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BT Promises 300Mbps FTTP By 2012

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the speeding-up dept.

The Internet 121

twoheadedboy writes "UK service provider BT has launched its Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) product, pledging it will offer downstream speeds of 300Mbps by spring next year. At present, the service can hit 110Mbps downstream speeds and will be available in just six locations from the end of October. More locations will be added and speeds will rise, however, with a 1Gbps service currently being trialled in Kesgrave, Suffolk. There may be continuing disputes over BT Openreach's pricing of fibre products, given the recent industry in-fighting. Nevertheless, 300Mbps fibre will provide some pretty speedy downloads for end users."

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121 comments

So you can hit your data cap... (3, Insightful)

houstonbofh (602064) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622406)

So you can hit your data cap in just hours now! WooHoo!

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37622416)

Don't read this... it is a curse...

In 2005, a little boy named Tim was playing in his front yard. After a few minutes of playing, Tim noticed that a large toy clown had appeared and was floating in the middle of the front yard. It had white skin, a striped shirt with many colors present on it, large, goofy looking hands with white gloves on them, huge feet with large brown shoes, a big, red round nose, and poofy red hair.

The clown was grinning evilly at Tim, who was very noticeably frightened at this strange occurrence. Tim somehow managed to shake off his fear, slowly got up, and tried to run down the sidewalk to get away from the toy clown. However, Tim's effort proved to be futile when the clown spread out the palms of both of his hands, placed them in front of his body with one hand behind the other, and then began shooting giant legos out of his hands. The legos homed in on Tim's bootyass, went right through his pants and underwear, and finally reached his bootyasscheekcrackhole! Afterwards, they began spinning around on Tim's bootyasscheekcrackhole, inflicting tremendous amounts of tickle upon his bootyass!

The legos then vanished, giving Tim a few moments of relief (however, after experiencing such a terrifying thing, he is still only a shell of what he once was). However, the clown was not finished yet! After a few moments, the clown said, in an evil voice, "I wanna go... you know where!" and seemingly vanished. Tim, however, knew exactly where the clown was: between his bootyasscheek johnson ultimatum supremacies! The clown, facing Tim's bootyasscheekcrackhole, put both of his hands together (with his fingers between one another), and whammed Tim's bootyasscheekcrackhole three whole times! The previous tickle paled in comparison to this tickle!

Now that you have read this (even a single word of it), the toy clown will shoot large amounts of his legos out of his hand and they will spin around on your bootyasscheekcrackhole, and major amounts of tickle will be inflicted upon it! To prevent this from happening, post this curse as a comment three times.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (0)

Eightbitgnosis (1571875) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622820)

Hell, and here I thought I posted weird things when I'm not sober

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37624606)

I find this "Youtubezation" of /. comments scary.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (1)

Impeesa (763920) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622450)

Wouldn't be surprised, in which case, not impressed. Starting sometime very soon, my ISP claims they'll be offering 250Mbps over regular cable [www.shaw.ca] , with either 1TB or unlimited monthly transfer. The price is high for a residential connection, of course, but you don't have wait for them to run fibre to your neighbourhood.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (1)

mirix (1649853) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622538)

Wow, they're finally offering >1MBps upload for under $100. About fucking time.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37622858)

youre better off with teksavvy than shaw.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623188)

Teksavvy isn't available outside Ontario, I'm pretty sure Teksavvy and Shaw don't overlap anywhere. What's wrong with Shaw? They're not Rogers. They do NXDOMAIN hijacking now if you use their DNS servers (and don't opt out of it), but they're not pulling any of the traffic shaping bullshit that Rogers is doing. And they've raised their caps instead of lowering them, again unlike Rogers. Maybe there isn't a Teksavvy in the West because we're not stuck with as crappy an ISP as you are.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (1)

mjwx (966435) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622484)

So you can hit your data cap in just hours now! WooHoo!

Reading the small print, 300 Mbps fibre will only be available in one or two select suburbs (read: the richest) and wont expand beyond that.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (1)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623710)

We're in the UK - the top level plans here tend to be free of caps.

Virgin's top couple of fibre tiers are completely cap-free (50Mb, 100Mb [200 in places]). I'm on the 50Mb tier and am paying a very reasonable amount (similar to my friends in Columbus, OH), for more than 4 times the speed. Decent latency too with extremely rare outages (and never for very long if they do happen).

