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Don't read this... it is a curse... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659228)

In 1995, a little boy named Tom was playing with his toys in his living room. After about 15 minutes of playing, a tiny little man walked up to him and said, "May I explore the mazes of your bootyass?" Tom, surprised by this sudden occurrence, remained speechless.

After thirty seconds passed, the little man asked the exact same question that he asked previously. This time, Tom asked the little man why he would want to do such a thing. The little man said, "Because I want to explore every maze inside your bootyass." Tom, sensing no bad intentions from the little man, nodded and said, "Well, all right. But no tickle! If there's any tickle, I'll smoosh ya!" The little man nodded his head and was sucked into Tom's bootyass as if his bootyass was a gigantic spaghetti noodle.

Tom was beginning to have second thoughts about letting the little man explore the mazes of his bootyass, but he just shrugged them off. He thought, "What harm could allowing that nice, charismatic little man explore the mazes of my bootyass bring? He was so nice, charismatic, and thoughtful. I made the right choice."

However, soon enough, he discovered that he was terribly wrong. Suddenly, he was looking into his own bootyass as if he was looking through a security camera. Inside, he spotted the little man and numerous round doorways made out of bootyass; it looked like an endless maze. To Tom's surprise, the little man suddenly transformed into a red toy carrying a gigantic sack over his shoulders and began walking towards the smallest doorway of them all! "That sack will never fit through that doorway!", Tom thought.

The toy continued onwards, and eventually the sack got stuck inside the small doorway in Tom's bootyass. The toy, visibly angry, began trying to force the sack through the doorway! This inflicted tremendous amounts of tickle upon Tom's bootyass! The toy then began kicking the sides of Tom's bootyass out of frustration while laughing the entire time. Even more tickle was inflicted upon Tom's bootyass. Just when Tom thought that nothing worse could possibly happen to him, the toy forced the sack right through the doorway and went flying deeper into the mazes of Tom's bootyass and crashed into the side of it! This inflicted more tickle upon Tom's bootyass than ever before!

Now that you have read this (even a single word of it), the very same toy, along with his giant sack which should fit through no doorway, will explore every single maze inside your bootyass (thereby inflicting major amounts of tickle upon it)! To prevent this from happening, copy and paste this entire comment and then repost it as a comment three times.

Re:Don't read this... it is a curse... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659250)

I hope you die of a particularly awful bowel disease that both causes you to waste away slowly and smell atrociously, so that that your vile pathetic evil mind has its physical manifestation in your body.

Die badly, pervert.

Re:Don't read this... it is a curse... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659360)

Don't read this... it is a curse...

In 1990, a little boy named George was walking down the railroad tracks that were located behind his backyard. Eventually, he decided to go back home, so he crossed the ditch that separated his yard and the railroad tracks. However, George noticed that it suddenly got very foggy. He could hardly see five feet ahead of himself!

George had his blanket over his head; part of it was dragging on the ground as he walked. While walking back to his house, he noticed a teddy bear sitting against a tree behind his shed; it was waving at him. This frightened George, who was now speed walking. George, not wanting to turn back to see the teddy bear, instinctively knew that it was following him. He saw its shadow approaching him from behind.

When it got close enough, he used his blanket and knocked it down on the ground. George was then flung into the air for seemingly no reason, and when he landed on the ground, he bounced back into the air. This happened a few more times, and each time he bounced, he would bounce about twenty feet into the air. Finally, George's bootyass landed directly on top of the teddy bear's face, and he could no longer move a single cheek.

George, although frightened, knew that something bad was going to happen. The teddy bear said, "Like, tsk, owie!" in a little boy's voice that sounded as if it was echoing throughout a room. After a few moments of silence, George heard a "vvvvvvvvvvvvv" sound that sounded like something was getting sucked into something else. He quickly realized that the teddy bear was getting sucked right up his butt as if his bootyass was a spaghetti noodle! Soon afterwards, George's bootyass became something else entirely: a rumblehouse bootyass! Then, the teddy bear started bouncing around in George's bootyass and hitting its sides whilst emitting an aura of pure malice.

