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Table Salt Could Help Boost HDD Storage Density By a Factor of 5

Soulskill posted more than 2 years ago | from the tasty-performance dept.

Data Storage 142

hypnosec writes "A team of researchers has managed to boost storage density on traditional magnetic platters as high as 3.3 terabits per square inch using a technique that relies on NaCl — table salt. (Comparatively, a recent 4TB Seagate drive had an areal density of 625Gb per square inch.) A research team used a technique called nanopatterning to create arrays of magnetic bits that have more regular features (PDF) than the current traditional, randomly distributed technique. Team leader Joel Yang compares the technique to a well known traveling trick; 'It's like packing your clothes in your suitcase when you travel. The neater you pack them the more you can carry.' Yang said, 'In the same way, the team of scientists has used nanopatterning to closely pack more of the miniature structures that hold information in the form of bits, per unit area.'"

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Does it boost my memory too? (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715320)

Does it boost my memory too? Maybe I should eat some more.

Re:Does it boost my memory too? (1)

MichaelKristopeit418 (2018864) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715710)

what does it do to power requirements, or total life of the disk?

Re:Does it boost my memory too? (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715866)

It may if the Hypertension doesn't kill you.

Re:Does it boost my memory too? (1)

dogmatixpsych (786818) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716260)

Hypertension will destroy your memory if it doesn't kill you so salt certainly won't help. :)

Re:Does it boost my memory too? (2)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716366)

HyperTension? Is that a new feature in Intel processors?

Re:Does it boost my memory too? (2)

dontmakemethink (1186169) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716302)

Actually, yes. Your brain needs electrolytes to function properly. [livestrong.com] Doesn't mean you should eat more, but you might not be getting enough.

first post! (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715348)

damn...have nothing to say....drawing a blank!

Re:first post! (1)

jank1887 (815982) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715998)

you could say.... Second Post.

conspiracy (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715394)

I'm sure that the HDDs manufactures were able to produce large enough disks 5 years ago, but they're slowly increasing the capacity, just to force us to buy a new disk every year.

Re:conspiracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715492)

I know very few people who buy a new hard drive every year.

Re:conspiracy (1)

Zen-Mind (699854) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715502)

Companies don't force anyone, people's ego does ... big difference. Stop defining yourself by what you own, but by who you are and you should be fine :P

Re:conspiracy (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715580)

It's clear what you're trying to say, but I'd still like to point that "what you own" and "who you are" can feed into each other.

Re:conspiracy (2)

0123456 (636235) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715590)

I'm sure that the HDDs manufactures were able to produce large enough disks 5 years ago, but they're slowly increasing the capacity, just to force us to buy a new disk every year.

One of the big issues is that when drives hit 2TB a lot of things broke. A traditional BIOS has a hard time booting from a >2TB drive and older operating systems couldn't handle the 4kB sectors either... even if they could build 4TB drives there wasn't much point when you couldn't boot from them and performance was sluggish due to bad partition alignment.

Re:conspiracy (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716244)

Always a shame when software flaws limit hardware progress :/

Re:conspiracy (1)

SomePgmr (2021234) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716410)

Sounds reminiscent of old file system type limitations. Didn't FAT16 have a 2gb partition limit? I seem to remember that there was an overlapping period when >2gb disks were out and people still had old dos systems around.

Re:conspiracy (1)

derGoldstein (1494129) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715618)

This used to be true with Intel in the 90's, pre-AMD. If there's no competition, there's no motivation to accelerate progress. This is a different case, however -- there is competition in the HDD business, so the motivation to out-do your competitors exists.

This doesn't mean that progress isn't being throttled, however. It's always possible that rivals within the same market are colluding, which is something that's harder to catch.

Re:conspiracy (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716012)

Intel in the 90's, pre-AMD

Pre-AMD? AMD was created because IBM demanded a second source for 8088 chips. They produced Intel-compatible chips from the 8086 onwards. From the 80s to the 90s there were half a dozen other companies producing x86-compatible chips. The '90s was probably the most competitive time for Intel.

Re:conspiracy (1)

afidel (530433) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716170)

Let's see:
Cyrix
VIA
AMD
IBM (codesigned with Cyrix)
NexGen
Transmeta
That's all I can think of. Are you aware of any others during the 90's?

Re:conspiracy (1)

datavirtue (1104259) | more than 2 years ago | (#37717076)

OKI, Texas Instruments, NEC, ...

