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HADOPI To Disconnect 60 People In France

samzenpus posted about 3 years ago | from the no-internet-for-you dept.

Censorship 255

bs0d3 writes "Today in France under the new HADOPI law, 60 people have received their third strike and are facing disconnection from the internet. The first 60 may only be the beginning. 650,000 people have received their first strikes, and 44,000 are on their second."

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255 comments

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There were supposed to be 61... (4, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623054)

...but they haven't caught me ye^#a$s%!_5%j~NO CARRIER

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (2, Insightful)

Elbereth (58257) | about 3 years ago | (#37623142)

That "NO CARRIER" thing hasn't been funny in 20 years.

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (1, Offtopic)

toQDuj (806112) | about 3 years ago | (#37623174)

Hear, Hear. It wasn't even funny when it was a real message on my terminal screen. ...

Fuck, I'm getting old.

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623276)

Yes, you're getting ve/()#&/#()&")"!/(!"()))==\+\ NO CARRIER

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 3 years ago | (#37623284)

Especially with IPoAC you tend to run out of carriers quickly.

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (1, Offtopic)

malkavian (9512) | about 3 years ago | (#37624156)

Informative Post over Anonymous Coward?

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (2, Funny)

AbRASiON (589899) | about 3 years ago | (#37623472)

Yes it has, stop posting.

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (0)

m50d (797211) | about 3 years ago | (#37623822)

Your mom hasn't been funny in 20 years

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37624048)

You should try it...

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (2)

geekmux (1040042) | about 3 years ago | (#37624102)

That "NO CARRIER" thing hasn't been funny in 20 years.

Not to mention watching an entire generation trying to figure out what the hell that means or grasp the concept of being disconnected at any time as they read this from the top of a mountain in the middle of nowhere from their 3G cell phone...

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623184)

Don't read this... it is a curse...

In 2006, a little boy named Zach was sitting in the back seat of his mother's car whilst they were driving home from the grocery store. In his arms, he held a ventriloquist dummy named Slappy. Zach was rocking Slappy back and forth in his arms as if Slappy was a baby. Then, suddenly, he tried to throw Slappy out the window. However, Slappy latched onto the side of the car and climbed back in faster than Zach could even believe! Zach apologized profusely and Slappy eventually forgave him.

Then, when Zach finally arrived home, he somehow locked Slappy in his mom's car, ran up on his porch, and then proceeded to point at Slappy and laugh at the seemingly hopeless situation that he was in. This action proved to be a mistake, however. In an event that completely took Zach by surprise, Slappy turned into a twinkling star that couldn't have been much bigger than a few inches, flew directly through the car door, and then went right into Zach's bootyass!

Still stunned at this unexpected development, Zach heard Slappy saying, from the inside of his bootyass, "Iiiiiiit's suuuuuuuuuuuppeeeer tiiiiiiiiiiiiiiime!" Then, before Zach could even react to those malice-filled words, Slappy began saying, "rarara!" Slappy was consuming all of the feces in Zach's bootyass, inflicting major tickle upon it! Zach, in a desperate attempt to make the tickle stop, ran into his mom's garden and began rubbing dirt in his face. The tickle, however, only worsened...

Now that you have read this (even a single word of it), Slappy will turn into a twinkling star, fly into your bootyass, and then consume all of the feces inside it (inflicting major tickle upon your bootyass)! To prevent this from happening, post this curse as a comment three times.

Re:There were supposed to be 61... (0)

MacTO (1161105) | about 3 years ago | (#37623512)

I guess they were too busy laughing at you downloading music with a 9600 bps modem to disconnect you.

Angry Voters (5, Interesting)

rtb61 (674572) | about 3 years ago | (#37623062)

650,000 warnings, that 650,000 people so far who are very unlikely to vote for Scarsleezy who snuck the law in with no public review. Guess who is going to lose the next election big time and what law will be changed by the next incoming President to ensure an extended political career.

Re:Angry Voters (3, Insightful)

master5o1 (1068594) | about 3 years ago | (#37623078)

I think that's being just a tad too optimistic.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | about 3 years ago | (#37623292)

Indeed, the French pirate party split in 3 and then merged again. Not exactly the best strategy to convince people to vote for you...

Re:Angry Voters (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 3 years ago | (#37623352)

Indeed, the French pirate party split in 3 and then merged again. Not exactly the best strategy to convince people to vote for you...

