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Zotac Releases GeForce GT 520 With Classic PCI Connector

Unknown Lamer posted about 3 years ago | from the time-to-upgrade-that-voodoo3 dept.

Graphics 199

jones_supa writes "It turns out that you can still get a legacy PCI graphics card with a modern GPU. In this case it's a Nvidia Geforce GT 520 card provided by Zotac. Both the PCI and PCIe x1 variants feature a GT 520 graphics chip with 48 stream processors, 512MB of DDR3 memory, a 810MHz core clock speed, a 1333MHz memory speed, and a 64-bit memory interface."

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You can also still buy carburetors (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544374)

Can you Slashvertise that too?

Re:You can also still buy carburetors (2)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 3 years ago | (#37545356)

We like stories about blinkie things that cost money, what isn't a Slashvertisement, then!?

Re:You can also still buy carburetors (2)

DigiTechGuy (1747636) | about 3 years ago | (#37545532)

But carbs are still very useful. Is there really much use in having a modern GPU on a PCI card? For those occasional legacy systems there are plenty of PCI cards floating around for cheap. Heck, I've got a stash of old PCI cards I'd gladly give away.

Re:You can also still buy carburetors (1)

julesh (229690) | about 3 years ago | (#37545974)

Is there really much use in having a modern GPU on a PCI card?

Probably. And PCIe 1x definitely. There are many GPU applications that do not require high bandwidth to the host processor (i.e. detailed calculations that can be performed with relatively static data sets such as rotating or stepping through static scenes where most of the geometry remains constant, or on the GPGPU side of things performing similar calculations repeatedly, e.g. neural network training). It also allows many-monitor systems on machines that aren't hugely expensive but need latest-generation features (e.g. complex shader programs).

Re:You can also still buy carburetors (0)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | about 3 years ago | (#37545610)

Can you Slashvertise that too?

Just wait until they switch to blipverts instead...

Re:You can also still buy carburetors (1)

Culture20 (968837) | about 3 years ago | (#37546198)

But can you fit four or more carburetors on a car to make it have eight or more displays (with some sweet, sweet, Xinerama action)? You can do that with PCI graphics cards.

Re:You can also still buy carburetors (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 3 years ago | (#37546770)

Yes and yes, although the number of displays you can put in a car have nothing to do with the number of carburetors.

Useful number of carbs is the engines cylinder count. So no less than 8 or more then 10 for reasonable cars.

Re:You can also still buy carburetors (1)

shish (588640) | about 3 years ago | (#37546400)

I've been on the lookout for something like this; not because of the power, but because I have a lot of legacy PC hardware that I want to hook into my HDMI monitor, and the PCI / HDMI eras don't really overlap. This does seem overkill and overpriced for that job though...

Performance (4, Interesting)

Spad (470073) | about 3 years ago | (#37544416)

PCI slots cap at 533 MB/s (and a lot are 133 or 266), which is less than a tenth of most PCIe x16 slots, so I can't imagine that you're going to be making the most of the hardware somehow.

Re:Performance (2)

armanox (826486) | about 3 years ago | (#37544444)

I'd be more interested in seeing it in AGP myself.

Re:Performance (1, Funny)

voidptr (609) | about 3 years ago | (#37544976)

What about those of us with poor neglected VLB slots? Huh? Who's going to give us an upgrade?

Re:Performance (1)

idontgno (624372) | about 3 years ago | (#37545020)

I want a recent-generation video card which works well with classic 8-bit ISA bus. I have at least one IBM XT-class machine I want to run Starcraft II on.

Re:Performance (2)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | about 3 years ago | (#37545482)

I want a recent-generation video card which works well with classic 8-bit ISA bus. I have at least one IBM XT-class machine I want to run Starcraft II on.

Have we created a new metric here of FPD (Frames Per Day)?

Re:Performance (1)

DigiTechGuy (1747636) | about 3 years ago | (#37545562)

That might be a good metric for turn based strategy games...

Re:Performance (1)

Kozar_The_Malignant (738483) | about 3 years ago | (#37545584)

I want a recent-generation video card which works well with classic 8-bit ISA bus. I have at least one IBM XT-class machine I want to run Starcraft II on.

Have we created a new metric here of FPD (Frames Per Day)?

