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Stunning Time Lapse of the Earth From the ISS

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the how's-the-view-up-there? dept.

NASA 180

The Bad Astronomer writes "Science educator James Drake took 600 still photos from the International Space Station as it orbited the Earth, and created a fantastic time-lapse animation out of them. It must be seen to be appreciated; storms and cities fly past below in amazing clarity."

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180 comments

Alright (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435202)

Great, but the Earth is old hat. Let's see some porn from the ISS!

Re:Alright (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435434)

A couple years ago, My frat bros rented a zero-gravity plane. Some of them took girlfriends/fuck buddies up for some gravity free pussy. That didn't work out, but one did get a zero-gravity hummer :). I bet a 69 would be less awkward than on Earth.

I jacked off and shot a pretty impressive roper, if I do say so myself.

Needless to say, we were banned.

We videotaped it, though. If I can find a copy, I'll upload it.

Re:Alright (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435446)

All I can say is 'Hahahahaha, NICE!' :)

Re:Alright (1)

slashdottedjoe (1448757) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435588)

The space station would have a great advantage over a 0G plane. You get the time to be creative. However, there will be a few issues with Newton's Laws.

Re:Alright (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37436990)

Nigga, I don't give a FUCK.

the video was spectacular (5, Insightful)

planimal (2454610) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435204)

seeing bolts of lightning from space was awfully sublime

Re:the video was spectacular (5, Insightful)

ajo_arctus (1215290) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435238)

I was amazed at just how much lightning was in that video. It never occurred to me until now that there would be so many thunderstorms going on all over the world all of the time. This is a rare video where the superlatives in the headline (amazing, fantastic etc.) are well and truly justified.

Re:the video was spectacular (1)

sznupi (719324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436616)

Too bad one other curious sight given by the ISS to its occupants is missing, aurora:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aurora_Australis_From_ISS.JPG [wikimedia.org]
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aurora_Borealis.jpg [wikimedia.org]
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Aurora_Borealis_from_Expedition_6.ogg [wikimedia.org]

Also, I won't complain if the next attempt would be less jerky... if not by longer exposures (which would introduce some motion blur, but probably also make lightning less visible), then at least by capturing photos more often.

Re:the video was spectacular (1)

instagib (879544) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435600)

The HD version is awesome. More FPS and longer would be appreciated! :-)

In the 90s there was a great late night program on German TV called "Space Night / Earth Views". While obviously only SD, those were mesmerizing films with perfect ambient/chill background music. Examples (headphones recommended):
Earth Views 6 Intro [youtube.com]
Earth Views 4 Excerpt [youtube.com]

Re:the video was spectacular (1)

CheerfulMacFanboy (1900788) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435766)

In the 90s there was a great late night program on German TV called "Space Night / Earth Views". While obviously only SD, those were mesmerizing films with perfect ambient/chill background music.

It's again on every night on both "Bayerisches Fernsehen" and "BR-alpha".

Re:the video was spectacular (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435852)

The US should run NASA videos and slideshows of space imagery all the time, seeding news and talk shows with them as "news events". We'd get a lot more people appreciating the truly elevating work we spend so relatively little to get from NASA. In fact NASA should probably get a half-billion bucks a year just to mail a DVD to every American household at Christmastime.

Instead all we get is the terminally boring NASA TV channel, and only on some cable systems (Cox in New Orleans, but not any in the NYC area). Germans do get it, or at least they did in the 90s. WTF.

Re:the video was spectacular (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435988)

Related downloads:
www.wupload.com/file/w867/103479450/Space_Night_-_Earth_Views_4-5.divx
rapidshare.com/files/401462612/Earth_views.mov

Re:the video was spectacular (1)

kilodelta (843627) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435840)

Yes indeed, I noticed that too. I also noted how lit up most of the Earth is at night. Talk about a big, glowing target!

Direction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435258)

This is awesome! I'm trying to figure out what part of the earth this is imaging. My best guess is going from the north to south pole along the western side of the Americas, starting somewhere near Vancouver/Seattle passing Mexico, down along Chile, and ending as it gets to Antarctica. Can anyone confirm this?

