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Artificial Blood Vessels Created On a 3D Printer

samzenpus posted about 3 years ago | from the time-to-change-the-vascular-cartridge dept.

Biotech 33

rallymatte writes "A team at Fraunhofer Institute in Germany has managed to create artificial blood vessels with a 3D printer that may come to be used for transplants of lab-created organs. From the article: 'To print something as small and complex as a blood vessel, the scientists combined the 3D printing technology with two-photon polymerisation — shining intense laser beams onto the material to stimulate the molecules in a very small focus point.'"

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Golden Girls! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37433784)

Thank you for being a friend
Traveled down the road and back again
Your heart is true, you're a pal and a cosmonaut.

And if you threw a party
Invited everyone you ever knew
You would see the biggest gift would be from me
And the card attached would say, thank you for being a friend.

Damn... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37433806)

"shining intense laser beams onto the material to stimulate the molecules in a very small focus point.'"

I was going to use this to suggest someone intended it as a replacement for the colloquial tweezers and a magnifying glass.

Unfortunately, there is nobody in particular I want to deride at the moment.

Damn this civilized-ness.

Re:Damn... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37433982)

You could suggest that the golden girls troll above you only needs one photon to stimulate his molecule.

Artificial Blood Vessels Created On a 3D Printer (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37433832)

One step closer to creating "Surrogates" ;-)

Re:Artificial Blood Vessels Created On a 3D Printe (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 3 years ago | (#37434160)

Speaking as a person who is already carrying a good $50k worth of implants, my human side rejects this notion while my cyborg side says "bring it".

Re:Artificial Blood Vessels Created On a 3D Printe (1)

jamiesan (715069) | about 3 years ago | (#37440736)

Just don't miss your payments on the replacement organ. Wouldn't want it to be reposessed.

Mmmmm....elastic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37433844)

Let me know when the adult toy industry comes up with a way to print a Real Doll from a series of photographs.

Re:Mmmmm....elastic (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37434166)

they werent interested in photos of your mom

Re:Mmmmm....elastic (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37434498)

For those who don't know, this guy is telling the truth. Some weirdo sent them photos of his mom and wanted them to make one.

I weep for humanity.

What a headline (0)

arisvega (1414195) | about 3 years ago | (#37433872)

.. and with such headlines, the population gets convinced that we got Star Trek technology standing by.

No wonder why half the population thinks that astronaut training takes places in "antigravity chambers".

(person at the hospital) "What do you mean you don't have this type of blood? Why don't you just print some, I read it on the news."

Re:What a headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37433958)

The headline is acceptable compared to others. Sure, it would be more accurate to say "Artificial Blood Vessels Created On a 3D Printer for user in lab-made organ" but not exactly short now is it? The key things is that it's an artificial blood vessel (basically a small tube) made on a 3d printer so the headline fits within the content.

Re:What a headline (1)

planimal (2454610) | about 3 years ago | (#37433980)

No wonder why half the population thinks that astronaut training takes places in "antigravity chambers". source?

Re:What a headline (4, Informative)

Arancaytar (966377) | about 3 years ago | (#37433990)

(person at the hospital) "What do you mean you don't have this type of blood? Why don't you just print some, I read it on the news."

Blood vessel != blood cell. Or is that the joke?

The headline doesn't exaggerate. They need to make artificial capillaries for synthetic tissue, and now they've come up with a way to make them. It'll be years before this will have progressed far enough to be an actual product (let alone one that is routinely used on human patients), but that's how all research works.

Re:What a headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37434000)

.. and with such headlines, the population gets convinced that we got Star Trek technology standing by.

I doubt average Joe would see this in their newspaper/newscast of choice. Growing an ear on the back of a mouse probably made it into the papers just because of its shock value.

No wonder why half the population thinks that astronaut training takes places in "antigravity chambers".

Doesn't it though? Both the Vomit Comet and underwater buoyancy chambers are designed to counter the effects of gravity. It may not involve plasma coils or deflector arrays or inverted tetryon particles but it's anti-gravity in my book just as rotation produces "artificial" gravity.

(person at the hospital) "What do you mean you don't have this type of blood? Why don't you just print some, I read it on the news."

See point the first. But seriously though, I'm curious as to how often hospitals are unable to source a rare blood type in industrialised nations.

Re:What a headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37434090)

reading comprehension fails again...

Re:What a headline (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37434416)

Well, this isn't Star Trek tech, only 5th element tech.
I wanna print my personal Milla Jovovich.

good news! (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37433906)

because the only thing more expensive than ink toner is human blood [boingboing.net] . oh wait...

Re:good news! (0)

mark-t (151149) | about 3 years ago | (#37434098)

The phrase "ink toner" is a contradiction in terms, making about as much logical sense as the notion of "dead survivors".

Because toner is *NOT* ink.

Ink is a liquid pigment, toner is dry.

Ink is simply absorbed into the substrate of whatever surface it is put upon, where toner is bonded to a surface through application of heat and pressure.

Re:good news! (1)

poofmeisterp (650750) | about 3 years ago | (#37434264)

I think the anonymous poster was going for humor on this. I laughed. Just food for thought.

Re:good news! (0)

Slashdot Assistant (2336034) | about 3 years ago | (#37434428)

How's the whistling coming along, Commander Data?

Ew... bad mental image. (4, Funny)

Commontwist (2452418) | about 3 years ago | (#37434104)

All of a sudden I had this image of printing kidneys, blood vessels and all, shooting out of a laser printer because someone clicked the wrong application.

