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184 comments

Hm... (4, Funny)

grub (11606) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558156)


So that means I should carry around yogurt to throw on my eyes during a date.

Re:Hm... (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558298)

Damn....The Aussies misspelled it. I was thinking they'd won a chile contest....not bread the hottest pepper.

The pepper itself is spelled chile.....if you're making the dish with ground chiles, beef and sometimes beans....originated I think in Texas, that would be spelled chili.

Re:Hm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558386)

I don't think that is universal.

Re:Hm... (1)

Dyinobal (1427207) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558410)

I'm afraid your wrong the pepper is spelled Chili or the UK spelling of Chilli

Re:Hm... (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558502)

In the UK we spell the meat dish chilli. I thought this contest was about peppers too..

Re:Hm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558872)

In the UK and the rest of the English speaking world, we use "you're" in that context. Don't yoo love it when a grandma/splleing Nartsi fucks up?

Writing from Nartsinia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559044)

Actually, we prefer to be called "Nartsinians". The term "Nartsi" is considered pejorative in my country, in part because of its resemblance to "Nazi", which you might recognize the name of a political party that ruled Germany from 1933-1945.

We do fuck up a lot, though. And we'll splle anything that moves: women, men, sheep, ranch dressing, conceptual art, even non-Euclidean geometry. In fact, as I type this right now, I'm splleing my au pair in the yoo.

Re:Hm... (1)

rsandwick3 (1495819) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559674)

You're aptensin two de-tale ibz amayzng...

Also, I'm still trying to determine what it would mean to have "bread" the hottest peppers...

Re:Hm... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558462)

a la wikipedia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chili_pepper#Spelling_and_usage

Chili Sans Beans?! (3, Funny)

walkerp1 (523460) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558724)

As a Texan native, let me point out that beans are only optional in the North.

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (1)

Dyinobal (1427207) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558852)

Ya I mean who makes Chili with out some beans, or even a mix of different types of beans. I typically use a mix of kidney and pinto beans.

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (2)

walkerp1 (523460) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558886)

Absolutely! Try some black beans too for a nice color contrast.

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559054)

You want color contrast? Use jelly beans.

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559118)

In the southeast, it is beans with a pot of coffee to add flavor.

Nathan

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (1)

walkerp1 (523460) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559174)

That's very good. I usually just throw in used grounds rather than the coffee itself unless I'm adding mesa flour for thickness.

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (1)

Vegeta99 (219501) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559128)

As a Pennsylvania native, I can assure you that beans are not optional. Somebody fed you sloppy joes without a bun.

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (1)

FatAlb3rt (533682) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559224)

Maybe that's why Pennsylvania chili is so famous.

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 2 years ago | (#37560010)

Yeah...I find if you go very far up north....it isn't chili either.

I had some chili from a family that was in the northern most part of Kentucky. Their chili?

Man, if there was anything in it besides, ground beef, beans, water and salt and pepper, I missed it.

No heat...no flavor...ugh.

I find that most foods tend to get flavorless quickly as soon as you leave the south and head up north.

I don't mean bland just in 'not hot'...but no seasoning whatsoever....

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37560126)

Dagnammed immigants gid fer summin' then?

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (2)

wierd_w (1375923) | more than 2 years ago | (#37560270)

You forgot the single most important ingredient.

Cumin

Substituting cumin for oregano in all meat chilli magically transforms it into spaghetti sauce.

Buy a bottle, open it, and smell it. It smells like chilli. It is what makes chilli, chilli, and not sloppy joe mix, maranara sauce, or spaghetti sauce.

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559236)

The only time beans are optional is in hot dog chili. And then it must be stated as such, same as you can't just call something "bacon" if it's made of turkey.

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37560116)

pa native as well, always had kidney and northern beans in my chili.

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (2)

maiki (857449) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559360)

Chili (née "Chile con carne", or "chili peppers with meat") originally had no beans. "Texas-style chili contains no beans and may even be made with no other vegetables whatsoever besides chili peppers." This is from the fount of all knowledge, Wikipedia [wikipedia.org].

