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Microsoft Taking Apple's Walled Garden Approach For Metro Apps

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the leading-from-the-rear dept.

Microsoft 389

New submitter gauauu writes "Microsoft will be taking a walled-garden approach to Metro apps, only allowing enterprises and developers to side-load Metro apps in Windows 8, while everyone else will have to go through the Windows Store. Note that this only applies to Metro apps; the model for traditional desktop apps won't change."

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Great (1)

V!NCENT (1105021) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448814)

Let Microsoft HTMLv5 stay Microsoft HTMLv5. The same with Javascript.

I don't want that crap anyway near anything else! Win-win situation.

Re:Great (0)

negRo_slim (636783) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448854)

The same with Javascript.

You mean JScript right?

Re:Great (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449048)

Have you identified anything that resembles WinRT-specific HTML5? From what I've seen that markup end of it is entirely normal standard HTML5. As is the JavaScript implementation. The only thing different is that the DOM exposes additional API for application-specific behavior that would not translate to a normal web page anyway.

Just curious if there is any meat to your accusations.

Re:Great (2)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449162)

So you mean they have Embraced HTML5 then Extended it?
I wonder what step would come next.

Re:Great (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449280)

The only thing different is that the DOM exposes additional API for application-specific behavior

I imagine that the only way to interact with some peripherals, such as the camera and microphone, will involve additional DOM APIs that are exposed to Microsoft-approved Metro style applications and not to traditional HTAs.

Re:Great (0)

Dr Herbert West (1357769) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449404)

Ummm.... "normal, standard HTML5"? There's nothing standard about HTML 5.

Mod parent as flamebait, please. Or mod me as troll, see if I care.

frost pist (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37448824)

is the bestest

Windows store (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37448826)

I think I will only be window shopping

And it begins... (5, Insightful)

MagikSlinger (259969) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448830)

The end of computing freedom as we know it.

Re:And it begins... (1)

sltd (1182933) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448856)

... Or you could just run something different.

Re:And it begins... (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449016)

Assuming you can even run something else. On most ARM platforms this is just short of impossible, and I expect that it will be made deliberately difficult on x86 in the future.

To run something else, buy other than Windows (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449078)

If you buy an ARM tablet with Android instead of an ARM tablet with Windows 8, you can "run something else" because pretty much every Android device out there supports "Unknown sources" now [tgdaily.com] .

Re:To run something else, buy other than Windows (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449254)

I can run Android on Android tablets, but running pretty much anything else (i.e. non-Android Linux platforms) is a pain due to the chaos Google has sewn in the driver space. Never mind upgrading the kernel when Google moves on to a new one, time for half-functional Backports Ahoy!

Re:To run something else, buy other than Windows (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449370)

Unless the firmware is locked.

Re:To run something else, buy other than Windows (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449456)

Even if an Android-powered tablet has a locked bootloader, it can still applications from "Unknown sources", unlike a Windows 8 tablet.

Re:And it begins... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449190)

This is utter bullshit. I run a desktop linux on a Z2, even replaced the bootloader. Lots of people run alternate firmware on routers, etc.

Maybe you mean you lack the technical skill to do this, but for many arm platforms replacing the OS is a reality. Most just would not want to or know how.

Re:And it begins... (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449458)

This is utter bullshit.

Have you tried swapping the kernel out on a non-Xoom Motorola device? How about running a non-Android OS (say, Fedora) with no loss of functionality? You can't, due to all the closed user space drivers and undocumented bits.

I run a desktop linux on a Z2, even replaced the bootloader.

You do? What distro? I'm guessing you're making do without hardware acceleration from your SoC and possibly have other hardware that is non-functional.

Lots of people run alternate firmware on routers

I do, in fact (but you ran for the ad-hominem anyway.) But that's because the drivers for my router (Netgear WNDR3700, even if it isn't ARM) are upstream in the kernel, which means no mysterious binary blobs or undocumented bits of hardware. I run OpenWRT, which is pretty much more open than anything else that exists out there.