Maybe they can attract Catholics that way. After all, now they are also a trinity. :-)

Re:Angry Voters (0)

MysteriousPreacher (702266) | about 3 years ago | (#37623924)

Maybe they can attract Catholics that way. After all, now they are also a trinity. :-)

NAMBLA, if they had a French office, would appear a better option for Catholics looking to form a coalition.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | about 3 years ago | (#37623554)

Anyway, without a proportional vote like in Germany and with such a high barrier to get reimbursed in your election costs (To get public funding you need 5% of votes vs 0.7% in Germany) there is no chance at all that the pirate party gets a good score ever.

In France, the way to fame is through the presidential election : candidates have to be given equal time in the media. But the PP decided not to go.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

Yvanhoe (564877) | about 3 years ago | (#37623522)

Sarkozy will probably not be reelected. Polls are very bad for him. his party has tried to seduce the internet crowd a bit last year but apparently decided that it is definitely lost to them (and rightly so). They simply do not understand this network of tube through which computers communicate with each other.

Re:Angry Voters (0)

Alarash (746254) | about 3 years ago | (#37623082)

I didn't (and won't) vote for Sarkozy, and I hate that law, but it was not "snuck in." There was no public debate, true, and RIAA-like types did give free music download coupons and that sort of things to the deputies, but in the end it was a democratic vote where the majority (held by Sarkozy's party, the UMP) won. This is democracry or, rather, oligarchy, but you can't say it was "snuck in."

Re:Angry Voters (4, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623154)

Not quite. I believe the law was passes very late at night, after they'd indicated that no further voting would be performed until the next day. The opposition had called it a night and left.

Re:Angry Voters (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623780)

those dirty bastards!

Re:Angry Voters (2)

rtb61 (674572) | about 3 years ago | (#37623176)

Did not not make it to the end of the article http://www.techdirt.com/articles/20110906/14595315829/sarkozy-routes-around-parliament-ditches-net-neutrality-forces-copyright-clauses-into-all-isp-terms-service.shtml [techdirt.com] . "Sarkozy Routes Around Parliament, Ditches Net Neutrality, Forces Copyright Clauses Into All ISP Terms Of Service" that's the headline from linked to at the bottom of the article. Don't forget that's 650,000 households, 650,000 families and those families of course will have relatives and other associations beyond that and the law isn't even a month old, youch.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

Robert Zenz (1680268) | about 3 years ago | (#37623782)

...that's the headline from linked to at the bottom of the article.

Headlines do not count. There was once a headline in the "Heute"-Newspaper here in Austria, (poorly translated by me) "Boy hit by subway". So, what are the first thoughts you have? A child being overrun by the subway because it fell on the tracks? Well, a little bit off...it was a 22-year old which was too dumb to get behind the orange line and got streaked by the train (broken arm).

Re:Angry Voters (2)

Joce640k (829181) | about 3 years ago | (#37623650)

There was no public debate, true, and RIAA-like types did give free music download coupons and that sort of things to the deputies,

Is that all it takes to buy a law in France...?

Re:Angry Voters (2)

tragedy (27079) | about 3 years ago | (#37623138)

That's about 1% of the population of France. It seems pretty likely that those people will eventually get their third strike, but 1% of the population isn't really enough. To get the kind of network effects that would turn outrage over this into an actual movement, you'd have to hit something like 10%. Plus, since those people would be having their voice in modern society crippled by being disconnected from the Internet, it would be even harder for them. Just try to organise any sort of large movement in this day and age without Internet access.

Re:Angry Voters (4, Interesting)

Zocalo (252965) | about 3 years ago | (#37623190)

True, 650,000 is about 1% of the population. However that's not 650,000 people that have recieved HADOPI warning letters, it's 650,000 households. Figure an average of two adults plus a good chance of a late teenager about to get the right to vote and you could be looking at 1.5 million people on the first step towards disconnection. Then there's student digs and bedsits where you could potentially be looking at five or more people on a shared connection - France has a large population of immigrants from across the EU and Northern Africa so I'd imagine the actual number of individuals might be much higher.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

ArsenneLupin (766289) | about 3 years ago | (#37623310)

Plus, count friends and families of those who received letters. You can bet this conversation will come up during lots of meals and drinks. If you personally know somebody who got struck by this asinine law, it's much easier to get worked up against it than if you just read in an anonymous blog about it.

My suspicion (1)

way2trivial (601132) | about 3 years ago | (#37624194)

is that it's 650,000 households with a very late teen/young adult still at home and responsible for the warning.