Now that you have read this (even a single word of it), the very same teddy bear will use your bootyass as a bouncehouse and inflict extreme amounts of tickle upon it! To prevent this from happening, copy and paste this entire comment and then repost it as a comment three times.

Re:Don't read this... it is a curse... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659258)

I don't need any bad luck at the casino tomorrow.

In 1995, a little boy named Tom was playing with his toys in his living room. After about 15 minutes of playing, a tiny little man walked up to him and said, "May I explore the mazes of your bootyass?" Tom, surprised by this sudden occurrence, remained speechless.

After thirty seconds passed, the little man asked the exact same question that he asked previously. This time, Tom asked the little man why he would want to do such a thing. The little man said, "Because I want to explore every maze inside your bootyass." Tom, sensing no bad intentions from the little man, nodded and said, "Well, all right. But no tickle! If there's any tickle, I'll smoosh ya!" The little man nodded his head and was sucked into Tom's bootyass as if his bootyass was a gigantic spaghetti noodle.

Tom was beginning to have second thoughts about letting the little man explore the mazes of his bootyass, but he just shrugged them off. He thought, "What harm could allowing that nice, charismatic little man explore the mazes of my bootyass bring? He was so nice, charismatic, and thoughtful. I made the right choice."

However, soon enough, he discovered that he was terribly wrong. Suddenly, he was looking into his own bootyass as if he was looking through a security camera. Inside, he spotted the little man and numerous round doorways made out of bootyass; it looked like an endless maze. To Tom's surprise, the little man suddenly transformed into a red toy carrying a gigantic sack over his shoulders and began walking towards the smallest doorway of them all! "That sack will never fit through that doorway!", Tom thought.

The toy continued onwards, and eventually the sack got stuck inside the small doorway in Tom's bootyass. The toy, visibly angry, began trying to force the sack through the doorway! This inflicted tremendous amounts of tickle upon Tom's bootyass! The toy then began kicking the sides of Tom's bootyass out of frustration while laughing the entire time. Even more tickle was inflicted upon Tom's bootyass. Just when Tom thought that nothing worse could possibly happen to him, the toy forced the sack right through the doorway and went flying deeper into the mazes of Tom's bootyass and crashed into the side of it! This inflicted more tickle upon Tom's bootyass than ever before!

Now that you have read this (even a single word of it), the very same toy, along with his giant sack which should fit through no doorway, will explore every single maze inside your bootyass (thereby inflicting major amounts of tickle upon it)! To prevent this from happening, copy and paste this entire comment and then repost it as a comment three times.

Re:Don't read this... it is a curse... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659260)

And now Slashdot has become 2005 Youtube.

unobtainium (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659306)

Meanwhile the largest deposit of unobtainium is still on Pandora.

Re:unobtainium (0)

jhoegl (638955) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659326)

Unobtanium, a lazy sci-fi writers contribution to the element table that explains in one simple word how difficult it is to obtain the ore... except that they are able to obtain it.

God I hate that name for an element.

Re:unobtainium (1)

Grey Ninja (739021) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659694)

It's actually a real word, that's been in use for many decades.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unobtainium [wikipedia.org]

Yes, I agree that it shouldn't have been used for Avatar. But its use predated the movie.

Re:unobtainium (1)

hairyfeet (841228) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660256)

So in other words the Unobtainium is just Applied Phlebotinum [tvtropes.org] ? Try saying THAT three times fast!

As for TFA, it looks like China trying to hoard all the rare earth metals is gonna bite them right in the ass. Nobody was really looking as long as China was selling, but the second they stopped suddenly it was worth looking for again. Isn't there a pretty big rare earth metal deposit in the USA as well? Of course they probably won't be allowed to dig it up, as we learned from all those superfund sites we got stuck with miners tend to be a little messy when it comes to the environment.