The problem stems from the fact that Android makes upstream porting of drivers for devices nigh upon impossible, certainly the vendors aren't cooperative (content to dump a .zip file out on some website.) With Windows, you have to hope that the device has identical hardware to another device or are willing to hack with haret (if that will even work) and that the kernels aren't signed and checked by the bootloader.

Re:And it begins... (2)

node 3 (115640) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449198)

Assuming you can even run something else. On most ARM platforms this is just short of impossible, and I expect that it will be made deliberately difficult on x86 in the future.

How is that even remotely possible? There will *ALWAYS* be hardware available that will allow you to run Linux (or whatever replaces it eventually). Always, always, always.

Yes, there will be hardware with which you *can't* run Linux, but that's always been the case and also always will. So what if some tablets and PCs won't let you? There are tablets and PCs that won't let me run iOS or Mac OS X, yet I have no trouble finding ones that will.

Re:And it begins... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449050)

Like what, Linux? lol.

And Windows 7 will stop being supported at some point.

Re:And it begins... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449086)

Why not linux? Why not BSD?
Why not an OS that has not even been written yet?

I have no windows computers in my home, I bet many on slashdot are the same. Oh yeah, your just a pathetic troll, that is why.

Re:And it begins... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449182)

Why not linux? Why not BSD?
Why not an OS that has not even been written yet?

I have no windows computers in my home, I bet many on slashdot are the same. Oh yeah, your just a pathetic troll, that is why.

Wait, not Linux, but BSD instead, or an OS that hasn't been written yet? Are you kidding me... GNU Hurd I suppose?

There's a difference between trolling and being realistic. No-life nerds with BSD boxes aren't going to take over the market any time soon.

Re:And it begins... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449304)

No one said takeover the market. They were presented as options for people who do not want to be constrained to a walled market.

Re:And it begins... (1)

lexman098 (1983842) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449338)

You're obviously not a PC gamer. Trollish as he sounds, he does have a point. Even without the gaming aspect, Windows (these days) is very hassle-free. I install linux from time to time (Suse and Ubuntu) for experimentation sake, and in my opinion, anecdotal as it may be, even ubuntu is not ready for prime time. Inevitably something will always get screwed up which requires a long quest through google to find some serpentine solution. It gets tiring. The saving grace in all this will be that someone will inevitably find a way to circumvent microsoft's lock-in if you really want unapproved metro applications.

Re:And it begins... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449054)

Like what? Linux? Bwahahahahaahahahaaha

Re:And it begins... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37448944)

Something happened to Linux when we weren't looking? Oh, whew. It's still there, over in the corner. I think you mean the end of freedom using a corporate OS.

Re:And it begins... (3, Insightful)

MagikSlinger (259969) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448956)

Why do you think they will stop with applications? Wait until you need permission to install an OS.

Re:And it begins... (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448978)

So then you replace the bootloader like we do on locked down embedded devices.

Re:And it begins... (1)

MagikSlinger (259969) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449108)

The vast majority of people will not do that. And then the companies lobby to make it illegal to do that.

Sony v. Hotz (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449116)

And wait for lawsuits over tools used to compromise the bootloader, such as Sony v. Hotz.

Re:Sony v. Hotz (1)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449350)

I thought it was St. Hotz now.

Re:And it begins... (1)

swanzilla (1458281) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448990)

Ask Sony how well that works out...

Re:And it begins... (1)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449082)

yeah and they tried very hard and had device only a few people wanted linux one, now a pc at the store...... i give a week

Re:And it begins... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449032)

And how exactly will they do that when they can'tnmpossibly control the desktop hardware?

Re:And it begins... (0)

MagikSlinger (259969) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449080)

And how exactly will they do that when they can'tnmpossibly control the desktop hardware?

Trusted Computing [wikipedia.org]

Re:And it begins... (2)

PCM2 (4486) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449278)

Well OK, fine, you give a real-world example, and so we can examine exactly how this attempt to control the desktop hardware turned out: Pretty poorly, if you ask me. Most laptops you get at Best Buy right now do not have a Trusted Platform Module (TPM). Business laptops do, where it's generally considered a fairly desirable feature (for reasons having nothing to do with DRM). If anything, though, the idea of "a TPM for every desktop" seems to mostly have been abandoned. I don't really see Microsoft making another push for it.

