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Windows 8 Roundup

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the whole-lot-of-new-going-on dept.

Cloud 474

There has been no shortage of Windows 8 news today. MrSeb writes: "Earlier this morning, at the Build Windows conference in Anaheim, California, Microsoft made it patently clear that 'To the cloud!' is not merely a throwaway phrase: it is the entire future of the company. Every single one of Microsoft's services, platforms, and form factors will now begin its hasty, leave-no-prisoners-behind transition to the always-on, internet-connected cloud." netbuzz pointed out that even the famous Blue Screen of Death will get a new look. Lastly mikejuk writes: "While everyone else is looking at the surface detail of Windows 8 there are some deep changes going on. Perhaps the biggest is that Metro now provides an alternative environment that doesn't use the age old Win32 API. This means no more overlapping windows — yes Metro really does take the windows out of Windows."

cancel ×

474 comments

The cloud... (2)

Capt.DrumkenBum (1173011) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404678)

and I thought Microsoft was irrelevant before.

Re:The cloud... (4, Insightful)

Colonel Korn (1258968) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404960)

and I thought Microsoft was irrelevant before.

Ah, the internet, where 90% market share means you just don't matter.

Re:The cloud... (2)

DJRumpy (1345787) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405046)

I thought the same thing but more from a company perspective, where they limit and restrict just about everything one does on the internet. This doesn't seem like a sound business move, or it will severely limit the need to upgrade from a business perspective at least. IS Security groups are already frowning on cloud services where I work.

Re:The cloud... (1)

BrentH (1154987) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405172)

Well, he uploaded his comment to the cloud, didnt he?

My Sage Advice (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37404684)

Short M$ but hedge with large purchases of screen cleaner futures.

Oh my (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404704)

We're really spamming the Windows 8 articles recently. Yeah no thanks, Windows 7 works just fine. It's the new XP - didn't you know?

Re:Oh my (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404908)

What's Windows?

Re:Oh my (oblig) (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404938)

What's Windows?

SNAP!

Re:Oh my (2, Insightful)

Penguinisto (415985) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404998)

I think it's a project by Microsoft to see if they can hype things out (like they did with Windows 7) and get massive results (like Windows 7)... sort of like emulating the Apple rumor mill, but instead of leaving the world to speculate, MSFT is trying to fuel the fire itself.

OTOH, I think it will backfire, mostly because I think they mis-read the reason Windows 7 was moderately successful: Windows 7 didn't become popular by the hype machine; it became moderately successful because the last decent version of Windows (XP) was released 8 years prior, and both XP and Vista using Windows enthusiasts were gagging for something that was up to date but not broken.

CNET (I know, I know) has been spewing out Windows 8 puff pieces every other day (sometimes every day), even for incredibly minor crap (e.g. Hyper-V, mounting .iso files, etc... minor bits that really don't mean much of anything to the end user individually.)

Re:Oh my (5, Interesting)

Miamicanes (730264) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405050)

> Windows 7 works just fine. It's the new XP - didn't you know?

It's sad, but you're probably right. Microsoft today is kind of like a rock star who's made so much cash, he's just going to be weird and do whatever the fsck he feels like doing from now on. If Microsoft is hyping "Metro" in an effort to generate developer excitement, they're having the exact opposite effect. Everyone *I* know is like, "WTF, has Microsoft gone completely batshit insane?"

It's almost like Microsoft's entire developer elite just hit their mid-40s, had a midlife crisis, realized they have enough cash to spend the rest of their lives coding for fun, retired en masse, and handed over the company to a marketing department that thinks making Windows look like a tablet UI so it can run phone apps better is somehow a good idea.

Re:Oh my (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405092)

It's almost like Microsoft's entire developer elite just hit their mid-40s, had a midlife crisis, realized they have enough cash to spend the rest of their lives coding for fun, retired en masse, and handed over the company to a marketing department that thinks making Windows look like a tablet UI so it can run phone apps better is somehow a good idea.

Wait, are we talking about Windows 8 or Firefox 8? :)

Re:Oh my (1)

Ethanol-fueled (1125189) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405246)

I like to think Microsoft just a bunch of assholes trying to see how much humiliation their users will endure before they switch.

First, there was the Microsoft television ad closing with Bill Gates wiggling his ass in our faces. Now, they name the UI for their latest OS "Metro," which condescends to the androgynous metrosexuality of the users of the iOS UI that Microsoft feels Win8 must rip off in order to be successful.

p.s. apparently I was the first [google.com] to link Win8's "metro" with metrosexuality.

