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Smartphones Can't Cure Acne, FTC Rules

timothy posted about 3 years ago | from the that-is-one-spiteful-ftc dept.

Cellphones 205

jfruhlinger writes "Your smartphone can send texts, surf the Web, and update your Facebook page, so it stands to reason that it can cure acne too, right? Well, maybe not. Two companies that marketed acne-cure apps have settled with the FTC and have been forced to take the apps off the market. (Colored light can kill acne-causing bacteria, but needs to be much more powerful than what a smartphone screen can put out.) Almost 15,000 people bought the apps."

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"Audrey Parker," (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345358)

>>FF>>

beauty "enhancing" app (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345368)

let me be the first to resubmit my previous "acne curing app" as a new "beauty enhancing app"

only 15k people? (2)

Surt (22457) | about 3 years ago | (#37345380)

I'm actually surprised teens turned out to be that smart. That seems like a very low number of suckers to me.

Re:only 15k people? (1, Insightful)

frisket (149522) | about 3 years ago | (#37345764)

All scams involve a movement of money from stupid people to smart people (that includes, of course, our current economic crisis, which is just a banking scam to get money out of gullible governments). Maybe teens are just getting smarter. I'd love to know the geopolitical demographics of those 15,000 though.

Re:only 15k people? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345886)

It's sometimes more accurately from the desperate to the privileged. There's a level of desperation at which a "I have nothing to lose" mentality kicks in. I expect it even makes sense, evolutionarily speaking, it's just not appropriate for the modern world.

I'm sure a lot of people equate "desperate" to "stupid". Until they wind up in the former category, at least.

Re:only 15k people? (1)

Reverand Dave (1959652) | about 3 years ago | (#37345918)

If it is was only a buck I bet a lot of kids bought it just because "hey it's only a buck" or even 5 bucks. In the very off chance that something like this would help, 5 bucks is a small price to pay, but still I'd bet that most of the kids who bought this were spoiled rich little idiots that don't have many other things worthwhile to blow their parents cash on.

Re:only 15k people? (2)

Renraku (518261) | about 3 years ago | (#37346206)

Actually, I've found that the most wasteful people are the poor ones. The people I know living paycheck-to-paycheck mostly end up spending every dime on crap instead of keeping some for savings. As an example, I know someone that will go out and eat at an expensive restaurant ($30+ a person) right after getting paid, for their 20 hours a week minimum wage, then complain about not having much money left over for gas. Did I mention they have the latest iPhone, pay $80/mo for mobile service? They can barely afford a place to stay or eat, but they can afford all that, apparently.

Re:only 15k people? (1)

nedlohs (1335013) | about 3 years ago | (#37346420)

No Way!

People who are bad at managing their money tend to end up living paycheck-to-paycheck and running out of money.

What an amazing coincidence.

Re:only 15k people? (4, Insightful)

slippyblade (962288) | about 3 years ago | (#37346594)

Or, here's another thought... Maybe the person's life is so miserable they see that splurge of eating out after payday as the one bright spot in an otherwise desperate and pathetic existence. Or maybe they are stupid. It's sometimes hard to tell the difference.

Re:only 15k people? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345928)

Wow, that is perceptive. You must be one of the smart ones, right? We should could use your input on other important world issues that would be valuable to our readers. We'd love to publish them on monthly basis.

All we need is a nominal monthly publishing fee to cover our costs, then you get the %30 of add revenue after covering our promotion costs. Feel free to give us an email with contact details. We can be contacted here at NotAScam@HonestPetesBlogs.com.

Re:only 15k people? (1)

errandum (2014454) | about 3 years ago | (#37345850)

I'd say that desperate teenagers would do almost anything to get rid of acne.

The mind can rationalize almost everything when trying to achieve a dream like this one.

I would never call them dumb, just victims of a scam.

Re:only 15k people? (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 3 years ago | (#37346524)

The other numbers in TFA are also interesting...

About 3,300 people paid US$0.99 for Acne Pwner on Google's Android Marketplace and about 11,600 people paid $1.99 for AcneApp through Apple's iTunes store, according to the FTC.

There you have it. Proof that iphone users are uglier and dumber than droid users.