Not if you set up page swapping to the virtual memory you set up on you 5.25" floppy drive (DSDD, of course.)

Re:Performance (1)

dgatwood (11270) | about 3 years ago | (#37545720)

You have to have multiple drives in a RAFD array....

Re:Performance (1)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | about 3 years ago | (#37545332)

The nice thing about PCI is that quite a few computers, old or contemporary, still have a fair number of PCI slots. With one or two truly esoteric exceptions, AGP was one slot only. You can never have too many video outs...

Re:Performance (1)

nobodyknowsimageek (218815) | about 3 years ago | (#37545366)

I'd be more interested in seeing it in AGP myself.

Much as I'd like to see this myself, the brief window of time that AGP existed, means it will never happen.

Re:Performance (1)

NJRoadfan (1254248) | about 3 years ago | (#37545648)

AGP came out in 1997 and lasted until about 2005 or so.

Re:Performance (2)

Andy Dodd (701) | about 3 years ago | (#37544464)

The 520 is one of the lowest-end within its generation.

Also, cards like these often have a lot of media playback capabilities that aren't bandwidth-hungry. This could likely, for example, allow an old clunker system to be upgraded to Blu-Ray capabilities fairly cheaply.

Due to the nature of PCI Express, it's actually easier for manufacturers to make PCI cards than AGP cards nowadays.

Re:Performance (3, Informative)

vlm (69642) | about 3 years ago | (#37544614)

Also, cards like these often have a lot of media playback capabilities that aren't bandwidth-hungry. This could likely, for example, allow an old clunker system to be upgraded to Blu-Ray capabilities fairly cheaply.

GT520 should run VDPAU acceleration pretty well... It takes practically zero CPU power to shovel bits at the video card. This means practically any old box out there is an instant HDMI output mythtv frontend. Obviously I haven't tried it, but it should work fantastic.

Re:Performance (1)

X0563511 (793323) | about 3 years ago | (#37545470)

It's nice to see an option anyways. Without cards like these, you'd be stuck with:
1. Integrated graphics (... shudder)
2. ATI Rage or other exhibits of ancient history

Some times you just have to use old hardware. It's nice to not have -all- of it stoneage.

Re:Performance (1)

NJRoadfan (1254248) | about 3 years ago | (#37545682)

It would be fun to stick one of these on a 486 board with PCI slots. Drivers would be an issue though as it likely doesn't come with Windows 9x drivers.

Re:Performance (1)

cheater512 (783349) | about 3 years ago | (#37546716)

Linux should work happily though.

Re:Performance (1)

hedwards (940851) | about 3 years ago | (#37544472)

LOL, when I read the headline I thought they had put a PCI slot on the card itself. Which would be bitchin' for games that require a Voodoo card to run right.

But, I do see that you're interpretation is the correct one.

and today my voodoo4 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544632)

can decode vc1 in xp and linux. Sounds like they are pandering to the broke diy crowd who would otherwise ebay, but don't have enough sense. That and the senseless relative techs of clueless elderly folks.

Re:Performance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544930)

But, I do see that you're interpretation is the correct one.

And you're grammar is the incorrect one.

Re:Performance (1)

redmund (955596) | about 3 years ago | (#37544476)

The GT520 is a pretty pathetically slow card anyway and I'm guessing the purpose of this is for people who need more display outputs on the cheap and don't have PCI-E slots to spare.

Re:Performance (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544494)

Ding, Ding, Ding, we have a winner.

Re:Performance (1)

locopuyo (1433631) | about 3 years ago | (#37544742)

Yes good idea, I could use another 2 monitors 8 isn't enough. Now I just need to find a bigger desk.

Re:Performance (1)

Coren22 (1625475) | about 3 years ago | (#37545572)

Mount um on the wall :)

Re:Performance (1)

FooAtWFU (699187) | about 3 years ago | (#37544492)

Yes, but sometimes it's nice to be able to stuff in another video card or three and get yourself a second monitor or some extra CUDA processing.... without having to completely replace your motherboard. If nothing else, it'll probably run cooler than an older PCI-based video card.

Re:Performance (1)

Pino Grigio (2232472) | about 3 years ago | (#37544564)

Hmmmm interesting. Does this allow use of NVIDIA's parallel Nsight? You need two cards for that and not all motherboards have two slots. This might be a good, cheaper solution.