So we're back to Windows 1.0? (3, Funny)

BLToday (1777712) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404718)

So we're back to Windows 1.0 with no overlapping windows? How am I suppose to quickly look at two open applications? or drag and drop items?

Re:So we're back to Windows 1.0? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404742)

So we're back to Windows 1.0 with no overlapping windows? How am I suppose to quickly look at two open applications? or drag and drop items?

Ballmer thinks you'll buy two screens.

Cause that's what billionaires like him do.

Re:So we're back to Windows 1.0? (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404768)

Ballmer thinks you'll buy two screens.

Cause that's what billionaires like him do.

Two computers, surely? Otherwise the single application will spread across both screens.

Re:So we're back to Windows 1.0? Holodeck? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404828)

Two computers, surely? Otherwise the single application will spread across both screens.

Let's remember to turn off the hologram projectors so the simulation doesn't escape and create evil droids, ok?

Two Computers? (1)

ISoldat53 (977164) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405018)

Dell will like that.

Re:So we're back to Windows 1.0? (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404778)

Not only that but Microsoft's "per processor" policy will quickly be changed to "per screen". Cos people are starting to use multiple screens, ya know.

Re:So we're back to Windows 1.0? (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404812)

Not only that but Microsoft's "per processor" policy will quickly be changed to "per screen". Cos people are starting to use multiple screens, ya know.

Don't see why.

All my computers have 2, 4 or 8 CPUs in them, so why should I subsidize people in mansions who can't read?

Re:So we're back to Windows 1.0? (1)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404838)

no overlapping windows? How am I suppose to quickly look at two open applications? or drag and drop items?

This is no problem. Just hit Mod4-space [naquadah.org] to cycle through tiling layouts until you see one you like.

Re:So we're back to Windows 1.0? (5, Interesting)

vux984 (928602) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404854)

The windows 8 tiles system supports true multitasking, and has a few window arrangements that let you have 1/2/3 (or 4?) applications on screen at once.

Its actually pretty well though out, and should work pretty well for tablet users and netbooks.

For those of us power users with big desktops and multiple screens with 10+ windows open... guess what... that's not going away. You just launch Explorer, and have a full desktop window manager.

Seriously... what's with all the idiotic hate on this?

Microsoft is only changing the DEFAULT window manager to be more consumer / tablet friendly. Good for them.

The prosumer/business/productivity group will still have the more pro oriented traditional window manager for doing what we do.

Nobody even half expects people working on an excel spreedsheet business projection drawing data from pdfs, web pages, and their email to do so using the new interface. Some things make sense to do in multiple overlapping windows. That's not going away.

So stop flipping out about it.

I can answer that! (3, Insightful)

khasim (1285) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404904)

Seriously... what's with all the idiotic hate on this?

Microsoft is only changing the DEFAULT window manager to be more consumer / tablet friendly. Good for them.

Because Microsoft is changing the default behaviour in the new product. And the new default behaviour will be LESS effective for the users of the traditional Windows systems (desktops and laptops).

Here's an idea. Why not leave the DEFAULT behaviour as it is already and add a new OPTION to change it to the tablet-friendly format for those who want it that way?

Re:I can answer that! (1)

Vancorps (746090) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404946)

That's pretty simple, the majority of computer users don't benefit from the traditional environment. For typical sales guys which live in Outlook they'll actually be more effective as the things they use readily will be easily accessible.

Usability is what Microsoft is after, they will make the easiest interface the default as they always have. More advanced features which we'll use on the regular will still be accessible and not really all that different from Windows 7, so what's with the complaining?

I just answered that. (1)

khasim (1285) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405028)

More advanced features which we'll use on the regular will still be accessible and not really all that different from Windows 7, so what's with the complaining?

Again. Because Microsoft is changing the default behaviour in the new product. And the new default behaviour will be LESS effective for the users of the traditional Windows systems (desktops and laptops).

For typical sales guys which live in Outlook they'll actually be more effective as the things they use readily will be easily accessible.

So you say. Maybe you're right. Maybe Microsoft got it wrong all those years ago when it dropped that interface style with the early versions of Windows.

Re:I can answer that! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37404950)

Hard to say what is more or less difficult on an OS that ain't released yet... izn't?

