)

I wish he'd leave Buttons alone, if it weren't for him, Mindy would certainly be crushed by a steamroller or fall off the Eiffel Tower.

What really happened... (3, Interesting)

csumpi (2258986) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291088)

- this Apple employee "lost" an iPhone5 at a bar
- this undercover Apple employee "found it" and listed it on craigslist
- this undercover Apple employee bought it for $200
- this Apple employee in a uniform picked it up
- the whole internet ran wee-wee-wee silliness about it

It's all part of the hype machine's advertising campaign. You guys have all been fooled.

Re:What really happened... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291480)

Quite honestly, why is this even a story.

Who gives a flying fuck?

Re:What really happened... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291648)

You forgot one item:

- Profit!

Forecasting our future (1)

ludomancer (921940) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291100)

Sadly, this is just a small hint of what's to come. I don't expect anything other than full-on corporate armies, each waging espionage and intellectual (and other) warfare against one another, to be the future of the US. Get used to it. Soon Apples Security team WILL be the police dept. :(
(and every other company with the money/man-power).

Re:Forecasting our future (2)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291154)

Corporate police forces are not new - some railway companies in the United States have had their own private police forces next to forever. And Apple probably figures they're more important than Burlington Northern - Santa Fe.

Re:Forecasting our future (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291268)

the rail police are long established. and iirc semi-official

Re:Forecasting our future (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291292)

The difference is that those security forces only work on railroad property or next to it under specific conditions. It's also a side effect of most of their infrastructure being in the middle of nowhere.

That being said, if the reports prove to be accurate, somebody is going to prison, impersonating an officer is a serious crime.

Re:Forecasting our future (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291306)

Railroad police are not private police. They are actual commissioned law enforcement and cross state lines willy-nilly and enforce any states laws where the railroad owns property.

Re:Forecasting our future (1)

Drgnkght (449916) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291334)

Anyone interested in finding a good(bad?) example of corporate police forces should google "pinkerton coal miners". Interesting stuff there if you like history.

Re:Forecasting our future (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291280)

There's a movie called Cypher. It had a surprisingly relevant fragment. [youtube.com]

Upside is Apple's security will have really snazzy uniforms and tacticool guns.

Did you know,,, (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291102)

that when the police wants to know where somebody is, they ask Apple?

There's no *official* investigation... (4, Interesting)

_0xd0ad (1974778) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291108)

The number they gave him was of an Apple employee whose title is "senior investigator" and who previously worked for the San Jose PD.

Maybe they were real cops. Maybe he called in an unofficial favor...

Re:There's no *official* investigation... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291158)

The number they gave him was of an Apple employee whose title is "senior investigator" and who previously worked for the San Jose PD.

Maybe they were real cops. Maybe he called in an unofficial favor...

This is any better or actually any different?

Re:There's no *official* investigation... (3, Funny)

Jah-Wren Ryel (80510) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291614)

This is any better or actually any different?

It is actually worse. When an off-duty cop gets hired to work for a private employer they should not have any privileges that normal private security would have - i.e. none. Anything else is abuse of power. Sadly, that's not the way it works in the US where off-duty cops get all the privileges and protections that on-duty cops get. I had a friend who was assaulted by a bouncer at a bar - she hit him back and got charged with assaulting an officer because he was an off-duty, out of uniform cop moonlighting as a bouncer.

Re:There's no *official* investigation... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291370)

Something about that line of reasoning doesn't make sense though. You'd think a 26 year veteran would know something as basic as the fact that impersonating a cop is a jail-able felony and that if you did decide to do that, that you wouldn't leave behind your real name and direct contact number behind.

Re:There's no *official* investigation... (2)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291476)

Exactly. An experienced law enforcement officer would know how to do this a lot better than what was described. At the very least, they'd know that having a bunch of cops doing a "favor" off-duty for what will undoubtedly be at least a minor news story is a really stupid idea.

*HOW* did they find the guy? (1)

Frosty Piss (770223) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291114)

The guy admits he was at Cava. Just how did Apple find his house?

Sure, the fake cop thing is troubling.

But still, how did Apple discover the location of some random guy who had drinks at Cava?

