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Apple's Siri As Revolutionary As the Mac?

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the voice-in-the-machine dept.

Apple 692

hype7 writes "The Harvard Business Review is running an article on Siri, the speech recognition technology inside the new iPhone. They make the case that Siri's use of artificial intelligence and speech recognition is going to change the way we interact with machines. From the article: 'The advantage of using speech over other interaction paradigms is that we have honed its use over thousands of years. It is entirely natural for us to talk to one another. Talking is one of the first things we learn how to do as children. It's second nature for us to ask a colleague or a friend a question and for them to answer the same way. Being able to talk to a phone like it's a personal assistant is something that people are going to get very used to, very quickly. It's a much more natural approach than using a mouse on a desktop. And I highly doubt the impact is going to stop at phones.'"

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Not only... (3, Funny)

wsxyz (543068) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707216)

Not only as revolutionary... It's also just as magical!

MIght as well be (0, Flamebait)

mozumder (178398) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707480)

Siri does look amazing, and will become really useful in a couple of years as developers outside of Apple operate on it.

Right now, I'm just amazed how bad other tech companies are at design. They're REALLY, REALLY bad. Remember when computers were sold with 500 page instruction manuals, and everyone was arguing over who had the better instruction manual, and then Apple comes along, and throws the instruction manual away, and everyone's like WTF? And people liked it, because they manage to design computers to be intuitive.

And theres tons of these stories from Apple. (LOL @ original Slashdot iPod post)

Really, is Apple going to be the only company in the world that gets human interaction? It's staggering how much they've advanced society on their own and all their profound technical achievements.. Are there absolutely NO actual designers at any other tech company? Do they only hire engineers? Is that it?

The only thing that ever came close to Apple over the last 30 years was the introduction of Google search bar, with no other crap around it. (remember the old search engines??)

Seriously, everyone else in the tech industry should just give up. Apple won technology. let them have it. Everyone else in the tech industry, please go back to school. Let Linux die, let Android die, let the PC die. Everyone else should just stop right now and do something else.

Maybe learn painting or drawing or something. Maybe start liking turtles. (remember Apple LOGO??)

Re:MIght as well be (5, Insightful)

tumnasgt (1350615) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707634)

You had me until the second to last paragraph. Macs wouldn't evolve nearly as fast if there wasn't Windows (and to some extent, Linux) adding new stuff. With a lot of the cool things Apple do, they aren't the one to first do something, they are the first to do it in a way that appeals to the mainstream. Look at smartphones, Windows Mobile phones were around way before the iPhone, but they were never popular in the mainstream because they didn't have the "cool factor". And if it weren't for webOS and Android, iOS would quite possibly still have the crap notifications system that just got replaced with iOS 5.

So, yes, Apple are great at what they do, but to say that they would be where they are without the competition is ridiculous.

Purely out of curiosity (2)

jimicus (737525) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707226)

I've heard from a number of Android users that Android also has voice & language recognition - can anyone comment how it works compared to how Siri's been pushed and demoed?

Re:Purely out of curiosity (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707262)

Voice Actions, it works exactly the same. Maps, Nav, post updates to social, schedules reminders/ calendars. send email / sms. Its been there since the start of 2.3
Except it doesn't have a fancy interface . it just shows a big microphone icon on the screen and lights up green when you talk

Re:Purely out of curiosity (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707406)

Oh boy, some people never learn. Android voice functions is literary the same things that has been in the archaic nokia phones from back in the day.

Voice recognition and some baby actions.

Siri is totally different. You might wanna watch Siri videos again and be less ignorant.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (4, Informative)

dragonhunter21 (1815102) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707534)

Looked basically the same, but with some extra commands added that, while they look sexy on the marketing blurb, I would never use. That said, I use the shit out of Voice Actions on Android, and I love them to death. Still, Siri isn't going to be the killer app that pulls me over to the iPhone side.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (4, Informative)

ustolemyname (1301665) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707270)

Works fine as a speech to text engine, but doesn't infer what you want done from what you said.

The real issue with it is how much of a dork you look like talking to your phone.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (1)

ustolemyname (1301665) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707286)

I note a sibling brought up "voice actions" that arrived in 2.3, I'm on 2.2 so I'm not familiar with that tech.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707290)

Vlingo

Re:Purely out of curiosity (5, Funny)

hondo77 (324058) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707372)

The real issue with it is how much of a dork you look like talking to your phone.