I also wager this therefore represents 650,000 young adults that will vote to oust the lawmakers involved.
countered by 1,300,000 parents to vote back in the lawmakers involved, to get junior the hell out of the house/basement....

Re:Angry Voters (1)

toQDuj (806112) | about 3 years ago | (#37623194)

Sure, but I cannot imagine the music industry letting it get too large, fearing a backlash. Now, it's just a fringe of the populace which has been caught, enough so you have a friend of a friend who got a message, but not enough that you have mass disconnects. If the group is small enough, you will never consider yourself a possible member.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

Serpents (1831432) | about 3 years ago | (#37624222)

Sure, but I cannot imagine the music industry letting it get too large, fearing a backlash.

Really? Judging by the blanket lawsuits some copyright owners filed in th US and now in Australia they seem to think that it's "the more the merrier"

Re:Angry Voters (1)

luminousone11 (2472748) | about 3 years ago | (#37623206)

1% of households more likely, so triple to quadruple that 1% to the actual number of people effected by the law, Also note that people most effected by the law are likely of voting age, along with plenty of non-directly effected people who can see the effects of this law by observation of those that are effected. I would bet after you weight some of these factors in that you have closer to that 10% you speak of, and if you count it based on voting eligible it is likely higher.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

Kjella (173770) | about 3 years ago | (#37623222)

Yes, it's about 1% of the population but about 2.5% of all households. Pretty much everyone will know someone, friends or family who has gotten such a notice. I would guess those that are first hit are those renting out apartments, typically the internet subscription is in the name of the one renting out while the tenants are doing the infringing. That should quickly escalate to a debate where the person disconnected is not the "bad guy" nor are most of the tenants. My prediction is that this will turn into a PR mess soon.

Re:Angry Voters (2, Insightful)

BlackCreek (1004083) | about 3 years ago | (#37623588)

I live in France, and don't know of any one who's got that letter. I think a lot of people in my age and income bracket would be embarrassed to mention they got suck a letter.

What _really_ sucks (not only in France, but in most of Europe AFAIK) is that I have no way of easily renting/buying videos through the internet. All choices I've looked at had a really old and incomplete catalogue. Last I tried to check that was in the beginning of the year, and all alternatives sucked big. I live in Paris (i.e. square meters cost a lot), there is no way I will pile up DVDs in the house.

I can understand that French parliament was lead (read: bought) into writing this legislation, but I really can't understand they did that without requiring the industry to put a legal alternative in place.

Re:Angry Voters (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37624042)

What _really_ sucks (not only in France, but in most of Europe AFAIK) is that I have no way of easily renting/buying videos through the internet. All choices I've looked at had a really old and incomplete catalogue. Last I tried to check that was in the beginning of the year, and all alternatives sucked big. I live in Paris (i.e. square meters cost a lot), there is no way I will pile up DVDs in the house.

In Finland several companies try to push such services down our throats all the time...

Edit:
Oh, dear, the captcha is "prison", is it an omen? ;)

Re:Angry Voters (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37624068)

they're politicians under the industry's pressure

they don't *care* if you understand.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about 3 years ago | (#37624164)

These days even a mediocre computer can rip a DVD and make an MPEG4 file. Maybe you should organize a DVD-borrowing society. What you do with the disc while you have it is your business.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | about 3 years ago | (#37623356)

Serious questions about this law: is it connection based, or account holder based? How's the disconnection work?

In case of the first: how about you're disconnected, a month later move out, then new tenant/owner of the place remains disconnected?

In case of the second: you're landlord and account holder of the Internet connection of the flat you let out, tenant downloads stuff, gets three strikes, and gets disconnected, will they also disconnect your personal connection?

Also these disconnections, how long are they supposed to last? Is there a time span for it? All I hear is "offenders will be disconnected" but not for how long, suggesting it's a life time ban.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

klapaucjusz (1167407) | about 3 years ago | (#37624084)

Serious questions about this law: is it connection based, or account holder based?

Subscriber based -- the disconnection is linked to the real-world identity of the subscriber. (In France, you cannot even buy a pre-paid telephone SIM without showing id.)

In case of the second: you're landlord and account holder of the Internet connection of the flat you let out, tenant downloads stuff, gets three strikes, and gets disconnected, will they also disconnect your personal connection?

In principle, yes.

You may want to read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HADOPI [wikipedia.org] .