Re:I can answer that! (1)

vux984 (928602) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405080)

Hard to say what is more or less difficult on an OS that ain't released yet... izn't?

Not really, the new metro stuff is a lot like windows phone 7, and will clearly feel very ipad-esque on a tablet / netbook.

And the classic windows explorer is a pretty well known quantity.

Its not that hard to see that Apple got a lot of things right with the ipad user interface. (It got a lot of things wrong too... and quite bluntly I think windows 8 shows a lot of promise in terms of addressing those short comings.

Re:I can answer that! (1)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405134)

but it is released, the dev version really should show what there aiming for

Re:I can answer that! (2)

vux984 (928602) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405032)

Because Microsoft is changing the default behaviour in the new product. And the new default behaviour will be LESS effective for the users of the traditional Windows systems (desktops and laptops).

First, the classic desktop is an application tile in the new interface. They've added an abstraction layer. The old system is not "gone", its just one step away. Its not even an "either or" really... because you launch the classic desktop from Metro... and then switch to and from that and other metro tiles. Hell... might even support running multiple instances of explorer in separate tiles... i wonder... that'd be really cool if you could.

Here's an idea. Why not leave the DEFAULT behaviour as it is already and add a new OPTION to change it to the tablet-friendly format for those who want it that way?

1) Because the people who would most benefit from the "new" Window manager are the ones that would be least likely to find the option to turn it on.

2) Because the full classic desktop manager is simply a "full screen" application. In other words, its a tile in the new system.

The user does not need to "switch" to classic, they just launch it, because its an application.

Re:I can answer that! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405118)

1) Because the people who would most benefit from the "new" Window manager are the ones that would be least likely to find the option to turn it on.

2) Because the full classic desktop manager is simply a "full screen" application. In other words, its a tile in the new system.

The user does not need to "switch" to classic, they just launch it, because its an application.

Which is stupid. The moment Win8 detects a touchscreen it could immediately opt to make Metro the standard; the moment it detects no touch capabilities it could resort to using the old setup.

This technology is already being used in Windows 7; the "demo mode" for example is only usable if Win7 runs on a laptop; on a desktop the option is disabled.

So easy, and it would avoid so much problems...

Re:I can answer that! (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405132)

And the new default behaviour will be LESS effective for the users of the traditional Windows systems (desktops and laptops).

Will it? I haven't used that specific UI, but tilling WMs are more effective than floating (i.e. "traditional"), in my opinion and of many other power users.
Of course, it requires multiple workspaces to work well, which I don't know if this will have.

Re:I can answer that! (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405146)

An even better idea--why not develop two distinctly different OSes like Apple...one for tablets/phones, and one for computers?

I might be as wrong as "No wireless, less space than a Nomad, lame" on this one, but I just don't see the allure of mixing the two paradigms into one OS.

Re:So we're back to Windows 1.0? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405016)

For those of us power users with big desktops and multiple screens with 10+ windows open... guess what... that's not going away. You just launch Explorer, and have a full desktop window manager.

Seriously... what's with all the idiotic hate on this?

Isn't that a tad obvious? The fact that MS takes away a perfect good Window manager (Aero) and replaces it with this crap. That stupid desktop metro app. without a start menu isn't a window manager since you can't simply start programs with it, not even Linux manages to create something that stupid.

So now we'd need to do what? Pin most programs we use onto the taskbar and copy the rest as symbolic links onto the desktop itself or something? That's even MORE stupid since the power of the Win7 start menu is that you get to have your most actively used programs grouped together for quick starting while also allowing you to group all your applications together so that you can quickly find what you need.

And yes I know of the search option (which also has been revamped, no longer searches groups; go figure).

But sometimes you know what you need without knowing the name up front, for example because you only need to use this, say, once every half year. Fortunately (that's how I do it with my admin tools) I can always find it because I'm keeping such apps. grouped together. For example "Tools -> Admin -> Audits". And now ?

Guess what genius; now nothing because all my groups are frickin' gone. Unless they expect me to go back to the stone ages and start making some kind of "menu" myself out of folders and symbolic links.

And the dumbest thing is that the start menu still exists... AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Windows\Start Menu.

They should NEVER have taken away the start menu; its as simple as that. They should have ADDED Metro instead of having it replace stuff. Then Win8 might actually have been something. But that's probably reserved for Windows 9...

