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German Surveillance Trojan Spies On Fifteen Apps

Unknown Lamer posted about 3 years ago | from the father-knows-best dept.

Government 69

itwbennett writes "Researchers from Kaspersky Lab have discovered that the R2D2 surveillance Trojan, which is used by German law enforcement to intercept Internet phone calls, is capable of monitoring traffic from popular browsers and instant messaging applications. 'Amongst the new things we found in there are two rather interesting ones: Firstly, this version is not only capable of running on 32 bit systems; it also includes support for 64 bit versions of Windows,' said Tillmann Werner, a security researcher with Kaspersky in Germany. 'Secondly, the list of target processes to monitor is longer than the one mentioned in the CCC report. The number of applications infected by the various components is 15 in total.'"

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First... (-1, Troll)

Frenzied Apathy (2473340) | about 3 years ago | (#37764092)

... post!!!

Kaspersky RULZ (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764104)

That's why i use Kaspersky Antivirus. These guys are not afraid to actually CATCH the virus.

Yet another reason... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764206)

Not to run Windows.

Nathan

PS.. image word "CONCUR"

Re:Yet another reason... (1)

ackthpt (218170) | about 3 years ago | (#37764512)

Not to run Windows.

Or to allow someone to install "updates" to your computer who goes by the name S. Tazi or Gus Tappo.

Re:Yet another reason... (4, Funny)

jamiesan (715069) | about 3 years ago | (#37765926)

Some guy named Lou Ftwaffa wanted me to install some plugins on my flight simulator.

Re:Yet another reason... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37769444)

Did you get the operational camo coated jet planes, with phalli under the wings this way? I heard they are quite difficult to maneuver compared to a Must-have-tang.

Re:Yet another reason... (3, Funny)

treeves (963993) | about 3 years ago | (#37767644)

A lady named Krystal Nacht insisted that I upgrade my shared libraries and clean up my registry, but when I did it, I found that my Windows was broken.

Re:Yet another reason... (1)

iceaxe (18903) | about 3 years ago | (#37767842)

*has a stroke from Godwin overdose*

Re:Yet another reason... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37780052)

Not to run Windows.

Nathan

PS.. image word "CONCUR"

Too bad the number of reasons to run it versus Linux (software titles) outnumbers that by 1000 to 1. Dipshit.

p.s. - image word 'you're a dumbass'

Apps? (2)

xavdeman (946931) | about 3 years ago | (#37764230)

Or applications?

Re:Apps? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764464)

"App" is a shortening of "application". They're not specifically for mobile phones though idiots will say that's the case.

Re:Apps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37765272)

They're not specifically for mobile phones though idiots will say that's the case.

Interesting. This is the first I've heard of it. I'm pretty sure I've been saying "App" since long before most phones ran them.

Re:Apps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37765878)

Some of those idiots are on this very site. You haven't been reading enough apple-related articles if you haven't spotted them.

Re:Apps? (1)

sexconker (1179573) | about 3 years ago | (#37765462)

Apps are what you get at Chili's. I recommend the Texas Cheese Fries.
Applications are uses, or forms you fill out for shit.
Programs are what you hand out at a theater.
Software is software.

Re:Apps? (1)

treeves (963993) | about 3 years ago | (#37767672)

Sometimes a church has an apps. Oh wait, that's an apse.

Re:Apps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764850)

Executable is the correct term in this case - not app, not application. An "application" usually consists of multiple files, even multiple executables, which work together. The German spyware only attacks processes based on executables with certain names, so it won't necessarily affect an entire application - only one of the processes in it.

"App" just refers to an especially crappy application, usually running on a phone or set-top box, with minimal user configurability.

Re:Apps? (1)

TheRaven64 (641858) | about 3 years ago | (#37765188)

"App" just refers to an especially crappy application, usually running on a phone or set-top box, with minimal user configurability.

I'm pretty sure 'app' has just been short for 'application' for the last 20 years or so. It isn't specific to mobile apps.

GPG? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764310)

How good of a code audit does GPG undergo? IIRC, GPG id largely funded by the German government.