--jch

Re:Angry Voters (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37624134)

"(1) An email message is sent to the offending internet access subscriber, derived from the IP address involved in the claim. The email specifies the time of the claim but neither the object of the claim nor the identity of the claimant."
 
I assume that depriving the accused of information is a measure to keep them from trying to appeal. If they don't know what they did, how can they say they didn't do it?

Re:Angry Voters (4, Interesting)

Coeurderoy (717228) | about 3 years ago | (#37623606)

Unfortunatelly no, that is about 550 000 people who didn't see the first letter (was sent to the wrong email address)
90 000 who didn't read it (many people bellow 20 only use IM)
5 000 who do not care and would not vote anyway
2500 who would not have voted Sarcosy anyway
2000 who would vote for sarcosy despite this because they consider it little more than a parking fine..
500 might change their vote maybe if they can bother about it...

Moreover the "socialist" (about as socialist as the US democrats are democratic or the republican are republican, that is very little)
did not really fight the HADOPI, they did some populist show about a "global licence" from their "left wing" (that would be an ISP tax that would give a licence to copy, but only music not movies, so would have solved about nothing), but in reality they are thick in bed with UNIVERSAL...

When we did a "demonstration" against DADVSI only 400 people came, for HADOPI we didn't even bother...
We are living in a situation where government make laws that criminalize people but in a way that enforcement can be completelly arbitrary, it's very convenient, "everybody is guilty of something" we can arrest them whenever we want to... what fun...

Re:Angry Voters (1)

Pi1grim (1956208) | about 3 years ago | (#37623798)

When those 550 000 get their internet connection cut off it won't matter if they received the first letter warning or not. And, actually, for a person who got cut off the internet lifting this bas is actually quite a good reason to go vote for the first guy who promises to lift it and remove this law. Hitting 2.5% of the households is not bad. When people get hit where it hurts — it's more probable that they will start acting. Heck, if the RIAA sued every student that ever downloaded MP3 for millions of dollars, not just several of them — we would see the RIAA smashed in several month. The only reason why we have copyright lobby stomping all over people's rights is because noone cares untill it knocks on the door and so far it still hadn't knocked.

Re:Angry Voters (1)

Coeurderoy (717228) | about 3 years ago | (#37623856)

So do not worry they will only knock after the next election, and I doubt very much that the result of the next election has any credible way to change this.

Re:Angry Voters (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37624014)

No need to wait for the next election, just wait half a year. By then we'll be seeing France trying to force a ISP bailout as all their carriers start facing bankrupcy due to... not having any customers.

Just wait... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623076)

... for the first politician to get his third strike.

Oh, who am I kidding.

MPAA's Three Strikes (5, Informative)

Sasayaki (1096761) | about 3 years ago | (#37623120)

Strike 1: http://gizmodo.com/329648/mpaas-university-toolkit-taken-down-for-violating-copyright [gizmodo.com]
Strike 2: http://torrentfreak.com/mpaa-steals-code-violates-linkware-license/ [torrentfreak.com]
Strike 3: http://www.amdzone.com/phpbb3/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=95638 [amdzone.com]

BOOM!

No more MPAA! They're offline forever! After all, the law is just and equal and fair and blind, right? And the MPAA -- the people who, let's face it, basically *wrote* this law -- should be held to the highest standard themselves. They, more than anyone else, cannot call it a youthful mistake, or a silly error in judgement, or ignorance or anything else... they have zero excuse and so accordingly they will be punished for their obvious and flagrant transgressions!

Right? ... right?

Re:MPAA's Three Strikes (0)

Jbcarpen (883850) | about 3 years ago | (#37623208)

Oh for mod points. Someone mod them up please.

Friend to sign up /mobile internet /Human Rights (1)

dredwerker (757816) | about 3 years ago | (#37623134)

Surely you get a friend or relative to sign up for the connection. Also what happens if you work from home ? What Internet on your phone? Pay as you go etc.. Then I can see a human rights problem, if a cat gets you to say in the UK surely the Internet and connectivity in general will be an abuse of human rights :) Then there is open wifi etc.. Community wifi for banned people :)

Re:Friend to sign up /mobile internet /Human Right (1)

Dark Lord of Ohio (2459854) | about 3 years ago | (#37623200)

Surely you get a friend or relative to sign up for the connection. Also what happens if you work from home ? What Internet on your phone? Pay as you go etc.. Then I can see a human rights problem, if a cat gets you to say in the UK surely the Internet and connectivity in general will be an abuse of human rights :) Then there is open wifi etc.. Community wifi for banned people :)

I am not sure they are able to ban these people permanently or put hard limitations for Internet users. Internet is too decentralized for one governmental entity to control it, so until there is no Thought Police there is no danger for freedom of the internet. But, someday one government may break the thin line between democracy and totalitarism and will cut all the cables. Look what happened in Libya or Egipt. They shut down internet services but somehow still were able to communicate with the "outside" world. But this requires more just a few bad men.