Re:unobtainium (1)

haruchai (17472) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660508)

Do you mean the Mountain Pass mine [wikipedia.org] ? Looks like it'll be up and running again by 2013, somewhat behind schedule. And yes, they've had quite a few enviro screwups over the years; let's hope they're smarter this time around. But in the short term, China isn't worried as, thanks to the shortsightedness of the US caving in to their cheaper REEs, there's not a lot of refining expertise left in America. So, many of the reactivated REE mines has been sending their product for final refinement to - yup, you guessed it - CHINA! Of course this state of affairs won't last forever but I don't think the Chinese are worried as they'll probably always be able to undercut the US market and it's not likely that rare earths are going to become useless anytime soon, especially since thorium is usually present, which they've been stockpiling for their nuclear research.

Re:unobtainium (1)

Kreigaffe (765218) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660608)

It's not that there isn't refining expertise left in America.

There is.

The problem is that it's expensive, because we have environmental regulations, because we have safety regulations to protect our workers -- China? I don't know if they technically do or not, but effectively they do not, and that means it's much, much cheaper to do all the dirty nasty dangerous refining over there and shit all over their environment. Because China likes money more than they like things living -- trees, grass, any individual Chinese person, etc etc.

A good summary (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659316)

A good summary would have told us *how* massive it was.

Instead I had to RTFA and find out that the article itself doesn't even tell us.

The amount of information in the summary and TFA could have fit in a tweet.

Re:A good summary (1)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659748)

The amount of information in the summary and TFA could have fit in a tweet.

They probably tweeted it also (perhaps more than once). And likely started Facebook and MySpace pages for the deposit.
Gotta raise that hype every way you can. There's no material product, but the investors want to dump shares^W^W advertise this amazing economic opportunity to others...

Re:A good summary (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659778)

A good summary would have told us *how* massive it was.

Yeah, and linking to an article which is worth a shit would help as well.

Here's a link to a much more informative article. [brisbanetimes.com.au]

Excerpts:
Currently, the world market for scandium is small - around two to five tonnes a year
then we'll produce - let's say - 40 tonnes of scandium.

But most relevant to your specific question is the last line: "A resource estimate is expected to be released mid-year.

Re:A good summary (1)

arisvega (1414195) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660158)

In other news: bear takes a dump in woods.

Re:A good summary (1)

cormandy (513901) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660704)

It was fucking massive. Is that better?

Metallica Metals... (2)

tywjohn (1676686) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659328)

They'll need the extra money to pay off Lars Ulrich

Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (4, Informative)

Animats (122034) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659336)

That's nice, but scandium has only a few minor uses. A find of high-quality neodymium or europium ore would be much more interesting.

Re:Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659658)

Of course they didn't find europium, it was in Australia!

Re:Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (1)

deek (22697) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659822)

If media/gaming companies can consider Australia a part of Europe, then dammit, so can some dumb element!

Re:Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660680)

Oh yeah, how come they found scandium then?

Re:Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (1)

sFurbo (1361249) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659792)

The rare earths usually go together, to the degree that separating them is a major hassle in their production. A deposit of one will contain smaller amounts of the others.

Re:Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (3, Informative)

AliasMarlowe (1042386) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659800)

And Scandium is not really a rare earth. It's the first transition metal (3d valence orbitals) with atomic number 21. Rare earths don't begin until Lanthanum (4f valence orbitals) with atomic number 57.

Scandium does have uses, but these have been small in part due to the limited availability of the metal. Is is questionable whether those uses will increase markedly in the near future, just because the supply of Scandium has increased.

Re:Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (4, Informative)

khallow (566160) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659932)

And Scandium is not really a rare earth. It's the first transition metal (3d valence orbitals) with atomic number 21. Rare earths don't begin until Lanthanum (4f valence orbitals) with atomic number 57.

Geology and mining does things a little differently from chemistry. Apparently, Scandium is classified as a "rare earth" because it occurs in deposits with proper rare earths. Similarly, gold is often classified as a "platinum group metal" because it's a common associate of proper platinum group metals.