SERVERS!!! (3, Interesting)

mosel-saar-ruwer (732341) | about 3 years ago | (#37544554)

If the form factor is correct, then plenty of recent Xeon/Opteron servers, with a free PCI slot, suddenly become AWESOME desktop platforms. Around here, you can get late model 4-core Xeons, with maybe 8GB of RAM, on Craigslist, from name-brand companies [HP, Dell, etc], for circa $500. And they will be of VASTLY higher quality [with esp. vastly better motherboards] than the consumer-oriented junk that those same companies are peddling.

Re:SERVERS!!! (3, Insightful)

erikscott (1360245) | about 3 years ago | (#37544668)

There are an awful lot of PCI slots in all sorts of embedded systems out there, and some of them may be looking for a graphics upgrade. For that matter, I still have instruments that have EISA slots in them. I suspect I'll be running them for another decade. 10Base2 is getting to be a pain to deal with, though.

Re:SERVERS!!! (2)

Coren22 (1625475) | about 3 years ago | (#37545606)

I have an old ISA 10BaseT card if you are serious...

Re:SERVERS!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544690)

If the form factor is correct, then plenty of recent Xeon/Opteron servers, with a free PCI slot, suddenly become AWESOME desktop platforms.

Bwahahahahahahah! Ah hahahahahaa! (this goes on for several minutes)

Have you ever seen or heard a server, dude? I'm thinking no. Rackmount servers are (a) unwieldy to use on the desktop and (b) FREAKING LOUD. Hope you like living with a vacuum cleaner.

(Also what makes you imagine most servers have a classic PCI slot, anyways? These days they're usually 100% PCIe.)

Re:SERVERS!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37545072)

Poweredge T110. Tower form factor and quiet like a desktop. I have one for my VMs.
4 memory slots for max 16GB
Two x8 slots
One x4 slot
One x1 slot

Granted, no PCI slots which was the point of the article, BUT not all server chassis are loud.

Re:SERVERS!!! (1)

Delusion_ (56114) | about 3 years ago | (#37545790)

I don't know about the T series, but the SC series of PE machines have 8x slots that have dividers which prevent use of 16x cards in them.

Interestingly, this can be solved by a heated blade and a heated screwdriver.

Re:SERVERS!!! (1)

afidel (530433) | about 3 years ago | (#37545180)

There are a lot of Core2 era Xeon servers with PCI/PCI-X slots, including a lot of pedestal servers which are designed to be used in an office environment. We use HP ML series for most of our remote offices where we don't have room for a dedicated rack. The biggest obstacle to using one as a workstation (other than the large size) is the fact that you generally can't just slap a new SATA drive in there, you need a carrier and on many systems the RAID card will only recognize certain drives.

Re:Performance (1)

TeknoHog (164938) | about 3 years ago | (#37544588)

It depends on what you do. Bitcoin mining with a Radeon HD5870 is not noticeably slower when it is on a PCI slot adapter, compared to PCIe x16. Many people use PCIe x1 slots for mining, to make use of all available slots, and for easier use of extension cables.

Re:Performance (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544842)

If you are doing bitcoin mining a better use of the card would be sharpening it and driving it into your skull.

Re:Performance (2)

jandrese (485) | about 3 years ago | (#37544968)

At this point it is hard to imagine that you're even recovering the cost of power with Bitcoin mining. Isn't it down in the low single digits vs. the US$ on the Magic the Gathering exchange? And the complexity is so high that you just get a dribble of coins out of even a high end farm anymore. The only time mining made sense was a couple of years ago when there were still suckers buying the damn things and driving the price up.

Re:Performance (2)

Toonol (1057698) | about 3 years ago | (#37546532)

Right now, it's far cheaper to buy bitcoins with cash than to pay the power cost to mine them. If you think bitcoins will be the currency of the future, go spend a few hundred dollars on them.

Re:Performance (1)

Synerg1y (2169962) | about 3 years ago | (#37544680)

It's quite cheap and it's for a niche market, why would u compare it to x16 lol, it's pretty obvious zotac makes x16 cards along w everyone else, so why would you... f'in slashdot.

http://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=nvidia+geforce+gt+520&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=7367667084&ref=pd_sl_4c2vcnzv38_b [amazon.com]

For $50 to play at 1024 over 800 is probably worth it considering 800 looks so horrible.

