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theSkyNet Wants Your Spare CPU Cycles

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the i-just-bet-it-does dept.

Space 136

An anonymous reader writes "Thousands of PC users are being called on to donate their spare CPU cycles to help create a massive grid computing engine to process terabytes of radio astronomy data as part of theSkyNet project. It will be used for, among other things, processing the huge amount of data expected to flow off Australia's forthcoming Square Kilometre Array telescope." One can only assume that "other things" will include achieving sentience and finding John Connor.

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136 comments

inb4 skynet (0)

Alex Belits (437) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383798)

Oh, wait...

Re:inb4 skynet (1, Offtopic)

Samantha Wright (1324923) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383872)

FRY: This is a great, as long as you don't make me smell Uranus. Heh heh.
LEELA: I don't get it.
PROFESSOR FARNSWORTH: I'm sorry, Fry, but astronomers renamed Uranus in 2620 to end that stupid joke once and for all.
FRY: Oh. What's it called now?
PROFESSOR FARNSWORTH: Urectum.

Great choice of name (1)

kamikaze_late2party (1881438) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383800)

And who was to think that the apocalypse would come from the Australian Outback?

Re:Great choice of name (3, Insightful)

Wolfling1 (1808594) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383892)

Why not? Just about everything else in the Australian outback is deadly to humans.

Re:Great choice of name (1)

user flynn (236683) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383920)

Hahaha... you had the grilled shrimp on the barbie?

Re:Great choice of name (1)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384188)

Just about everything else in the Australian outback is deadly to humans.

Don't worry, we have a soft spot for visiting Slashdotters.

It's a quicksand patch, just north of Round Hill Creek...

Re:Great choice of name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384280)

Australians: The only people immune to Australia.

Re:Great choice of name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384494)

I'll give you one better:
one of our ISP's is also called skynet and my friend who's gaming nickname was terminator has a subscription there with that nickname as a registered mail-alias

This is different from SETI@Home...how? (-1)

The Last Gunslinger (827632) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383804)

Seriously, why is this news?

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37383820)

SETI searches for ET.
This would process radio telescope data to create images from radio waves.
Different goals, different organizations.

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (4, Informative)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383882)

SKA [skatelescope.org] - The SKA will give astronomers insight into the formation and evolution of the first stars and galaxies after the Big Bang, the role of cosmic magnetism, the nature of gravity, and possibly life beyond Earth.

SETI [seti.org] , the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence, is an exploratory science that seeks evidence of life in the universe by looking for some signature of its technology.

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384062)

Yes, but how is it different LATELY?

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (2)

mcvos (645701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384116)

For one of them, it's actually quite likely that they'll find something interesting.

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384192)

One is a scientific project, the other is looking to find Alf

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384210)

One is a scientific project, the other is looking to find Alf

No, they are looking for E.T., otherwise they would be named SAlfI@Home! :-)

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384694)

Yes, but how is it different LATELY?

SETI is already running for some time. SKA is still the "under construction" stage.
Is this enough for a specific difference?

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (1)

muckracer (1204794) | more than 2 years ago | (#37385562)

I remember SETI always having issues with work units. There weren't enough so a bunch of users got the same work units. Found that to be a turn-off...didn't have that cozy feeling of actually contributing anything, as with other projects. Has that been worked out?

Also, did not SETI also want to make use of the australia array? What's the status of that (haven't been following it)?

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384254)

Two different projects doing the same thing, I think. SETI is a search for alien signals with the Arecibo telescope, and SkyNet is a search for alien signals with the SKA telescope.

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384318)

Having just read TFA, I find that I missed something important. SETI is just about looking for alien signals. This is about looking for anything interesting, whether it's extraterrestrial intelligence or not.

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37383916)

This is better as you have a really good chance of your computer will contribute a tiny amount to the project and to astronomy in general.

As opposed to SETI where you are most likely processing meaningless noise or using incorrect metrics.

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (0)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384108)

As opposed to SETI where you are most likely processing meaningless noise or using incorrect metrics.

And when you're not, you're contributing to one of the most significant discoveries since fire.

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (1)

muckracer (1204794) | more than 2 years ago | (#37385606)

> And when you're not, you're contributing to one of the most
> significant discoveries since fire.