Re:conspiracy (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716180)

AMD was created because IBM demanded a second source for 8088 chips.

Except that AMD was formed 10 years before the 8088 existed (1979), and didn't start second-sourcing the 8088 until 1982 or 1983.

Re:conspiracy (1)

Jeng (926980) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715654)

Very doubtful that all the HDD manufactures had this technology 5 years ago. If all did then one of them would have used it to try to gain an advantage over the others.

Now if only one did, and they were the leader in the field, then yes plausible.

Re:conspiracy (1)

Nutria (679911) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716208)

Now if only one did, and they were the leader in the field, then yes plausible.

Or they might have used this method to reduce the number of platters, thereby reducing costs (though not necessarily prices).

Metaphors (2)

uigrad_2000 (398500) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715442)

It's like packing your clothes in your suitcase when you travel. The neater you pack them the more you can carry.

Dr. Yang continued. "For speciality file systems, imagine you are travelling for a wedding, and you need to pack a suit. The extra meta data for the file system is stored in a container much like the suit compartment of your luggage."

Unfortunately, the metaphor did not stop there.

"Data read times have been improved also. Imagine again that the suitcase is packed neatly, but this time all clothes are on their sides. Now, imagine the suitcase is being spun in an x-ray device by the TSA. The tighter packing allows them to see more of what is packed in the suitcase during each arc of 30 degrees."

The rest of the conversation has been edited out, but it related seek times to finding shoes that match your outfit.

Re:Metaphors (1)

idontgno (624372) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715482)

I see that yet again, Dilbert [dilbert.com] has pioneered critical storage technologies.

Re:Metaphors (1)

Joce640k (829181) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716348)

Whoah, dude. You can quote Dilbert back to 1993?

Re:Metaphors (1)

TheLink (130905) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716504)

Seriously though, when I pack for travelling I roll up my clothes tightly but I don't twist them. That way they aren't really creased (in fact they are less creased than if I folded them "neatly")

Sometimes if I need more space I stuff the rolled up clothes in a plastic bag, and use a vacuum cleaner to suck some air out of the bag (to squeeze stuff more) - but you shouldn't do this if you might not have access to a vacuum cleaner for repacking and you won't have extra space (given away gifts, used consumables etc). Also be aware that the luggage compartments in many planes isn't pressurized so... ;)

Re:Metaphors (3, Funny)

MozeeToby (1163751) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715638)

The whole time I was reading the analogy I was expecting him to finish with "That is a very graphic analogy which aids understanding wonderfully while being, strictly speaking, wrong in every possible way." With apologies to Sir Pterry.

Re:Metaphors (4, Interesting)

nabsltd (1313397) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715804)

The rest of the conversation has been edited out, but it related seek times to finding shoes that match your outfit.

This post makes me feel like I'm reading a Douglas Adams book. Well done.

Re:Metaphors (1)

Megane (129182) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715852)

Sorry, this is Slashdot. We use automotive analogies here. Does it have anything to do with melting ice on bridges?

Re:Metaphors (1)

rossdee (243626) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716320)

Here they use salt on other parts of the road, not just bridges. (of course by the time the plow truck has got down our end of the street its just about run out of the salt/sand mixture. - and Sodium Chloride doesnt do well when its below 0F

Re:Metaphors (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716584)

They used some crazy chemical here a couple years ago, it had a bluish tint. I don't know what the hell it was called, but it didn't work for shit and turned the roads into a skating rink. We were right back to the salt/sand the next season. I'm betting someone in the DoT got their walking papers for that one LOL

Re:Metaphors (1)

datavirtue (1104259) | more than 2 years ago | (#37717136)

You have not worked in government have you? People do not get fired for mistakes, they get promoted--seriously.

Re:Metaphors (2)

wintercolby (1117427) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716552)

Okay, so imagine you're a car dealer... if you have a parking lot full of cars parked at haphazard angles, then you won't be able to fit as many in . . . but if they're all at 30 degrees from the customer service entrance, then you'll fit at least 3 times as many cars into the parking lot and you can use a pair of binoculars to do your inventory.