Re:And it begins... (1, Insightful)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449288)

Great but how many.pieces of hardware actually have that or even have it enabled? Seriously fud over tpm is getting old.

Re:And it begins... (4, Interesting)

tverbeek (457094) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449212)

Or the beginning. This will make it easier to illustrate to people the advantages of an open system such as Linux or BSD or Haiku...

Re:And it begins... (1)

MagikSlinger (259969) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449290)

Mod parent +1

Re:And it begins... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449366)

What'd you guys expect when you went on a non-stop campaign to poo-poo Microsoft over every vulnerability? That they'd suddely Open Source all their products?

Re:And it begins... (2)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449474)

Err, I expect Microsoft continue their antagonistic business practices that they've been engaging in for the last 20 years, including their unmitigated hostility to FOSS and user choice (that is, real choice and not "which Microsoft platform do you want to use?")

It's very profitable, after all (1)

Nimey (114278) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448864)

Most companies would kill to get a 1/3 cut on every program sold.

Re:It's very profitable, after all (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37448938)

Yeah, but it works for Apple because people are willing to overlook vendor lock-in for a variety of reasons (which I won't go into here). It's not going to work for Microsoft - at least not as well as they hope it is going to work.

Re:It's very profitable, after all (1)

pushing-robot (1037830) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449174)

Most companies would kill to get a 1/3 cut on every program sold.

Brick and mortar stores already do. As does Steam, as well as many other online services.

Thing is, most smaller developers would rather be coding than spending their lives dealing with processing/billing/installation/supply chain issues, so paying someone 30% off the top to handle all that is actually a good deal. Small developers selling cheap apps would probably lose most of that to credit card processing fees anyway. Big developers like Adobe and Autodesk do get a bit screwed, but I won't be losing any sleep over that.

Just the start (4, Insightful)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448916)

The Metro interface (as well as the WinRT APIs) are covered by this policy going forward. So this means that ARM devices from MS will be locked down, as well as the Metro half of any desktop/x86 platform. Eventually they will deprecate the older APIs and you will only have the WinRT/Metro APIs.

Microsoft is very much gunning to enforce a Walled Garden across all products that run their OS. I half expect them to make a hardwired TPM key a requirement for a Windows 8 (possibly later) logo, which they'll use against the user to keep them trapped in the Walled Garden. After that, it's just a matter of making it impossible to install other OSes (Motorola style) and they'll have the market domination and exclusion of FOSS they've always wanted.

Re:Just the start (1)

MonsterTrimble (1205334) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448980)

And Linux starts to look that much better.

Re:Just the start (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449088)

To some. But the majority will say "Oh, right, as if that was possible". That's what they always say. And in 5 years, they will start screaming we're screwed!

Re:Just the start (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449144)

Provided that a home user who wants to use Linux can still find new, affordable PC hardware that has driver support for Linux.

Re:Just the start (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449392)

new, professional pc hardware can run linux.
old, affordable pc hardware can run linux.

new, affordable pc hardware with windows only stuff is gonna start developing glitches in 3 years and suddenly become less of a deal.

If i have to choose between closed app stores and dpkg, i'll gladly keep dpkg even on the old battered laptop w/ a single core @1.8ghz that weights like your mom.

Re:Just the start (2)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449258)

oh linux u get better w/ time while the others frantically go up and down

Re:Just the start (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449014)

Motorola failed at that, you know that right?
Droid 2 and X are now supported by Cyanogenmod.

They would also have to ban all emulators and VMs, like apple does on the iphone. I don't see that happening anytime soon.

Re:Just the start (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449092)

Droid 2 and X are now supported by Cyanogenmod.

Really? They loaded a new kernel? How?

Or are they using the same old kernel, with work around hacks?