Re:Chili Sans Beans?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559878)

I am not from Texas, but I agree, once there are beans in it, it is no longer chili. It is some sort of bean and meat stew...

Re:Hm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558846)

While we're on the subject of misspellings, "bread" is not the verb you're looking for. You want "bred". "Bread" is a baked good made from yeast-leavened flour, "bred" is the past tense of "breed".

Nobody "bread the hottest pepper", although if you don't have any yogurt handy, bread works okay after the hottest pepper to quench the heat a bit.

Re:Hm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558990)

Not in the US.

Here, Chile is a country in South America.

Chili can be either a hot pepper, a shorter name for the dish chile con carne, or a Rochester, NY suburb (though the pronunciation is different).

Re:Hm... (1)

shadowfaxcrx (1736978) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559140)

Are you by any chance from the US Southwest?

I grew up in NM and spell it that way too, but the other places I've lived don't.

Re:Hm... (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559172)

Are you by any chance from the US Southwest?

I grew up in NM and spell it that way too, but the other places I've lived don't.

Nope..I live in New Orleans.

Re:Hm... (1)

Cutting_Crew (708624) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559660)

Are you by any chance from the US Southwest?

I grew up in NM and spell it that way too, but the other places I've lived don't.

Nope..I live in New Orleans.

nice, i live in southern mississippi, just up the road from you so hello neighbor - and i like chili in my hot dogs, my homemade chili, on tortilla chips and who knows what else.

Re:Hm... (1)

plopez (54068) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559872)

You should try a bratwurst wrapped in a tortilla w/ chili and cheese on it. Be sure to wash it down with a good pilsner (in other words *not* XX or Corona)

Re:Hm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559242)

What batter would be best to "bread the hottest pepper"?

Re:Hm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559536)

Am I the only person that will point out you misspelled "bred"? "Bread" is a tasty carb filled treat. The past tense of breed is spelled bred.

Re:Hm... (1)

BluBrick (1924) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559572)

The past tense of breed is not spelled the same way as the stuff you use for sandwiches, it's bred.

At least it is here in Australia where we spell the hot pepper "chili" (sometimes "chilli"). As for the dish made with ground chilis, beef and sometimes beans, we usually refer to it by its longer name of chili con carne (literally chili with meat). However, when spelled with an "e" on the end, the word Chile is always a proper noun that refers to a country on the west coast of South America.

Re:Hm... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559698)

In Texas, we spell it with an "e"; being heavily influenced by the Spanish language where it spelled "chile". Be careful of your use of the word "always" !

Not news. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558226)

Capsaicin is far more interesting than its a ligand for pain! carried by small delta c fiber neurons and is fat soluable. While its nice to see a bioscience story here, there are plenty of new ones to report on.

Like if you stick it in mice in utero during a critical period, the mice don't develop pain sensing fibers. At all.

most important conclusion (1)

ptr2004 (695756) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558250)

from the article: "it appears capsaicin does not cause permanent tissue damage, even in high doses" So we can all chill out :)

Re:most important conclusion (1)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558448)

from the article: "it appears capsaicin does not cause permanent tissue damage, even in high doses" So we can all chill out :)

I'm not so sure of that ... a friend had a bottle of "100% pure cap" [hotsauceworld.com]. Basically, it was in a two-layer glass container with an eye dropper and a whole lot of cautionary notes.

Apparently, the sellers of this stuff (and I have no idea where he got it) felt that in it's pure form, this stuff could basically chew through your stomach lining, blind you, and all sorts of crazy stuff.

It scared the hell outta me. I wouldn't want to be the one to verify that it can't cause tissue damage. :-P

Re:most important conclusion (1)

Onymous Coward (97719) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558718)

I was wondering whether there were some damage potential from capsaicin.