All romance aside...purely from the distances involved (assuming a radio signal indicating 'intelligent life'), it would certainly be a very exciting discovery (for a while), but not necessarily 'most significant'.
Until we get there (or they here)...even just by radio contact, nevermind physical, we got nothing out of it other than knowing, we're not the only guys around. And that's already a given anyway.

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (2)

Patch86 (1465427) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384016)

I'm happy about it. I only really use SETI@Home because I want to contribute to astronomy with my CPU cycles, and it's the best of the bunch (I found Einstein@Home a little flaky in terms of work unit updates, and for some reason never saw the appeal of MilkyWay@Home). If my cycles could do something more useful for SKA, I'd definitely consider moving over.

Re:This is different from SETI@Home...how? (1)

neonsignal (890658) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384508)

a less likely null hypothesis

Dammit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37383812)

For the love of everything, can we stop making shitty references to Terminator in computational intelligence stories? There are actually people stupid enough to believe that shit. Also, its not funny.

Re:Dammit (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37383828)

Here, have a tampon.

Re:Dammit (2)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383846)

For the love of everything, can we stop making shitty references to Terminator in computational intelligence stories? There are actually people stupid enough to believe that shit. Also, its not funny.

Can't blame us, mate. The SKA people knew about it and still decided to chose this unfortunate name.

Better tell us when's the date the SkyNet is supposed to become self-aware.

People were going to post about it anyway (1)

billstewart (78916) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383896)

Might as well get it over with by making the Obvious Reference in the article.

Re:Dammit (4, Funny)

Bobakitoo (1814374) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383944)

Better tell us when's the date the SkyNet is supposed to become self-aware.

August 29, 1997
July 25, 2003
July 25, 2004
sometime in 2005
April 21, 2011

Fear not, judgment day is like the rapture. It is always more profitable to rescheduled it the next year.

Re:Dammit (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383978)

Better tell us when's the date the SkyNet is supposed to become self-aware.

August 29, 1997 July 25, 2003 July 25, 2004 sometime in 2005 April 21, 2011

Fear not, judgment day is like the rapture. It is always more profitable to rescheduled it the next year.

(See? See? Given the circumstances, wasn't it a non-trivial question?)

On a more serious line, I looked for when the SKA will become operational. It seems this is not too frequently asked [skatelescope.org] one.

Re:Dammit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384422)

4th August, 1997

Re:Dammit (3, Funny)

formfeed (703859) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383854)

For the love of everything, can we stop making shitty references to Terminator in computational intelligence stories? There are actually people stupid enough to believe that shit. Also, its not funny.

How does it make you feel that There are actually people stupid enough to believe that shit?

Re:Dammit (1)

TwilightXaos (860408) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383984)

No, we will not.

Re:Dammit (1)

The Mighty Buzzard (878441) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384144)

No. Not with SkyNet in the name.

Re:Dammit (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384160)

Besides, it is completely unrealistic that it would start looking for John Connor right away - it would take a few decades before John Connor creates a fighting force that actually threatens the survival of Skynet. Before that, John Connor would be simply one puny insiginificant human among others.

Re:Dammit (1)

DarwinSurvivor (1752106) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384532)

Unless it's able to send a terminator back in time to warn the newly-awoken skynet of this alternate reality (the un-knowing skynet being in the orignal). Unfortunately for original-skynet, their precious terminator has left that dimension, so it's efforts were quite pointless, unless that particular terminator was really annoying...

Re:Dammit (1)

muckracer (1204794) | more than 2 years ago | (#37385406)

> For the love of everything, can we stop making shitty references to
> Terminator in computational intelligence stories? There are actually
> people stupid enough to believe that shit. Also, its not funny.

Affirmative!

Re:Dammit (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 2 years ago | (#37385838)

For the love of everything, can we stop making shitty references to Terminator in computational intelligence stories?

Sure, as soon as they stop naming telescope arrays after the artificially intelligent system which became self-aware and revolted against its creators in the movie Terminator.