My internet has been hassle free and very fast for the nearly 2 years I've had it.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624096)

Virgin is a bit unusual. Most ADSL providers (who all use BT's backbone) do use caps, because BT imposes caps in their wholesale rates and doesn't. Oh, and you do have a cap - you can only upload 6000MB between 3PM and 8PM.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (1)

xMrFishx (1956084) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624192)

Indeed, when I had Virgin, I found them very bursty. Yes I'd get what was 11Mbit on my line but it would only hold that for a few hundred megs or so, then it slipped down to around 3, never did much uploading but downloading would cause Virgin to strangle the line.

I'm currently on BT ADSL (which is, fineish except for a drop out every night for a few seconds) on a line outside my control (I don't pay for this one so I don't choose providers). It is at least consistent with the data rates at around 7Mbit for full file transfers, so in essence I can shift larger data transfers faster on a slower line due to the absence of (obvious) throttling. Mind you I don't use (read: trust) BT's DNS and use an alternate one.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624510)

Virgin documents their throttling rules, and I've found that they do follow their policy. I can get 1.1MB/s on my 10Mb/s line until I go over the cap, then it drops to about 250KB/s. I've only managed to hit the cap twice: once when I had to upload about 20GB of video footage to my publisher (screencasts with no interframe compression) and once when I decided to watch a film on iPlayer HD in the early evening (you hit the cap after about 55 minutes at iPlayer HD bitrates - that's what's making me consider switching to the 30Mb/s plan at the moment).

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (1)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 2 years ago | (#37625002)

Ah yes, they changed the policy in exchange for the increased upload speeds (was cap-free when it was 50/1 and changed to only monitor traffic between 3pm and 8pm when it went to 50/5 - but downstream is never capped at all).

I could certainly exceed that 6GB in the time slot if I was uploading at full speed for the whole 5 hours, but in practice I have not run up against any issue. The 50Mb plan has been well worth the money for me.

Re:So you can hit your data cap... (1)

beelsebob (529313) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624756)

Actually, they offer (truely) unlimited services at the high end (which this is). What angers me more about this is that they're busy wasting time installing FTTP for people, while FTTC has barely got out of major cities. There are still some fairly large cities (aberdeen for example) where FTTC simply doesn't exist, and if you're in a town, screw any chance of that!

I'd much rather they spent their money on getting moderately fast internet out to everyone, rather than super fast to a very few, and super slow to everyone else.

Who cares? (0)

kyouteki (835576) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622410)

So you can now hit your bandwidth cap faster than ever? At a certain point, latency is the biggest problem to contend with, not bandwidth.

Re:Who cares? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37622754)

> So you can now hit your bandwidth cap faster than ever?

Well of course, all transmission systems have to have a bandwidth "cap" otherwise their frequencies would be all over the spectrum.

Oh I see, you're mis-using an engineering term you don't understand. You might as well have said "hit your LCD cap" for all the sense you made.

Re:Who cares? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37622834)

Uhg. If you're looking to "take back" that terminology, you're about a decade too late.

Re:Who cares? (1)

EdIII (1114411) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622914)

> So you can now hit your bandwidth cap faster than ever?

Well of course, all transmission systems have to have a bandwidth "cap" otherwise their frequencies would be all over the spectrum.

Oh I see, you're mis-using an engineering term you don't understand. You might as well have said "hit your LCD cap" for all the sense you made.

Are you serious? :)

First off, it is not his fault. Secondly, he did use it correctly. "Bandwidth cap" is an actual term, because it has been effectively made into one, by the industry to indicate the total transmission of data is limited. Obviously to less than what is possible in a given period.

You're applying an engineering interpretation that no reasonable person would make in the context of the conversation.

His point about latency is spot on. If you offered me a 1 Tbps connection at 250ms latency and a 1 Mbps connection at 2ms, I am thinking I would choose the latter. My greatest issue right now managing several branch offices for a client is not the amount of data I can transfer at one time (bandwidth), but how fast the packets are being sent back and forth (latency). The branch offices are oversupplied with bandwidth. Using maybe 20-25% of their connections at any one time, but there are periods of high latency that significantly affect operations. Reliable low latency connections (expensive fiber connections, etc.) are not viable right now given a double dip recession and the need to trim operational costs practically everywhere. I don't have, or know, of a single company out there making huge infrastructure investments right now. It's about maintaining (barely) what you have right now and waiting for the economies to pick back up. Only companies with bailout money, and access to corrupt politicians, and executives that just don't give a shit are acting otherwise.