Capsaicin is a highly irritant material requiring proper protective goggles, respirators, and proper hazardous material handling procedures.In cases of skin contact (irritant, sensitizer), eye contact (irritant), ingestion, and inhalation (lung irritant, lung sensitizer). Severe over-exposure to pure capsaicin can result in death; the lethal dose (LD50 in mice) is 47.2 mg/kg.[52 [wikimedia.org]] [57 [wikimedia.org]]

Painful exposures to capsaicin-containing peppers are among the most common plant-related exposures presented to poison centers. They cause burning or stinging pain to the skin, and if ingested in large amounts by adults or small amounts by children, can produce nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and burning diarrhea. Eye exposure produces intense tearing, pain, conjunctivitis and blepharospasm.[58 [wikimedia.org]]

Re:most important conclusion (1)

LunaticTippy (872397) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559662)

That is no joke. A coworker was exposed while testing some capsaicin powder and was in a coma for days. He was advised not to eat any capsaicin for the rest of his life as he was likely to be sensitized to it.

Re:most important conclusion (1)

Dr Herbert West (1357769) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558734)

Pure-Cap is more about hype than anything else... you can even pick it up in most big-city delis (Bay Cities in Santa Monica, CA carries it). A drop on the end of a toothpick is about all most people need.

It is a skin irritant, and I wouldn't want it in my eyes, but it's not highly corrosive or anything. On the other hand, It does melt the rubber cap on the eye dropper after a few months.

Re:most important conclusion (4, Informative)

Pedersen (46721) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558784)

Sadly, "Pure Cap" is *not* pure capsaicin, and that stuff on the bottle is just marketing. The Scoville rating for Pure Cap is about 500,000 to 600,000 Scovilles, while straight capsaicin runs at 16,000,000 Scovilles.

Go, read the ingredients for "Pure Cap" and note that it's mostly vegetable oil.

I've had hotter than Pure Cap. You have to work up to it to be able to handle it, but it's very doable.

Re:most important conclusion (1)

element-o.p. (939033) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558916)

You have to work up to it to be able to handle it, but it's very doable.

"They were both poisoned. I've spent the last few years building up an immunity to capsaicin." With apologies to S. Morgenstern.

Re:most important conclusion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559076)

Also, there are chilies that a a lot hotter than 600,000 Scoville. Even before the contest, the hottest Habañeros were rated at 850,000 Scoville.

Re:most important conclusion (3, Insightful)

gstoddart (321705) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559226)

I've had hotter than Pure Cap. You have to work up to it to be able to handle it, but it's very doable.

I just don't see the point, to be honest.

Years ago, a friendly pub owner offered to make several of us his "stupid hot" wings ... basically, fresh habaneros and lots of other stuff.

It numbed my face, and the next day was ... unpleasant. Since then, my stomach literally can't handle anything excessively hot, and I no longer derive pleasure from it.

I just don't want to play anymore -- I can get tasty with some heat long before the ridiculous threshold that playing around with some of those peppers are at.

Though, a friend of my wife has been eating hot spicy foods for so long, that I'm fairly convinced that if food isn't crazy hot (and super salty), she can't even taste it any more. Because everything she cooks is very spicy. So she's either worn out the taste buds, or with age they're less sensitive. I don't want to be in my 50s and not taste anything less corrosive than battery acid. :-P

Re:most important conclusion (1)

ultramk (470198) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559778)

I use a 600k scoville-rated ghost pepper sauce on a daily basis. I'm a "non-taster" on the old scale, so I require a lot of stimulation in my food to find it enjoyable. The endorphin rush is significant and pleasurable.

In soup for example, I use a few drops, which gives me the effect of adding a ton of some milder hot sauce. The advantage is that I get a tiny fraction of the sodium that I would from Tabasco or something similar--and sodium's something I'm trying very hard to keep a lid on.

The interesting thing is that after a month or two of this, my tolerance level went through the roof. The great thing is that now that the heat has died away somewhat for me, the complex and fruity flavors of the ghost pepper itself really shine through. Delicious stuff.

Re:most important conclusion (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37560032)

Article linked [australian...hic.com.au] by TFA:

The fiery Trinidad Scorpion Butch T registers 1,463,700 Scoville heat units, placing it ahead of the current leader recognised by Guinness World Records, the Naga Viper, which comes in at 1,382,118. Jalapenos measure about 2500-5000 and the hottest Tabasco is 30,000.
...
The chilli is so scorching, that Marcel and his team have to wear protective gear when handling the new variety. "If you don't wear gloves your hands will be pumping heat for two days later," he says.