So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715504)

..., does it make data storage more palatable, or should the claim be taken with a pinch of salt... :)

Re:So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715962)

A grain of salt you dumb mother fucker!

briny (1)

vencs (1937504) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715510)

Expected the TFA to have any detail about read/write speeds - something that one would expect about a HDD (not a lame suitcase analogy). Higher densities on platters often resulted in slower IO speeds as the heads proved not to be that precise in deciding whether a bit was set or not and so ends up in verifying the data using some ECC type mechanisms. May be the real motivation is to say that disk is the new tape.

Re:briny (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715754)

Yeah, maybe in opposite land.

In the past Increased densities have always resulted in increased speed because the amount of data that can be fed to the heads per unit of distance is increased.

Re:briny (4, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716048)

An increase in linear read speed, anyway. Hard drive random seek times haven't seen much change since the '80s. Densities have improved by a factor of over a million while seek times have improved by a factor of less than two.

Important note: (4, Funny)

Baloroth (2370816) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715516)

Do not try this at home. Pouring table salt on your hard drive platters will not improve their storage density.

Re:Important note: (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715598)

But it makes them more delicious

Re:Important note: (2)

EdZ (755139) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715628)

It will, however, significantly improve their flavour. Unseasoned glass substrate platters are particularly unappetising.

Re:Important note: (2)

Overzeetop (214511) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715652)

You don't know that. How could you, since it will likely make them unreadable. For all you know, you may have increased the available density by more than 5X. The heads would simply not be able to read them. ;-)

Re:Important note: (4, Insightful)

Jeng (926980) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715740)

Whenever the subject comes to data density I recall Heinlein take on this.

Basically you can take a match stick, and put a single mark on it. The distance between the mark and the end of the stick is the data being recorded. The higher precision the larger amount of data being recorded. With high enough precision a single mark could contain all the information that mankind has ever produced.

Re:Important note: (1)

gnasher719 (869701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716020)

Basically you can take a match stick, and put a single mark on it. The distance between the mark and the end of the stick is the data being recorded. The higher precision the larger amount of data being recorded. With high enough precision a single mark could contain all the information that mankind has ever produced.

You just re-invented arithmetic coding. Any file can be represented as a single real number between 0 and 1, as long as you have enough precision.

Re:Important note: (2)

sakdoctor (1087155) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716176)

The information density is still limited by quantum gravity, which predicts discreteness of space-time at the Planck length scale.

Re:Important note: (1)

MobileTatsu-NJG (946591) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716418)

That's not true. The number of marks you have after you write it is itself information. You'd be writing infinite data on a match stick!

(Sorry, I've had a terrible week programming.)

Re:Important note: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716590)

Heisenberg uncertainty principle limits how well localized the mark can be, given that the momentum of the mark is small. Also, thermal effects will perturb the mark position.

Re:Important note: (4, Interesting)

falzer (224563) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716602)

If my math is right, Planck's length as your resolution limit gives you 6.187x10^34 possible marking positions per meter of stick, which means you can encode about 115 bits with one mark on a 1m Planck-grade stick.

Re:Important note: (1, Insightful)

IorDMUX (870522) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716964)

If my math is right, Planck's length as your resolution limit gives you 6.187x10^34 possible marking positions per meter of stick, which means you can encode about 115 bits with one mark on a 1m Planck-grade stick.

Not quite. You can record one 115 bit value, which is very different from 115 bits. a 115 bit value has 2^115 = 42 million billion billion billion (10^34) bits of information.

A slight difference.

Re:Important note: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37717272)

If you encode the bits that small, how do you know where they are?

Re:Important note: (1)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715770)

You don't know that. How could you, since it will likely make them unreadable. For all you know, you may have increased the available density by more than 5X. The heads would simply not be able to read them. ;-)

I just tried that with my PS3, and I think your theory may be correct. It doesn't turn on, but I get a sense that the density has increased by roughly 500%. I also get a sense that I need to buy a new PS3. I'll definitely try to transfer the HDD over to the new one!

Re:Important note: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715756)

TLDR; I managed to fit only a little amount of table salt through the tiny holes that were covered by stickers, but my HD doesn't seem to be any faster.

Re:Important note: (3, Interesting)

interval1066 (668936) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716076)

Took me a minute becuase the article was very difficult for me to read (navy font against a lighter blue background, brilliant) but all they did was add table salt (in aqueous solution I'm sure) to the developing chemicals in the etching process. That's interesting from a chemistry persepective; it implies they may be able to even higher densities by fiddling around with that catalyst- in stead of salt maybe they add shrimp cocktail to the process and get peta byte capacities or something.