Re:Friend to sign up /mobile internet /Human Right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623268)

The cat thing is getting annoying. Don't believe everything you hear/read. That stupid woman ranting about how a cat allows an illegal immigrant to stay in the UK is just trying to scare the public about how bad the Human Rights Act is. There is a lot more to the story than a cat.

Re:Friend to sign up /mobile internet /Human Right (1)

wvmarle (1070040) | about 3 years ago | (#37623336)

Anonymous pre-paid Internet. Hard to send account owner a notice; even harder to have them disconnected let alone keep them disconnected (the latter of course being the actual punishment).

Anonymity is dead (1)

stooo (2202012) | about 3 years ago | (#37623362)

Only surveillance remains. You are not anonymous. You are tracked by your own technology.

Re:Friend to sign up /mobile internet /Human Right (1)

__Paul__ (1570) | about 3 years ago | (#37623550)

If I remember correctly, you can't get an anonymous pre-paid card in France - you need to provide a passport or other ID when you buy it.

And that said - France's prepaid plans are utterly shite. Possibly the worst in Europe. The only card that is even vaguely worth the money is one from Orange, and they have very onerous conditions attached, including blocking SMTP/POP and disallowing tethering - with the possibility that they'll null all your credit if they catch you doing it (not sure how they can tell, though).

Re:Friend to sign up /mobile internet /Human Right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623574)

Unless it is a wireless internet, at some point that account is going to be terminated at a fixed address.
Kind of hard to be anonymous unless you pay cash for rent and not having *any* mail/package delivered.
Think utility/credit card/bank bills.

Re:Friend to sign up /mobile internet /Human Right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623446)

You say that this is a human rights issue, but I fail to see how this is any worse than the million dollar fines and blackmail going on in the United States of America.

Yes, losing your internet connection for a month and a 1500 Euro fine would be a hassle, but it would not be the life crushing burden of paying back the exorbitant fines imposed by the US courts, nor the immediate $3000-$5000 settlement letter other companies would hit you with.

Re:Friend to sign up /mobile internet /Human Right (1)

91degrees (207121) | about 3 years ago | (#37623982)

It's curious how

"This is a real relationship! We love each other dearly, and have made a life here. We have friends and are part of the community. This is our home. We even have a cat!"

Gets reduced to "I must be allowed to stay because I have a cat".

My roleks (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623136)

My Roleks wrist watch was about $10, but original Rolex is about $8000. Does that mean i stole $8000 from Rolex, because that's a sale they didn't make?

Re:My roleks (2)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 3 years ago | (#37623314)

My Roleks wrist watch was about $10, but original Rolex is about $8000. Does that mean i stole $8000 from Rolex, because that's a sale they didn't make?

Of course. Also, by buying the Roleks, you helped the manufacturer to build even more Roleks watches, thus increasing the damage. Also, since you wear that Roleks watch, people who see it might be led to buy one, too. So I'm sure the WWAA (Wrist Watch Association of America) will sue you for about $100 billion.

Oh, wait, make that $200 billion, because you posted on Slashdot about it.

Re:My roleks (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623766)

Don't forget all the terrorism, human trafficking and child porn he supports by buying a Roleks!

This is rediculous (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623152)

You can't possibly allow people to be permenently disconnected from the internet. To me personally, that is denial of freedoms. We couldn't enjoy things like Facebook. By the way if your a developer on fb right now you can actually change your facebook profile covers [myprofilecovers.com]

Re:This is rediculous (1)

Rosco P. Coltrane (209368) | about 3 years ago | (#37623238)

You can't possibly allow people to be permenently disconnected from the internet. To me personally, that is denial of freedoms. We couldn't enjoy things like Facebook.

I would think any law forcing people out of Facebook is a good law.

Perhaps you should have used denied access to Wikipedia as an example of a true loss in the lives of HADOPI victims instead...