Re:So we're back to Windows 1.0? (3, Funny)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405124)

That stupid desktop metro app. without a start menu isn't a window manager since you can't simply start programs with it, not even Linux manages to create something that stupid.

I believe that's a planned upgrade in Gnome 4.

Re:So we're back to Windows 1.0? (2)

exomondo (1725132) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405312)

Isn't that a tad obvious? The fact that MS takes away a perfect good Window manager (Aero) and replaces it with this crap.

They haven't taken away the window manager, it's still there, it's just that it's decoupled from the core system now (which is good because you can have a desktop GUI on desktop/laptops, a touch-oriented GUI on touch devices and no GUI at all on servers) and you launch it if you need it or applications that need it launch it automatically (like VS does in the preview).

without a start menu isn't a window manager since you can't simply start programs with it

Since when does a window manager require a start menu?
I agree with you that the start menu should remain, and i really hope that it does in the final release, let's not forget this is a developer preview, not even close to final.

Unless there's a Deinstall Ballmer button (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404728)

Unless there's a Deinstall Ballmer button, Win8 is dead.

From inside BUILD::: (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37404740)

It feels like M$ hail mary pass to carry their installed base of developers over to the windows phone and to tablets,. There is very little here for traditional applications.

This is cool (2, Insightful)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404744)

It looks increasingly like Windows 7 will be the last version of Windows I ever have to use.

Re:This is cool (4, Insightful)

nbetcher (973062) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404824)

That's what most people said about XP when Vista was on the horizon.

Re:This is cool (2)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404856)

That's what most people said about XP when Vista was on the horizon.

True, I might have to look at it again around Windows 9 or 10.

Re:This is cool (3, Funny)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404902)

True, I might have to look at it again around Windows 9 or 10.

Windows X with Magic Mouse. Think Differentlier.

Re:This is cool (1)

vivian (156520) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404926)

I'm still running XP and loving it (just as long as it stays nicely locked away in it's VM running on my Ubuntu box) - so as far as I am concerned, XP IS the last version of windows I have to use.

Re:This is cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405178)

Yes. Just yes.

Re:This is cool (3, Interesting)

Sitrix (973862) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404928)

And most of those people stayed with XP till Windows7 came out... A lot of businesses did the same thing, simply stayed on XP and skipped Vista entirely. At work we are already making plans to skip Windows 8 unless Microsoft gives us ability to make our workstations more business oriented rather then having them look like a bunch of touchscreen home PC's.

Re:This is cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405036)

For me, it was true.

Re:This is cool (1)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405158)

Had Vista stuck around and Win 7 not come to the rescue, people would still be saying that about Vista.

Re:This is cool (1, Informative)

black3d (1648913) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404840)

Indeed. Tried Win8 out yesterday. Extremely disappointed with the forced nature of the Metro UI and how it takes over .. everything. Must admit I'm a fan of the ribbon changes to Explorer, et al. It's just a shame it's all hidden behind this horrible Metro UI that I never want to see. It's a shame that it's so difficult to switch apps if you want to "search" or actually use Explorer.

          "What's that? You want to look up something on Wikipedia in Internet Explorer, then go back to Word? No less than 4 mouse clicks and three full screen changes to get back there from here". - Metro UI

It's a damned shame too, because I felt like they just about got everything right with Windows 7. Give me Windows 7 + ribbon interface and I'm happy as Larry. But force me to use a crap interface that I don't want to interact with and I'm gone as a user. Maybe Ubuntu next.. Maybe even.. *shudder*.. a Mac.

You forgot about alt-tab (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37404898)

"What's that? You want to look up something on Wikipedia in Internet Explorer, then go back to Word? No less than 4 mouse clicks and three full screen changes to get back there from here". - Metro UI

As much as I hate to say it you don't have to; just use alt-tab to switch between the two just like you did with the 'old' desktop.

Of course that is assuming you started these programs from the desktop.

Re:You forgot about alt-tab (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405182)

"What's that? You want to look up something on Wikipedia in Internet Explorer, then go back to Word? No less than 4 mouse clicks and three full screen changes to get back there from here". - Metro UI

As much as I hate to say it you don't have to; just use alt-tab to switch between the two just like you did with the 'old' desktop.

WTF? Alt-tab? Who needs alt-tab? Not only am I not on a tablet, but I'm also not on a 15" 800x600 screen anymore either!