Re:Performance (2)

arbiter1 (1204146) | about 3 years ago | (#37544698)

i gotta 2nd that say you got an old Athlon XP, Pentium 4, even old Celeron that don't have PCI-e, With this card that only uses like 30 watts using hardware video decoder you got a use outta an old PC.

Re:Performance (1)

Lord Crc (151920) | about 3 years ago | (#37544790)

I can't imagine that you're going to be making the most of the hardware somehow.

Depends on what you do with it. Consider this article [techpowerup.com] about PCI-Express scaling on a 5780... A lot of games get 75% FPS or above using only a 1x PCIe port compared to a 16x. Keep in mind that the 5870 is a high-end card, and the 520 is a low end, so I don't think the performance hit will be that bad.

Re:Performance (1)

UnknowingFool (672806) | about 3 years ago | (#37545190)

I suspect people that would get an upgrade with a 520 don't exactly have powerful machines to start. It is barely better than an integrated GPU. I can see this for PVR boxes as it is more than adequate to play movies. For gaming, look elsewhere.

Re:Performance (2)

timeOday (582209) | about 3 years ago | (#37545196)

The real reason to put a new card in an old computer is because manufacturers stop releasing drivers for old cards, and old drivers don't work with recent OSes (this is particularly bad under Linux).

I just ditched a pretty good laptop (Thinkpad T60p) because ATI doesn't support the video card any more, and the generic drivers don't support the features that make it useful to me (DVI output through a docking station in this case).

Re:Performance (1)

hitmark (640295) | about 3 years ago | (#37546070)

this is why RMS started GNU in the first place...

Overkill (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544454)

Considering PCI's bandwidth, the usefulness of the product is quite limited...

PCI? Legacy? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544460)

That's not legacy. This [upup-downdown.com] is legacy.

Re:PCI? Legacy? (1)

f8l_0e (775982) | about 3 years ago | (#37544666)

Sweet comic. I had the exact same experience with X-Wing on 486 with 4MB of ram. I eventually made memmaker my bitch and finally got it working.

Re:PCI? Legacy? (1)

jandrese (485) | about 3 years ago | (#37545100)

The timing is slightly off on that comic. In 1995 you could get a Pentium (with floating point bug!) and 16MB of memory for reasonable (at the time) prices. That Pentium might even have triple digit Mhz! You would also get a double or maybe quad speed CD-ROM and maybe a whole gigabyte of Hard Drive.

The utterly braindamaged DOS memory model was still a problem though. Luckily, that year also saw the release of Windows 95 and the beginning of the end of segmented memory.

Re:PCI? Legacy? (1)

PRMan (959735) | about 3 years ago | (#37545762)

Most people didn't upgrade to Windows 95 very fast. I was doing desktop support to free low memory all over the place in 1996. I finally convinced them to do a nationwide Windows 95 upgrade.

Re:PCI? Legacy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37545754)

That's not legacy. This [upup-downdown.com] is legacy.

LOL, page slashdotted from a comment.

Re:PCI? Legacy? (1)

Kozar_The_Malignant (738483) | about 3 years ago | (#37545800)

I remember these fights and saving the successful config.sys, himem.sys, etc. files to a boot floppy to use just to play that game. Nothing else loaded but the bare essential mouse, keyboard, and video drivers and load those high.

Re:PCI? Legacy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37545866)

I'd have left out ANSI.SYS. You can probably get rid of EMM386.EXE too, as it likely takes up more conventional RAM than the CD-ROM driver does (and using UMBs would rob you of a hundred or so KB of extended memory).

Re:PCI? Legacy? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37546174)

I remember killing my dad's 386 trying to fit more games onto the HDD/memory. It seems that Stacker wasn't too happy about being loaded into high memory...

Ideal for HTPC (4, Interesting)

0100010001010011 (652467) | about 3 years ago | (#37544484)

There are a TON of older computers that people still run with PCI slots. They would work just fine repurposed as a HTPC but until now there was no hardware acceleration available. The XBMC Forums will have someone come along that is looking for the "Best" PCI option and usually that involves either an SVIDEO or VGA connector. Some new TVs will have a VGA but not all of them.