Re:Important note: (3, Funny)

RoverDaddy (869116) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716436)

No petabytes, because peta would object to the exploitation of shrimp.

Re:Important note: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37717030)

No petabytes

NOOOOO! How will we save petafiles?

Re:Important note: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716430)

What did my sysadmin always say about taking care of my hard drives?

Never put salt in your hard drive. Never put salt in your hard drive. Never put salt in yoNever put salt in yoNever putNever putNeverNeverNeNeNe

Always put salt in your hard drive.

Re:Important note: (1)

insertwackynamehere (891357) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716870)

Thanks. I nearly choked to death on my Qdoba you fucking dick

Re:Important note: (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716754)

Could it possibly 'chip' the platter??

Re:Important note: (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#37717270)

Do not try this at home. Pouring table salt on your hard drive platters will not improve their storage density.

That depends on which definition of the word "areal" you use.

Retention (1)

Zen-Mind (699854) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715530)

Salt is now good for both water AND data rentention YAY!

SeaSaltGate? (1)

Bemopolis (698691) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715544)

I haven't read the article, but the idea sounds kosher.

Good night, tip your waitresses.

Re:SeaSaltGate? (1)

tgd (2822) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716546)

I haven't read the article, but the idea sounds kosher.

Good night, tip your waitresses.

I'm taking the whole thing with a grain of ...

Nevermind.

So, ... (1)

mpmansell (118934) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715552)

...does it make data storage more palatable, or should the claim be taken with a pinch of salt... :)

Re:So, ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716054)

as stated previously, it's a GRAIN of salt you stupid stupid motherfucker. Now, go shoot yourself in the face.

take care (1)

godrik (1287354) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715558)

We should take that news with a grain of salt. One can not just spread NaCl on its hard drive and get performance kick.

Screw that (1)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715560)

I want a massive SSD capacity increase, and price drop.

Re:Screw that (1)

ajlitt (19055) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715664)

Until that happens, enjoy the increasingly more garish whips the buggy drivers will be brandishing.

Limits (1)

CanHasDIY (1672858) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715574)

Just don't use too much, or your disks might begin retaining water...

electron beam lithography (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715668)

It looks like they have found a neat way to improve resolution when patterning with e-beam lithography. But, honestly, hard drive media is probably the worst application they could think of. e-beam is so slow, it doesn't matter how small you can make features, if it takes months to years to pattern a single platter, it just won't work.

Potential positives? (1)

JabrTheHut (640719) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715678)

This probably won't happen, but:

If it drives up the price of salt then it may spur desalination projects making more drinkable water available. It might make desalination cheaper, and help increase the world's water supply. However, you'd need to use truly huge quantities of salt for that to happen.

Re:Potential positives? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715964)

Have you any idea of the cost of salt these days? It's almost free.

Re:Potential positives? (1)

Reverand Dave (1959652) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716104)

As salt is one of the most plentiful minerals on the planet and such a small amount of the overall salt produced is due to desalinization, I doubt your prediction will ever happen.

" NaCl — table salt" (1)

NevarMore (248971) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715680)

Whats the chemical formula for driveway salt? Kosher salt? Sea salt?

Imagine how much we could store in the big granules of road salt when winter rolls around!

Re:" NaCl — table salt" (2)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715928)

Well driveway salt can have a lot of different formula.

NaCl - Standard Cheap Rock Salt
KCl - Safety Salt
CaCl2 - Quick Melt Salt

Patents (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715684)

Someone quick . . . get a patent table salt . . .and method of neat suitcase packing.

Re:Patents (1)

wintercolby (1117427) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716620)

Someone quick . . . get a patent table salt . . .and method of neat suitcase packing.

Don't for get to patent the part about putting a storage device developed with this technology in a computer.

Please, This is a Geek Site (1)

avandesande (143899) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715692)

Would it have killed you to call it sodium chloride in your summary and skip over the table salt thing?

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (2)

codemaster2b (901536) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715816)

Table salt has a 1:1 correlation to sodium chloride. Therefore no additional information is conveyed using the chemical name. While I appreciate your desire to be geeky, may I point out that "table salt" is 33% more efficient at conveying the intended information?

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37715864)

but 250% less efficient than NaCl

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (1)

epine (68316) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715980)

While I appreciate your desire to be geeky, may I point out that "table salt" is 33% more efficient at conveying the intended information?