Back in the olden days, talking into your phone was all you could do with it.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (3, Funny)

Tharsman (1364603) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707568)

The real issue with it is how much of a dork you look like talking to your phone.

Back in the olden days, talking into your phone was all you could do with it.

Thats so 2007.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (1)

bryan1945 (301828) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707494)

As opposed to making sweet, sweet love to it? I think the idea of a phone is to 'talk.'

Re:Purely out of curiosity (4, Interesting)

BasilBrush (643681) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707498)

The real issue with it is how much of a dork you look like talking to your phone.

Once upon a time, before they became internet terminals, everybody talked into their phone. I hadn't realised it had become so rare!

You don't have to press the home button and talk into it like a walkie-talkie you know. The proximity sensor will switch Siri on if you put the iPhone to the side of your head, if you're not making a phone call. And you can also operate it via the handsfree kit.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707624)

"Siri. Tea. Earl Grey. Hot."

Now what's so dorky about that?

Re:Purely out of curiosity (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707324)

Android's 'Voice Actions' can only understand a predefined set of phrases and keywords. Siri can understand very natural language, and even follow context. Siri is far more advanced. But Google has some of the best engineers on the planet. A nice upgrade for Voice Actions will likely come sooner than later.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (2)

chronoglass (1353185) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707434)

there is the major difference, natural speech.
I think it'll really become useful once it all becomes standard, and is "always listening".

at present on my android phone I have to go to search, then hit the mic, and remember the phrase that does the right action.
I use the hell out of "navigate to"
I occasionally use "note to self"
rarely I use the "call"
and the "message to " is a bit.. er, unruly
and I don't honestly remember any of the other ones.

while I am happy to see it getting better, I would prefer to remove the step of activating it with a button, I'd also like to remove the required name of siri.. let me call it jeeves.. or zombie minion!

"Zombie minion! get me some hamburgers"
"did you mean in-n-out master"
"why yes.. yes I did"
"turn left.. arrrrrggggg"

Re:Purely out of curiosity (4, Funny)

savuporo (658486) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707516)

there is the major difference, natural speech. I think it'll really become useful once it all becomes standard, and is "always listening".

That would be awesome .. imagine if your cloud collected web services could always access and record everything that happens around you, without pushing a single button.. wouldnt that make facebooks and google plusses even more awesome .. i mean who needs browser tracking cookies if you have access to microphone ..

Re:Purely out of curiosity (1)

chronoglass (1353185) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707584)

exactly! and just think of how pissed you'll be when you get that data bill.. streaming audio for a whole month.. yowza!
just because it COULD be used, doesn't mean it HAS to be used.

now if I used it for google or facebook, I'd expect it to be used. I guarantee my google voice is being stripped for keywords for targeted advertising.. because throwing in random words makes for some fun web browsing.

saying bondage a few times every call for example or in a few texts

Re:Purely out of curiosity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707456)

So if I say "Siri, go fuck Steve Job's corpse", it will know what to do?

Re:Purely out of curiosity (1)

Captain Splendid (673276) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707590)

So if I say "Siri, go fuck Steve Job's corpse", it will know what to do?

Of course. It will download the requisite app first, though.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (3, Informative)

milbournosphere (1273186) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707328)

I believe the difference is that Siri incorporates natural language recognition, whereas Android does not. On my Android phone, I still have to navigate to the Navigation app and then tell it where i'm going. With Siri, I imagine that one would simply say 'take me to in-n-out.' It's the same thing with messaging; I need to go to the app, and then press the little mic button. I imagine that one simply has to say 'message so-and-so' with Siri.

This is what makes Siri revolutionary in my book. Yeah, it's been out in app form for a while now, but this is the first platform to really show off this kind of natural language recognition.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707386)

Actually, if you say "Navigate to In-n-Out" it will launch the Navigation app set to the nearest In-n-Out.

Bring up the voice search app and hit the help button. It shows you a list of all the voice commands it supports.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (5, Informative)

James Carnley (789899) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707420)

You don't have to manually launch anything.

Just start voice search and say "Navigate to McDonalds" and it will launch your navigation app and plot a course to McDonalds for you.