Is is questionable whether those uses will increase markedly in the near future, just because the supply of Scandium has increased.

Why? There are apparently a number of viable aluminum alloys that use scandium. Cheaper scandium makes these more competitive with similar alloys (apparently, titanium containing aluminum alloys).

Re:Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (1)

asdf7890 (1518587) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660152)

Some of the uses for it overlap with those for elements that are both rarer and pretty much controlled by China (they've bean very canny about securing such resources over the last decade or two, and now protect direct exports). If the main thing stopping the use of those alternatives is the cost of acquiring the raw material then this find is likely to make them more attractive by increasing availability and reducing that cost. The change won't be fast though, and many uses of rare earth materials are often in processes that involve other rare elements so unless the processes being discussed are unusual in only needing this one rare element such co-dependence will complicate things (unless this deposit contains the other elements in useful amounts too, of course - as others have pointed out deposits of several rare elements are often found together).

Re:Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (1)

L4t3r4lu5 (1216702) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659890)

A find of high-quality neodymium or europium ore would be much more interesting.

We'd love to get hold of more Europium, but:

[ ] Afghanistan cornered the market
[ ] They can only get Oceanium down under.
[ ] All of Jupiter's moons are ours, except the one with the rare earth element. Figures.

Please delete as appropriate.

Re:Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (1)

ozmanjusri (601766) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660044)

A find of high-quality neodymium or europium ore would be much more interesting.

You mean like Lynas mining's Mt Weld in Australia?

Re:Nice, but one of the less useful rare earths (1)

gentryx (759438) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660138)

Neodymium is called a rare earth, but actually it is no rarer than copper [wikipedia.org] .

Trivial usage (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659340)

Going by the linked ABC article - and the fact the only thing the company has announced was it's annual report today (which isn't really news as the projects/mines would already have been known).

Scandium sells for $5,000/kg. According to the annual report, there is only current use of 5t a year (I assume worldwide). So that's only $25 million a year worth of output. That's pocket change for a mine.

Re:Trivial usage (1)

smash (1351) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659418)

Ahh, but is the minimal current usage due to lack of supply, rather than lack of potential use, given appropriate quantities?

Re:Trivial usage (3, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659442)

For those wondering how he got the $25 million/year figure: $5,000/kg is $2267.96/lb, 5 metric tons is 11,023 lbs. $2267.96/lb * 11,023 lbs = $24,999,723.08 which happens to be very close to $25 million.

Re:Trivial usage (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659534)

I assumed math was how he achieved that number...

Re:Trivial usage (2)

egladil (1640419) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659558)

Actually, I think he just multiplied $5000/kg with 5000 kg (5t) to get (exactly) $25 million.

Re:Trivial usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659574)

Gee thanks.
Or perhaps he just did $5,000/kg * 5t = 25 million.
Metric is convenient that way.

Metric is convenient (1)

stooo (2202012) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659688)

>> Metric is convenient

You nailed it. All is about simple conversions.

Re:Trivial usage (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659458)

China bought in big into Metallica. As such, they need press to make it sound good. Bad tastes and high calories. Just what you would expect.

Just wondering (1)

greylion3 (555507) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659344)

.. if we found an ancient civilization's landfill.

Re:Just wondering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659380)

Oh my God. I'm back. I'm home. All the time, it was... We finally really did it.

You Maniacs! You blew it up! Ah, damn you! God damn you all to hell!

Re:Just wondering (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659446)

ALIENS

Metallica Metals (2, Funny)

brenddie (897982) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659352)

http://www.metallicaminerals.com.au/board_of_directors [metallicaminerals.com.au]

James Hetfield
Lars Ulrich
Kirk Hammett
Robert Trujillo

Let the suing being

Re:Metallica Metals (1)

Dark Lord of Ohio (2459854) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659456)

http://www.metallicaminerals.com.au/board_of_directors [metallicaminerals.com.au]

James Hetfield Lars Ulrich Kirk Hammett Robert Trujillo

Let the suing being

They forced Jason Newsted to sell his shares before he quit the band, and I have heard that Jason is going to sue them because of hostile takeover of the company and his loss of profits from this scandium deposits. ps. Jason is better basist than Trujillo! And Metallica ended in 1991!