I want to move to Germany... (1)

Oswald McWeany (2428506) | about 3 years ago | (#37764320)

Imagine being able to legally work on producing the software to do this. Not just legally- but with the backing of the government. ... no, I do not condone it... ... but it would be fascinating to work on. :)

Re:I want to move to Germany... (1)

WormholeFiend (674934) | about 3 years ago | (#37764338)

Vee haf vays of monitoring yur messages!

Re:I want to move to Germany... (1)

Moheeheeko (1682914) | about 3 years ago | (#37764396)

the Gestapo has new ways of making you talk, one by one they add email addresses of your loved ones to the email containing your browser history.

Re:I want to move to Germany... (3, Funny)

ackthpt (218170) | about 3 years ago | (#37764424)

Vee haf vays of monitoring yur messages!

In Soviet Germany ... wait, what?!?

Re:I want to move to Germany... (1)

TangoMargarine (1617195) | about 3 years ago | (#37764554)

East Germany [wikipedia.org]

Re:I want to move to Germany... (1)

fierce (1475725) | about 3 years ago | (#37771276)

Shaka! The walls fell?

Re:I want to move to Germany... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37772976)

Darmok yes! With arms wide open!

Re:I want to move to Germany... (5, Interesting)

ackthpt (218170) | about 3 years ago | (#37764402)

Imagine being able to legally work on producing the software to do this. Not just legally- but with the backing of the government. ... no, I do not condone it... ... but it would be fascinating to work on. :)

Imagine a world where a government employs such devious means...

Then imagine a world where the government kicks down your door because your detected their worm and quarantined it - which makes you a person of interest.

Re:I want to move to Germany... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37765182)

Any person tech savvy enough to detect an app like that and/or quarantine/remove it, wouldn't have it installed in the first place.

Re:I want to move to Germany... (1)

zAPPzAPP (1207370) | about 3 years ago | (#37766254)

They use some more hands on methods to get it installed than your ordinary worm.
Like breaking into your house, or snatching a device for a "security check" (at which point you are to give them all passwords of course).

Re:I want to move to Germany... (1)

couchslug (175151) | about 3 years ago | (#37766880)

"Then imagine a world where the government kicks down your door because your detected their worm and quarantined it - which makes you a person of interest."

Then imagine that country's track record over the first forty-five years of the last century, plus the track record (yet to be fully revealed) of the Eastern half of that country, and don't forget how many players are either still alive or lived long enough to have direct contact including training with current law enforcement.

Sleep tight.

Re:I want to move to Germany... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37771354)

Then imagine a world where the government kicks down your door because your detected their worm and quarantined it - which makes you a person of interest.

And then Imagine theres no Pizza.

Imagine mozzarella [youtube.com]
Anchovies on the side
And maybe, pepperoni
Rounds out your pizza pie
Imagine getting pizza
Delivered to your door

Why imagine, it already happend (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37771486)

last year the German policy busted a guy and seized his IT equipment because he had a trojan on his PC and they wanted to analyze it.

Google translate of the article:

http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=de&sl=de&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.heise.de%2Ftp%2Fartikel%2F33%2F33653%2F1.html
But then, the Pirate Party is at 10% if elections would take part next sunday.

Re:I want to move to Germany... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764470)

You dont think this is what the NSA does, or spy agencies in every country, all day long, every day?

Then you be naive, son.

Re:I want to move to Germany... (2)

heson (915298) | about 3 years ago | (#37764954)

NSA does not need to snoop in the leaf node, they have the network (and the cloud). If I was NSA, I would also build a tight partnership with google, in fact, many of googles features looks like spinoffs of what I imagine NSA is doing.

Re:I want to move to Germany... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37772238)

> If I was NSA, I would also build a tight partnership with google

If I was the NSA, I'd BUILD Google as a front-end and then ROFLMAO each day at the office...

Re:I want to move to Germany... (1)

Dishevel (1105119) | about 3 years ago | (#37765310)

Yes. Fascinating.
You can be a complete asshole now under the cover of authority making less money for a bigger evil.

Re:I want to move to Germany... (2)

zAPPzAPP (1207370) | about 3 years ago | (#37766186)

You will have to apply for a job at that one company they hand all those shady contracts to. You know, the one the minister of interior is involved with.
Good news though: from what the CCC told us, they are really in need of some capable hackers.

Do Antivirus projects block this Trojan? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764356)

or do they have a whitelist of government sanctioned trojans that they let through?