Re:most important conclusion (1)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37560000)

The article is incorrect. It is possible to die from capsaicin poisoning, but it takes a very large amount. There have only been a few reported cases.

On the other hand, there have been LOTS of people who have been made very sick by ingesting too much of it. It may not be permanent, but at the time I have no doubt you might wish to permanently end it all.

I was right after all! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558254)

People thought I was crazy to drink milk with my BBQ chips when I was younger.

Re:I was right after all! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558486)

> People thought I was crazy to drink milk with my BBQ chips when I was younger.
No; they thought you were a wimp. Seriously, BBQ chips?

Re:I was right after all! (0)

Tanktalus (794810) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558570)

Whew, that's hot stuff. What's in it?

Tomatoes.

Ow, someone should put a warning on the label!

Re:I was right after all! (1)

BattleApple (956701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558880)

Blair's Death Rain habanero chips are actually pretty hot.. 600,000 scoville I think. Yeah, they're not BBQ, but there's no reason they couldn't be

Re:I was right after all! (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559636)

They are actually pretty lame. I bought some hoping they were hot and was sorely disappointed. They might claim 600k but they are full of shit. I ended up putting after death on them to make them hotter.

Re:I was right after all! (0)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558766)

People thought I was crazy to drink milk with my BBQ chips when I was younger.

You thought bbq'ed chips were hot?!?!?

Whew...whatta wimp....

Something for the Atreides (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558262)

Fortunately for heat-seekers, it appears capsaicin does not cause permanent tissue damage, even in high doses.

"It's what I call 'fake pain'," says Mark. "It doesn't actually cause you physical harm, even though it feels like it."

Like that pain box in Dune.

So, the next time when eating Thai with these peppers...

I must not fear.
Fear is the mind-killer.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
Where the fear has gone there will be nothing.
Only I will remain.

Re:Something for the Atreides (5, Funny)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558698)

Yeah, repeat that mantra again while sitting on the toilet.

Re:Something for the Atreides (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558826)

C'mon Ice Cream....

Re:Something for the Atreides (1)

cayenne8 (626475) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559062)

Yeah, repeat that mantra again while sitting on the toilet.

I think the mantra at that point is....

"C'mon ice cream......!!!"

Best remedy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558374)

is ICE CREAM!!!!! Instant relief because of the cold, and more than enough fat to fully neutralize the capsaicin...

Re:Best remedy (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559234)

is ICE CREAM!!!!! Instant relief because of the cold, and more than enough fat to fully neutralize the capsaicin...

Unless you are lactose intolerant or allergic to dairy, as I am.

No matter. I'm a fire eater - I have a bag of Habanero Pistachios next to my keyboard at the moment. Over time I've built up a tolerance for casaicin and often make food which scare my friends.

I did grow habaneros once, and found as important as fertilizer, the heat and humidity of the weather, plus direct Sun exposure had significant influence on the heat of my peppers.

Re:Best remedy (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | more than 2 years ago | (#37560200)

I am not sure as to the method of action, but sliced kiwi seems to temporarily relieve the burning sensation from hot foods.

I have a laosian brother-in-law who's mother produces papaya salad that I swear contains more red thai pepper than it does shredded green papya. (It makes other laosians wince, and mexicans cry. I have seen it myself.)

I refuse to eat it unless I have either sliced kiwi fruit or a glass of milk handy. Laosians tend to be lactose intolerant, like yourself, so usually milk is not available during social functions. Kiwi however seems well received by the locals.

You might give it a shot sometime.

Re:Best remedy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559430)

bad idea. try it and you'll see.

the cold actually makes your blood vessel rushes more when the cold is away, and you'll experience the heat even more than normal. like eating something really hot and try to remedy it with ice cubes. simply bad.

The ring of fire after you've had chili... (4, Funny)

LordNacho (1909280) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558442)

always made me think people have a few taste buds in their anus. I mean how else can it feel hot right?