Re:Ideal for HTPC (1)

QuantumPion (805098) | about 3 years ago | (#37544810)

Might as well just get a $50 sandy bridge pentium g620 and a $50 h61 motherboard with HDMI out and be done with it rather then try to keep an obsolete machine running with a silly PCI graphics card that is probably slower than the graphics core built into intel's new cpu's.

Re:Ideal for HTPC (1)

jedidiah (1196) | about 3 years ago | (#37544898)

As "pathetic" as a "slow nvidia card" may be. It will probably still run circles around an Intel part, especially for the given use case.

"Good Intel GPU" is along the same lines as "Year of the Linux Desktop".

Re:Ideal for HTPC (1)

Tukz (664339) | about 3 years ago | (#37545114)

For HTPC purposes, Intel GPU's are good enough.

Re:Ideal for HTPC (1)

Telvin_3d (855514) | about 3 years ago | (#37546066)

Actually, no. The third party chipsets include hardware for better up-scaling and decoding of h.264. Removes a lot of noise and produces a better result, particulartly if you are outputting to something like a TV.

Re:Ideal for HTPC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544900)

Might as well just get a $50 sandy bridge pentium g620 and a $50 h61 motherboard with HDMI out and be done with it rather then try to keep an obsolete machine running with a silly PCI graphics card that is probably slower than the graphics core built into intel's new cpu's.

.... and then you need to get new RAM, because it takes DDR3 instead of DDR or even SDRAM. .... and then you need to upgrade your hard drive (and optical drive) to an SATA drive, because new boards don't have IDE...or at least get a IDE board for PCIe for the new motherboard. .... and then you need to get a new power supply (or a 20->24 pin converter) because the new board doesn't work with the old power supply.

Re:Ideal for HTPC (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | about 3 years ago | (#37545270)

You are absolutely correct. Technically, the GF520 is still considerably more powerful than anything Intel produces, but the Intel part will make up for at least in part with latency and bandwidth. That's besides the point, however, as no one looking to use onboard Intel graphics, or one of these cards, has any care for any meaningful graphical or computational performance. They both run hardware accelerated decoding well enough, and the new system will idle around 1/3rd the power as the old Athlon/P4 combined with discrete graphics.

Re:Ideal for HTPC (1)

PRMan (959735) | about 3 years ago | (#37545846)

This card couldn't touch the new Intel Graphics Family stuff, which is pretty decent ( http://www.anandtech.com/show/4083/the-sandy-bridge-review-intel-core-i7-2600k-i5-2500k-core-i3-2100-tested/11 [anandtech.com] ). Still, that would require a whole new system build at about $300 minimum, even using the built-in graphics. The card is probably less than that.

Re:Ideal for HTPC (1)

wagnerrp (1305589) | about 3 years ago | (#37546696)

That benchmark puts the a low end Radeon 5450 at comparable to the best Intel graphics in some tests, and significantly outperforming it in other tests. Meanwhile, this benchmark [techpowerup.com] puts the GF520 at somewhere around 50-100% better performance than the Radeon 5450, depending on the test. So yes, this card is far more powerful than anything Intel offers, but it's moot because no one looking for one of these cards or Intel graphics cares much about graphical performance.

Re:Ideal for HTPC (1)

Bleek II (878455) | about 3 years ago | (#37545840)

No it's not. I've played with recent PCI gpus and they aren't suited for decoding video. Even decoding a 480p youtube will suffer. It's not just about the Mbit/s of the video because the GPU still has to make lots of calls to the system's memory when decoding video in most cases! So PCI will not handle current requirements video well! Stay away from PCI GPUs unless you have a real use for it. Video can be handled by PCI GPUs as long as the CPU does the decoding and not the GPU.

Re:Ideal for HTPC (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37546204)

Weird,
I was unable to decode 720p with my CPU until I put in a PCI GPU with onboard hardware decoding. The CPU must magically be able to decode that now.

What (1)

YodasEvilTwin (2014446) | about 3 years ago | (#37544490)

And what are you going to put this in, a PII? That won't help, the bottleneck is the processor (~400 MHz) or some other part of the ancient hardware.

Re:What (1)

sconeu (64226) | about 3 years ago | (#37544624)

No, you put it in a system with AGP and PCI slots.