The ISS isn't in polar orbit is it? (1)

PeterM from Berkeley (15510) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435300)

In fact, I looked it up, Wikipedia has the ISS in a 53 degree inclination orbit. I can't make heads-or-tails of what I'm seeing in the video either.

It certainly isn't going pole-to-pole, though.

Re:The ISS isn't in polar orbit is it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435570)

Find out what city has green lights (0:32 seconds in the video) and you'll find your continent.

Re:The ISS isn't in polar orbit is it? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435862)

Every city I've been to has green lights - that's how I was able to drive through the cities.

Re:The ISS isn't in polar orbit is it? (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436078)

It says right in the YouTube description, though yeah I guessed correctly where it was as it passed Mexico, that little sliver of land between North and South America is fairly recognisable even when it's "upside down" :p

Re:The ISS isn't in polar orbit is it? (1)

riverat1 (1048260) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436372)

I think AC if right about tracking down the west coast of the Americas. It looks like the first big city you see is probably Vancouver, BC, Canada, then the Puget Sound region, on to Portland. I live in Oregon and the placement of the cities south of Portland look just right to me. If you look at a globe the 53 degree inclination is about right to track down the coast. Here [nasa.gov] is a page that shows the ISS track.

Re:Direction (1)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435342)

I agree it looks like it's flying over the western side of the Americas at first, but I think it must then turn towards the east. You would never see the sun rising over Antarctica, and all of the satellite path maps always look like wavy lines against the Mercator projection, so it would make sense for the ISS to turn east as it approaches the southern tip of South America.

Re:Direction (1)

icebike (68054) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435622)

At 18 seconds in they play east of the Gulf of California over central mexico.
31 seconds Veracruz
35 seconds, Panama appears on left edge

Re:Direction (4, Informative)

ScottForbes (528679) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435844)

This page [nasa.gov] shows the orbit of the ISS. I believe what we're seeing is:

0:00 - Seattle / Vancouver as a dot on the horizon at left.
0:05 - Left to right: Seattle, Portland, San Francisco.
0:12 - ISS passes over land slightly north of San Francisco, moving toward Las Vegas; Los Angeles and San Diego on the right.
0:16 - ISS passes almost directly over Las Vegas (bottom center).
0:18 - ISS passes almost directly over Phoenix. Gulf of California on the right; Dallas and Houston on the horizon at far left.
0:28 - Mexico City. Gulf of Mexico on the left, Pacific Ocean on the right.
0:34 - Central American coast flyby, complete with tropical storms.
0:43 - South American coast flyby: Colombia, then Ecuador, then Peru.
0:51 - Lima, Peru.
0:55 - Border between Peru and Chile. The station's orbit begins to curve inland (eastward).
0:58 - Valparaiso and Santiago on the horizon at right (behind the solar panels after 0:59).
0:59 - Buenos Aires, Argentina is just appearing on the horizon (top center) as the video ends.

So I don't think Antarctica is ever visible - the station's orbit starts to turn eastward before that happens.

Re:Direction (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435892)

> I agree it looks like it's flying over the western side of the Americas at first, but I think it must then turn towards the east.

Huh? The space station can't "turn towards the east," it's in orbit. What, do you think it has a steering wheel? :)

Re:Direction (2)

vell0cet (1055494) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435404)

Remember, the earth is revolving while the ISS is orbiting, so it will be very confusing to try to figure it out by watching that video. It's not like the earth is standing still while the ISS orbits.

Re:Direction (1)

Kagura (843695) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435526)

It takes 90 minutes to orbit the earth at the ISS' altitude. The earth only rotates 22.5 degrees out of 360 degrees. That's 6.5% of one full rotation. The earth is basically standing still as far as the space station is concerned over one orbit.

Re:Direction (1)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435614)

However, the ISS orbits once every 1.5 hours, so the Earth's revolution would be pretty insignificant in this video (which looks like about half an orbit). Still very confusing, since the ISS is in a LEO making the overall patterns difficult to see. That and the cloud cover obscuring lots of details. My best guess agrees with the OP, it seems to be going from somewhere near the arctic along the west coast of the US (you can make out the coast of California pretty clearly, and see Central America) and what I'm pretty sure is the length of Chile down at the bottom. It isn't completely polar. Orbital dynamics, however, are pretty complex.