-sent from my ipad using the slashdot pro app

Re:only 15k people? (1)

Dthief (1700318) | about 3 years ago | (#37346572)

how long was it available.......and how many people KNEW about it......

What colour is UV? (2)

Jimbookis (517778) | about 3 years ago | (#37345382)

UV kills bacteria. But I don't think the iPhone makes UV. Hey, that gives me an idea... iSolarium! I'll be rich!

Re:What colour is UV? (1)

mark-t (151149) | about 3 years ago | (#37345560)

To answer your opening question... black.

Re:What colour is UV? (1)

Internetuser1248 (1787630) | about 3 years ago | (#37345722)

Actually uv has it's own colour on the spectrum, it is similar to blue/violet but not. The human retina can perceive this colour just like all the others, but the lens of the eye is opaque to ultra violet, so most people cant see it. You can get an operation to strip the opaque layer so you can see ultra violet but it is not recommended as the uv light destroys retinal cells, so you won't see any colours after looking at uv too long.

Re:What colour is UV? (0, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346558)

Actually, the apostrophe has its own use in English and IT IS is similar to ITS but not. My retina can perceive this misuse and it's like getting an icepick in each lens. I wish my eyes were opaque to apostrophes so I couldn't see IT IS instead of ITS.

Re:What colour is UV? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345664)

Oddly enough, the light used in real acne phototherapy is *not* UV - it's in the visible wavelengths, and is thus non-ionizing. The bacteria primarily associated with acne happens to be vulnerable to this type of light; it triggers a chemical reaction that ends up destroying the bacterial cell. Human cells do not contain the particular compound that causes that reaction, which is why those wavelengths aren't harmful to us.

The summary is actually accurate for once - the main reason these apps don't work is that cell phones simply don't produce light at the right wavelengths with nearly enough intensity.

Re:What colour is UV? (1)

Khyber (864651) | about 3 years ago | (#37345804)

And the devices will NEVER be able to produce the right wavelengths with intensity.

Re:What colour is UV? (1)

Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) | about 3 years ago | (#37346634)

Well, not with that attitude.

Re:What colour is UV? (1)

Jarik C-Bol (894741) | about 3 years ago | (#37346114)

or you could just wash your face at least once per day with shampoo that is ideal for your hair type. works wonders for everyone i know who's tried it. Shampoo formulated for *your* hair (ie, thin, oily, dry, etc) tends to do wonders for your face.

Re:What colour is UV? (1)

DJRumpy (1345787) | about 3 years ago | (#37345678)

Actually the article mentions red and blue light, so it sounds like visible light per the study, but it would have to be far more intense than anything a smartphone could ever produce:

"This app was developed by a dermatologist," the marketers of AcneApp said. "A study published by the British Journal of Dermatology showed blue and red light treatments eliminated p-acne bacteria (a major cause of acne) and reduces skin blemishes by 76%."

Houston dermatologist Dr. Gregory Pearson worked with developer Koby Brown on AcneApp, according to FTC documents. AcneApp generated significant media attention in late 2009 and early 2010, just after the app launched, including reports in the New York Times and on Fox News.

The acne treatment claims from both apps were unsubstantiated, the FTC said. Brown and Pearson misrepresented the British of Journal of Dermatology study on light therapy.

Light therapy can help treat acne, but not at the low levels of light iPhone devices emit, some dermatologists have said.

Re:What colour is UV? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345810)

You damned insensitive clod...
Just because your unevolved eyes can't view the UV end of the color spectrum doesn't mean it is colorless.

Re:What colour is UV? (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 3 years ago | (#37346560)

I'm interested in signing onto your enterprise. My idea is to offer an ad-supported "free" version which basically just tells you when and where to get UV light. I have no programming skills, but it would basically show the time until it was daylight and tell the user to go outside naked.

Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

oldhack (1037484) | about 3 years ago | (#37345384)

With their fancy iPhones and Nintendos, they wouldn't know which end of soldering iron to hold.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

Mursk (928595) | about 3 years ago | (#37345412)

Is it the hot one? I bet it's the hot one.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 3 years ago | (#37345424)

Only if by "hold" you mean "stick in their eyes"

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

Jimbookis (517778) | about 3 years ago | (#37345454)

Or stabbed in the face [youtube.com] .