Turns out it's just the irritant effect. My wife reminds me of this each time now.

Re:The ring of fire after you've had chili... (4, Funny)

ae1294 (1547521) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558524)

always made me think people have a few taste buds in their anus. I mean how else can it feel hot right?

Turns out it's just the irritant effect. My wife reminds me of this each time now.

Wow, your wife is really all up your ass about that..

Re:The ring of fire after you've had chili... (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558608)

Um. Taste buds are for, you know, tasting. Chili's will irritate your eyes, nose, throat, all around your mouth, your intestines, cuts.. probably your ears.. anything sensitive pretty much. They're also awesome.

Re:The ring of fire after you've had chili... (1)

oldhack (1037484) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558782)

Hey, run that by me again.

Your wife reminds you of anus pain...?

Re:The ring of fire after you've had chili... (1)

Beorytis (1014777) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558924)

>Turns out it's just the irritant effect.

No. TFA says that capsaicin receptors are in other areas of the body besides the tongue. Capsaicin can fool nerve cells into sensing high temperature anywhere.

Re:The ring of fire after you've had chili... (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559000)

What crawled up her butt?

Re:The ring of fire after you've had chili... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559840)

What crawled up her butt?

Prolly that capsaicin-revving worm the poster was talking about.

Re:The ring of fire after you've had chili... (1)

plopez (54068) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559970)

That effect is also good for intestinal parasites. It drives them right out of your system from what I understand.

Re:The ring of fire after you've had chili... (1)

c0lo (1497653) | more than 2 years ago | (#37560094)

always made me think people have a few taste buds in their anus. I mean how else can it feel hot right?

From here [australian...hic.com.au]

The chilli is so scorching, that Marcel and his team have to wear protective gear when handling the new variety. "If you don't wear gloves your hands will be pumping heat for two days later," he says.

It's 1,463,700 Scoville units.

Attention to the thief who is eating my pizza (3, Funny)

joeflies (529536) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558478)

Attention to the thief eating my pizza from the company refrigerator, may this serve as your fair warning that you just might bite into a sample of the Australian Worm Juice the next time you steal a slice.

Re:Attention to the thief who is eating my pizza (1)

bigredradio (631970) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558528)

Awesome idea. Now if I can just find a way to slip it into a soda can (work) or beer bottle (home).

Re:Attention to the thief who is eating my pizza (2)

dargaud (518470) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558876)

Awesome idea. Now if I can just find a way to slip it into a soda can (work) or beer bottle (home).

I homebrew and I just made my second batch of chilly beer: I just put a small chilly in each bottle before starting the 2nd fermentation. Most people who've tried it love it, it's very good to drink as an appetizer, with olive and chips. Some people hate it tough. More for us ! I make it from a strong blond.

Re:Attention to the thief who is eating my pizza (1)

BattleApple (956701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558998)

For beer you can get a bottle capper for about $15. For soda, a plastic bottle.. I think it's possible to get the cap off without breaking the safety ring if you push it up while you're unscrewing it

Re:Attention to the thief who is eating my pizza (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558978)

In case folks were wondering...

A worm farm is basically a box that contains compost, dirt, and worms. You add food scraps and compost to the top. The worms chew through and digest the compost and food scraps. Worm juice is the fluid that collects at the bottom of a worm farm. It is not (as I first thought) made by throwing worms in a juicer. Worm juice is a very effective and safe fertilizer.

Re:Attention to the thief who is eating my pizza (1)

whathappenedtomonday (581634) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559918)

well, to be even more exact, it's not just about the fertilizer quality of the juice - TFA says:

but what makes it particularly effective for bringing out the heat are the bodies of insects that have decomposed in the worm farm. "The insects in there are living and dying pretty rapidly, and bits of their shell will break down," says Mark. "When you apply the juice to the plants' roots, they think they're getting eaten by insects." In response, the chillies produce more of their defensive compounds like capsaicin. "It's like getting an injection to boost your immune system," he says.