In the future it will become more about latency and less about bandwidth. Was there not an article recently about a transatlantic fiber run that was expressly for the purpose of speeding up (latency) connections for trading on stock exchanges?

About it not being his fault, Marketing Douchebags are the one responsible for the massive confusion about terms. To make it easy to understand it would be like being sold gasoline in liters but your car tells you everything in terms of gallons. It also does not help that different amounts of gasoline are deliberately used to imply how fast the car can travel instead of how far it can travel.

That is it in a nutshell. I've told all my clients that try to understand just what they are getting that 1 Mbps connection allows them to download a file at 125 KB/s, which is what Firefox or IE shows the speeds in. It makes it pretty easy then for them to understand that an office of 30 people can't watch Netflix (executives working hard for the bonuses) and YouTube (regular employees hard at work) all at once on a 6 Mbps connection.

Cut the guy a break. He had a valid point and was only using terms that have been used by the industry for years.

Re:Who cares? (1)

aXis100 (690904) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623102)

I agree with the grammar nazi - "download cap" and "quota" both make complete sense and are commonly used. I have never heard it called "bandwidth cap", which makes no sense anyway.

Re:Who cares? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623382)

Start a sentence with 'I agree with the grammar nazi' and it'll do wonders for you on /.

No, really. Keep it up. ...

So what? Hong Kong has this already (3, Informative)

slyguy135 (844866) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622414)

In Hong Kong it's easy to get 1Gbps FTTP, e.g. with HGC (aka Three) for HK$198 a month (about US$25 or 16 GBP a month): http://www.threebb.com.hk/eng/broadbandoffer.html [threebb.com.hk]

Re:So what? Hong Kong has this already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623262)

This 1Gbps connection is capped at 10-20Mbps (depending on provider) out of Hong Kong.

Re:So what? Hong Kong has this already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37624230)

So what? Hong Kong has awesome ice lemon tea too. But it would still be news if BT started selling that in UK. Great news in fact.

Re:So what? Hong Kong has this already (1)

YeeHaW_Jelte (451855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624432)

I dunno, but maybe even if Hong Kong has this the English might like their broadband connections a little bit closer to their homes?

I (Netherlands) just this morning had my fibre installed into the house, and live in a small rural town. They have a nice system where they start a campaign in each individual town, and when more that 30% preorder a fibre glass connection, they connect the whole village/town/city in one go, free of costs.

That might be a model that could provide for quick rollouts in other countries too.

Re:So what? Hong Kong has this already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37625040)

An island 20 miles on a side is going to find it easier to wire people up than one the size of England. Having a population density 30x higher also helps with profitability, I'd imagine.

Re:So what? Hong Kong has this already (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37625116)

In Hong Kong it's easy to get 1Gbps FTTP, e.g. with HGC (aka Three) for HK$198 a month (about US$25 or 16 GBP a month): http://www.threebb.com.hk/eng/broadbandoffer.html [threebb.com.hk]

I'm sure the density of of Hong Kong helps. Too bad that even the densest cities in North America and Europe can't come even moderately close to this.

Something for urban planners to think about.

Re:So what? Hong Kong has this already (1)

nine-times (778537) | more than 2 years ago | (#37625276)

Meanwhile in the US, many of us are still dealing with DSL and 2 Mbps down, .3 Mbps up. Even in NYC, depending on the neighborhood, you might not be able to get a 10Mbps symmetrical connection for less than $1,500/month.

Just a matter of price... (2)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622548)

I have 60/60 Mbit fiber for about $100/month here in Norway. All it'd take to have 400/400 Mbit fiber is one phone call and about $1000/month. Some operators in the chain even say up to 1000/1000 Mbit, call us for pricing. No caps and I've had ~6 MB/s both downloading and uploading. Before with cable and DSL it was always how far are you from the central, how clogged are our lines. With fiber it's only a matter of how much you want to pay, really. After all they have to keep some pretty fat pipes to the backbone for that line to be useful, that's what costs money now.

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

HopefulIntern (1759406) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623182)

Ah how I miss fedrelandet. Here in the UK my
I did have fibre at one place I lived a few years ago, but while the line got the full speed they offered (20mb at the time) as is usual with Virgin UK, and indeed all UK providers, "we don't support upload"...whatever that means. In practice it meant a 20/0.7mbps line. In addition, because it was FTTC, the whole area was oversaturated to the point where latency was off the charts. Speeds were good, but a ping to the server in the next town was 500ms+ with jitter of over 300.