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (2)

idontgno (624372) | about 3 years ago | (#37345858)

I suspect a 600-degree (Fahrenheit) soldering iron tip would do a spectacular job of killing p-acne bacteria. Just apply directly to forehead. And nose. And cheeks.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

sconeu (64226) | about 3 years ago | (#37345868)

Don't laugh, it actually happens.

40 years or so ago, I was soldering a radio kit, when my kid sister came up next to me. She startled me, and my hand jerked. A blob of solder went into her eye.

Luckily, she was fine, but I've been gun-shy around soldering irons ever since.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

publiclurker (952615) | about 3 years ago | (#37346492)

It was my electronics classes in high school that taught me not to blindly grab at falling objects, a trait that has helped me quite a bit in the kitchen.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

dgatwood (11270) | about 3 years ago | (#37346536)

If you look carefully on the back of my hand, you can still see the scar from where I accidentally raised it into the hot part of a soldering gun once. That said, I can't imagine somebody being stupid enough to do it intentionally. You'd feel the heat by the time your skin was an inch away, and you'd pull back almost by reflex unless you were moving really rapidly as I was.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

lgw (121541) | about 3 years ago | (#37346638)

Nope, I grabbed the wrong end of a soldering iron once (not intentionally, of course) - the reflex action that makes you jerk back from hot things is far too slow to save you from a heat source that intense. Man, the blisters that raised!

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (0)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#37345420)

Which is their parents fault, not theirs.
No point in blaming them for something someone else failed to teach them.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

AwesomeMcgee (2437070) | about 3 years ago | (#37345598)

I'm planning on teaching my kid to solder just after CPU + Heatsink installation, and before C. So somewhere around 4 years old. My kid's going to pwn me when he's 9. My own personal debugger.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346354)

. My own personal debugger.

Have you considered breeding them for profit? I think there's a big market for that kind of thing.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

syousef (465911) | about 3 years ago | (#37346448)

I'm planning on teaching my kid to solder just after CPU + Heatsink installation, and before C. So somewhere around 4 years old. My kid's going to pwn me when he's 9. My own personal debugger.

Spoken like a man that has no kids.The reality is for the first 2 years unless you're lucky and has a kid that sleeps you'll be too tired and sleep deprived to do much of anything. Most you'll manage is setting them up with a couple of interesting computer games and teaching them where some of the keys are (great way to teach alphabet).and how to use a mouse.

I'm sure there have been exceptional 4 year olds who've learnt to program, but most kids won't be up to learning to sound out words at 4 let alone reading and writing in any kind of language. Amazing what they can do without language skills though.

My son's 3 and he's quite bright for his age though not a genius (and I say this thankfully - ever heard of a happy genius?). I'd never trust him with a knife at this age let alone a soldering iron. He can swing a bat or club but is quite prone to accidentally hitting his 1 year old sister.

Kids are not something that takes up a little of your spare time. They take up every waking hour while you're with them. You have to put their needs first all the time. Be prepared for that or don't breed. I wouldn't trade my kids for anything, and I'm going to enjoy watching them grow up and helping them learn.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

dgatwood (11270) | about 3 years ago | (#37346626)

I'm sure there have been exceptional 4 year olds who've learnt to program...

I learned on my own with teach-yourself-BASIC books and data tapes when I was in first grade (and I probably could have learned sooner, but we didn't own a computer until then). (I then proceeded to terrify the folks at a music conference a year or two later when their program didn't work, they couldn't find the bug, and I proceeded to fix it, but that's another anecdote.)

I'm quite confident that most kids of above-average intelligence could learn programming at that age, given a language that's easy enough to learn (i.e. procedural programming, not OOP, nor assembly, nor functional programming or any other such insanity). It's more a question of motivation and interest than anything else.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

Jeng (926980) | about 3 years ago | (#37345734)

Put hot thing next to solder, let it melt, move on.

Pretty much common sense, I don't believe there was a single person in my electronics class in highschool that needed to "learn" how to solder.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

Obfuscant (592200) | about 3 years ago | (#37345800)

Pretty much common sense, I don't believe there was a single person in my electronics class in highschool that needed to "learn" how to solder.