Apple == BAD? Maybe.

But one wonders if in fact this random guy who had drinks at Cava was in fact at one time had the stolen/ lost phone?

Otherwise, how would Apple Thugs found his address?

Re:*HOW* did they find the guy? (1)

sribe (304414) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291192)

Otherwise, how would Apple Thugs found his address?

Really? Seriously??? GPS? Find my iPhone? Have you been living under a rock?

Re:*HOW* did they find the guy? (1)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291256)

But still, how did Apple discover the location of some random guy who had drinks at Cava?

Supposedly, they traced the phone to the guy's house. They spoke to the owner of the house who told the investigators that he had been at Cava but he didn't take a phone. He allowed them to search the house and they found no phone.

Considering the accuracy of the iPhone AGPS, perhaps they should have knocked on his neighbor's door...

Re:*HOW* did they find the guy? (1)

LWATCDR (28044) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291266)

umm. Do you think that just maybe that any prototype iPhone might just have GPS and 24/7 tracking of location turned on? Just maybe?....

Re:*HOW* did they find the guy? (1)

nahdude812 (88157) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291340)

They didn't find the phone there. Maybe they pulled a favor at Cava and got a creditcard receipt, then located that CC number in their own internal creditcard database from iTunes. Even if they only had last-four digits, there can't be that many matches in the area.

I searched Apple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291116)

for a sign of intelligent life. Finding none, I moved on.

If this is true (0)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291118)

I hope they nail Apple to the fucking wall.

This is too far.

Re:If this is true (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291472)

Assuming that the story is true. I've read that the lost phone and raid was a hoax. So when reporters ask SFPD about the raid, they had no clue about it. Which then lead to accusations that Apple lied about being police officers. Of course my Internet sources could be wrong. They also told me CmdrTaco WAS Steve Jobs.

Re:If this is true (1)

blueg3 (192743) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291550)

It seems pretty unlikely, since Apple would know that the story would get out and they already know that an iPhone prototype loose in the wild is pretty decent publicity, so it's a very stupid idea. Still, if they actually did it, I think it's likely that it will not be cheap at all, and I think they'll deserve everything they get for pulling such a stunt.

It probably even won't be cheap if it's Apple pulling a hoax. It seems a lot more likely that it's a blogger or other attention-seeker out to generate press for some reason. Hopefully they won't be hard on him.

Re:If this is true (1, Insightful)

sl3xd (111641) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291552)

If true, I absolutely agree.

However, it must be understood that many of Apple's competitors spend massive amounts of money to smear Apple (and each other).

As far as what we *know*:
    - Some media outlets are claiming there was a stolen iPhone prototype. The details are frankly shaky enough as it is - the only "lead" is the bar owner claims that he was contacted by someone claiming to be Apple security.
    - A couple of people are claiming that a group impersonating the police searched a guy's home, looking for an iPhone.

Here's the thing: I've learned to be more than a little leery about press reports about any company, because "the competition" is always ready & willing to smear each other. The details are so sparse as to make it sound more than a little fishy.

All anyone has to do is:
    - Pick a bar
    - Follow a mark. Preferably somebody the public would be "sympathetic" towards.
    - Contact the bar, claim to be from Apple, and claim there was a lost phone.
    - Send a crew out to the mark's home, and impersonate the police department.

It's cheap, low risk of ever being caught, and pays off big. Classic mudslinging.

Who would stand to gain? Any of Apple's competitors, anybody who wants to short Apple stock, a news outlet with a grudge against Apple... there are more than a few options.

The more I think of it, more it sounds like a smear campaign. Apple has far too much to lose, and they aren't idiots. Apple is quite conscious of how closely their every move is watched.

Yaaaaaawwwwwwnnnnn (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291126)

Boring.

iPhone "Policeman" Photo (1)

decipher_saint (72686) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291198)

Here's what they look like: http://i.imgur.com/CmLXu.jpg [imgur.com]

Re:iPhone "Policeman" Photo (1)

R3d M3rcury (871886) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291288)

Really? They wear very short skirts?

I assume you mean something like this [theworldoflogansrun.com].