I don't need to alt-tab to switch between the two, I just hit ^C in the web browser, hover over Word (because I did a couple of RegEdit tweaks to make focus-follows-mouse without autoraise, you know, like the X Window System has done for 20 years. Just because I had to use RegEdit to do it in Win7 instead of using the old PowerToys for XP tweak for X-Mouse doesn't mean it can't be done), and hit ^V to paste the text in whatever location I left the Word cursor sitting when I moved over to the IE Window.

The correct number of mouse operatios should be two imprecise movements, and zero clicks.

Re:This is cool (1)

vux984 (928602) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404942)

Metro will be good on tablets which is what its aiming for. And I already like it more than iOS on the ipad.

Nobody should seriously be using the metro interface while writing an artical in word while referencing websites, email, pdfs, etc... that's just asinine.

Use explorer where it makes more sense. Its not going away anytime soon, and if it does go away it will be replaced with something just as powerful... its absurd to think we are going to be forced into metro.

Re:This is cool (3, Insightful)

black3d (1648913) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405084)

Vux - I completely agree. It's more the point that it forces you to. If you hit F3 to search, you're taken to the Metro search interface. You're now forced to pick one of their search "targets" and to use their interface. You can't even see your application as you're now in a full-screen Metro interface, so it's going to take at least three clicks to get back to your program (one in the lower left corner to bring up the Start screen, then one on Desktop to open the desktop "gadget", then one on your application).

If, heaven forbid, you use Internet Explorer (which sadly, many users still do as the default browser on their PCs), it's also now a full-screen metro "app". If in the above example, you followed search to a Wikipedia link, you're now in a full-screen IE session with your original application several clicks away (and several clicks to get back to your IE to make sure you read something correctly, etc).

I understand it's for tablets. That's great. But forcing it on desktop users as at present is asinine. I hope to be shown in beta that we have the option to not use Metro at all. That hasn't been mentioned yet. What we've been told is that we're going to have to "change the way you do a lot of things" and that we need to "interact with the screen" more. That suggests they are going to force this Metro crapware on top of everything.

Re:This is cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405216)

So why don't you launch internet explorer from explorer.exe the way you have been for the LAST TEN YEARS?

Re:This is cool (2)

black3d (1648913) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405284)

Err.. who launches Internet Explorer from an explorer window? You don't navigate to C:\Program Files\Internet Explorer and launch it. At the very least, you launch it from your Start menu except - oh, didn't you know - there's no Start menu in Win8. You click the Start button and you're taken to the full-screen MetroUI Start Screen.

Re:This is cool (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405268)

I downloaded the images yesterday but couldn't get them to run on a flash drive or burn with a DVD +R.

How hard is it to run explorer? I do not mind one mouse button click to get to desktop. IS the Windows 7 desktop as usable? For your use of wikipedia, according to the videos you can drag the edge of IE and use another app like Word (metro version).

Since you can't use your fingers MS has enabled right mouse button click to do these things. Let me know how it is.

Re:This is cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405326)

Please don't imply anything negative about the Mac and in future, you won't get the +1 Troll modifier from an Apple fanboi with a hurt butt.

Re:This is cool (1)

microbee (682094) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404956)

Why do you still have to use it now? What's holding you back?

Re:This is cool (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405030)

Why do you still have to use it now? What's holding you back?

At home, games and video editing, though I don't do either much anymore so I boot into Windows about once a month.
At work, Word for documents incompatible with Open Office. But I normally put it off until I have to reboot for a kernel upgrade anyway.

BSOD (2)

Anne_Nonymous (313852) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404774)

>> Your PC ran into a problem that it couldn't handle, and now it needs to restart.

Your software caused a giant fuck-up; don't try to blame the hardware.

BSODs are very often hardware related (2, Informative)

Sycraft-fu (314770) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404860)

Not always the hardware itself, sometimes the driver, but I'd say 90% or more of the BSODs I see at work are related to hardware. Very rare that it is purely a software issue.

Re:BSODs are very often hardware related (1)

oodaloop (1229816) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404952)

Strange then the desktop that crashed under windows runs better with Linux. I had no idea I downloaded better hardware!

Re:BSODs are very often hardware related (1)

webmistressrachel (903577) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405072)

That's a very old troll from such a young UID!

Linux running better in your personal isolated case probably has, as the parent informs you, more to do with buggy drivers than anything else. If there is a problem with your hardware, Linux will crash (or complain, anyways) too.