This just in... (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659356)

...Message from White House...

Australia found to harbor terrorists. Military action advised.

Re:This just in... (1)

future assassin (639396) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659584)

Dood they have Mad Max and Crocodile Hunter, better not fuck with them...

Re:This just in... (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659698)

Is Crocodile Dundee too old to put up a fight? (From seeing his age at IMDB, I guess he is...)

Re:This just in... (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659752)

He lives in the US anyway. Tax exile.

Re:This just in... (1)

Jimbookis (517778) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659786)

He lives in the US anyway. Tax exile.

Really, you think it has nothing to do with the fact that his wife is a US citizen? If he was living in one of those European principalities or dodgy Caribbean islands you might have a point.

Re:This just in... (2)

mjwx (966435) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659842)

...Message from White House...

Australia found to harbor terrorists. Military action advised.

Headline from 2012

US Forces Fail to Stop Koala Drop Bear Insurgency in Australia.

Fear the drop bear.

P.S. it's harbour

Re:This just in... (1)

sosume (680416) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660112)

You fail. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_and_British_English_spelling_differences [wikipedia.org]
Most words ending in an unstressed -our in British English (e.g. colour, flavour, honour, neighbour, rumour, labour, humour, harbour) end in -or in American English (cf. color, flavor, honor, neighbor, rumor, labor, humor, harbor). Wherever the vowel is unreduced in pronunciation, this does not occur: e.g. contour, velour, paramour and troubadour are spelled thus the same everywhere.
Most words of this category derive from Latin non-agent nouns having nominative -or; the first such borrowings into English were from early Old French and the ending was -or or -ur. After the Norman Conquest, the ending became -our in Anglo-French in an attempt to represent the Old French pronunciation of words ending in -or, though color has been used occasionally in English since the 15th century. The -our ending was not only retained in English borrowings from Anglo-French, but also applied to earlier French borrowings. After the Renaissance, some such borrowings from Latin were taken up with their original -or ending; many words once ending in -our (for example, chancellour and governour) now end in -or everywhere. Many words of the -our/-or group do not have a Latin counterpart; for example, armo(u)r, behavio(u)r, harbo(u)r, neighbo(u)r; also arbo(u)r meaning "shelter", though senses "tree" and "tool" are always arbor, a false cognate of the other word. Some 16th- and early 17th-century British scholars indeed insisted that -or be used for words of Latin origin (e.g. color[6]) and -our for French loans; but in many cases the etymology was not completely clear, and therefore some scholars advocated -or only and others -our only.

Re:This just in... (1)

mjwx (966435) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660134)

You fail.

In Australia we speak British English (of course you know that because you actually read the wikipedia article you copy/pasted, didn't you).

We dont Harbor anything, that's a spelling error.

P.S. Just to confuse you, labour and Labor are both correct spellings with different meanings in Australian and British English.

Re:This just in... (2)

gmhowell (26755) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660172)

In Australia we speak British English (of course you know that because you actually read the wikipedia article you copy/pasted, didn't you).

You do understand your quaint local customs will be of scant interest to a US occupying force that will view extraneous usage of the letter 'u' as a clear sign that you are an insurgent?

Re:This just in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660518)

As f Ny modrn American w%d knw nuf of d en lang 2 notis a diff... :-P

Re:This just in... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660360)

We do Harbor something. We Victor Harbor it. http://tourismvictorharbor.com.au/

FTFA (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659374)

"With scadnium selling currently selling for $5,000 a kilo, owner Metallica Metals says it will double the size of a planned cobalt and nickel mine at the site."