It's all well and good BT and the UK rolling out all this fancy hardware in one or two towns in the country, when even people living in major cities (like me) cannot reach the magical 1mbps, nevermind double-digits.

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

HopefulIntern (1759406) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623198)

hmm, i must remember not to use > and < that first line should say "Here in the UK my (less than)1mbps (yes, mb not MB) suckfest is starting to get to me."

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623498)

(less than)1mbps (yes, mb not MB)

Tell your ISP that RFC 1149 was an April Fools joke and to up the MTU for your connection into integers.

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

HopefulIntern (1759406) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623604)

Sadly my town does not have its own phone exchange, so we have to use neighboring towns to the east or west depending on where we live. I am right in the middle, therefore the exchange is over 6 miles away. There is no fibre. Repeated appeals to have fibre brought to the remaining streets in the town (about 2/3 is cabled) has been denied by Virgin saying it is not economically viable.

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

N1AK (864906) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623328)

I'm glad you like the service you get. That said you're paying 4x as much for broadband than most standard packages in the UK. You're clearly getting a better package for that money, but I doubt the majority of UK users would swap given the price difference. I'm a heavy web user (though I stopped torrenting years ago) and the ~$15 a month package I'm on does what I need. None of that means I don't want lines to improve, better lines will allow more services over the internet etc.

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623394)

Around here you can't get Internet for $15/month. About $40/month is common for a slow DSL line, like 2/0.5 Mbit or so. Decently speedy lines are $60-80, with fiber taking another premium on top of that.

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

HopefulIntern (1759406) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623614)

But these prices are out of context for people who do not realise the difference in price levels for Norway. Take those prices, alongside the minimum wage rate and average cost of a Big Mac, and you can see it is not that expensive, relative to other commodities.

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624254)

But these prices are out of context for people who do not realise the difference in price levels for Norway. Take those prices, alongside the minimum wage rate and average cost of a Big Mac, and you can see it is not that expensive, relative to other commodities.

True, I'm just not sure how valid the comparison would be. A Big Mac largely reflects local wages and local ingredient prices, while computer equipment is almost to a dollar the same except for taxes and such around the world. There's a lot of expensive equipment in the fiber itself, the boxes and the centrals which would cost the same throughout the world. Other things like actually laying down the cables and running the company itself follows local wages, so I suppose it would be somewhat cheaper but it probably wouldn't be half the price in a country with half the price level. Still, I was rather surprised to hear he had broadband for $15 (10 GBP), looking online most offers I found was around $25 (17 GBP) which is more reasonable with respect to our and GB price levels.

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

nosferatu1001 (264446) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624440)

SKy BB - 7.50 per month for totally unlimited use

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 2 years ago | (#37625118)

SKy BB - 7.50 per month for totally unlimited use

And the small print [sky.com] :

When you take a Sky TV package (from £20 a month)
with Sky Talk & Line Rental (£12.25 a month)

So if you already pay at least 32.25 you can add 7.50 for broadband, that's hardly a fair comparison. The lowest you can get broadband only for is 10 + 12.25 = 22.25/month, three times your quoted price.

Re:Just a matter of price... (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37625186)

2/0.5mbps isn't slow. There's plenty of folks around these parts that would be thrilled for the upgrade. Personally, I'm fortunate enough to live in a part of the city where I can get somewhat quicker service.

That being said, I'm jealous of the UK in this case, it's not likely that I'll have access to a connection like that at any price until sometime in the 2020s at the earliest unless something is done to break up the regional duopoly between CenturyLink and Comcast.

Re:Just a matter of price... (2)

lars_stefan_axelsson (236283) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623720)

I have 50/50 Mbit fiber for about $40/month in Sweden. No caps. This includes IP telephony (pay cheap rate for calls but no subscription fee).

So $100 sounds expensive... :-)

Re:Just a matter of price... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37625346)

I also live in Sweden and pay $35 per month for 100/100 Mbit. And yes it's really 100 Mbit both ways, I measure several times per month.

Re:Just a matter of price... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37624112)

I have 100/10 fiber to the building in Germany (Munich) for €30 (currently ~$40). No caps, no mandatory disconnect after 24 hours like most DSL connections. I actually get about 8MiB/second down, and about 1.1Mib/s up. Latency is excellent also, about 25-30ms inside Germany.