Re:Direction (1)

Extremus (1043274) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435458)

Agreed. I just disagree on the Antarctica bit: in my opinion the video ends when the ISS start to "turn" into South America. The blackout region to the left, near the end of the video, seems to be the Amazon forest. As a matter of fact, the ISS is in this same path right now (2011-09-18 20:22 UTC).

Re:Direction (4, Informative)

RoFLKOPTr (1294290) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435532)

This is awesome! I'm trying to figure out what part of the earth this is imaging. My best guess is going from the north to south pole along the western side of the Americas, starting somewhere near Vancouver/Seattle passing Mexico, down along Chile, and ending as it gets to Antarctica. Can anyone confirm this?

The description on YouTube [youtube.com] says:

A time-lapse taken from the front of the International Space Station as it orbits our planet at night. This movie begins over the Pacific Ocean and continues over North and South America before entering daylight near Antarctica. Visible cities, countries and landmarks include (in order) Vancouver Island, Victoria, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Fransisco, Los Angeles. Phoenix. Multiple cities in Texas, New Mexico and Mexico. Mexico City, the Gulf of Mexico, the Yucatan Peninsula, Lightning in the Pacific Ocean, Guatemala, Panama, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, and the Amazon. Also visible is the earths ionosphere (thin yellow line) and the stars of our galaxy.

Re:Direction (1)

dhall (1252) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435708)

From the youtube video description:

This movie begins over the Pacific Ocean and continues over North and South America before entering daylight near Antarctica. Visible cities, countries and landmarks include (in order) Vancouver Island, Victoria, Vancouver, Seattle, Portland, San Fransisco, Los Angeles. Phoenix. Multiple cities in Texas, New Mexico and Mexico. Mexico City, the Gulf of Mexico, the Yucatan Peninsula, Lightning in the Pacific Ocean, Guatemala, Panama, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Chile, and the Amazon.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74mhQyuyELQ [youtube.com]

Awesome Lightning (1)

Haedrian (1676506) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435270)

Lightning looks really impressive from up there. Shame its not as good down here.

Re:Awesome Lightning (1)

mywhitewolf (1923488) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436100)

? i've seen some amazing lightning storms that give you the "wow" factor every bit as much as this footage. perhaps you don't live in a particularly stormy area?

just one word (1)

cyberfin (1454265) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435274)

Wooooooooooooooooooooooooooow.

These things always help putting the world and its issues into perspective.

Priceless (1)

rainer_d (115765) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435286)

So that's what those rich people pay for...

Re:Priceless (1)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435874)

You mean every American taxpayer? We're hardly all rich. Only the tiniest percentage of us are. And they don't pay taxes.

Re:Priceless (1)

Teancum (67324) | more than 2 years ago | (#37437040)

Partially agreeing with the grandparent post, I'd agree that particular view would be worth seeing for about $20-$40 million, assuming I had that kind of money. It would be especially worth watching from the Cupola of the ISS or something similar. That several wealthy people have paid that sort of price for the privilege, I'd have to say that particular view of the Earth is precisely what those folks are paying that kind of money to see.

Interesting (2, Funny)

deathcow (455995) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435296)

I thought they weren't going to fly over Compton/Los Angeles anymore at nighttime after the Soyuz-jackings last year?

Re:Interesting (0)

houghi (78078) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435698)

What is so special compare to the rest of the world that they can;t fly over it? OK, I could understand that they do not care about any other country in the world, but any other place in the US?

Also: what does 'flying over' mean? How many miles should they avoid it on each side?

Re:Interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435822)

It's called a joke.

Re:Interesting (2)

Dr Herbert West (1357769) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435926)

Not everyone is from the U.S-- so jokes about dangerous neighborhoods in the US fall flat.

In short, Compton ( a neighborhood in Los Angeles) is often associated with high levels of street crime-- in particular car-jacking/stealing. Hence, the "soyuz-jacking" reference.

Populous (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435298)

That was just Populous: The Beginning, with better graphics.

You know what would be cool? (5, Funny)

The Creator (4611) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435360)

If we got everyone to shut of their lights and not answer radio calls from ISS for a day. Just to mess with their heads!