Re:Just the start (3, Insightful)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449120)

Eventually they will deprecate he older APIs

Bullshit. They aren't going to deprecate the apis that form the backbone of the millions of applications that keep people on windows. There is no way it'll happen.

Re:Just the start (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449214)

Sure they will. Oh sure, enterprise will be able to maintain older APIs. But they're solidly targeting the mass market consumer level stuff and leveraging their position to push developers to move to the new APIs. After all, if you want to be on Windows 8 ARM, you need to use the new APIs.

They're just getting started. Don't proclaim their plans are impossible just as they're getting them off the ground.

Re:Just the start (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449420)

So your claim is they are going to intentionally run their customers off and for no reason break backwards compatibility which is the only reason.people stay on windows?S Suuuure they will.

Re:Just the start (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449160)

and exclusion of FOSS they've always wanted.

Citation needed. Is there any evidence Microsoft has felt threatened by any other OS for consumers since OS/2? Blog posts with conspiricy theories do not count as "evidence"...

To all who said "but the iPhone is not a computer" (5, Insightful)

Geof (153857) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449272)

To all who said about Apple's lock-down "but the iPhone is not a computer", this was always the end game. The argument was that the iPhone is not a computer (a general-purpose platform), therefore it's OK to restrict what users can do with it. (And besides, they said, we'll still have our PCs.) They confused cause and effect. The iPhone is not a computer because it is locked-down.

With Apple making money hand over fist, it should be no surprise that Microsoft wants in. Will they succeed in their attempt at control? I don't know. But I'm certainly not going to make excuses for them.

Don't give me the any flak about hating Apple. My desktop is a Mac. But my new laptop runs Linux.

Wait (3, Insightful)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448920)

It's only a "walled garden" if you keep the undesirables out. With Microsoft's market share, everyone will be in the garden along with you. Wonderful, it's no longer a garden but more a federal prison. Welcome to the ocean of piss.

Naturally (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37448928)

See what works, copy it -- Microsoft

Re:Naturally (1)

StripedCow (776465) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449206)

Apple copied that whole hardware-content bundling business-model from Amazon.

Where Apple really copied it (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449328)

I thought Apple had copied the pricing structure from Microsoft's Xbox Live Indie Games program, including the $99 per year fee to jailbreak your own device and the 70/30 split.

Anti Anti-Virus? (1)

tingentleman (1773138) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448950)

Makes sense if it stops the current Russian Roulette of installing a Windows or Android app and praying it's not stuffed to the gills with Malware. This is the primary reason many feel safer with iOS.

Re:Anti Anti-Virus? (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37448996)

Which has dick all to do with being a Walled Garden and everything to do with the store being managed.

Re:Anti Anti-Virus? (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449042)

What android app russian roulette are you referring too?
Google has removed and will continue to remove such apps from their market. Sure installing pirated apps might get you something terrible, but the security permissions would have told you that.

Re:Anti Anti-Virus? (1)

Dog-Cow (21281) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449318)

No they won't. An app might have a legitimate reason for access to otherwise private data, but still contain a trojan that sends that data off to some bot herder. In short, you're not too bright, but you are a fanboy.

Re:Anti Anti-Virus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449112)

Makes sense if it stops the current Russian Roulette of installing a Windows or Android app and praying it's not stuffed to the gills with Malware. This is the primary reason many feel safer with iOS.

Or, y'know, you could try to resist your hardwired Pavlovian response to desperately look for an install link the second you see at least four stars in a review and do some actual looking around to see if you can trust the app.

Oh, wait, that'd require forming your own opinion, as well as actual cognitive reasoning, and you're an iOS user. Silly me.

Re:Anti Anti-Virus? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449114)

Android does not have malware issues. The only time you hear about it is when antivirus makers commission articles about how some Chinese pirate sites are serving up malware. If you stick to the Android Market, you're completely safe.