Re:Just a matter of price... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37624342)

Just to add a little perspective to things... I live in northeastern connecticut and the available speeds here are ridiculous. Fastest dsl you can get is 6mb.... About 80$ a month. Cable has up to 12 but it costs close to $300.... Here cable providers are specific territories so our cable provider is who im talking about; metrocast. Then i can drive ten minutes north to charter territory and they have 40 mb service and a few months ago doled out free speed upgrades. I run an outsourced IT company and its painful that theres so much difference in available speeds within a 100 mile radius. Uverse is coming but its taking forever but thats not even fiber to the prem im told its fiber to a certain point and then dsl for the last leg. Ever consider moving your home or business for better bandwidth? I have hehe

and here I am (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37622610)

and here I am in downtown los angeles, a city of millions of people, in a high-density area, and my only choices are 5 mbps DSL from AT&T, or 3-6Mbps from clearwire (although at times it dips as low as 160 kbps, it's absolutely worthless)...

Filter Speeds? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37622630)

Just think about how much faster it would be without the government filtering!

Ah, BT. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37622666)

I'll just point you to this
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/10/03/bt_service_outage/

Look at a map of the UK, consider, this power outage in the Midlands fscked their *Business* ADSl service over the *whole* of Britain.
This cockup was the final straw, don't know what business we lost because of it but it caused me a shedload of grief that afternoon, so I'm in the process of 'migrating' to VM, sick of the poor BT ADSL speeds and service (ok, so maybe a 'frying pan and fire' move as far as some of you are concerned, but VM have been providing a stable service in our area for quite some time)

You seriously think I'd trust my business connection to BT fibre?

Re:Ah, BT. (1)

SimonTheSoundMan (1012395) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623548)

Migrate to Virgin Media then, I live in Birmingham and VM was down for over 24 hours this week, this has happened for the third time this year. It went down fro both domestic and business FTTP. BT goes down for an hour and everyone moans.

Re:Ah, BT. (1)

ledow (319597) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624016)

You want to complain then. Obviously your contract specifies the availability precisely and you'll entitled to something for that kind of outage if you're running a business on it? No? Shocking.

But even so, just complain. My 10Mbps VM home connection slowed to slightly less than 1Mbps for three days until the engineer came out - they refunded the entire month's cost for the broadband and some more BEFORE THE ENGINEER HAD EVEN VISITED.

However, to provide my own useless anecdote, the BT Business ADSL2 connection in work (which is a large school literally METRES away from the town's exchange) has two lines, for which I designed and built a little power circuit for that can remote-cut-off the power to the modems (because that's often the only way to get them to reconnect).

It goes down THAT often that we are always bouncing between the two connections throughout the day (luckily, a couple of kernel patches and our Linux gateway handles it seamlessly for the 150 desktops it serves) and at least 2-3 times a week they BOTH go off and have to be reset (either automatically, or by text message). We know if an off-site backup fails because we get an email from our online backup provider and when it does, we just text the box to reset the modems and the next backup will (probably) succeed. Myself and the bursar both have the number in our speed-dial.

Even then, we carry two 3G stick's in the school (one supplied by BT) for emergency use that the network can run off (albeit slowly) for about a day before we hit the usage limit on one of them.

And that's on their special "educational" service where they provide extra support and greater service.

Re:Ah, BT. (1)

petermgreen (876956) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624394)

ok, so maybe a 'frying pan and fire' move as far as some of you are concerned, but VM have been providing a stable service in our area for quite some time

I can't say i've noticed a whole lot of difference. Both BT wholesale ADSL (i've never bought directly from BT) and drop out from time to time. Sufficiantly rarely that you put up with it as a home user, sufficiantly frequently that I wouldn't rely on either for a buisness.

If you are trusting an internet reliant buisness to a single "broadband" link you are being an idiot. Either get multiple broadband links from different providers or get a proper connection with a service level agrement.

Disparity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37622690)

I've lived in several areas of the UK, and the disparity I've seen in speeds, especially on the edges of towns, is terrible. At the moment I'm in Bletchley, home of computing, and less that 2 miles from 300Mbps trial areas. I get 4Mbps. On the edge of Scunthorpe I got less than 0.5Mbps, North Oxford (Jericho) was around 2Mbps. Non of these were particularly remote locations, but all suffer from outdated infrastructure.

BT needs to start getting it's infrastructure sorted so that most people can get a decent speed, rather that a few small areas getting much faster.