Re:BSODs are very often hardware related (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405156)

This happened to me, but it was an hardware issue (with the DMA chip, IIRC) - Linux simply was able to detect and disable it.

Re:BSODs are very often hardware related (1)

ILongForDarkness (1134931) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405008)

Yep I saw a video to that effect on Channel 9 (admittedly a biased source). The problem so they say is that drivers live below the kernel/user land divide. So when things go screwy with the driver it is a kernel level fault and often knocks the whole OS down. It was a poor design, but sadly as with a lot of Windows warts it stuck around because of compatibility reasons. A lot that MS gets blamed and cursed for has reasons. They aren't ignoring that there is a problem, that the product at some levels is poorly designed, it is just that they have hundreds of thousands of software partners, some apps and devices used by millions of people that would break if they changed things. It looks like Win 8 might finally break some of the dependency on Win32 and the current kernel level partitioning. Hopefully stability will be greatly improved because of this.

Re:BSOD (1)

Calos (2281322) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404886)

To be fair, it could be either.

Give-a-way (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37404790)

So M$ is giving the desktop to someone else????

always-on? (1)

exomondo (1725132) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404800)

If only these 'clouds' or 'cloud services' actually had effective redundancy like they claim to and we didn't have so many 'clear sky' moments where they go down.

Re:always-on? it's Cloud-y in Seattle (2)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404848)

If only these 'clouds' or 'cloud services' actually had effective redundancy like they claim to and we didn't have so many 'clear sky' moments where they go down.

Oh, come on, it's not like all the big Clouds got hacked this past weekend ... like Google and Amazon ... .... oh ... wait ...

From the article... (1)

Cornwallis (1188489) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404816)

"Are we really ready for a world where the devices we use for most of our waking hours can communicate behind our backs?"

We're in that world now thanks to Windows. Our devices ALREADY communicate behind our backs. Trouble is, they are communicating with the criminals in Russia...

Re:From the article... country of origin (1)

WillAffleckUW (858324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404862)

"Are we really ready for a world where the devices we use for most of our waking hours can communicate behind our backs?"

We're in that world now thanks to Windows. Our devices ALREADY communicate behind our backs. Trouble is, they are communicating with the criminals in Russia...

Mine work for China.

Metro is lipstick on a pig (0)

jmcbain (1233044) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404830)

You heard it here first. www.metroislipstickonapig.com

Re:Metro is lipstick on a pig (1)

Sponge Bath (413667) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404932)

The world squeals at the deliverance of Metro. [cue banjo]

Horrible marketing at work. (5, Insightful)

vinn (4370) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404832)

So here's what everyone is hearing in the Windows world about Win8: "We're changing Windows. A lot. It's gonna look completely different. It's gonna act completely different. A lot of the things you do today probably need to be thought about differently".

Here's how IT management is interpreting that: "We might completely break Windows again. A lot. It's gonna confuse users. It's gonna make them less productive. Don't even think about using this product in a business environment without considering all of the extra support they're going to need."

Guess what? Based on what I've already seen, there's no way I'm even bringing this product into our environment for even a test basis until it's been out for over a year. If we're gonna have to completely retrain users how to do something, we're going to consider other things. That new Motorola Bionic with it's full screen dock and keyboard is looking more and more like something I want to own.

Retraining (2, Insightful)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404896)

Funny how companies keep eating the retraining costs, while claiming those same training costs are the reason they don't deploy Linux desktops.

Re:Retraining (2)

Vancorps (746090) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404994)

What retraining costs? I recently upgraded a whole slew of users from XP to Windows 7, those that noticed any difference were happier for the changes and were used to them inside of a day. The bigger retraining came with Office, not the OS and OpenOffice or LibreOffice are quite different from modern MS Office. They work in a pinch for a lot of people but not everybody.

Of course if you're talking about admin training that's different and I haven't met too many admins lately that are Windows only, most deploy both opting to go with what works best in a given situation.

Re:Horrible marketing at work. (1)

ross.w (87751) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404906)

Since here we're still on XP and only now considering migrating to Windows 7, I think it will be a lot longer than that. It won't be until Microsoft drops support for Windows 7 anyway. That's the only reason my company is ditching Windows XP.