Re:Anti Anti-Virus? (1)

robmv (855035) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449340)

"They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety, deserve neither liberty nor safety." Benjamin Franklin

The DRM train rolls on.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37448952)

Interesting how in America we are systematically seeing our freedoms impinged upon by the government while the same thing is going on with the tech companies. Sucks to be beholden to both. I still can't drop my stupid Windows VM due to the need of Adobe software.

Stallman was right (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37448968)

Now, how crazy does he seem? He experienced the lock down that mainframes had and now we're experiencing the same things with smaller computers. Back then IBM (among others) also tracked your software and made sure things just ran.

It'll be interesting to see how Windows Power Users deal with this. They'll have to look to IT to be set up as a user who can "side-load" an application. Like that will happen.

Re:Stallman was right (4, Insightful)

RocketRabbit (830691) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449002)

Windows Power User = knows how to change the default wallpaper, but can't code.

Re:Stallman was right (1, Troll)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449274)

Apple Power User - oh wait... let me go ask the geniuses.

Re:Stallman was right (1)

monkyyy (1901940) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449176)

everyday he does seems less crazy and i want his beard

Re:Stallman was right (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449202)

I'm.pretty sure most power users will use the traditional desktop which has no such restrictions. Our did you not bother to read the whole summary?

Re:Stallman was right (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449348)

Until the APIs the traditional desktop are no longer available, or they use ARM where you can't distribute software via any other means.

Re:Stallman was right (1)

Desler (1608317) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449376)

Until the APIs the traditional desktop are no longer available

Which will be never.

Re:Stallman was right (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449244)

Except with mainframes the mainframe belonged to the corporation/university/government and the order to lock it down came from the people responsible for buying it and maintaining it. At best what you did was lease it by paying for CPU time. But no one is forcing you to bend over backwards and drop your trousers so that Ballmer can rape you with a chair. Microsoft has to make a fuck-ton of money in order to justify any project because they are so bloated. If they end up grabbing say 15% market share this project will be shelved really quickly, just like Vista was. So vote with your wallet - it's the only power you have. But it's an improvement over the old way where it wasn't your mainframe and you had no power, it was do it this way or work somewhere else.

Re:Stallman was right (1)

Waffle Iron (339739) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449292)

When I saw this article and the direction the computer industry is headed, I thought: "RMS must be spinning in his grave." (...And he's not even dead.)

One more nail in the coffin.... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449046)

This is simply born from greed. The death throes of a dying computing model.

Re:One more nail in the coffin.... (1)

Dunbal (464142) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449298)

Someone should tell them that if they released Windows 7 licenses for $10, everyone in the world would buy at least one.

Not a problem (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449066)

The first thing I will do with W8 is uninstall / disable Metro... Problem solved!

W8 for a new operating system, W9 about how bad it is... W10 When will a good OS arrive?

In x86 only (0)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449240)

The first thing I will do with W8 is uninstall / disable Metro

This is possible only in x86 version, not in ARM version. Unlike the other-architecture versions of Windows NT 3 and 4, the ARM version of Windows 8 will not include an ARM port of the classic desktop.

Just another monopoly (-1)

HexaByte (817350) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449124)

The article states that there will probably be a 70/30 revenue split with the developer as in Win Phone7. Since you won't be able to independently market your Metro app, I believe that would make this another illegal Microsoft monopoly.

However, before we all go after them for that, remember that Apple is also doing this. Both monopolies need to be broken up, and their illegal practices stopped.

Re:Just another monopoly (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449180)

I think for Apple to incur that sort of attention they'd need to threaten to ban a developer from the App Store for listing their software in the app store for other platforms. They'd also need to make a habit out of doing so.

Re:Just another monopoly (2)

MikeMo (521697) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449192)

Ignoring for a moment the fact that Apple does not have a monopoly on phones - just what are Apple or Microsoft doing that is actually illegal? All stores take part of the retail - 30% is actually low for many categories.

Re:Just another monopoly (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449324)

All stores take part of the retail - 30% is actually low for many categories.

There are many stores, and no one store has a monopoly. Also, I can forgo brick and mortar stores these days if I wish. But with Metro/WinRT or iOS you must go through the store or you do not get to sell (or even be available) at all. So surrender 30% of your sales price (and increase it accordingly) or you are out of business.