Re:iPhone "Policeman" Photo (1)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291352)

Holy crap. 2 links to pics and neither were goatse? What is the Internet coming to?

Re:iPhone "Policeman" Photo (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291466)

This ain't yer paw's Slashdot

that may be a felony (1)

Joe_Dragon (2206452) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291232)

so who will take the fall for this?

Re:that may be a felony (0)

sl3xd (111641) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291632)

I see the following issues:
* The chances of finding any of the individuals who were allegedly impersonating the police (ie. the criminals) is about zero.
* Given that the people involved in the "Police" raid on a private home are comfortable impersonating police, they are almost certainly comfortable impersonating an Apple Employee (ie. the "Apple Security" that called up the bar asking about the iPhone).
* There are organizations with motive, means, and opportunity to impersonate Apple as part of a grudge or smear campaign.

Or (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291344)

Or the whole story is fabricated to garner attention. Or some people have staged the whole affair to cause trouble for Apple. Or an Apple employee(s) made a foolish mistake. Or somebody(s) just plain ol' lyin'.

Tracing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291432)

I thought the iPhone had tracing and remote data wiping.

Fake? Maybe not (1)

PPH (736903) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291446)

A number of police departments in my area permit moonlighting by their cops. In some cases, this just means security in front of the local dance club. But some of them make pretty good coin working security for local companies or detective agencies.

Those may have been real stinkin' badges.

Search Warrant? (1)

Calibax (151875) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291450)

It only matters whether they had a search warrant. If so, it was legal. Search warrants do not have to be served by the police force having jurisdiction over the property being searched. For search warrants, it's the jurisdiction of the judge signing it that matters, so a California state judge can't issue a warrant for a property in New Jersey, for example. And if the guy didn't ask to see the search warrant, he made a big mistake.

It doesn't matter whether they were SFPD. They could have been a nearby police force such as South San Francisco (a separate city), or any number of other nearby city police forces, or county sheriff's deputies, or they could have been one of the task forces set up to combat computer crime in the Bay Area, or they could have been a federal agency.

My best guess (and only a guess) was that it was the Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer Team that operates out of offices in Campbell, CA. They have state-wide jurisdiction.

Clueless article, repeated by clueless Slashdot editor.

Lost iPhone in a bar? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291522)

Is this just a really delayed Deja Vu or what?

Why do people act surprised? (1)

swb (14022) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291554)

Non-cops, ex-cops, bad guys -- impersonating an officer has gone on forever, especially among detectives and security guys. You almost have to give ex-cops a break, acting coplike is probably a tough habit to break.

Generally speaking, white, middle class people do exactly what they're told when a "cop" tells them what to do.

I did a ride-along with a friend who is a cop and it was almost hilarious. Upstanding white people did EXACTLY what I suggested, in a "Is-this-OK?" manner, despite the fact that the cop was in uniform and I wore civilian clothes.

Why is everyone convinced that this is real? (0)

WilliamBaughman (1312511) | more than 2 years ago | (#37291576)

Why is everyone convinced that this is real? Is there some hard evidence that I don't know about? Any evidence indicating:

  • The iPhone being an iPhone 5?
  • That the people who say that got an email message from Apple really did get such a message?
  • That Apple (or an authorized representative) really sent it?

Sneaking around isn't really Apple's modus operandi. If they reacted the way they did last time, this would look totally different, and they haven't given any kind of impression that they were unhappy with the way they handled it last time. If Apple decided to break the law instead of just calling the police (who appear willing to answer Apple's calls) and expose themselves to massive liability with a plan that was very unlikely to work (impersonate a cop and ask for the phone) then why wouldn't they just kick the guy's door in and threaten to shoot him in the head? Once he gave back the iPhone (if he had it) he wouldn't have any evidence to show that Apple threatened him, and if he did, he would probably be too wise to call them on it.

This whole thing screams fake. And tedious fake. It used to be that people in the media were suckered by better con artists than the ones walking around today.

Apple is doing it wrong (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291578)

You contract out of house for Shadowrunners [wikipedia.org], for the sake of plausible deniability.
Having your own security team do it, off territory? That's just stupidity.

iPaganda? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37291642)

Of what consequence to nerds, I ask you, Slashdot.

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