Re:What (2)

vlm (69642) | about 3 years ago | (#37544658)

And what are you going to put this in, a PII? That won't help, the bottleneck is the processor (~400 MHz) or some other part of the ancient hardware.

Running VDPAU video card acceleration on a zbox my CPU varies a lot depending on content but it would seem a pentium 75 Might be able to act as a mythtv frontend with this card. I think something in your specified PII era would be far more than enough. Especially since in ye olden days when mythtv was new, a PII was a kinda decent frontend, and its not like TV has changed much since then.

Re:What (1)

afidel (530433) | about 3 years ago | (#37545440)

Of course tv has changed since the PII came out, there was no HD back then. NTSC encoded as MPEG2 is simple, playing back 1080p30 content using one of the modern codecs is much, much more difficult, especially if you don't have hardware acceleration (which would be a big reason to add an NVidia card to an older system).

Re:What (1)

vlm (69642) | about 3 years ago | (#37545512)

Of course tv has changed since the PII came out, there was no HD back then.

First commercial ATSC broadcast = July 1996. Mid summer anyway, as I recall. I'm in the telecom biz, trust me on this.
First retail sale of a PII = 1997ish, certainly not before 1996

Its quite the horse race there.

Re:What (1)

afidel (530433) | about 3 years ago | (#37546638)

First consumer ATSC card that I know of: 2006 (Hauppauge HVR-950 though that was USB, most HTPC's would have used the HVR-1600 which didn't launch till 2007).

Not about the bottleneck (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544880)

My mom has an old pc that works fine, but I gave her a large monitor, that is beyond the resolution of her on-board video. It still works, and looks reasonable. But we've all seen what non-native resolution looks like.

My guess is that there are plenty of P-III and P-4's out there that are a video card away from being able to take full advantage of modern monitors. A PCI port is the least common denominator, AGP comes in 3.3 and 5v flavors, and was absent in some machines with onboard video. It can also be sold to people looking for extra non-gaming monitors on a modern pc, where AGP has died.

Re:What (1)

julesh (229690) | about 3 years ago | (#37546064)

And what are you going to put this in, a PII?

I have PCI slots in my Core2 system. It only has 3 PCIe slots. If I wanted 8 monitors (and let's face it, who the hell doesn't???), this card would allow me to get there.

Internal combustion powered buggy whip for sale! (1)

Chas (5144) | about 3 years ago | (#37544512)

Woo!

Neither fish nor foul nor good red herring!

What about the C=64 (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544548)

I'm still waiting a version compatible with the CBM-64 serial bus.

Re:What about the C=64 (1)

jameskojiro (705701) | about 3 years ago | (#37544872)

Naw, we need a S100 version.

Oh, SO going into my Alpha Personal Workstation... (3, Interesting)

derinax (93566) | about 3 years ago | (#37544592)

I'm hoping it's got a bog-standard PCI interface specification, so that the old PWS console firmware works with it. The PWS 600au works great with an ATI Radeon 9000, NetBSD + X11. Not so sure about the xorg support for the GT520 though. We'll see.

No Win98 drivers? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37544620)

Well, this doesn't help my Win98 retro gaming tower at all then, does it.

Re:No Win98 drivers? (1)

zaibazu (976612) | about 3 years ago | (#37545520)

Some of the recent Nvidia Chips caused nasty geometry artifacts in older games which kept getting more and then the game crashes. I wasn't able to play Sim City 4 and Startopia.

Problem disappeared when I switched from my 8800GT to a Radoen HD5870. A friend with a GTX280 had the same problem as me.

Sweet! (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about 3 years ago | (#37544814)

I can have a video card with 512mb of ram in my 486 with 8mb of ram. I can't wait to see what Doom looks like now!

Re:Sweet! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37545056)

I can have a video card with 512mb of ram in my 486 with 8mb of ram. I can't wait to see what Doom looks like now!

doom is software. unless you mean gzdoom. oh god it will run at like 0.005fps

Re:Sweet! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37545594)

Your 486 has PCI? Gotta be one of the later models, made when pentium had become the norm then...

Re:Sweet! (1)

damn_registrars (1103043) | about 3 years ago | (#37546052)

Your 486 has PCI? Gotta be one of the later models, made when pentium had become the norm then...