Tell that to my Himalayan salt or my Mediterranean sea salt, both of which imply unspecified exotic trace elements. I'm not quite so willing to energize on white bread custom as to equate the two. For brevity, I keep a shaker of NaCl.

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (2)

AdamHaun (43173) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716028)

Tell that to my Himalayan salt or my Mediterranean sea salt, both of which imply unspecified exotic trace elements.

They're the same trace elements as all unprocessed salt -- minerals that were also dissolved in the ocean. I ran across a site that claimed Himalayan salt has 84 elements, although that's impossible without including some toxic and/or radioactive ones. The claim seems to be based on a lab report that lists 84 elements, many of which are not present in detectable quantities in the salt.

[I was in a bad mood one day and ran across the stuff at Whole Foods. It prompted me to do some research.]

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716100)

My table salt also has some iodine in it.

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (1)

avandesande (143899) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716240)

Exactly. You can't use table salt for photographic processes because the iodine poisons the emulsions. I doubt they would want iodine in something that goes into hard drive platters either!

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (1)

avandesande (143899) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716254)

Table salt is inappropriate for almost all chemical processes because of additives and impurities.

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (1)

afabbro (33948) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716388)

Table salt has a 1:1 correlation to sodium chloride.

Some of us like to get some potassium [mortonsalt.com] in our "table salt".

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716508)

Yeah, what is sodium anyway? Natrium?

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716274)

But Table Salt has more of an impact than just saying sodium chloride.
"Something that is sitting there, right on your table, can magnify bit storage on a platter significantly."
"hey this random chemical that some of you may or may not know can increase storage!"

Not everyone is a chemist here, remember. While Sodium Chloride is one of the most well known chemicals, that isn't the point.
Plus, It helps external readers too who may or may not frequent the site.

Besides, they already mentioned NaCl in addition to table salt. Best of both worlds IMO.
WHAT MORE DO YOU WANT?! SOME TEA AND BICCIES? AGH

Re:Please, This is a Geek Site (1)

Algae_94 (2017070) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716412)

I don't think you need to be a Chemist to know what NaCl is. In fact, if you don't know what it is, you are either very young and haven't learned it, a complete idiot, or the modern school systems are a complete joke. Perhaps seeing "NaCl" in the summary would spur someone who is unaware of what it is to actually try to learn something and look it up.

This is one story... (2)

Anubis IV (1279820) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715776)

This is one story that I'll be taking with a grain of salt.

buh-dum-TISH

Hey, scientists, it's *us* ... (1)

Provocateur (133110) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715810)

Hey fellas, it's us. You can tell us that one of you was having his lunch at his desk and spilled some of the salt from his salt packets onto some of your test disks. And actually tried to pass it off as 'more experiments'. He could have put the devices out of the way but naaaa. Anyway, win-win, right? (Oh, could you hand me some of the pepper, while you're publishing your results...)

So what about quasicrystals? (1)

wisebabo (638845) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715916)

Does the non-repeating nature of quasicrystals help (or hurt) data storage?

Any Nobel Laureates care to reply?

Dont believe all such reports. (1)

140Mandak262Jamuna (970587) | more than 2 years ago | (#37715974)

All I'm sayin' is, take it with a pinch of salt.

Re:Dont believe all such reports. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716472)

For the third fucking time, the saying is a GRAIN of salt you ignorant motherfucking retard.

Re:Dont believe all such reports. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716654)

Don't be so proud of that pun, it wasn't sodium impressive.

Degradation (1)

burning-toast (925667) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716292)

Salt + Oxygen + Iron Oxide (rust).

How long will this chemical combination remain stable? Is long-term oxidation a concern here?

Re:Degradation (1)

jmak (409787) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716608)

I suppose the salt only takes part in the manufacturing process, and is removed afterwards.

Hmmm (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716378)

I put some salt on my clients HDD with some fava beans and nice chianti... sector scramble

That's not data (1)

hackertourist (2202674) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716632)

That mark is useless without the table that tells you what each distance represents. So on that matchstick you haven't stored data, merely a hash of that data.

Just a spoonful of salt.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37716666)

Makes the harddrive get big!
      The harddrive get big!
            The harddrive get big!

Bacon Salt (1)

Gunnut1124 (961311) | more than 2 years ago | (#37716886)

Think of the miracles they could perform if they'd use Bacon Salt instead...
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