Re:This is rediculous (1)

Kjella (173770) | about 3 years ago | (#37623354)

Wikipedia? Nice, but hardly required. Granted, Norway is really high up there on online banking but I'd go nuts just paying bills. I had to fix some complicated paperwork so instead of a lot of back and forth and verified copies and whatnot I figured I'd just drop by the bank. For one, almost all the local branches are gone because just do it online. You can find ATMs to take money out and almost all have their paycheck electronically deposited, but to find an actual cashier where you can pay a bill is practically gone. When I finally dug one up, the queue was forever, the clientel left who didn't pay their bills online dubious and the fees asoociated with it outragous. Expect paying anywhere between $5 and $8 in fees per bill you pay manually. Anything and everything about it screams "Please don't come here, go online and do it". I suppose you could find a web cafe as your "bank", but with everyone having Internet at home and on their phones they're going the way of the payphone too. I'd probably end up doing my banking at McDonalds in exchange for a burger, how fucked up is that? No Internet is like banning you from streets because streets have stores and you were caught shoplifting in one of them. Not that copyright infringement is equal to stealing in any case. The only thing I hope is that this is some weird French thing that hopefully won't spread anywhere else.

Re:This is rediculous (1)

maxwell demon (590494) | about 3 years ago | (#37623390)

You can find ATMs to take money out and almost all have their paycheck electronically deposited, but to find an actual cashier where you can pay a bill is practically gone.

Here in Germany, many ATMs allow to make payments as well. Also, I can send in my payment orders by (non-electronic) mail.

I suppose you could find a web cafe as your "bank", but with everyone having Internet at home and on their phones they're going the way of the payphone too.

With everyone carrying a laptop, smartphone or similar computer with him, I guess access points will remain common. What will likely become rare is the cafe also providing the actual computers.

Can't stop everyone (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623172)

Now watch as there will be a sudden increase of Backtrack downloads from France IP's.

Satellite (1)

argee (1327877) | about 3 years ago | (#37623216)

I can predict the future: A Satellite Internet Provider is going to gain 60 new customers.

I, for one, find this a welcome development (1, Funny)

93 Escort Wagon (326346) | about 3 years ago | (#37623252)

Let's face it - this is France we're talking about, so some significant percentage of these people adore Jerry Lewis. That, in and of itself, is worthy of a lifetime ban from all internet activity. Heck, those people should be required never to interact with another human being again.

Re:I, for one, find this a welcome development (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623322)

Please, next time, go buy a brain to the nearest store before posting. :-D

Silly (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623272)

The question is how many of those 650,000 are high-profile people (eg people who definitely could afford it, but are too lazy and/or cheap to) eventually reach the third strike.

As for "what was stolen" this is often a straw argument to deflect the blame.

With physical media, making a copy, is often a labour intensive process, it only became cheap with the advent of the printing press, and subsequent technology. So back when copyright laws were invented, there was still a time and effort required to copy anything, so making copies of something someone else made required access to the original item and significant amount of time to produce a copy.

We hit the slippery slope with the advent of cheaply produced CD and DVD's. The cost to make a CD or DVD is in the pennies, but the time to produce the original work is extremely high. The time to produce a copy? a few seconds. How else would China get away with copying all of Disney's films and putting them into a 110disc box to sell it for 50$? Look around, you'll find most of the chinese piracy is for popular TV shows and movies that aren't yet available legally, or in the case of EU and AU, only available in the US. The region coding system has in fact increased piracy (because chinese produced counterfeits are all region 0, and NA/JP/EU/AU players will all play region 0 discs, oops someone didn't think region codes through very much.)

So who loses money when people pirate using the internet? You may laugh, but it's other pirates. The people who pirate TV shows, DVD's and games are all cheap bastards who weren't going to buy it anyway, but the instant-availability of this stuff on the internet means only really stupid people buy chinese bootleg copies. So that's actually more of a win. The difficulty is getting people to pay for the content instead of simply pirating it.

So how do you do that? You don't. Not directly anyway. What you instead do is appeal directly to the fans (eg the very people who buy the product) to pre-order/pre-pay in advance to first to see/watch/listen/play, Once enough pre-orders are queued to produce, make sure the costs are all fixed, and go. All purchases after-the-fact are then considered gravy. If your product stinks, people won't order the next one. Simple as that. Start with digital distribution and produce physical media only while there is a demand for it.

So that's what needs to happen, is that the business model needs to change from "large investment, and attempt to recoup costs with sales" to "pre-budget the investment, rewarding the investors first", removing most of the middle-men in the process.