"I said print out my organizer not organs!"

Re:Ew... bad mental image. (1)

nurb432 (527695) | about 3 years ago | (#37434340)

Just call it lunch and be happy.

bypass grafts (2)

lseltzer (311306) | about 3 years ago | (#37434138)

When my father was in for aortic valve replacement and bypass I asked the surgeon (Dr. Oz, the guy on TV a lot, did his surgery) and his cardiologist why there weren't artificial grafts. Instead they take vessels from the legs, adding another opportunity for infection and something else to heal, not to mention time to the procedure. They said that nobody had any success with it, they didn't know why. Venus grafts clog right back up pretty frequently; arterial grafts do much better, but you don't have a lot of arteries you can spare. TFA talks about capillaries, not coronary arteries. I'm not sure if the tissue needs would be any different.

Re:bypass grafts (1)

Dunbal (464142) | about 3 years ago | (#37434200)

I have arterial grafts. But then again my surgeon wasn't famous.

Joining Blood Vessels Without Sutures (1)

simoncpu was here (1601629) | about 3 years ago | (#37434156)

Joining Blood Vessels Without Sutures + Artificial Blood Vessels Created On a 3D Printer = WIN

Turnip Blood (1)

walkerp1 (523460) | about 3 years ago | (#37434396)

Now the ink mongers can suck my blood more efficiently than ever before.

Laser two-photon polyermisation (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37434520)

You bring the light from a pulsed laser to a very tight focus inside a photoresist -- the same type of chemical used in standard photolithography. When this photoresist absorbs light with a wavelength of, say, 400nm, it cross-links to become a fairly solid plastic. In normal photolith, you'd illuminate a controlled area with 400nm light.

In two-photon polymerisation, you start with light of, say, 800nm, and you rely on two photons being absorbed at the same time, which together have enough energy to do what a single 400nm photon could. The key here is that, since the probability of this two-photon process depends on the square of the intensity, rather than linearly as in the case of normal one-photon processes, then you can localise it much better: with a tight focus, the chance of polymerising a ~100nm region near the focus is pretty much unity, while the chance of polymerising something away from the focus is pretty much zero. You then move that spot around inside the a blob of photoresist on a microscope slide.

Have a look at Nanoscribe GmbH [nanoscribe.de] for a commercial device, with images of some things they've made.

Oh no... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37434550)

Is every manufacturing process going to be called "3D printing" now? Is it like "nano" was in the 2000s? Because this will make those huckster scam artists at Makerbot even more douchy and insufferable. No, your 5$ worth of old printer motors in a wooden box are not worth 1300$ and printing a crappy mold is not the next Industrial Revolution. God those Makerbot fanbois are worse than Apple fanatics. We get it. You wildly overpaid for a useless gizmo and that Bre Pettis dude is laughing himself to sleep every night. What a skeevy douche.

Seriously, do you have any idea of the amount of serious milling hardware you can get on eBay for 1300$?

Laser two-photon polymerisation (2)

fishicist (777318) | about 3 years ago | (#37434672)

You bring the light from a pulsed laser to a very tight focus inside a photoresist -- the same type of chemical used in standard photolithography. When this photoresist absorbs light with a wavelength of, say, 400nm, it cross-links to become a fairly solid plastic. In normal photolith, you'd illuminate a controlled area with 400nm light.

In two-photon polymerisation, you start with light of, say, 800nm, and you rely on two photons being absorbed at the same time, which together have enough energy to do what a single 400nm photon could. The key here is that, since the probability of this two-photon process depends on the square of the intensity, rather than linearly as in the case of normal one-photon processes, then you can localise it much better: with a tight focus, the chance of polymerising a ~100nm region near the focus is pretty much unity, while the chance of polymerising something away from the focus is pretty much zero. You then move that spot around inside the a blob of photoresist on a microscope slide.

Have a look at Nanoscribe GmbH [nanoscribe.de] for a commercial device, with images of some things they've made.

one step closer to teleportation. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37434734)

I can see teleportation going the 3d printer route.

I can imagine Quagmire would be enjoying this one (1)

MindPrison (864299) | about 3 years ago | (#37435054)

printing out whatever kinky stuff he needs :)

Oh Giggety, Giggety - GIGGETY!!

Artificial trachea implanted back in June (1)

Scrameustache (459504) | about 3 years ago | (#37435212)

http://www.npr.org/2011/07/11/137770068/windpipe-grown-from-stem-cells-implanted-in-man [npr.org]

So the fellow in Stockholm, who's name is Paolo Macchiarini, decided to try, first time - he thought the time was ripe to try an experiment in which they would take a scan of his trachea to make sure they had the exact dimensions. A fellow in London has invented this spongy plastic. It's porous. Make a model of his trachea that's exactly the right size. Meanwhile, a company in Massachusetts was making an incubator.

The model and the incubator were flown to Stockholm and the patient was sent there. And they took some of his bone marrow, I think probably from the hip bone. The bone marrow contains stem cells, which can make a variety of different tissues. They combine the fellow's stem cells in this incubator with this model, which sort of serves as a scaffold for the cells to grow on, along with several growth factors that tell the cells what kind of cells to become, namely cartilage, which is what trachea, wind pipes are made of.

And within a couple of days, enough cells have grown in the surface of this thing that they could put it into his - they took out his diseased wind pipe, put this in, stitched him up, and it worked.

Looks interesting (1)

raymorphic (2461142) | about 3 years ago | (#37438226)

Now we just need to see how the outcome turns out.

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