Brilliant (1, Interesting)

darkwing_bmf (178021) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404876)

Cloud computing is the wave of the future. The idea of using a desktop PC as a primary computing device is increasingly becoming an anachronism. The wave of the future is ubiquitous computing capability not tied to one specific device. For instance, being able to listen to a song in your car on the way home from work, your phone while you walk to the mail box and through your home entertainment system when you walk in the door, with all the systems seamlessly interacting with each other so you never miss a beat.

Obviously this won't happen with Windows 8 but at least it's step in the right direction.

Re:Brilliant (4, Insightful)

Suiggy (1544213) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404970)

The problem is that cloud computing tantamount to slavery computing, turning users into slaves. It takes away all control and concentrates it in the hands of large corporations.

I'm all for ubiqutous computing, but unless I own and control all of the devices I use, and the software running on them, what's the point?

I'm tired of being a slave. A slave to the dollar, a slave to the government, a slave to the company I need to work at to survive in this pitiful existence. I don't want some big corporation to take away my personal computing experience.

I don't see how people are so blind as to think cloud computing is an improvement.

Re:Brilliant (2)

Miamicanes (730264) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405214)

^^^ Exactly. People have forgotten that PCs were revolutionary BECAUSE they devolved control and power away from centralized IT departments, and put it directly in the hands of end users who could skirt bureaucracy and do cool, new useful things without having to wade through months of committee meetings first. Those who don't remember the past are doomed to repea...NO CARRIER

Re:Brilliant (1)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405254)

os: linux
social network: diaspora
data management: torrent

dont worry more and more people agree w/ that idea

Re:Brilliant (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405310)

Why couldn't you have your own cloud? (Ok, one answer is that you still wouldn't control the conduit.)

Re:Brilliant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405060)

I'm sorry, that's not computing. That's using appliances, one of which is a PC.

The fact that a phone has a processor in it does not make it a computer.

But if you have a better example, let us know.

Re:Brilliant (1)

John.P.Jones (601028) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405088)

Its becoming an anachronism primarily because software developers (yes I am one) would much rather have their code running protected on hardware they control (but preferably don't own e.g. EC2 Azure) and acting as a service than letting you have control of it on your own cheap commodity hardware. Really this is plugging the 'digital hole'. Damn now I'm sounding like Stallman, see what they've done to me?

Re:Brilliant (1)

Miamicanes (730264) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405162)

Fine. Let my desktop PC use UPnP to configure my router, let my router update my DDNS hostname, and let my Android phone & tablet sync directly with my desktop PC. Maybe add a server appliance running Samba into the equation. No need to screw with proprietary online services that either cost lots of money or can vanish tomorrow without warning. I guess we're the geezers now, but anyone old enough to remember dotcom services we depended upon disappearing overnight (or mid-afternoon), never to return, is unlikely to ever fully trust "the cloud", let alone any proprietary service provided by it that locks you in and gives you no way to escape to freedom with your data.

Re:Brilliant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405188)

I'd prefer to keep my desktop PC as my primary computing device, but be able to serve up its computing capacity wherever I am. In your example, music would be streaming from my desktop to my car, my phone, etc, according to where I am. This way, I still have a big, powerful desktop to use when I need lots of computing power at very low latency, which just can't come from a distant server.

Equally importantly, it means that the system is under my control. If I want to stream my music to another device, I just tell that device to listen to my desktop, and tell my desktop to stream to it. If I'm using an online service of some kind, I'm going to find that they have an extra charge if I want to stream to more than three devices, or if I want to use it at peak times, or if I want a faster connection (and they throttle the default option to make this more attractive), etc.

Re:Brilliant (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405192)

Scott McNealy, is that you? Didn't having your company go toes up teach you anything about your old "the network is the computer" song-and-dance?

Re:Brilliant (1)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405300)

> For instance, being able to listen to a song in your car on the way home from work, your phone while you walk to the mail box and through your home entertainment system when you walk in the door, with all the systems seamlessly interacting with each other so you never miss a beat.

> Obviously this won't happen with Windows 8 but at least it's step in the right direction.

I wouldn't expect it to happen with any version of Windows. I don't see windows ever having that degree of integration. At least in our lifetimes.

With one exception. They could do it by having all of your devices remotely logged into your media server and playing it through the multimedia capabilities of RDP. This could work at least well enough to demo on stage, and it dovetails nicely with Microsoft's philosophy of code reuse and rebranding.