It just begs for civil disobedience. (2)

sanermind (512885) | about 3 years ago | (#37623290)

Myself, I generally don't bother to pirate things much... but if anyone pulled that sort of nonsense, I'd be seriously tempted to start downloading crap left and right, and encourage all of my friends to do so as well.

Let's see them kick -everybody- off the internet, and see how that works, hmmm?

Resilient Network (1)

stooo (2202012) | about 3 years ago | (#37623388)

Build a public open Wifi network. It can withstand a loss of nodes.

Oi, French, civil disobedience! Now! (4, Interesting)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | about 3 years ago | (#37623304)

All 650,000 people on your first strike, please proceed to your second. The 44,000 on your second, proceed to your third. The rest of you, endeavour to earn your first over the coming weeks.

Come on, France. You still understand the effectiveness of collective withdrawal of labour. So call the government on its own foolishness by forcing the law to take steps which withdraws you from effective contribution to the country. Do not stop until you can proudly call yourself the nation with the most people individually forbidden from using the Internet.

First, other countries will laugh at you. Then your businessmen will realise what they've just done to their chances to make money. Then your government will listen to that whispering, gold-plated voice in their ear and the law will be repealed. Foreign governments and business will realise what will happen if this sort of law is enacted in their own precious fiefdoms and global attitudes will start to change.

But you have to start yourselves by taking a risk and standing up.

Thank you.

Re:Oi, French, civil disobedience! Now! (1)

sanermind (512885) | about 3 years ago | (#37623326)

(I was first... lol)

Re:Oi, French, civil disobedience! Now! (0)

sanermind (512885) | about 3 years ago | (#37623374)

MOD PARENT UP! Seriously.

Re:Oi, French, civil disobedience! Now! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623716)

This is France. If they're upset by it, they will block the ports and burn cars in the street. The French know how to riot.

Human Right (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623324)

The UN declared internet access a human right:
http://www.osnews.com/story/24821

Re:Human Right (1)

ThePhilips (752041) | about 3 years ago | (#37623546)

Inapplicable. Criminals commonly lose some of their human rights, while making up for their crimes.

Another question is whether the government does really want to turn a sizable chunk of the populace into criminals. After all, if a person crossed the line once, crossing it again becomes much less of a moral issue.

Re:Human Right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623652)

Inapplicable.

This is wrong. You need to look up the definition of 'right' asap. It is an important word to know in this world.

Criminals commonly lose some of their human rights, while making up for their crimes.

You can not lose a right. You are correct that many countries violate the UN's definition of human rights, but it still pulls a lot of weight.

Re:Human Right (5, Insightful)

91degrees (207121) | about 3 years ago | (#37623664)

The right to a fair public trial is also a human right as well though, and these alleged criminals didn't get one.

Article 10: "Everyone is entitled in full equality to a fair and public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him."

Re:Human Right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623836)

Except it's not a "criminal" charge, it's a misdemeanor. And they have the way speed tickets are handled for automatic radars as a precedent for punishment without court.

Re:Human Right (1)

91degrees (207121) | about 3 years ago | (#37623944)

If it's not a criminal charge, then there's no justification to take the rights away.

You can't have it both ways. Either it's a criminal charge and requires a fair and public trial before the right to an internet connection is taken away, or they haven't committed a criminal act so still have the basic human right to an internet connection.

Re:Human Right (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37624004)

Where does it say this is a criminal penalty?

I would have thought without being convicted of a crime it could only be considered a civil penalty.

As such exclusion from some human rights would surely not apply.

put on hold (1)

jevring (618916) | about 3 years ago | (#37623364)

Wasn't the enforcement of this law put on hold due to some irregularities with the company collecting the data to base these things on?

To quote Shao Kahn (1)

deimios666 (1040904) | about 3 years ago | (#37623384)

It has BEGUN!

Re:To quote Shao Kahn (1)

Sodki (621717) | about 3 years ago | (#37623828)

Actually, it was Shang Tsung. Big Fail.

Big foot (-1, Offtopic)

cviuan (2477406) | about 3 years ago | (#37623464)

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Re:Big foot (1)

qxcv (2422318) | about 3 years ago | (#37623586)

Why can't you be banned from the Internet?

Re:Big foot (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623752)

Why? look at where he is hosted
http://www.robtex.com/ip/66.147.244.85.html [robtex.com]
Since when has America taken spam seriously ?