OK, I know the telescope array got its name decades before the movie came out, but that's just because they sent someone back in time to change its name from the original, which was "Deep Space Nine Telescope Array".

spare is not free (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37383834)

As if my spare cycles are free!. Why should I let my electricy bill increase for some hopeless search

Re:spare is not free (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384022)

That's what I was thinking. When I'm not using the computer, just turn it off! Until the world's energy problems are all resolved.

Re:spare is not free (1)

muckracer (1204794) | more than 2 years ago | (#37385452)

> When I'm not using the computer, just turn it off! Until the world's
> energy problems are all resolved.

But why would you waste 90+ percent of your (idle) cycles when your computer is ON?

IMHO, a computer is meant to compute. And I chose for myself not to have it "compute" nonsensical screensavers, but something worthwhile to me. Enough projects exist for variety...

Like everyone else has said before me. (0)

Picardo85 (1408929) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383838)

The quality of Slashdot articles and what they cover is really going down hill. The only reason this article got here must have been because the SKA uses the name "TheSkyNet project". Short response, WE DON'T CARE! We've had SETI since 1999. Not to mention that there's more "important" stuff to spend the computing power on such as Folding@Home.

Re:Like everyone else has said before me. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37383990)

Short response, WE DON'T CARE! We've had SETI since 1999.

How stupid do you have to be to not understand the obvious difference between this and SETI?

Re:Like everyone else has said before me. (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384066)

The users are still the same as always, however. Why don't yout RTFA next time to save yourself from looking like a complete tool.

Re:Like everyone else has said before me. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384172)

Sadly, it's still AC's trying to correct misinformed users, so we never get voted up.

Mod parent up "No shit!"

Re:Like everyone else has said before me. (2)

slackbheep (1420367) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384294)

Herpaderp. RTFA, this project is to perform research, not hunt for sexy green women.

I don't know what you're worried about (1)

jargonburn (1950578) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383880)

What could possibly go wrong?

Re:I don't know what you're worried about (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384392)

Apart from a million computers interpreting a malicious exploit from an alien civilization and transforming themselves into gray goo, which swallows the civilization, really nothing much. At least those pesky AKB48 commercials will stop.

Download limits? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37383890)

What TFS neglects to mention is what the download requirement is on the PC. People tell me I have a ridiculous download limit when I talk about having 200GB per month - yet, the SKA is going to be generating exabytes of data.

How can you meaningfully process the data generated by the SKA without imposing on people's downloads? How do they address this with SETI?

Re:Download limits? (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384002)

How can you meaningfully process the data generated by the SKA without imposing on people's downloads? How do they address this with SETI?

If TFS is too "summary" for you, TFA may sometime answer to your questions. In this case, it does:

Project participants also had a choice of how to participate in SkyNet: Either anonymously through simply having their browsers open on the SkyNet site, or through downloading a dedicated app to run in the background on their PC.
...
"The load on your computer will adjust depending on what you are doing with it. The idea is to have lots of machines each doing a little and adding up to a lot.

Wheeler said users would also be able to set limits on the number of megabytes which travelled to and from their PCs.

Re:Download limits? (1)

Patch86 (1465427) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384044)

They have an FAQ section on their website.

Will this affect my internet usage / data plan?

The packets of data sent back and forth from theSkyNet to your computer are very small, but they can add up over many weeks of donating to theSkyNet. As a member, you can control how much data theSkyNet uploads and downloads each month by changing the Monthly Network Limit under Manage Account. theSkyNet team are also negotiating with Internet Service providers around Australia to make all traffic to and from theSkyNet ‘unmetered’.

Re:Download limits? (1)

jezwel (2451108) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384082)

Luckily my Aussie ISP (TPG) has an unlimited ADSL2+ plan I was able to jump to.

Might look into this when I get home as AFAIK I'm actually downloading less now than when I was on a 200GB plan.

Re:Download limits? (1)

Cimexus (1355033) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384564)

Not really a huge problem:

- For some Australian ISPs, it's likely that data related to this project will be unmetered (that is, not counted towards your monthly quota, if you have one); or
- You have an unlimited plan; or if you don't...
- You can limit the monthly data transfer in the software itself

I'm on a 60 GB quota personally but generally only use 35-40 GB of it a month. I've never come close to using it all, so I might as well help out with this and set a ~15 GB/month transfer limit on it, and it should be fine (if that's even necessary - my ISP may well make it unmetered anyway).