Re:Attention to the thief who is eating my pizza (1)

plopez (54068) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559916)

It's good for keeping pets from chewing on electrical cords (or anything else for that matter). It causes no harm to the pet and might just save its life.

Another day, another Aussie-promoting story on /. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558760)

No matter how lame, no matter how uninteresting, the Aussie-lurvin' "editors" of Slashdot will find some shit to fulfill the site's mandatory Daily Story Promoting Australia requirement.

Fat ? (1)

dargaud (518470) | more than 2 years ago | (#37558808)

I've just grown by first crop of capsain-rich chillies, but I'm no specialist (I prefer them tasty, not life threatening). So if fat is so good at getting rid of the heat, why not take a mouthful of lard, or gargle with olive oil ?!?

Re:Fat ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37558960)

I personally think that drinking a glass of cold unskimmed milk is way more pleasant. Or just eating a piece of cheese. Or, even better, having your chillies on cheese!

But then again I'm Dutch, and most of the cheese we have around here actually tastes good.

Re:Fat ? (1)

BattleApple (956701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559368)

why not take a mouthful of lard, or gargle with olive oil ?!?

Do you really have to ask that question?

Incidentally, FTA: "My favourite remedy is olive oil," he says, "but it's not the most pleasant."

Re:Fat ? (1)

Mindcontrolled (1388007) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559586)

I know enough people from the mediterranean area who would, just for the taste, take a tablespoon full of olive oil, every now and then. To be honest, if it is a really good oil, it is not unpleasant.

Re:Fat ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559838)

Do you really have to ask that question?

Of course he has to ask. In case you've forgotten, Ttis is America. Here, we'll eat anything that doesn't eat us first. Unless, of course, it's that local-grown, organic, or health-food stuff, or if it's foreign. Just drop it in a deep frier...

Re:Fat ? (2)

rolfwind (528248) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559760)

FTFA:

"Something with a lot of fat in it - like yogurt or milk - is going to dissolve the compound and wash it away," says Mark Peacock, a plant scientist from the University of Sydney, who this year helped to cultivate the world's hottest chilli, the Trinidad Scorpion Butch T. "My favourite remedy is olive oil," he says, "but it's not the most pleasant."

from concentrate? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559582)

Was the worm juice freshly-squeezed or from concentrate? We must know for science!

Capsaicin just isn't that interesting (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559592)

The whole capsaicin thing has already been taken to its logical conclusion. Dave's insanity actually sold a tiny bottle with a pure crystal of the stuff in it.

Beyond macho pissing contests, taste is what matters. Far and away, the best salsa I've ever had is a mix of mild and hot at a tacqueria near here. It's the taste that keeps bringing me back, not the fact that it makes my mouth sting and my eyes water (which it does). To somebody who is playing the capsaicin game, their salsa probably tastes like lukewarm bathwater because their tastebuds have been fried. Their loss.

asterisk (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37559708)

There should be an asterisk in the record books since their peppers were juicing...

Yoghurt is an ancient secret (1)

msobkow (48369) | more than 2 years ago | (#37559804)

Yoghurt to cut the burn has been a staple of East Indian cooking for millenia. Plus a nice mango lassi to top off a meal is tasty.

Re:Yoghurt is an ancient secret (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37560352)

Yoghurt to cut the burn has been a staple of East Indian cooking for millenia. Plus a nice mango lassi to top off a meal is tasty.

Except that chili peppers were only introduced to the orient by Western traders after, you know, Columbus and others found the West Indies.

They forgot alcohol. (2)

Jane Q. Public (1010737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37560084)

It's not a very "scientific" article if they neglected to mention that capsaicin is not just soluble in fats but also in alcohol.

You need more than a couple of percent, though, so a beer isn't going to help you much. A glass of port or something stronger, like swishing a shot of whiskey or vodka around in your mouth, will whisk a lot of the capsaicin away.

Using endorphin release as an explanation (1)

bunbuntheminilop (935594) | more than 2 years ago | (#37560330)

The article mentions that the reason we like chili is partly explained because it releases endorphins. Why dont they just say they don't really know?

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