2PCI, 1 shared ISA/PCI, 4 ISA (2 with VLB).

7 slots to rule them all...

Mac Pro1,1 (1)

HTH NE1 (675604) | about 3 years ago | (#37545078)

Can it be flashed with Mac-compatible firmware?

As yet there are but one or two video cards compatible with a Mac Pro1,1 capable of playing Portal, and they are still quite expensive ($400+), no longer manufactured, and vendors are unreliable for (1) shipping the correct card for the model of Mac and (2) don't seem to last very long once they do ship a "working" one (apparently a reflashed PC card). The last one I got eventually decided that it had to drive the display connected to it at exactly the same resolution as another display of differing resolution on the original video card. Even if no display was connected to it.

Graphics cards don't need PCI-E 16x (1)

flimflammer (956759) | about 3 years ago | (#37545212)

A lot of people don't seem to understand that you don't need a 16x PCI-E slot for graphics cards, or even half that. The cards will rarely ever require that much bandwidth and certainly not under normal gaming conditions.

This card seems to be designed for situations where you want to do things with your PC that isn't bleeding edge gaming. That particular card isn't really that great anyhow. This would be perfect for a multimedia PC, or for casual games.

Question (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | about 3 years ago | (#37545418)

Would a card like this be helpful in any way for adding a 3rd or 4th display to your computer? Possibly still with some 3d accelleration, even if it's relatively slow?

Re:Question (1)

PRMan (959735) | about 3 years ago | (#37545884)

It would be VERY good for that.

Re:Question (1)

julesh (229690) | about 3 years ago | (#37546170)

Yes. The PCIe 1x variant should be particularly useful for up to 8 monitor systems, as systems with 4 PCIe slots are very easy to find. Beyond that you may find getting enough power to them problematic, but it is theoretically achievable.

Why does it need to be modern? (1)

erice (13380) | about 3 years ago | (#37545806)

If you are going to saddle it with a PCI or a single lane PCIe, why do you need a modern GPU? Older technology cards are still available and still supported.

Re:Why does it need to be modern? (1)

DRAGONWEEZEL (125809) | about 3 years ago | (#37545960)

For FOLDING / Coin Mining on the side?

Re:Why does it need to be modern? (1)

julesh (229690) | about 3 years ago | (#37546296)

If you are going to saddle it with a PCI or a single lane PCIe, why do you need a modern GPU? Older technology cards are still available and still supported.

Because the GPU manufacturers actually charge nearly as much for older designs as they do for low-end modern ones. Because the memory for older GPUs is becoming hard to acquire. Because if you're investing large sums of money to design a board for a specialised application that isn't going to sell spectacular numbers, the difference between a $10 GPU and a $15 GPU isn't really going to make a proportionally huge difference to the retail cost of the board, and it might make a difference to whether it's useful for some customers.

link speed can be a limiting factor (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37546078)

Just because you don't max out the pci-e 16x throughput, doesn't mean the 16x linkspeed is useless, faster throughput means less time waiting for data, every millisecond spent waiting is not being used for calculations..

No AGP? (1)

Hamsterdan (815291) | about 3 years ago | (#37546180)

Wouldn't it make more sense to sell one with AGP too?

Before my X2 died, It was upgraded with a HD3850 and could run pretty much anything, albeit not at highest settings. I'm trying to see what good a PCI card could do besides

A) adding a third monitor
B) adding hdmi on the cheap on an HTPC

Systems with PCI slots will either have PCI-E or AGP slots. Those that only have PCI will be in P2 class, and it makes no sense to upgrade that kind of machine with a fast video card, even for folding or mining.

Re:No AGP? (1)

FreonTrip (694097) | about 3 years ago | (#37546406)

Strictly PCI would be restricted to Pentium and pre-Super7 systems. The Pentium IIs were marketed heavily on the back of AGP, but some forever alone lunatic out there is slapping his hands together, crowing that his quad-processor Pentium Pro box will finally get a "worthy" video card. I almost want to see that.

Most likely for dell servers (1)

weiqj (870224) | about 3 years ago | (#37546704)

Dells has been shamelessly sabotaging it's low end servers by deliberately crippling the PCI-E slot (only allowing PCI-E X1 slots) so that people can't use it s a powerful desktop. This card is a perfect solution.
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