How much solder is too much? How much is not enough? How often do you clean the tip? Do you clean it before you shut it off? What does a good solder joint look like? More important, what does a bad solder joint look like? How can you tell a bad solder joint when using ROHS solder and they all look like bad joints?

How do you remove bridges? How do you keep from creating them in the first place? How do you solder SMD? How do you unsolder SMD? Do you "fill in the hole" when the hole is larger than the pin? How do you make a via? How close do you clip the leads after soldering?

For hobby operations, it's pretty much "common sense". For commercial users, learning to solder is important.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345862)

Bigger the blob the better the job!

Which hot thing? (1)

publiclurker (952615) | about 3 years ago | (#37346514)

Placing the solder by the soldering iron will make it melt, but produce a bad joint. The need to heat the lead was something that a lot ofpeople in my classes never quite understood.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345818)

"Which is their parents fault, not theirs."

Perhaps they were busy teaching them about talking snakes.

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345516)

I think it's the end with reflow-oven written on it........

Re:Our "tech savvy" kids (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 3 years ago | (#37346410)

With their fancy iPhones and Nintendos, they wouldn't know which end of soldering iron to hold.

Instead they know how to network their computers, make web pages, and produce/edit/publish the movies they've made..

Yeah, today's kids aren't tech savvy at all.

a fool and his money... (1)

CheshireDragon (1183095) | about 3 years ago | (#37345404)

...are soon parted

Smartphones may not be able to cure acne... (1)

rasteroid (264986) | about 3 years ago | (#37345444)

but I think they have an in built proficiency at transmitting it, especially when phones get passed around (e.g. "Hey Brad, Jake's on the phone, he wants to talk to you.")

Re:Smartphones may not be able to cure acne... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345506)

Friend, acne isn't contagious.

at some point... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345458)

At some point we need to stop protecting people from mind-boggling levels of stupidity, or it just allows people to get away with being even *dumber*.

I think people should be able to market apps like this. If it claims to do something that is physically impossible, and you pay for it, well, it's your own fault for being such an idiot. Because you're probably not *really* that dumb, you just decided you'd rather not bother to think.

Seriously, what ever happened to spending 5 seconds doing a rudimentary level of critical thought?

-s
 

Re:at some point... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#37345482)

These were probably children that were misled. Everyone was a child at one point, they need guidance not your bullshit. What we should do is toss the assholes that make these scams into the clink for a couple decades.

Re:at some point... (4, Insightful)

DanTheStone (1212500) | about 3 years ago | (#37345558)

People have been selling snake oil (fish oil? placebos?) for a very long time. A huge portion of marketing is misleading. You need to learn not to fall for it, not have people try to hide the whole world full of scammers from you. The same ability to sort out bullshit applies to prescription drugs, diets, vitamin supplements, and everything else people try to sell you.

Re:at some point... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | about 3 years ago | (#37345670)

No, we need both. We need people to be able to detect bullshit on their own and we need to have the law deal with the scammers.

Re:at some point... (5, Insightful)

Hatta (162192) | about 3 years ago | (#37345900)

You need to learn not to fall for it, not have people try to hide the whole world full of scammers from you. The same ability to sort out bullshit applies to prescription drugs, diets, vitamin supplements,

mission statements, campaign promises, sermons...

Re:at some point... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346256)

To clarify, fish oil is recognized by the AMA and various international medical organizations as having cardio protective effects. So your grandma was onto something with that cod liver oil. EPA and DHA are essential nutrients. Snake oil on the other hand....

Re:at some point... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346436)

Well, good thing that a comment on the internet saved you from being misled by the AMA and their science.

Re:at some point... (2)

wondafucka (621502) | about 3 years ago | (#37345684)

These were probably children that were misled. Everyone was a child at one point, they need guidance not your bullshit. What we should do is toss the assholes that make these scams into the clink for a couple decades.

You're faulting people for exploiting the weaknesses and insecurities of others? I can't even imagine what Television would be like without it.

Re:at some point... (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | about 3 years ago | (#37345848)

Everyone was a child at one point, they need guidance not your bullshit.

I don't think it's just children that need guidance. People, including adults, seem to fall for scams all the time.