This also works with your other example: "Text Bob Dole Hey man" will launch your messaging app and put "Hey man" in the message.

It's pretty neat once you start using it a lot.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (1)

milbournosphere (1273186) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707474)

Learned something new about my phone today. No where in any manual did I see that. Thank you!

However, my overall point is that Siri is much less brittle than Google's voice search. Hopefully this will change in Ice Cream Sandwich.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (4, Interesting)

dragonhunter21 (1815102) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707550)

Even better, if you press and hold the search button, it'll automatically start voice actions. I don't think I've sent but five typed text messages since I started using it.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707640)

You mean, like Android's voice actions?

http://www.google.com/mobile/voice-actions/

Re:Purely out of curiosity (3, Interesting)

obarthelemy (160321) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707330)

PCs have had it for ages too, I tried it 10 years ago... Felt like a dork (and that was all on my lonesome in my room, not in a crowded street), was slower than typing (on a keyboard though, not a touchscreen), and misunderstood me enough to make it a pain.

It's indeed also on my Android phone, never cared until Siri, tried it out when it seemed to be the next magical thing... dropped it as fast as the first time around.

From what I've read, Siri might be more accurate and more intelligent, but my guess is, not enough to override the basic dorkiness and inaccuracy of a speech interface.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (2)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707472)

Watch the video [apple.com] . If it really works like it does in the video, we're talking about a whole new speech recognition experience. Once it's out, you can bet the Apple store will be filled with people putting it to the test.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (1)

dragonhunter21 (1815102) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707578)

Android: "Text Nick meet me at Andrea's period"
Siri: "Text Nick meet me at Andrea's"

I don't see the revolutionary difference, really. Siri does do some funkier things, I'll say that, but once you learn the (very simple) syntax of Android voice commands, you've got it.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (1)

SchroedingersCat (583063) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707520)

Second that. Microsoft Voice Command has been around for a while as well as voice command in windows. It is fine for dictation but I would not use it to control PC. It is much easier to point what needs to be done with mouse than to explain it.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (4, Interesting)

BasilBrush (643681) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707620)

I had computer graphics on my computer back in 1982. So these modern day "consoles" can't be anything special, eh?

Every product with speech recognition is not the same, just as every product with graphics is not the same.

And whilst people might feel dorks talking to a desktop, they're very used to holding a phone up to the side of their face and speaking into it. It's not seemed like a bizarre occupation for many decades.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707338)

Given that Siri was originally developed with the support of DARPA, I'm guessing it works better than the Android voice recognition. Oh, and it probably beams all your questions to a spy satellite.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (1)

i kan reed (749298) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707352)

Well, I find my droid has problems hearing me correctly, and haven't seen siri in person to know if its any better. There isn't any magical "do the most logical thing based on what I say" app either. I don't like apple products, but this one sounds good.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (2)

inputdev (1252080) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707418)

I've been using Android with voice commands, and have been surprised with how well it works, I much prefer it to the virtual keys. It has issues when there is bad internet connectivity, and as you would expect in very noisy environments, although, to be fair, it does better than I had expected in most noise.
I noticed someone else say that it doesn't interpret what you want it to do, and that is only partially true, there are several commands, like "text john I'll be five minutes late" and it completely fills out the fields. But the most common is the "navigate to pizza", which launches the navigation app and starts providing turn by turn navigation without any more presses. I refuse to ever navigate a touchscreen for getting somewhere in the car again.
Equally useful is the fact that no matter what it interprets, it automatically searches google, which is quite often the first thing I do with text now anyway.

Re:Purely out of curiosity (5, Funny)

Taagehornet (984739) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707436)

Android speech-to-text actually works pretty well. I'm using it now to write this and I find bark bark shaddup I find that it bark bark shut up damnit bark bark don't make me come down there I find that bark bark okay that's it I'm coming down there argh crash thud bark bark bark bark bark bark

Shamelessly stolen [slashdot.org]

Re:Purely out of curiosity (5, Funny)

sexconker (1179573) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707478)

Android speech-to-text actually works pretty well. I'm using it now to write this and I find bark bark shaddup I find that it bark bark shut up damnit bark bark don't make me come down there I find that bark bark okay that's it I'm coming down there argh crash thud bark bark bark bark bark bark

Troubles with the wife?