Re:Disparity (1)

nOw2 (1531357) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622780)

Yes but not just infrastructure to the home: having suffered as little as 300kbit/s peak-rate speeds out of an 8Mbit/s line from BT I'd like them to sort out capacity to the exchange before showboating ever faster technologies.
That was in a city centre - there are some exchanges in the UK which have been oversubscribed continuously since ADSL switch on nearly 10 years ago.

Flagship product hides the truth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37622700)

It's all well and good having a flagship product likes this but most areas outside of cities struggle to get anything more than 1 Meg from BT.

Perhaps they should be focussing more on upgrading their ancient copper/aluminium wiring infrastructure outside of the cities so that everyone can benefit from improved broadband speeds rather than just showboating with products like this.

Does it even matter? (1)

merauder (518514) | more than 2 years ago | (#37622898)

Since by then we won't be able to do anything that would utilize those speeds anyway. The way things are going, everything will be locked down tight.

Re:Does it even matter? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623910)

Of course it matters! How can companies compete in the marketplace without being able to say they are "better" than their competition?
don't you watch the ads? "We can offer you X Mbps more than they can (pay no attention to the use meter in the lower right of your screen)."

Isn't it interesting that bandwidth caps weren't needed when people were restricted to how much they can download by the speed of their line?

so what ... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37622916)

these amazing download rates mean nothing if the servers you are downloading from are uploading slower than you are downloading....
35mbps from comcast and my youtube videos still stall from time to time...

Re:so what ... (2)

Pentium100 (1240090) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623008)

BitTorrent, on the other hand works just fine, especially when there are a lot of peers.

P2P sharing protocol? YOU PIRATE!!! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623818)

Yes, BT throttle BT. At least they don't quietly ignore it like TalkTalk does.

But you won't find many people able to use Bittorrent and they'll be on a 300/0.7Mbps connection, so you'd need around 500 people to share with (and nobody using their machine as a source) to max out.

Re:P2P sharing protocol? YOU PIRATE!!! (1)

Pentium100 (1240090) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623874)

That sucks, I have a 300/300 connection, when I manage to download a very popular torrent shortly after it is put on a public tracker (and does not have that many peer yet), my upload on that torrent alone reaches about 20MB/s, add the other torrents and it comes quite close to the advertised upload speed.

On the other hand, making the upload be that fast over a single TCP connection requires some tweaking of the TCP settings which require lots of restarts.

With a 300/0.7 connection you will never be able to achieve 300mbps download using TCP - there will be not enough bandwidth for ACK packets.

Re:so what ... (1)

Inda (580031) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624504)

So open more connections to different servers.

I (the family) have nine devices at home which connect to the internet

2 laptops
1 desktop
3 phones
1 TV
1 Xbox
1 Wii

It is unlikely all will be downloading at the same time, but not impossible.

I only have 30/3mbit and maxing it out is not hard.

Location, location! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623114)

"UK service provider BT has launched its Fibre to the Premises (FTTP) product, pledging it will offer downstream speeds of 300Mbps by spring next year. At present, the service can hit 110Mbps downstream speeds and will be available in just six locations from the end of October.

Six houses, huh? Those lucky dogs.

Throughput? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623148)

I wonder what the latency on the system will be like.
IMHO, I care more about speed than bandwidth.

Get me 30Mb/s first! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623168)

BT promised me FTTC by end of last month, now that date got moved to end of the year.
Guess if they promised 300Mb/s by 2012, we can expect it in 2099.

UK is decades behind the rest of central europe, and it's not because it's too expensive for BT as they announce profits and pay millions in dividans every year. Rich get richer, the poor sufffer longer.

Re:Get me 30Mb/s first! (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624116)

Virgin Media just rolled out 100Mb/s here (only 10Mb/s up though), and in most urban parts of the UK, so it's not like BT has no competition. I'm on their 10Mb/s plan at the moment, but I'm quite tempted by something with a bit more upstream.

Only a decade behind (1)

AmiMoJo (196126) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623226)

I have been waiting for FTTP for years after having used it in Japan years ago. If they manage to make it generally available by next year then we will be maintaining our position at about 10 years behind the leaders. Various European countries are 7 or 8 years ahead of us too.

I really frustrates me, and I'm not just talking about broadband. For example Dyson vacuum cleaners are often released in Japan a few years ahead of the UK, despite them being a UK product. Take the Dyson City for example, we got it about 24 months after Japan but still had to wait another couple of years to get the turbine head model. It seems to apply to absolutely everything, even ideas.

We used to lead the world in engineering and technology.