Re:at some point... (1)

plover (150551) | about 3 years ago | (#37345530)

Well, here's a list of 14,999 people (and one smart guy with a lawyer) who have already proven themselves to be even more stupid than I thought possible.

The only thing I don't want to do is support them on the dole. Beyond that, go ahead and rip them all off again.

Re:at some point... (1)

Ruke (857276) | about 3 years ago | (#37345606)

Going broke doesn't make dumb people smarter. Especially with the app that was developed by a Dermatologist: these people are being told by individuals who represent themselves as experts that the product works. If they do a quick google search for "color light kill acne", they get pages and pages of legitimate-looking results. In the United States, we regulate medical claims specifically because it is unreasonable to expect everyone to hold the level of expertise that would allow them to determine the validity of such claims.

Allowing fraud wouldn't necessarily result in a smarter population, but it would provide a financial reward for being a more clever fraudster.

Re:at some point... (1)

Khyber (864651) | about 3 years ago | (#37345844)

"In the United States, we regulate medical claims specifically because it is unreasonable to expect everyone to hold the level of expertise that would allow them to determine the validity of such claims."

That wouldn't be an issue if our educational system hadn't been gutted.

When homeless meth heads know better than the general populace which medical claims are substantiated and which ones are not, you KNOW there is a problem with our educational system.

Re:at some point... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346198)

When did they cut medical spectroscopy from the high school curriculum? I bet it was right after they cut the after-school neurosurgery program.

Google's Android Marketplace (1)

Macrat (638047) | about 3 years ago | (#37345618)

At some point we need to stop protecting people from mind-boggling levels of stupidity, or it just allows people to get away with being even *dumber*.

Isn't that what the "freedom" of Google Marketplace is all about?

Re:Google's Android Marketplace (1)

idontgno (624372) | about 3 years ago | (#37345958)

You're right. Stupid people clearly belong in the iPhone market where they can be protected from their stupidity.

Oh, that's interesting. Reading TFA (yes, this is Slashdot, but go with it) and following a few links indicates that "AcneApp" was an iPhone Market app [go.com] . Never mind. Stupid people belong in the iPhone market, but they won't be any better protected. Just less free. That's OK, I guess; non-stupids don't much need them around anyway.

Re:at some point... (2)

firewrought (36952) | about 3 years ago | (#37345814)

At some point we need to stop protecting people from mind-boggling levels of stupidity, or it just allows people to get away with being even *dumber*.

We're all stupid at something no matter how much knowledge and experience we acquire. (In fact, it's a well known adage that smart people are the most likely to fall for a scam" [thedailybeast.com] .)

While your statement is appealingly righteous, the downside is that the unscrupulous run up costs for the rest of us, no matter what intelligence level they target. I'd rather they not get away with it, even if it spares people the hard-knocks education you advocate. For a society to function anywhere near optimal, the vast majorities of its transactions must be conducted in good faith by all parties.

Re:at some point... (1)

tlhIngan (30335) | about 3 years ago | (#37345994)

We're all stupid at something no matter how much knowledge and experience we acquire. (In fact, it's a well known adage that smart people are the most likely to fall for a scam".)

Not only that, there are some pretty remarkable apps out there.

Magic Mover [appshopper.com] , an app that vibrates the phone in a particular way to push stuff around. Or just have the phone move in a particular direction, just like in the old days where you could design a series of disk accesses to "walk" the disk drive across the floor.

Blower - real air [appshopper.com] plays a specially modulated sound that moves air around.

With strange and wonderful apps like that, it's easy to see how some other apps can proclaim to cure acne or other things.

Re:at some point... (1)

cheekyjohnson (1873388) | about 3 years ago | (#37346042)

smart people are the most likely to fall for a scam

I wouldn't say that they're very smart at being able to tell something is a scam, then. And I think whether someone is "smart" or not is difficult to determine to begin with.

Re:at some point... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346120)

At some point we need to stop protecting people from mind-boggling levels of stupidity, or it just allows people to get away with being even *dumber*.

I think people should be able to market apps like this. If it claims to do something that is physically impossible, and you pay for it, well, it's your own fault for being such an idiot. Because you're probably not *really* that dumb, you just decided you'd rather not bother to think.

Seriously, what ever happened to spending 5 seconds doing a rudimentary level of critical thought?