Re:Purely out of curiosity (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707618)

Android speech-to-text actually works pretty well. I'm using it now to write this and I find bark bark shaddup I find that it bark bark shut up damnit bark bark don't make me come down there I find that bark bark okay that's it I'm coming down there argh crash thud bark bark bark bark bark bark

Troubles with the wife?

Talking trees. He obviously lives in the Forest of Skund.

Eva for android/android assistant is very similar (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707574)

Amazing how good marketing always triumphs and makes something sound new and innovative. Steve Jobs dies and the whole world goes into a hush..Dennis Ritchie dies and not a soul cares!

Coming back to the topic :) I use Eva for android.. Heres a demo video and judge for yourself

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BYnTKNhv1m0&feature=player_embedded

here are the features
http://www.androidzoom.com/android_applications/tools/eva_bftqr.html

It cant handle conflicting appointments and every now and then i have problems in setting up new appointments in the future..it also has trouble with my name :)..but does manage to do pretty much everything else..

There is another software called android assistant
  https://market.android.com/details?id=com.advancedprocessmanager&hl=en

which is not as good but manages to do stuff..the advantage is that it also lets you type out your instruction..very useful in noisy areas or on the train..combine that with the swype keyboard for android
http://www.swype.com/
  and you have a powerhouse in hand

Except not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707230)

The advent of Siri is nothing revolutionary. It is simply combining already existing apps/features with a few things added. Sure, contextual voice interaction is interesting, but it's not a revolutionary thing.

Re:Except not? (2)

drx (123393) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707310)

Isn't it like a speech input for an Infocom game?

Some of these games also were able to understand pronouns like "it", "him", "there" ...

Re:Except not? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707360)

RTFA...

"In true Apple fashion, there is little that is technologically novel. ... Very accurate speech recognition systems have been around for some time. So too has advanced artificial intelligence — Watson has won Jeopardy, and every year, the entrants to the Turing Test get better and better. But until now, nobody had put speech and artificial intelligence together in a compelling way: which meant that the voice systems on our computers and our phones have been clunky to the point where it was just easier to avoid them."

Re:Except not? (4, Interesting)

jo_ham (604554) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707364)

Perhaps, but isn't that the point?

Every so often someone comes along trying to reinvent the wheel on computer interfaces, and it usually falls flat - like the "arms up in the air Minority Report UI", or 3D UIs etc.

Taking a bunch of features that people use all the time and combining it into a system that you can interact with quickly and easily when you're not "actively using" your device might be exactly what we need.

Being able to pick up your phone and say "remind me to call mom when I get home" and then put it right back down and have the phone be able to work out what you want is a great idea. It takes you about 5 seconds and then you can go back to whatever you were doing.

I don't think we'll be using it like Star Trek just yet as the main way we interact with computers, but for simple things like that I think it could be awesome (dare I say, "magical (TM)").

As many people will point out here, this is not Apple's original technology, they weren't the first to do it, there will be use cases where it won't work, you can do it much more cheaply and non-walled-garden-y with a rooted Nexus GTi Turbo running cyanogen, Apple steals everything, they're an evil empire tracking your every move and other such tiresome memes etc etc, but Siri is one of the first attempts to really pull this sort of thing together cohesively. Whether it is successful or not, who can say yet? It's certainly interesting and I expect we'll see it on many other smartphones in a similar guise - it's not like the technology is unique.

about that "arms up in the air Minority Report UI" (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707496)

the worst part of Minority Report's fancy computer interface was they needed sneaker-net to move a file across the room.

speech recognition is noisy. (1)

CdXiminez (807199) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707242)

Ever since I used speech recognition software for a while for entering text, I have worried that it would become popular and take us back to the noisy days of typewriters. Except this time for people talking to their electronic devices all the time.

Re:speech recognition is noisy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707308)

It would indeed be quite noisy and annoying if people were always talking to their phones.

Re:speech recognition is noisy. (1)

mepex (687816) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707380)

But with improved microphones, I imagine you could whisper almost inaudibly. That would probably be even less noisy than a keyboard.

Re:speech recognition is noisy. (2)

CdXiminez (807199) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707412)

Daily I wish people would indeed stop doing this.