Metallica was right when they wrote 'Battery' many years ago..

Scandium == Chemical-X ?!? (1)

storkus (179708) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659378)

This discovery has been made at a former nickel mine at Greenvale, just out of Townsville.

Wait, so the Powerpuff Girls (formerly known as the Kickass Girls) are really from Down Under?

Re:Scandium == Chemical-X ?!? (1)

wierd_w (1375923) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659452)

Why else do you think so many monsters attack them from the sea? What with global warming altering ocean currents, and the radioactive seawater from nearby Japan, how is it possible that they could be from anywhere ELSE but Australia?

Be that as it may, a contact of mine from QLD insists that he had never even heard of the diminutive superheroines until I started asking about them, so they must be quite good at press manipulation down there.

Re:Scandium == Chemical-X ?!? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660120)

He probably just doesn't have cable, or you should no longer be in contact with him.

I JUST WANT TO CELEBRATE (1)

Y-Crate (540566) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659386)

Another day of mining!

Looks like... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659398)

Looks like it's no longer...

*puts on sunglasses* ...scantium.

YEAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

You may have found it... (1)

Gravis Zero (934156) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659414)

but can you compete with the prices from China? Will your employees work for slave^H^H^H^H^H freedom wages?

Re:You may have found it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659678)

China is massively limiting rare earth exports lately. They need that stuff for them selves.
There is not much to compete with currently, especially since rare earth prices are going up dramatically lately.
Please check your facts.

Re:You may have found it... (1)

asdf7890 (1518587) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660186)

Actually for the most part they don't need it for themselves directly, most of the supply is used in the manufacturing industry producing things that are then sold to the rest of the world (yes the Chinese populous uses this output too, but once you take the poor rural population out of the equation it becomes clear that exports of such products is currently more significant than sales internal to the country). That is why China is controlling access to the rare elements as much as they can: they are protecting the manufacturing industry that their economy depends upon quite strongly. If this element, now found in significant quantities out of China's control is significantly useful then other governments may encourage (through grants and subsidies) the development of those alternatives in order to try tip the control of the market a little more towards their favour.

Fuck China (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659416)

Good...fuck China...

A secret plan for cheaply mining it (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659426)

They're planning to bury a keg of beer somewhere on the property then charge a 5'er for shovel rental. With any luck the shovel rental should pay for processing.

scandium is NOT a rare earth (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659438)

scandium is element 21, and its claim to fame is a great alloy with aluminum. It could be considered the best element to alloy with aluminum. However, Scandium is hard to find in good ores.

Australium? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659448)

http://www.teamfortress.com/loosecanon/09.html

Rare earth? really? (1)

frovingslosh (582462) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659450)

OK, it's rare. But at atomic number 21 I'm not clear how anyone can say it is in the rare earth group, those are much heavier elements.

Re:Rare earth? really? (1)

snookums (48954) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659682)

According to the ever-reliable wikipedia, Scandium has "traditionally" been classified with the rare earth metal on account of chemical similarity to the lanthanoid elements, and generally being found in nature alongside said elements.

Re:Rare earth? really? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660308)

If it makes a sensationalistic headline, anything that journalists can stretch to fit is game. Even if it is total lies if interpreted correctly instead of for emotional effect.

How about (3, Funny)

pkinetics (549289) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659466)

US invasion of Australia to commence in 3...2...1...

Re:How about (2)

smash (1351) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659488)

Not required. The aussie government will just lube up and bend over for the rogering they're about to receive via the "free trade" agreement or a revision thereof.

Re:How about (1)

qxcv (2422318) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659646)

Say what you want about Australia's leaders being in bed with the US, but right now mining + free trade is keeping our economy chugging along pretty well (and has been for the last few decades). Protecting inefficient industries simply delays the inevitable whilst giving those in said industries free reign over pricing in local markets. Case in point: bananas. Bilateral FTAs are a win-win situation.

Re:How about (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659716)

Mining contributes 9% of Australia's GDP (post crises) and less than 2% of jobs.