-s

You can't fix stupid. Tried it several times and it just does not work. If you want to fix something start with greedy people who prey on the stupid. I suspect that you will get the same result though. They go hand in hand the stupid and greedy. It's virtually impossible to keep them apart. Brought to you by Shoehornjob maker of the new app that shows you how to make GOLD from COAL. On sale for 9.95 limited time only. Got ya.

You know what? (4, Insightful)

SilverHatHacker (1381259) | about 3 years ago | (#37345548)

I don't want to live on this planet anymore.

Re:You know what? (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 3 years ago | (#37345600)

Can i have your stuff?

Re:You know what? (1)

mr1911 (1942298) | about 3 years ago | (#37345638)

I can't help you get off the planet, but the living part is in your own hands.

What are you waiting for? Do you need some Kavorkian wannabe to do it for you?

Re:You know what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346138)

I'm thinking he's probably waiting for someone to guarantee they can get his dead body off the planet before he chooses to expire.

The captcha for this post is canons.

Re:You know what? (1)

Sez Zero (586611) | about 3 years ago | (#37345724)

But what about your lawn? Will NO ONE think of the LAWN!?

Who will tell the kids to stay off your lawn if you're not there to do it?

Re:You know what? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346000)

We don't want you living on this planet either. Dick weed.

smart teens? (2)

nblender (741424) | about 3 years ago | (#37345568)

Does that make them 'oxy-morons'?

Re:smart teens? (1)

matthiasvegh (1800634) | about 3 years ago | (#37346054)

Oxytetracycline however, may actually help them. Just saying..

Crazy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345604)

I'm very surprised that it didn't sell way more apps.

Abscessed Tooth [abscessedtoothinfo.com]

user reviews (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345652)

average rating: 4.8 stars

latest reviews:

5 stars: wow the interface is so smooth. very user friendly.

4.5 stars: best app on the store. very intuitive. clean looks.

5 stars: such a convenient solution. keep up the good work.

1 star: did not cure my acne.

Re:user reviews (1)

Megahard (1053072) | about 3 years ago | (#37345876)

Reference, for those who didn't get it. http://www.xkcd.com/937/ [xkcd.com]

Acne-causing bacteria? (1)

MrEricSir (398214) | about 3 years ago | (#37345668)

Are we really sure bacteria is the CAUSE of acne? Sure, a lot of doctors seem to think this, but I've never seen any evidence suggesting bacteria is really to blame.

Re:Acne-causing bacteria? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345712)

Yeah. Here I thought it was all vertebral subluxations.

Re:Acne-causing bacteria? (1)

jabuzz (182671) | about 3 years ago | (#37346174)

My understanding is that we are really sure that bacteria are *NOT* the cause of acne. The cosmetic/drug industry has spent large sums of money on the issue on hopes of coming up with a "cure".

As I understand it what happens is that a reaction to testosterone causes the sweat in a hair folical to become stickier than normal. This neatly explains why it starts at pubeity. As a consequence there is a tendancy for the pore to become blocked easier. This neatly explains why good hygene can reduce the symptons. What then happens is that the sticky sweat building up in the blocked poor is an ideal breading ground for bacteria that can make it worse. This also explains why antibiotics can also reduce the symptons. However bacteria are not the cause of acne.

Unfortunately as far as I am aware this knowledge has only led so far to one drug, and it can only be prescribed by a specialist (at least in the UK) as it can have severe psycholoical side effects. It works by blocking all the "sweat" from being produced, which is something of a sledge hammer approach.

The first drug company to come up with an over the counter medicine to fix the root cause, aka the stickier than normal sweat will of course become fabuously wealthy.

Re:Acne-causing bacteria? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346182)

To get rid of acne, change your diet and get more direct sunlight on your skin.

If that doesn't help, then go see a specialist, as in a dermatologist, "skin doctor".

Of course, anyone who believes a phone will offer a cure for something like that, will prefer self-medication over professional advice. So, I say, let them, they either learn something from it, or they don't and the gene pool gets a little cleaner.

lack of sex (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346416)

Acne appears in sexually mature individuals who are prevented from having sex for a long time, therefore producing and accumulating too much testosterone (which incidentally also results in increased violence, lack of attention and behavioral instability). We keep inventing drugs and cures and pretend we don't see the elephant in the room, a problem we created ourselves. No other animal on the planet would be able lead a normal life in the presence of the opposite sex and being prevented from mating for as long as we are.