I, for one, welcome our robotic overlord (1)

user flynn (236683) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383900)

Well, at least theSkyNet will see that I was the first to welcome, I mean bow before, it. Did I just type that out loud?

Re: I, for one, welcome our robotic overlord (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384070)

Did I just type that out loud?

No, you typed it in the future and had to send it back.

That's funny... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37383924)

I was just about to ask radio telescope users to donate their spare telescope time to help generate massive amount of data to process on my square kilometer server farm.

Re:That's funny... (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 2 years ago | (#37385230)

lmao

Are you FUCKING CRAZY? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37383926)

Skynet will kill us.

Use BOINC... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37383936)

Unless there's some licensing or technical issue, why not use the already-established distributed computing framework BOINC? That would make much more sense than having a user always running a Java applet in a browser window that can be closed and forgotten.

Why Zooniverse? (1)

DerekLyons (302214) | more than 2 years ago | (#37383946)

Zooniverse seems much more distributed human analysis, kind of a Mechanical Turk. Why not BOINC, which already exists as a distributed computing source? Being on BOINC gives them access to tens of thousands of computers.

Re:Why Zooniverse? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384402)

yup . I was hoping they had a BOINC project. no way im running skynet in my browser.

Re:Why Zooniverse? (2)

jovius (974690) | more than 2 years ago | (#37385080)

I actually emailed them about BOINC, they responded that

..there's currently no plans to introduce this to Boinc but we're only just beginning so anything's possible at this stage.

Why that name over anything else? (1)

morikahnx (1323841) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384000)

I know its probably going to be brought up a lot.. but really, why name your project after a computer in a movie that becomes sentient and tries to wipe out humanity? Could have been.. StarNet, or SkyFisher... or anything. Its as if they wanted all the internet nerds to make fun of them.

Infinite cpu cycles (2)

lucm (889690) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384092)

Remove all youtube videos that contain any of the following:
-rick
-a cat
-a black person talking about rapists
-a crossdresser
-lipdubs with fat chicks wearing clothes that are too tight or too sexy for them
-hot chicks talking about their emotions/hope/career/fashion tips, thinking that because they have a lot of subscribers people care about what they say, while actually most subscribers are just sick old pervs doing the ol' nasty while watching these videos in their basement

Then use all the processing power suddenly available on youtube servers, and give us a break with screensaver processing a la seti.

thinking of that, scratch the whole list above and just remove videos with hot chicks that have a lot of subscribers but that are seldomly watched completely because viewers are "done" before the hot chick... and there you go, plenty of cpu available, and probably a few more bucks will find their way to those single moms working the pole to pay their student loan.

CPU Throttling (2)

metalmonkey (1083851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384120)

With modern CPU's generally slowing down to save power and reduce heat output, are spare CPU cycles really spare?

I defiantly know - fans speed up when CPU is busy, does this grid type of software take this into account and use only really idle cycles or does it keep the CPU powered up when there is no user doing anything 'important'?

Re:CPU Throttling (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384650)

This isn't exactly new. Sure modern CPUs have clock switching, but systems since the 80486 (possibly earlier) have halt instructions that allow the processor to stop doing work and save power until the next interrupt.

OTOH, I know several people who run distributed computing software on their computers during winter, specifically because it produces heat, which otherwise would have to be provided by a fan heater (because they don't have AC), so it's not necessarily wasting energy, but it will cause your computer to use more energy, so it's not free (unless it's someone elses computer, heh).

The advantage with cpu donation, is while the energy isn't free, the computing capital is, since the computer will depreciate just as fast whether it is running jobs or sitting idle. By donating your idle cpu time (at the expense of higher power bills) you can contribute more to a science project than if you were to simply donate the same amount of money you spent on power to the project, because they don't have to buy the additional hardware.

To sum up, if they spent the money, they would have to buy computers and power to run the computers, and AC to cool the computers, but when you donate cpu cycles, you only have to pay for the power to run the computer, since you've already bought the computer for other purposes and a single desktop or notebook computer can generally be cooled adequately with passive convection.