Re:speech recognition is noisy. (2)

NoNonAlphaCharsHere (2201864) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707366)

Yeah, I can see how this is going to make my life easier:

"page up, page up, down, down, down, shift o, slash splat quot FIXME -- who wrote this shit ques ques splat slash quot CR escape"

Pah. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707424)

I for one look forward to the day that I can run into an office building and yell, "Run CMD", "Format C Colon forward-slash y enter"

Re:speech recognition is noisy. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707576)

And those people with the bluetooth headsets, how will we ever tell them from the crazy people just talking to themselves?

Quality? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707244)

It had better be good, or it'll go over as well as the handwriting recognition on the Newton.

What about the people that created it? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707260)

Why does Apple get all the credit when they bought the technology? The company that created it should be at least mentioned.

You complain about it... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707392)

...and yet you keep this information to yourself.

You really want to know why Apple gets all the credit? They don't. All the individual people involved in it get to put it on their resume and will get credit where it is going to matter for them. SRI gets credit from Apple (and anyone else who might have bought or licensed it) where it is going to matter for them. Apple gets credit in public because that's where it is going to matter for them. Everyone wins.

My personal assistant is not a phone (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707266)

If I make a request of my personal assistant, it is probably something that I expect to take a great deal of time. For example, I might ask him or her to get me a cup of coffee, or proofread a letter. If that request takes 5 seconds longer because the personal assistant has to figure out what I mean or ask for clarification, I don't care.

If I make a request of my phone, like "Put this number in my address book," I expect it to be done instantly. If the phone doesn't understand it the first time, has to ask for clarification, or doesn't carry it out 100% correctly right away, I am going to be annoyed.

So it'll work for 90% of the population? (2)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707274)

Always the problem with engineering something like Speech Recognition is you'll have to train people to enunciate correctly - though with Siri the opposite may become true, where the LOL, WTF, UR, etc. generation adopt an entirely new dialect to communicate with their devices.

Thank goodness, for the remaining 10% we'll still have the comedy of a person standing on a street corner yelling at their iPhone. "No! Phone home! ET want PHONE HOME! No! Not Rome! PHONE HOME!!"

Bah (1)

ickleberry (864871) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707278)

I can type almost as fast as i can talk and I prefer using a mouse and keyboard than talking to a machine, not to mind the problem of other people listening in.

In 2000 I had a Nokia 3310 with voice dialing and probably every phone I had since has that feature but I never felt the urge to use it and I don't know anyone else who does.

Also any current speech recognition technology I ever saw has been honed over thousands of years to only recognise Californian expensive coffee drinking IT worker's accents.

Re:Bah (4, Interesting)

Above (100351) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707402)

A good touch typer can accurately do 60 wpm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Touch_typing). I've seen ones that can come close to 100 wpm with relatively few errors, at least in short bursts.

Typical speech rates are 140-200 wpm, depending on the subject and the speakers mood (http://itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/005018.html). Pretty much everyone can speak and comprehend 300 wpm (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Words_per_minute), and some people can speak as high has 500 wpm. You can read around 300 wpm.

I suspect the reality is you type at somewhere between 25-50% of the speed you can talk, and that's for ordinary words. Throw in special characters that require you to do complex keystrokes and your typing will tank, but your speech will not. For instance, check your words per minute typing something like this vrs reading it (assuming you have a standard US keyboard).

    Please tell Mr Muños that it is £200 or ¥20,000; and Mr Schröder would like a response immediately.

I bet you can say that as fast as any other sentence, but typing it will require you to look up a character or two unless you type international stuff a lot.

Re:Bah (1)

monkeyhybrid (1677192) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707566)

He has a stutter, you insensitive clod!

Re:Bah (3, Funny)

mswhippingboy (754599) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707642)

Except what SIRI will transcribe is:

Pistol missed your moon Otis 200 bouncer 20,010 and mistress rotor would like a responsibility.

Re:Bah (2)

UnknowingFool (672806) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707616)

There is a difference in text-to-speech which has been around forever and natural speech recognition and contextual responses. For example, you can say "Call Susan mobile." That's not new. But that's not Siri. The promise to Siri is: "Call my sister. Which sister and which phone? Susan. Her mobile. [Dialing]" Apple video makes it look like Siri is much more advanced than your 2000 Nokia. At least that's the promise. Whether it lives up to the expectation, we'll see after tomorrow when the first people start using it.