Re:You know what would be cool? (1)

ericloewe (2129490) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435690)

Or we could hook them up to an answering machine: "Your call is important to us..."

Re:You know what would be cool? (1)

FlyingGuy (989135) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436870)

The Magrethea answering machine would be appropriate, especially on the second call.

Re:You know what would be cool? (1)

FlyingGuy (989135) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436818)

I think It would have to be pre-planned waaaaaaaaaay in advance.

I wonder what would happen at power plants if everyone removed power from any outdoor photon emitting device a at the same time?

I have a boner (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435366)

...in honor of Carl Sagan.

Fitting (4, Insightful)

DigitalGodBoy (142596) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435368)

Carl Sagan's "Pale Blue Dot":
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p86BPM1GV8M [youtube.com]

Always a good perspective check

I don't have time to watch all that... (3, Funny)

mutube (981006) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435426)

Executive summary [hoover.net.au]

Some of us have jobs to do you know.

Re:I don't have time to watch all that... (1)

johanatan (1159309) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436306)

Umm, I watched them both because it's a weekend and neither was significantly longer or shorter than the other. One arguably had greater intrinsic artistic merit.

Light pollution (1)

Jmc23 (2353706) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435374)

It's a little sad to see all that light pollution. I wonder my children eill ever be able to see the milky way... without having to pay for a space trip.

What i found most interesting was all the thunderstorms aligned over large distances.

Re:Light pollution (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435478)

There are many places even in the USA where the night is pitch black and you can see the Milky Way with zero light pollution. It's much easier to go the NE New Mexico than into orbit.

Re:Light pollution (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435498)

You've never been camping, have you?

Re:Light pollution (1)

pyrosine (1787666) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435548)

I think if they can afford a space trip, and they are affordable, it is an acceptable price to pay for light pollution - especially since with it comes exploration of space and even extraterrestrial colonies

Re:Light pollution (1)

smellotron (1039250) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436950)

I think if they can afford a space trip, and they are affordable, it is an acceptable price to pay for light pollution

How about we get affordable space trips and reduce our light pollution? For starters, we can stop pointing so many lights up.

Re:Light pollution (1)

nmb3000 (741169) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435644)

It's a little sad to see all that light pollution. I wonder my children eill ever be able to see the milky way... without having to pay for a space trip.

As others mentioned, there are plenty of places you can go that still offer a pristine view of the night sky. Light pollution drops off pretty rapidly as you get away from the source.

This summer we had a mini family reunion at my uncle's cabin in southwest Montana. Possibly the best part for me was getting away from the city and seeing the night sky the way it is truly meant to be seen. The sheer number of stars and their brightness is mind-boggling and yet so easily lost and forgotten in even a smaller city. When you see the stars, planets, and galaxies (including our own) laid out above you it is so easy to understand why ancient humans gave so much thought and concern over the heavens. It's impossible to look at that and not start thinking about all kinds of possibilities (and start feeling very small).

One thing I found surprising was the astounding number of satellites visible from the ground. They move across the sky at a pretty fast clip and there are so many. At one point I could see 5 in the sky at the same time, all moving different directions. Very neat.

Re:Light pollution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37436068)

... you realise a lot of that was photoshop'd right?

Wow...even at that height, (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435392)

you can see the thin line of pollution that we create that circles the earth. No wonder the earth is melting away with the global warming. I'll be surprised if the earth is viable for my grand kids.

Re:Wow...even at that height, (1)

Dr Herbert West (1357769) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435562)

Not to be a climate-change denier or whatever, but is that really what that is? Citation? I had assumed it was more likely some kind of magnetic halo, or something like the northern lights, or light pollution bouncing off the atmosphere. I'm not a climatologist, obvs. Anyone here know what that "halo" is?

I live in L.A, so my experience of pollution is that it's brown, not a pretty green/yellow color.

Re:Wow...even at that height, (1)

Jesus_666 (702802) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435656)

The description on YouTube says that it's the ionosphere. So unless we count the sun and its light as pollution I don't think that line qualifies.

Re:Wow...even at that height, (1)

fahrbot-bot (874524) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435692)

I live in L.A, so my experience of pollution is that it's brown, not a pretty green/yellow color.