Re:Acne-causing bacteria? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346426)

Subluxations.

Dr. Bob will be along presently to explain in detail.

Re:Acne-causing bacteria? (1)

interkin3tic (1469267) | about 3 years ago | (#37346646)

Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease of the pilosebaceous unit resulting from androgen-induced increased sebum production, altered keratinisation, inflammation, and bacterial colonisation of hair follicles on the face, neck, chest, and back by Propionibacterium acnes [nih.gov]

Wiki on Propionibacterium acnes [slashdot.org]

is a relatively slow growing, typically aerotolerant anaerobic gram positive bacterium (rod) that is linked to the skin condition acne... Preliminary research shows healthy pores are only colonized by P. acnes while unhealthy ones universally include the non-pore-resident Staphylococcus epidermidis, amongst other bacterial contaminants. Whether this is a root causality, just opportunistic & a side-effect, or a more complex pathological duality between P. acnes and this particular Staph is not known

So it sounds like bacteria are a necessary part of it.

Bright blight light? (1)

Commontwist (2452418) | about 3 years ago | (#37345696)

Makes me wonder if anyone would buy an app promising to allow your cell phone to generate an EM force field by oscillating it's transmission signal.

Hey, it would be handy when--oops, I mean 'if'--the aliens with particle beam blasters come.

Had to be done (2)

kakyoin01 (2040114) | about 3 years ago | (#37345740)

"Your smartphone can send texts, surf the Web, and update your Facebook page...

...but does it know why kids love Cinnamon Toast Crunch?"

Homeopathy (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345772)

So how come they get fined while producers of homeopathic "medicines" don't?
I'm asking seriously.

Re:Homeopathy (1)

Toonol (1057698) | about 3 years ago | (#37346254)

I would bet they went wrong by actually claiming a medical benefit. Most homeopathic things I've seen make it pretty clear that there's no proven medicinal benefit to their use. To the right kind of wacko, that's almost a selling point.

Maybe they should have just marketed this as a 'cheek-warming' app, with a notice 'acne-curing effects are not scientifically proven'. People would still buy it to cure acne.

Wait, what are they saying? (1)

macraig (621737) | about 3 years ago | (#37345930)

Smartphones Can't Cure Acne, FTC Rules

So is the FTC telling us that smartphones are unable to cure acne or that they're not going to allow them to do it? What is this, a guv'ment conspiracy to protect the benzoyl peroxide cartel?

Settled? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37345950)

The company has settled with the FTC. This means that Apple keeps their cut of $26,500 in app sales, the FTC gets almost $16,000, and the people who got ripped off get nothing.

Sounds fair.

Sucker born every click. (1)

geekmux (1040042) | about 3 years ago | (#37345956)

"...Almost 15,000 people bought the apps."

Ah, you misspelled "dumbasses".

Cripes, where's Red Forman when you need him...

Yeah, well... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346008)

They may have taken my acne curing app, but at least I still get to keep my shakeweight and equilibrium bracelet.

Headline? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346012)

Smartphones Can't Cure Acne, FTC rules

Can not, Do not, or Are not allowed?

Re:Headline? (1)

Toonol (1057698) | about 3 years ago | (#37346272)

Well, regardless of whether they could before, they can't now.

Colored lights can hypnotize (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346090)

Sparkle someone else's eyes!

Ultrasonic mosquito repellent (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346166)

That's another stupid type of app that sells a lot.
Nokia seems to have one of these [ovi.com] promoted in its app store [ovi.com] currently.

And yet they can sell these... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346270)

...at $30 a crack...

powerbalance.com

By the way, read the legal page:
"POWER BALANCE attempts to be as accurate as possible with regard to the description of its products. However, POWER BALANCE does not warrant that all product descriptions or other content of this site is accurate, complete, reliable, current, or error-free. If a product offered by POWER BALANCE itself is not as described, your sole remedy is to return it in an unused condition."

ye olde medicine wagon (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37346328)

the more things change the more they stay the same.

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