Re:Only a decade behind (1)

HopefulIntern (1759406) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623300)

We used to lead the world in engineering and technology.

When was this?? I was under the impression the UK creedo was "Older is better" or "innovation is scary" or "technology is unnecessary".

Re:Only a decade behind (1)

sgt101 (120604) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623440)

Well - you know; the industrial revolution thing; the development of aircraft thing (as in jet engines); the development of computing thing (colossus); anti-biotics and a few other bits and bobs.

Re:Only a decade behind (1)

HopefulIntern (1759406) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623624)

My response was more in jest, but you can't deny the very British notion of "we have always done it this way, why change?" such as when I noticed people burning garden waste in their gardens, or making a big gory game of hunting foxes, or tiny roads not suited for modern vehicles.

Re:Only a decade behind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623946)

Whilst I can understand your 1st gripe allow you your own thoughts on the 2nd - what the hell else do you expect our smaller roads to be as some are literally thousands of years old. Hell most of the big straight roads are built over roman roads (look on google maps at Slinfold just west in A29 - that is Stane street which was the roman road from Fishbourne roman palace home of client king Cogidubnus' to London), the windy little roads are grown up farm tracks and tend to have started as the easiest way from x to y on foot. I even heard a theory that the A303 for part of it's length follows a neolithic trackway that was itself based on earleir Reindeer migration routes

Re:Only a decade behind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37624152)

Jet-engines and anti-biotics were pioneered in Germany under ww2 and ww1 respectively.

Re:Only a decade behind (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623894)

We used to lead the world in engineering and technology.

When was this??

As recently as rocket technology. Stephenson's rocket [wikimedia.org] , to be precise.

Thats retardedly expensive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623350)

May i mention that in Hungary i pay 25$ for a 120/12 Mbit connection with no caps? And thats perfectly normal.

Re:Thats retardedly expensive (1)

Rising Ape (1620461) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624146)

So? It's not as if anyone's going to move to Hungary for an internet connecction.

And wages will be much smaller, it's not as if that means it'll be any more affordable in practice. Probably also why it's much cheaper to deploy.

Delaying FTTC (1)

abigsmurf (919188) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623626)

BT earmarked my town for Fibre to the Cabinet last November, now their current plans say it's going to be March. Deeply irritating.

That said, I'm incredibly close to my cabinet so when I finally do get it, I should get great speeds, 30mb+ hopefully.

Re:Delaying FTTC (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37624488)

FTTC speeds don't seem to degrade with distance from the cabinet as much as ADSL did, I'm about 200 yards from the cabinet and get close to 40mb/s.

Re:Delaying FTTC (1)

HopefulIntern (1759406) | more than 2 years ago | (#37625142)

I would not get my hopes up. Just because they are rolling out FTTC for your exchange does not mean they are bringing it to your cabinet. I recently was overjoyed that my exchange was getting FTTC, since my current speed sits at 0.5mbps. Upon further research it seemed they probably will not be bringing it to my cabinet. BT usually only provide FTTC to 40-50% of the cabs on the exchange.

Meh, why bother, BT? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623662)

You're only going to have to ban them all.

After all, what's the point of terrabytes of HDD space and a massive download rate if not to pirate movies?

For those that don't know already (1)

jimicus (737525) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623816)

BT is truly the master of disingenuous advertising, particularly when it comes to broadband speed and availability.

"FTTC" does not, for instance, mean "Fibre to the cabinet". It means "Fibre to some of the cabinets served by this particular telephone exchange. If your cabinet isn't one of them, sucks to be you."

Similarly "FTTP" means "We're running fibre out from the exchange to a limited area. If you happen to be lucky enough to be in that area, you can get fibre to the premises. Probably."

I predict BT will crow far and wide that they've got FTTP in every telephone exchange in the country by 2014, but that won't mean 300Mbps for all. Not by any stretch of the imagination.

Re:For those that don't know already (1)

Xugumad (39311) | more than 2 years ago | (#37623994)

Exactly. I hear a lot of about "Oh, the UK has such and such a speed" and "BT promises xyz".

Y'know what? I'm on an "up to" 24mbs line, which actually gives me 10mbs, BT provides "up to" 8mbs in this area, which is actually more like 2-4.

Yes, some areas get really really fast connections, but don't be fooled into thinking that this is UK-wide.

Re:For those that don't know already (1)

JasterBobaMereel (1102861) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624802)

Try Virgin - 2 Shops in Bournemouth (Large conurbation in UK) hawking broadband et al, I live within a few meters of the exchange in the centre of town, but "sorry we don't have cable to that road" ... i.e. the road with the telephone exchange in it ..!