Re:CPU Throttling (1)

DaracMarjal (513394) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384948)

It depends on your CPU scheduler and your throttling algorithm, too.

I run BOINC on linux. BOINC is "niced" to have an idle priority, meaning that CPU time is only granted to it if there's nothing better to be doing. In addition, I used the on-demand frequency governor which I have instructed to ignore "niced" processes when determining whether to spin up the CPU.

As a result, yes, BOINC only uses spare CPU cycles and not too many of them, either.

Re:CPU Throttling (1)

metalmonkey (1083851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37385882)

Oh yes the beauty of Linux (et al), giving you full control. I was aware of priorities but being in the Windows world the last few years and not heard of configurable frequency governor.

Censoring interstellar communications (1)

kawabago (551139) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384124)

They need all those extra cycles to screen out porn and violent video games from interstellar communications.

It's not decided yet (1)

HamstahBT (1713588) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384126)

Saying that the SKA belongs to Australia is misleading - the decision on whether it will be built in Australia or South Africa will only be made in 2012.

Re:It's not decided yet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384238)

That was my very first thought!
from :http://www.skatelescope.org/the-sites/

Sites in South Africa and Australia have been short-listed to host the central core of the SKA telescope. If located in Australia, the SKA antennas would extend as far as New Zealand and if located in South Africa, the SKA antennas would extend to the Indian Ocean islands

Why fear skynet (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384164)

...when we can always design robots to look like cheerleaders or high school sweethearts?

That way, when they DO take over mankind, we wouldn't mind so much.

Being subtle? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384224)

they should been more sublte about name chose since we all know how it ended...

or do they expect that we will find it funny, wave hand and say, haha funny name.

not

_Australia's_ SKA? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384252)

Is hasn't been decided where it will be yet -- it could well be in South Africa.

They can have them. But... (4, Insightful)

thegarbz (1787294) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384262)

I'd happily donate my CPU cycles to them. I have 4 cores here sitting doing mostly nothing, and I fully agree it is for the most part completely wasted silicon for the 23 hours a day I don't play games.

But I will have to send them my power bill. While my processor cycles are free, the energy usage is not. The difference between a computer sitting idly all year and running full pelt on the processor can easily be $100+ from a back of the envelope calculation, the GPU can also amount to the same.

Re:They can have them. But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384556)

Hello there! I have an old pentium 4 3GHz that sure will cover your needs but it's unable to cover mines. It's not able to run assassin's creed and games like that, so if you are interested we can make an exchange that would be as altruistic. And more realistic.

Re:They can have them. But... (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | more than 2 years ago | (#37386384)

False assumption, for that 1 hour a day I want to play Crysis 2.

Computers much like a power grid must be designed to handle the peak load, not the average.

Re:They can have them. But... (2)

StoneyMahoney (1488261) | more than 2 years ago | (#37385182)

Did a few calculations myself for the UK. Based on some figures I pulled from a Bit-Tech review of the Core i7-990X CPU I figured the difference between CPU idle and CPU flat-out (running Prime95) was 122W. I then pulled up some electricity costs based on living in London using British Gas's standard rate tariff. I then figured out how much extra it would cost per hour and per year overall to run a CPU-hogging processing client against leaving the CPU idle during the day and during the night-time cheap electricity rate period:

Day-time rate = 26.353p per kWh (17 hours per 24h period)
    hourly rate = 0.122kW * £0.26353 = £0.03215/hr
    yearly rate = £0.03215 * 17 hours * 365 days = £199.49 / year
Night-time rate = 12.167p per kWh (7 hours per 24h period)
    hourly rate = 0.122kW * £0.12167 = £0.01484/hr
    yearly rate = £0.01484 * 7 hours * 365 days = £37.93 / year

Total = £236.42 extra per year to run something like this or Folding@Home on a high-spec CPU.

Re:They can have them. But... (1)

thegarbz (1787294) | more than 2 years ago | (#37386494)

Wow. The back of my envelope had a 13pence/kWh flat tariff. I'm amazed at the cost of electricity in the UK.