I'm not an expert and I don't know if what's seen in the video is all pollution, but different chemical and particulate pollutants inhabit (for lack of a better word) different altitudes. The brown haze you see in LA probably mostly soot from vehicles, power plants, and other things burning somewhere or other chemicals that filter the sunlight. From the page on smog [wikipedia.org] :

Los Angeles and the San Joaquin Valley

Being in low basins surrounded by mountains, Los Angeles and the San Joaquin Valley are notorious for their smog. The millions of vehicles in these basins plus the added effects of the San Francisco Bay and Los Angeles/Long Beach port complexes contribute to further air pollution....

constant streaming (1)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435460)

there should be live streaming of the planet done constantly by many satellites at different latitudes/longitudes, resolutions, frequencies, all sorts of options.

Re:constant streaming (1)

jthill (303417) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435672)

There's the ISS live stream [nasa.gov] which isn't on 24/7 and isn't always an Earth view then, but it's the best I've found. Plays with VLC on linux, too. On Windows you can make the live video your desktop. That's, uhhh, distracting.

Low FPS (1)

samkass (174571) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435464)

Man, reality has low FPS.

Re:Low FPS (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37436356)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PdDEpC0uHWI still waiting on the 1080p from youtube but should be nice enough:)

Finally! (1)

GodGell (897123) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435470)

Out of all the dozens of ideas I've had that others realized and made millions, this is certainly the one I'm glad someone else also thought of.

Just this week I was thinking about ways to get a tiny probe into space whose only purpose would be photography. NASA (understandably) doesn't waste too much of their tiny bandwidth (and mission time) to transfer large photos; but what if that was the mission's only purpose?
We could create a timelapse of all of Humanity making their rounds around the Sun. We could take a shot of Earth setting above the thin atmosphere of Mars.
We could park it in geostationary orbit around Europa and make a timelapse of it circling around Jupiter, perhaps even witnessing the expansion and compression it experiences in doing so... the possibilities are endless.

If only I could convince Canon or Nikon to sponsor the century's publicity stunt.

Re:Finally! (1)

rgbatduke (1231380) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435558)

You mean aside from their many-times-a-day global photographs of the weather of the world, available on almost any weather site?

For example: http://classic.wunderground.com/tropical/ [wunderground.com] and scroll down to the latest atlantic still photograph. If you wait too long, BTW, you'll get infrared by default -- you only get clouds per se during daylight so that you can see them.

Or then, there are the many military satellites that can take amazingly high resolution pictures of the surface almost anywhere, to the point where sunbathing nude in your back yard is a chancy proposition if you really don't want anybody to see your ass...

There are, however, ways for even amateurs to get a camera "into space". The traditional one is to buy a weather balloon and use it to haul your camera to 20+ miles, at which point the earth looks pretty much like "earth from space" -- black sky, curvature, clouds. There are some lovely pictures that have been taken this way if you google for them.

rgb

Re:Finally! (1)

cwebster (100824) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435682)

NASA already has many satellites in orbit that take pictures. Its not live streaming, but you can easily download the data and look at it for yourself. Their cameras aren't just restricted to the visible spectrum (in fact, that is probably a minority), but the cloud tracking projects definitely have visible data from a polar orbiter. The Terra satellite (i think its that one) takes something like 9 pictures along its orbit at different angles to the earth so that cloud height and motion can be determined (correct parallax and drift using multiple images of the same location taken from different angles). For the non visible wavelengths you'll find infrared, water vapor, land use, and many other images.

Re:Finally! (1)

GodGell (897123) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435744)

But what about all the other planets? Most probes don't waste bandwidth on sending more than a few pictures back, and I doubt they would ever change trajectory (or match speed with a moon/planet) just for composition.

Re:Finally! (1)

cwebster (100824) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435984)

http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/photos/raw/ [nasa.gov]
http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/messenger/multimedia/index.html [nasa.gov]

Those are just two missions that come to mind.