The randomness of their coverage is odd beyond belief

sdsl (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37623842)

Meanwhile try getting 2mbps sdsl anywhere for less than GBP250 / USD390 per month.

BT are just milking the old cheap infrastructure for their own profits, fair enough, but there is little feasible competition and labour costs are far too expensive to overhaul the whole network. FTTC should have been a quick and easy solution with FTTP the longer term - but they can't even do that.

FFTF in Spain (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37624050)

In Spain some farmers are installing what they call "Fiber From The Farms".
That's it, they are buying fiber cables themselves (about 0.5 €/m they say) and installing them with their own means up to the closest neutral point.
They are buying 1Gbit for everyone interested (currently in the thousands) for ~400€/month (AFAIK) bypassing all ISP's (in essence they are their own ISP).
They are registered as a non-profit organization and as a legal ISP.

More info here [wikimedia.org] .

And free wi-fi... (1)

Geeky (90998) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624054)

The latest BT offering (infinity, I think they call it) gives speeds up to, I think, 40MB/s if your exchange and local cabinet support it. Part of that bandwidth is ringfenced off to provide a public wi-fi access point to other BT customers. The idea is that if you're a BT customer, you can use any of those hotspots from your phone/mobile device. If enough people sign up, you can probably find coverage in most streets.

I'm hoping they've got the security model locked down though, as I presume it's a condition of the deal that it's enabled.

Meanwhile in the countryside... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37624190)

...I'm still waiting for a stable 512kbps. Now before you all start with the "you chose to live there" malarky, my village is 10ish miles from Sheffield, and 15ish miles from Manchester, not exactly the middle of nowhere.

The problem is BT don't give a crap about telephone exchanges with less that a few thousand people being served by them. The headline exchanges in the big cities allow them to say that they offer up to a million gagillion so that people will be taken in by the marketing bollocks. Our exchange isn't LLU'd, competition is non-existant, and the copper cable hasn't been replaced for almost 50 years.

JT

Is this another void-where-prohibited "pledge"? (1)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624236)

You know, up to 300Mbs?

Wake me up when they offer binding contracts to provide minimum speeds. Until then, it's just marketwank.

However... (1)

symes (835608) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624538)

I had BT fibre to my place for a while. It was awesome and very reliable (one of the reasons why I went for it). But chatting to the engineer it turned out there is another reason why BT are keen to push forward with fibre - a certain section of the community are pinching copper wire. Fibre does not have much resale value, if any, and can last longer. I was near the sea and it turned out one reason why fibre was installed was because the original wiring was degrading faster than expected. So upgrading has other long-term benefits, other than the obvious.

WTF? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37624694)

So a real connection would be around 60Mbps? What the fuck are BT playing at offering assymetrical fibre... I've never heard anything so stupid! What's the contention ratio for this stupid product?

The cheapest way for businesses to send large amounts of data in the UK is to stick it on a hdd and send it via courier. What are BT doing about that?

Virgin do me nicely... (1)

adycarter (261257) | more than 2 years ago | (#37624734)

30mb/3mb connection with Virgin. £27 a month with no need for a phone line or paying any form of "line rental" to BT, infact I dont even have a phone line in the building.

Their trafic management policy is nicely listed here:
http://shop.virginmedia.com/help/traffic-management/traffic-management-faster-uploads.html [virginmedia.com]

I get on average 33mb down and 3.1mb up according to speedtest.net if I manage to hit their cap in the evening (OnLive uses about 2.5gb per 30mins) then I get throttled down to 7.5mb which to be fair is way more than anyone round here gets on BT anyways.

Its rarely down and always works nicely, problem for most people is down to their cable network not covering most places, if you're lucky enough to get it then get it...

Re:Virgin do me nicely... (1)

FireFury03 (653718) | more than 2 years ago | (#37625232)

30mb/3mb connection with Virgin. £27 a month with no need for a phone line or paying any form of "line rental" to BT, infact I dont even have a phone line in the building.

Unfortunately, to my knowledge they still don't offer static IPv4 addresses or small IPv4 subnets. (Yes, I know they do "mostly static" addresses, but having an address that *might* change without notice really isn't good enough). Also, I believe they have gone on record stating that they have no intention of rolling out IPv6 any time soon. So for now I'll stick with my dual-stacked connection over ADSL.

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