Sanity Check? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37404880)

Is anyone actually stopping to say - "hang on a minute, what do people actually use?"

The hype of "the valley" would have us believe that everyone was sitting with a tablet with everything in the cloud.

The reality I see around me everyday is that everyone is sitting with a desktop/monitor/keyboard and is using a wide variety of local software. Not only are they doing that because it is "what has been", but also they are doing it because it is "what is required".

Is all this hype added to everything just to shift very large margin tablets and sell OSs? Was the netbook (a product that according to "the valley" is dead) so harmful that it's concept (low margins, fully functional, low requirements) had to be eliminated?

Re:Sanity Check? (1)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404934)

The reality I see around me everyday is that everyone is sitting with a desktop/monitor/keyboard and is using a wide variety of local software.

In the future everyone will plug in their phone when they get to work, and edit Excel spreadsheets in The Cloud using the touchscreen.

I read it on /. so it must be true.

Re:Sanity Check? (1)

darkwing_bmf (178021) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405094)

Is anyone actually stopping to say - "hang on a minute, what do people actually use?"

That is a rather incomplete inquiry. The better questions to ask are why do people use the things they use? What goals are they trying to accomplish? How can we make their lives better?

Not only be screwed by local problems! (0)

gweihir (88907) | more than 2 years ago | (#37404910)

As if Windows did not still have plenty of those. Now you also are screwed if the MS cloud has a problem.

Seriously, win 7 is is halfway decent and stable (still crashy and byggy) when used only in local mode + web (not with IE!). I am constantly amazed what MS-apologists consider normal OS performance. A cloud connection needed for reasonable performance is an absolute no-go. Not that I use Windows for anything than gaming, and even there it sucks.

Re:Not only be screwed by local problems! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405258)

You have seen a crash on Win7?!?! Shit, what did you do wrong because I've seen more kernel panics that Win7 crashes

"Leave no prisoners behind"? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37404936)

So .... they're taking all their prisoners with them?

Someone needs to go to idiom school.

Again, seriously? (0)

Mike (1172) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405010)

How many posts are we going to see about Windows 8 on Slashdot?
This is blowing my mind.
How is this "news that matters"?
Since when do slashdot readers care about "Windoze"?
I pointed this out a couple of days ago and I was moderated a "troll".
Has the slashdot community changed that much???

This not a troll; it is a comment....or more accurately, a [non-rhetorical] question.

Re:Again, seriously? (1)

Mike (1172) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405040)

Wait...I think I may have figured out the answer to my own question.
I just realized that Slashdot's logo no longer has the tag line "News for Nerds. Stuff that Matters".
I'm not sure when that tagline disappeared, but I guess it wasn't for no reason.

-Mike

My problem with mobile computing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37405054)

I code while walking, talking, eating an sometimes bathing. I'd like to be able to move to something less bulky (like my phone) but currently there are no mobile devices that let me code and compile in whatever language I want. When I see that as a feature on a tablet I'll pick it up day 1. I don't use word or excell, I hardly check my email and angry birds bores me. Developing software is what I do 98% of the time on my computer so to get me to move away from a traditional PC to your fancy tablets, I need to be able to develop directly on the device.

Security (1)

ISoldat53 (977164) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405058)

I haven't seen any comments on security. Does WS8 improve security?

Two things (2, Insightful)

stewbacca (1033764) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405074)

I have two things:

1 - Given Microsoft's track record for abject failure in the innovation department, does anyone really believe any of this hype?

2 - Does anyone else think trying to be two things at once will just be one hot mess? Unlike Apple who does iOS very well, and OS X very well, this seems to be doomed to trying to be two things at once, while simply sucking at both. I think Apple dabbled with the concept with Lion but quickly realized that when I'm using a desktop, I want a desktop OS, not a 27" iPad.

What is Metro? (1)

unassimilatible (225662) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405174)

Would have been nice to explain WTH Metro is in the summary, or provide an inline link to it.

Windows 8 for non-tablets (1)

Billly Gates (198444) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405232)

Ars Technica did a review of Windows 8 by using explorer.exe and tried to use it as a regular PC running Word. Results are mentioned here [arstechnica.com]

what innovation (3, Funny)

roc97007 (608802) | more than 2 years ago | (#37405242)

Regarding the new improved BSOD: "After expressing emoticon-style sadness"

Windows catches up with 1980's mac.

Well, I guess it's a start.

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