For your proposal, I think you underestimate the complexity and equipment needed to launch a probe and have it captured into a geostationary orbit (you want to "match speed") of a moon of another planet. Also note that geostationary orbits are very high altitude orbits over the equator. For decent pictures you need to do what the ISS is doing and use a lower orbit (polar or other inclination), but in that case you wont "match speed" anymore and will have to deal with the body moving underneath you (from your reference frame).

At the costs involved you'll probably want to put more than just a nikon and a big lens on your probe.

Green city? (3, Interesting)

luisdom (560067) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435496)

What's the green light seen on sec. 30?

Re:Green city? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435568)

Can't see the yellow brick road from this altitude, but......

Re:Green city? (4, Insightful)

reverseengineer (580922) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435836)

Looks Veracruz has predominantly mercury vapor lighting, as opposed to the yellow-orange sodium vapor lighting seen in most of the other cities. Tokyo at night from space glows greenish blue for this reason, anyway. There's an discussion of this (and of other effects seen in pictures of cities at night taken from orbit) here: Cities At Night [nasa.gov]

Re:Green city? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37436774)

It appears that it's on the opposite side of Mexico from the Yucatan Peninsula, so it may be Guatamala or something. It's hard to say. The video definitely starts at the Pacific NW, progresses down California, then moves passed Central and South America.

Re:Green city? (1)

rocketPack (1255456) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436096)

Kind of looks like a toxic green cloud settling over New Jersey... Maybe all that methane off-gassing from the dumps is accumulating in the atmosphere above the bigger cities. Could also be a by-product of spray tanning chemicals.

Shopped (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435538)

If I saw this in a game, I'd say there's way to much effects and colours and it looks completely unrealistic.

Re:Shopped (1)

Osgeld (1900440) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435630)

well, in the past I might agree with you, but there is not enough brown to rationalize that thought with today's games

Screensaver? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37435650)

Does anybody know how to convert this video into...a screensaver?

I know it seems like a simplistic request, but googling a bit reveals...well...nothing.

Even in just a simple loop I'd love to use it...but short of downloading it and using a media player, I can't seem to find something that does this...

Re:Screensaver? (1)

Dr Herbert West (1357769) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436018)

I already beat you to it-- get a commercial (or better yet, freeware) screencap software like CamStudio or SnapzPro, set the rezolution to 1080 on the YouTube toolbar, and record it playing. Then do all your cropping, resizing, exporting in your video editing software of choice.

It took me five minutes.

Amazing! (0)

owlnation (858981) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435654)

Stunning video! It just shows you how crappy most scfi movie and TV show VFX have been. The real thing is waaaayyyy better. I could watch it for hours.

Plagiarism already (1)

macraig (621737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435762)

Would you believe some twit has already plagiarized it, and even kept the same YouTube title?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tInCjvBy-Uw [youtube.com]

I've never felt a need to "report" YouTube videos before, but there doesn't even seem to be a public mechanism to do it.

Re:Plagiarism already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37436382)

It's been made private.

It was amusing to watch for a while... people pointing out what a dick he was being, him deleting the comments.Eventually he made the video unsearchable, and then eventually made it private so that only his butt buddies can now see it. heheh

Solar Panel Motion (1)

the monolith (1174927) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435858)

I watched the ground (stupendous,) I watched the lightning (amazing,) I watched the stars (Fascinating: it's worth watching them come upwards from the horizon - like rain in reverse, and also watch the atmospheric effects on them.) Then I tried to figure out where places are (still clueless: would like second-by-second tabulated list of locations, please.) Then I started watching the ISS itself - the play of light and reflections on the equipment that is visible, and have to ask (someone knowledgeable, please) if the motions of the solar panels while in earth shadow are really necessary? It just seems uneconomical electrically and mechanically to allow such movements.

Just asking, as always.

Graham.
(SETI user of the day 19 September 2011 - Every Little Helps!)

Re:Solar Panel Motion (1)

shutdown -p now (807394) | more than 2 years ago | (#37436422)

Then I tried to figure out where places are (still clueless: would like second-by-second tabulated list of locations, please.)

It's right there in the description of YouTube video if you expand it.

truly stunning (1)

ordinal (110255) | more than 2 years ago | (#37435964)

with all the hurt and pain in the world it's stuff like this that truly make it all worth it... the lights, the lightning, the earth. thank you

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