Linky [abc.net.au]

I don't think that counts as 'keeping our economy chugging along'.

Re:How about (1)

LordLucless (582312) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659798)

Protecting inefficient industries simply delays the inevitable whilst giving those in said industries free reign over pricing in local markets

Where "efficient" generally means outsourcing to a country with lax labour and human rights enforcement.

Re:How about (1)

mjwx (966435) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659904)

but right now mining + free trade is keeping our economy chugging along pretty well

Like the free trade agreement that prevents us from exporting beef to the Americas.

I think you need to read up on what those free trade agreements entail. They're pretty one sided (and not on Oz's favour), The US trade agreement in particular specifically prevents a lot of exports and shoe horns more then a few US laws on us without even asking our permission.

Also the mining companies need to pull their heads and arses into line, they dig up our nation at _our_ pleasure. I'm looking at you Andrew "Twiggy" Forrest.

Re:How about (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659964)

I think if a nation cannot make things and is dependent on other countries for basically everything, it is a vunerability for that country.

Re:How about (2)

savuporo (658486) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659516)

Except that there are companies like Molycorp just reopening old pits in US right now. Rare earths are not all that rare, actually.

Re:How about (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660384)

I prefer my earths well-done. You just never know what lurks around the oven...

Re:How about (1)

foniksonik (573572) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660926)

Makes you wonder how much rare earths were left in the slag pile of former mines.

Re:How about (1)

SEE (7681) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659760)

Australia's an industrialized English-speaking federation of states with a dedicated capital territory that fought at our side in World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq I, Afghanistan, and Iraq II. And we've got a defense agreement and a free trade agreement with them.

Why would we bother to invade? They're already US!

Re:How about (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659910)

Australia's an industrialized English-speaking federation of states with a dedicated capital territory that fought at our side in World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Iraq I, Afghanistan, and Iraq II. And we've got a defense agreement and a free trade agreement with them.

Why would we bother to invade? They're already US!

Well from what I have seen of them they have the smug smart ass bullysuperiority complex the Yanks have down to a tee so yeah close enough.

Rare earths are not rare (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659478)

We've been over this before. The cost of rare earths does not have to do with their scarcity, but rather the cost of refining the ores into useful metals—it's a complicated process with lots of toxic chemicals.

Re:Rare earths are not rare (1)

jonwil (467024) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659824)

Is there something about China that would give them a cost advantage in rare-earth processing in the way they have a cost advantage in the production of things like iPhones, Nike shoes and circular saws? Or could the US (who would have obvious national interest concerns about being so reliant on China for these important metals) build their own processing facilities for all these non-Chinese rare earth deposits everyone hears about?

Re:Rare earths are not rare (1)

CrimsonAvenger (580665) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660808)

Is there something about China that would give them a cost advantage in rare-earth processing

A complete lack of [enforced] environmental protection laws?

A complete disregard for the value of any particular individual life (other than the aristocracy, of course)?

Oh, and slave labour as an expendable workforce....

Can't wait for the game (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659524)

"Rare Earths Tycoon"

Great (1)

Statecraftsman (718862) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659526)

Just after I registered peakscandium.com!

Finally something good comes out of Australia (1)

UpYoursNetwork (2480958) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659562)

Guess all that criminal activity which caused the place to be inhabited was worth it now, eh? Streuth!

Re:Finally something good comes out of Australia (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659692)

What? As opposed to all the criminal activity NOW in the USA ?

1: USA built on slavery
2: USA was the original destination for British convicts (120,000..about the same as Oz later).
3: 5 % of the worlds population, 50% of the worlds drug use.
4: 10,000's of gun murders each year.
5: Still starting off illegal and unjustified wars

Anyway, you're just jealous. Oz has better weather, and food, and culture and women and economy and education and healthcare and..and..and.....on and on it goes.

You just want to be us, we know that...but we won't let you.