Cell phones made more annoying (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707282)

In addition to hearing your unwanted conversations now we also hear you navigate your UI.

Re:Cell phones made more annoying (1)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707348)

In addition to hearing your unwanted conversations now we also hear you navigate your UI.

Playing a nintendo nostalgia app: "UP UP DOWN DOWN ..." "I SAID UP UP DOWN .."

Hype much? (4, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707288)

Apple fans can take comfort from this evidence that while Steve Jobs may no longer be with us in the flesh, he lives on in the hearts of journalists. And the reality distortion field is still fully operational.

Inside? (3, Insightful)

Culture20 (968837) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707296)

Is it actually inside, or is it like dragon, google, et al where the processing is done in "the cloud"? I'm interested in a non-network solution.

Re:Inside? (-1)

mosb1000 (710161) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707408)

The phone does it.

Office Use? (1)

Phurge (1112105) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707312)

Can you honestly see this being used in an office environment?

Or for that matter, on a plane?

Re:Office Use? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707336)

Tracey Jordan: Television ON. Porno!

Re:Office Use? (1)

jdastrup (1075795) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707346)

It's the next step in the natural progression of the Apple-inspired UI. Once Apple removes the visible/touchable UI completely, you'll have to talk to it.

Re:Office Use? (1)

jdastrup (1075795) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707396)

1. Get rid of the keyboard
2. Get rid of the buttons
3. Get rid of the touch screen (iPhone 5, after everyone uses Siri exclusively)
4. Get rid of the voice input (iPhone 6)
Now you just think what you want to do, and it will be done.

Re:Office Use? (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707482)

1. Get rid of the keyboard

2. Get rid of the buttons

3. Get rid of the touch screen (iPhone 5, after everyone uses Siri exclusively)

4. Get rid of the voice input (iPhone 6)

Now you just think what you want to do, and it will be done.

Pretty sweet, until the person in charge of city engineering takes a snort or toke during break...

Re:Office Use? (2)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707558)

Now you just think what you want to do, and it will be done.

No need for that. In the utopia of Jobsism, in a few years your iThings will not need a control interface because they'll just tell you what to think.

Re:Office Use? (1)

localman57 (1340533) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707414)

Yeah. They tried that already with the no-buttons iPod Shuffle a generation or two ago. Apparently the 11 people who bought them didn't like it.

Re:Office Use? (1)

jdastrup (1075795) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707438)

That's cause you couldn't talk to it.

Re:Office Use? (1)

MrHanky (141717) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707416)

Of course. Half the point of Apple's gadgets seem to be to draw attention to them all the fucking time. Case in point: the story above.

Re:Office Use? (4, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707500)

Of course. Half the point of Apple's gadgets seem to be to draw attention to them all the fucking time. Case in point: the story above.

Totally!

Posted from my iPhone

Re:Office Use? (3, Funny)

maccodemonkey (1438585) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707464)

"Can you honestly see this being used in an office environment?"

You're right. Nobody ever talks into phones in an office. /s

It won't be used. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707316)

Who wants to talk to their phone? That's stupid. If you wanted to talk in to your phone, get a phone. Oh, wait....

Mr Scott will be pleased (2)

MichaelSmith (789609) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707322)

But can you actually talk into the mouse?

M-x tourette-mode on... (1)

Forbman (794277) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707342)

While speech between people is natural, it is not a natural interface with our devices. We've learned to tune out the one-sided conversations other people may be having on cell phones in our presence. Not so sure about a command interface, however. How many people actually use the voice dialing feature on their cell phones? Yes, I'm sure some of you will, but...

However, if I won the lottery, I'd put up some money for someone to hack it and create a Tourette's mode for it... Now, THAT could be some good comedy!

Re:M-x tourette-mode on... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707580)

Have you actually taken a look at what Siri is and how it works? I ask because it looks like you misunderstand even how it's activated.

My Camaro... (1)

pongo000 (97357) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707382)

...talks to me, and I can talk back to it. While its vocabulary is limited, I'm amazed at how accurate its speech recognition software is, even with very low S/N ratios (windows down, road noise, etc.).

I know of an author (Bulletproof Unix, among other books) who dictates all of his books using Dragon. He tells me it's incredibly accurate, and requires only minimal formatting and error correction.