Re:Just another monopoly (1)

StripedCow (776465) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449276)

Indeed, hardware vendors should be forced to sell "open" hardware.

As we don't have to buy 5 devices anymore just to get 5 different apps, this is much better for the environment. This alone justifies that rule.

Re:Just another monopoly (5, Insightful)

Dog-Cow (21281) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449364)

One day you will learn what a monopoly is in the eyes of the Law, and your poor little mind will simply melt.

Hint: Apple is not a monopoly, in precisely the same way Ford isn't a monopoly for being the only manufacturer of Ford vehicles.

Re:Just another monopoly (1)

Duradin (1261418) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449428)

The -1 Does Not Agree With Hivemind didn't take long to find you.

To burn up even more hater points I'll quote you since I don't have points to give you.

Dog-Cow:
"One day you will learn what a monopoly is in the eyes of the Law, and your poor little mind will simply melt.

Hint: Apple is not a monopoly, in precisely the same way Ford isn't a monopoly for being the only manufacturer of Ford vehicles."

Re:Just another monopoly (2)

nine-times (778537) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449468)

However, before we all go after them for that, remember that Apple is also doing this.

If you're talking about Apple's desktop app store, there's no requirement for developers to distribute through the app store. As far as I know, selling your app through the app store doesn't give you greater access to OSX APIs.

Not that I don't fear the "walled garden" concept, but just to point out that what Microsoft is doing seems to be even worse than what Apple is doing.

Experiments (3, Insightful)

should_be_linear (779431) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449218)

With all sorts of strange experiments MS and Ubuntu are conducting on their user base, I wouldn't be surprised if we see Windows XP re-establishing itself as market share leader, using low-end hardware, ThePirateBay and developing world as its prime vehicles.

And yet... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449284)

We'll still get bloatware with our new machines.

Borg icon (1)

StripedCow (776465) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449326)

Microsoft just wants to get rid of that Borg-icon on slashdot. And out of desperation they're copying Apple because they have a much friendlier icon.

the model for traditional desktop apps won't chang (1)

nurb432 (527695) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449334)

For now.

Register as a developer (1)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449352)

What's to stop everybody from registering as a developer so that they can sideload?

Boycott (5, Insightful)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449378)

So don't buy Windows 8. Stick with 7 or switch to Linux.

Developers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449412)

Exactly what kind of stuff will we have to do to prove ourselves as developers? I don't care as long as it's free and can be done by clicking a "developer" setting.

Bad case: They make developers sign up and give all sorts of personal information before they'll let you download some patch to let you run anything
Worse case: Same as above except for constant phones home to Microsoft
Worst Case: Microsoft is super fucking evil and forces every developer to pay for licenses to develop. (along the lines of AppHub's $100/year membership fee)

If it's the worst case, prepare for a major depression in desktop software development. Followed by Microsoft either reverting the change, or dying out, probably years after Windows 8. (What good is an OS if you can't get any new developers for it)

Oh! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449418)

Never saw that coming!

quote from the article.... (2)

Cutting_Crew (708624) | more than 2 years ago | (#37449440)

"A primer for Windows developers on Microsoft’s website states that distribution of traditional desktop applications will proceed as usual. “Open distribution: retail stores, web, private networks, individual sharing, and so on” will be allowed".... This tidbit is NOT like how apple does things. The one thing i hate about Apples walled garden is that I have to pay $99 a year to test an app on an actual device that I OWN. I know Apple will say that they want their users to have a "good experience" or whatever but if i want to write an app that will heat up *my* phone so much that it makes the phone literally explode i should have every right to do so and if someone comes to me and wants to try an app that I wrote on his/her phone without getting a certificate key and wants to take the risk of his/her phone exploding in their hand then that is the risk that they should accept, understanding that kind of behavior isn't covered under his/her phones warranty.

At least... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37449452)

Whew! At least we'll still be able to run our desktop apps on Windows 8.

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