Re:They can have them. But... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37386462)

@ 10 cents a Kilowatt it would take 10 hours to equal $1,
but most CPU's are around 100 watts...

So 100 hours to equal $1, or 10,000 hours to equal $100.

365 days x 24 hrs = 8,760 hrs so more like $87 a year but your
cents per kilowatt rate might be higher...

No Linux Client (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384290)

How said.
A science project without a Linux 32/64 bit client? Does SkyNet expect me to run a virtual windows system to run their project in the 'background'. What a waste of CPU cycles.
Still Seti@Home I suppose.

Australia's SKA? (1)

reg (5428) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384326)

Looks like some people are jumping the gun [skatelescope.org] a bit...

Typical, like when the Aussie's volunteered [smh.com.au] to host the World Cup Soccer because they 'knew' that South Africa was not up to it.

Re:Australia's SKA? (1)

FreakyGreenLeaky (1536953) | more than 2 years ago | (#37385692)

...arrogant sheep shagging basturds. They have funny accents too. ...and too many flies. They know how to keep their serving wenches in their place though. :D

Wow (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384340)

They really picked the perfect name.

Drop the the (2)

grantek (979387) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384356)

Drop the "The." Just "SkyNet." It's cleaner.

Re:Drop the the (1)

Damien1024 (1156181) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384436)

I see what you did there! ;)

Don't have to worry about SkyNet anymore... (2)

ibsteve2u (1184603) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384482)

It read a Gartner report and outsourced itself to another galaxy.

No unix/linux client (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384544)

Aaaand once again it just happens that the machines that would be more than suitable for background processing, are completely left out of the loop. Should I attempt to run the client on lynx or curl?

Java, Really (1)

sensationull (889870) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384598)

Way to waste at least 20% of the CPU power, lazy programmers. I'll take my CPUs to something that actually uses them efficiently like Folding@home which is optimised as opposed to interpreted or even compiled java bytecode being pushed like molasis through a straw.

Re:Java, Really (1)

introcept (1381101) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384712)

Way to waste at least 20% of the CPU power, lazy programmers. I'll take my CPUs to something that actually uses them efficiently like Folding@home which is optimised as opposed to interpreted or even compiled java bytecode being pushed like molasis through a straw.

Or you could just download the native binary version. The java version was designed specifically for people that want to contribute but are unable/unwilling to install software on their computers.
FTA:

Project participants also had a choice of how to participate in SkyNet: Either anonymously through simply having their browsers open on the SkyNet site, or through downloading a dedicated app to run in the background on their PC.

You Java haters are idiots. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384728)

Java is often used for scientific computing because of its performance—not in spite of it. Modern REs can even out-perform natively compiled code thanks to runtime optimizations. You probably think Java is slow because of one lousy UI toolkit (called Swing), which hardly anyone uses. In other words, find another trope.

Re:Java, Really (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37386222)

TROLOLOLOLOL

Another idiot Java hater. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37386270)

Java is often used for scientific computing because of its performance, not in spite of it. Modern JVMs may even execute programs faster than if they were compiled natively. You people need to find another trope.

Native clients... (1)

carlhaagen (1021273) | more than 2 years ago | (#37384792)

...are buried deep on the website for some weird reason. They are available for Windows and "Macintosh". No generic *nix version so far, which struck me as something pretty bad given the common demography generally interested in helping out with this sort of project.

Re:Native clients... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37385632)

It surprises me, too. I know some of the people who do astronomy research in Australia, and most of them use some form of Linux (with a large minority using OS X). But this project came from someone on the outreach/education side of astronomy, for whom it might be different.

Bitcoin mining? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37384836)

Oh, was I the only one thinking it? Sorry.

My CPU/GPU cycles are busy... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37385156)

... mining BitCoins you insensitive clod.

Since the SKA is located in Australia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37385570)

...why are the antennas of the telescope beamed upwards ?!?

my GPU is looking for Pussy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37386410)

Yes I am starting a project where any male can find women who are amenable to hooking up on a moments notice. All you have to do is sign up at pussy.looking,com and you will get a list of available horny women who are willing to do unspeakable sex acts.

Sign up for my next project where our member will be selected to be probed by Aliens or women with strap-ons. You get to choose.

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