I wonder (1)

Anarchduke (1551707) | about 3 years ago | (#37623478)

I everyone connected to the internet in France were to willingly violate 3 times as a form of protest, would the suddenly bankrupt ISP's in France look at reversing the law?

Re:I wonder (1)

Chatterton (228704) | about 3 years ago | (#37623646)

They will not go bankrupt because they also do phone and TV on the link. They will cut the Internet transfert but not the 2 others and thus keep some revenue stream. And to be checked: They could keep all their revenue stream as they still provide TV and phone on the link saying the internet is gratis if the customers take the phone and the TV...

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623792)

That's providing that you actually have the TV and land line phone. I personally dont have tv over several years now and i dont suffer from that, I never had landline phone to begin with.
GTFO from /. you are not nerd enough!

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623882)

That is even worse than that. People with a pure internet connection (no phone nor tv) will be disconnected but the contract with their provider will remain valid and so they will have to pay for nothing until they are eventually reconnected.

Re:I wonder (2)

UnoriginalBoringNick (1562311) | about 3 years ago | (#37623774)

From the translation of the Hadopi law (provided here: http://www.laquadrature.net/wiki/HADOPI_full_translation [laquadrature.net] )

"Art. L. 331-30. - The suspension of access mentioned in articles L. 331-27 and L. 331-28 does not, in itself, affect paying the price of subscription to the service provider. Article L. 121-84 of the consumer code does not apply during the period of suspension.

"The costs of a possible closure of the subscription during the period of suspension are born by the subscriber.

"The suspension applies only to access to public on line communication services and to electronic communications. When this access service is purchased as part of commercial composite services including other types of services, such as telephone or television services, the decision of suspension does not apply to these services.

... So I think the ISPs are covered.

Re:I wonder (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623848)

And download the same thing, maybe that show where they cut off the heads of the nobles.

Re:I wonder (1)

Narishma (822073) | about 3 years ago | (#37623866)

People disconnected will still continue to pay their ISP contract.

RE: Tools (2)

Archon-X (264195) | about 3 years ago | (#37623594)

I know a few people who have received their first strikes. For what it's worth, they were using eMule to get themselves nabbed.

Seems strangely obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37623940)

Well if people don't consume content they're not entitled to, they won't have to run the risk of disconnection. If the content is good enough to consume, it's good enough to pay for. If it's not good enough to pay for or too expensive, why are you bothering with it? The consumer doesn't have the right to dictate the value of content to the content creators other than by feedback in the form of purchasing decisions.

i'd prefer to see the rights holders taking people to claims court instead, but piracy is so widespread I can see why this has happened. You reap what you sow - try not pirating things, it's surprisingly easy.

vpn time (1)

jupiter126 (2471462) | about 3 years ago | (#37623956)

People receiving their first advice probably will punish their children, kick intruders out of their wifi or look for alternatives either changing protocols (http, torrent, ftp, irc, ...) or hiding trough proxies, TOR or VPN's. People receiving their second advice are already more likely of knowing what's happening and why they receive it, they are also probably starting to consider paying an anomiser/VPN service. People disconnected after 3 warnings probably know what they are doing wrong and how they do it. They are pissed off from being cut off the internet, and most probably will try to seek revenge in some way against the one responsible for their cut off (ISP, political party, ...). Although I think this law is abusive, without wanting it, Hadopi is a great way to push users towards securing their communications and greatly contributes towards the concept of anonymity on internet on a large scale. Not only will geeks, corps, govs and criminals use 4096 bit rsa vpn's, but the average "joe" in his garage will now also want to use it. This is gonna be fun to decrypt : enjoy :p

Increased popularity in darknets (1)

gellenburg (61212) | about 3 years ago | (#37624026)

The only thing laws like this will do is force I2P and Freenet to become more popular.

Which — ironically — is a blessing for those that use both of those services as it would make both of those networks more robust and viable.

LOL (1)

koan (80826) | about 3 years ago | (#37624066)

Yes I LOL'ed, how long will this stupidity last? Until they are out of business?

Socialist primary candidate to keep 3-strike (2)

Balaitous (126540) | about 3 years ago | (#37624088)

The info about the 60 people at 3rd signaling is a week old. Latest news is that François Hollande, a Socialist (main opposition party) primary candidate leading the polls, has announced in a film industry lobby meeting that he will keep the HADOPI including the repressive part [numerama.com] , just "adapting" it. That's contrary to his party programme and we will see how that fares in the primary and later.
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