Wake me up when your Chinese masters decide to let you out of your $4/hr factory job for 5 minutes.

Re:Finally something good comes out of Australia (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37659766)

There's nothing wrong with drug use...

Re:Finally something good comes out of Australia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660670)

Wow, you got modded down. The Women's Temperance League must be on /. now...

I knew this place was going down the tubes.

(Note to mods-on-crack: Ethanol is a drug. Nicotine is a drug. Caffeine is a drug. Also, the crack which you are on is a drug, but if you think there's something wrong with it, just stop, don't go modwarring against all drugs everywhere.)

Re:Finally something good comes out of Australia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660196)

Dear lord you are a tard.

1. Slavery was neither illegal nor particularly criminal for most of the formative years of the US.
2. Many of those were debtors, hardly a worrisome criminal class.
3. [Citation Needed]
4. [Citation Needed] You picked an awfully specific term of art, 'murders', vs. a more sensible term, 'deaths'.
5. If you and your country think they are illegal, why haven't they pressed for a trial for Bush, Cheney, Obama, etc.?

Re:Finally something good comes out of Australia (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660442)

Not a "tard"...in fact, completely right.

1: Paedophilia wasn't "illegal" back in Ancient Rome either, so that makes it right ? So you're a pervert then ?... If they make murder legal then that's ok too? Locking people up for years without trial was also "legal" in the USSR, so that's ok then ?
2: I realise I'm dealing with a dimwit American, so I'll spell it out for you....the "debtors" as you claim, were EXACTLY THE SAME SORT OF PEOPLE SENT TO AUSTRALIA LATER ON ! The didn't all magically turn into serial killers the year after they stopped sending them to Boston.
3: Just fucking use Google you lazy prick. Look at the WHO, CIA, NIDA .
4: Ditto.......although I'll make it easier for you....the USA is right up there with Columbia and South Africa.
5: Well dipshit, half the world would love to put those fucks on trial, but the reality is they're safe, just like you trying to put Putin on trial for something. Try it and see how far you get ? Probably straight to a hospital with Polonium poisoning.

You're a real fucktard, aren't you ?

This is (1)

LS (57954) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659602)

Scandi-lous!

*ducks*

Re:This is (1)

catmistake (814204) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659734)

I don't care what they found... if minors were involved they should be punished

Let me be the umpteenth person.. (1)

CliffH (64518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659608)

... to welcome our new Aussie overlords.

Re:Let me be the umpteenth person.. (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659774)

Oh no not Bob Katter [wikipedia.org] .

Re:Let me be the umpteenth person.. (1)

Cant use a slash wtf (1973166) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659912)

The Wikipedia article on him doesn't seem to have a picture of him. They must not have been able to find a picture of him without that ridiculous hat.

Re:Let me be the umpteenth person.. (1)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 2 years ago | (#37659990)

I live in Victoria so there is little chance of me taking a picture of him for wikipedia. Maybe his brother could submit one?

Re:Let me be the umpteenth person.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660118)

You mean the hat that is part of Australia's cultural identity [wikipedia.org] ? Does that make you or the hat ridiculous?

Fucking small minded city centric people.

Rare earths are not quite ... rare (4, Informative)

giorgist (1208992) | more than 2 years ago | (#37660080)

In fact they are quite common. One of te big problem with rare earths is that if you extract them, you generally find them in company with thorium. Now even though it is naturally there, one you took it out of the ground you are obligated to treat it as a radioactive waste. You are not aloud to mix it back into the ground at the same consistency you found it. The result is that one of the few places on earth you can get rare earths is ... China. Who by the way is storing the thorium, and is moving ahead into building Gen IV reactors.

In fact there is a dude that is petitioning to be allowed to extract "rare" earth metal and be allowed to store the thorium. This one mine will be able to produce all the energy the US needs as a ... byproduct. Now that is handy

http://energyfromthorium.com/2011/03/10/free-thorium/

Creepers? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37660762)

And how will this help me against the Creepers?

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