  I'll be the first to admit I've not actually tried Siri yet, but it seems to me speech recognition has been vastly improved over the years, and would hardly call Apple an "innovator" in this area.

Re:My Camaro... (1)

belthize (990217) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707524)

Don't you mean '82 Trans-Am ?

Re:My Camaro... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707556)

and would hardly call Apple an "innovator" in this area.

No one remembers who did it first. They only remember who did it best.

Hearing is not the same as understanding (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707384)

Tell 5 people to do the same thing using the same words in the same order and you will see 3 different things delivered.

I'm sure it will have an impact. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707410)

Maybe, if Apple is really, really lucky, it will be almost as cool as their last game changing UI development [google.com] .

they're trapped in the reality distortion field (1)

Lluc (703772) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707442)

How of the questions you ask Siri could by typed directly into Google or Wolfram Alpha and return the answer? ... probably most of them except for a special few cases that require local knowledge from your GPS or address book. IMO, this will not change anything related to our interaction with phones / computers unless it can respond to almost any question you ask it. This seems more like a job for IBM's Watson than an iphone.

Re:they're trapped in the reality distortion field (1)

dragonhunter21 (1815102) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707622)

You just gave me the best idea ever.

Google should partner with WolframAlpha and give us the best search ever. Google for the voice API and maybe UI, and WA for everything else.

THAT would be a Siri-killer.

forget Siri (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707502)

I want Denise.
http://guile3d.com/en/

Most inefficient way to communicate... (1)

stanjo74 (922718) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707508)

"'The advantage of using speech over other interaction paradigms is that we have honed its use over thousands of years..." This is a fallacy - voice is the most inefficient way to communicate: very error prone and dependent on enunciation and hearing, not repeatable (information is altered every time its repeated), requires additional activities like body language for proper interaction. Just because we used it for thousands of years doesn't mean it's the best - we didn't have a choice, because all other means of communication require mass education, and this is not something humanity has a good track record with over the centuries. I can read faster than I can speak. I can sometimes type faster than I can speak. I cannot repeat twice the same sentence over 10 words without major effort. I need to engage in body language to be understood. I have to share the same communication medium with others. On the other hand - voice is the least common denominator. Whether voice will popularize the communication between the lowest human denominator and machines, yest I get, it will.

Pfffst its already been done (1)

future assassin (639396) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707510)

on Start Trek

Computer......

Re:Pfffst its already been done (1)

ackthpt (218170) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707638)

on Start Trek

Computer......

An I think that's the thing... you must prefix each command so it knows you are addressing it, not Mr. Spock or Lt. Uhura.

As if role play wasnt hard enough. (1)

Chardansearavitriol (1946886) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707518)

How do you get something like this to interpret actions? I have trouble with the idea of saying dash equal moan equal dash (-= moans =-) or asterisk moans asterisk out loud repeatedly.

Touching isn't natural?? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707532)

I believe touching is just a natural. Touching a phone perhaps is not, but nor is talking to a phone.

Current speech recognition is horrible (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37707536)

I'll be glad when my coworker can stop using the loud robotic voice his iPhone requires for the speech recognition system to work.

Because It's Apple (1)

Nom du Keyboard (633989) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707542)

Because it's Apple it is suddenly world changing technology. Had it been anybody else it would have been: Well when Apple implements it properly...

Ben there done that (5, Interesting)

strangeattraction (1058568) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707548)

Heard a technology interview on NPR this morning. It was very funny. They kept asking Siri questions it could not answer. Great entertainment. Actually saw the technology a couple of years ago at the Semantic Web in San Jose. It was very funny then too. The problem I have and have always had with this type of thing (hand writing rec, voice rec etc) is that when it gets it right you are amazed when it gets it wrong you are mad. If I type character in my computer by keyboard and the wrong thing shows up on the screen it is my fault. When the computer recognizes the wrong characters it is the machines fault. We expect better behavior from our machines than we do from ourselves.

Apple's Siri (1)

WeBMartians (558189) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707570)

I saw the "I'm drunk" example ... Siri suggests a cab. What happens if you say, "I'm horny!"? ...or, even more important: "I'm broke!"

Google is dead (-1)

mveloso (325617) | more than 2 years ago | (#37707586)

If Siri works as advertised and spreads, google is basically dead.

Go Apple!

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