Re:Do Antivirus projects block this Trojan? (1)

GameboyRMH (1153867) | about 3 years ago | (#37765358)

If they know it exists then it's not very secret is it? Most antivirus apps have open virus definition files. Chances are there is no whitelist for these, and in fact I would expect any AV tool that does heuristic scanning to pick it up.

They damn well better pick it up if they're going to pick up every cracked game executable in existence >_<

Re:Do Antivirus projects block this Trojan? (2)

zAPPzAPP (1207370) | about 3 years ago | (#37766348)

Anti Virus are good at picking up malware that spread a lot.
But these trojans are supposed to be used in very limited cases, so there is little chance of any AV aiming to find them specifically (up until now that is).
Heuristcs are supposed to handle such cases, but you can test your malware against those heuristics until you are good to go and if they don't know of you, they can't change heuristics to catch you.

Re:Do Antivirus projects block this Trojan? (2)

godel_56 (1287256) | about 3 years ago | (#37768822)

Anti Virus are good at picking up malware that spread a lot. But these trojans are supposed to be used in very limited cases, so there is little chance of any AV aiming to find them specifically (up until now that is). Heuristics are supposed to handle such cases, but you can test your malware against those heuristics until you are good to go and if they don't know of you, they can't change heuristics to catch you.

RTFA.

Kaspersky stated that their AV had already detected this heuristically as a variation of the R2D2 Trojan and blocked it. They suggest installing a password in your AV to prevent anyone adding any malware to its exclusions list, as the installers had physical access to the computer to install it.

Chrome and Safari not on the list? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764364)

n/t

Re:Chrome and Safari not on the list? (1)

Frenzied Apathy (2473340) | about 3 years ago | (#37764510)

n/t

Sorry, this is completely off-topic, but doesn't typing "n/t" (by which I'm assuming you mean "no text") in your post make the reason for typing it a moot point? Kind of self-contradictory?

Just a question...

Re:Chrome and Safari not on the list? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764566)

Regardless of whether it's moot (or contradictory, which I think you meant), it's necessary to get past the filter.

Re:Chrome and Safari not on the list? (1)

jpapon (1877296) | about 3 years ago | (#37765232)

While it is contradictory, why not go with ironic, oxymoronic, or perhaps paradoxical?

Windows has malware? Tell me it aint so. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764504)

Windows has malware? Tell me it aint so.

Law enforcement reports... (1)

justdiver (2478536) | about 3 years ago | (#37764542)

nothing interesting other than suspiciously high traffic to David Hasselhoff's website.

Cool (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764552)

It's nice to see the government is devolping cross platform, a true model for everyone!

In Corporate US, it's for Legal Documentation ! (2)

cbelt3 (741637) | about 3 years ago | (#37764564)

Such' 'spyware' is rife in the Corporate world, but it's called "Document retention" and "monitoring for legal cases". Corporate smart phones, computers, etc. are all equipped with methods to record everything we do. Just because some shyster could possibly want to use it as an axe to such money from our company.

You *CAN* get a job in industry writing this kind of code. Seriously. It's out there.

Re:In Corporate US, it's for Legal Documentation ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37764956)

not all are. only from companies which are stupid enough to throw their bargaining chips away... though even that market has to be enormous since ceo's and cto's are stupid as hell usually.

Re:In Corporate US, it's for Legal Documentation ! (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37770150)

Such' 'spyware' is rife in the Corporate world, but it's called "Document retention" and "monitoring for legal cases". Corporate smart phones, computers, etc. are all equipped with methods to record everything we do. Just because some shyster could possibly want to use it as an axe to such money from our company.

In some industries (like investment banking) they are required to keep track of what their employees do. Email, IM, web browsing, SMS, etc.

Top Notch Support (2)

Sponge Bath (413667) | about 3 years ago | (#37764820)

"...capable of running on 32 bit systems; it also includes support for 64 bit versions of Windows"

I wish all software and hardware vendors were that current.

R2D2? (1)

asylum_street_blues (1122751) | about 3 years ago | (#37765382)

Wait 'til Lucasfilm sues the Germans for copyright infringement. Even Google had to put a little "used with permission of Lucasfilm Ltd." notice on everything using "Droid".

Re:R2D2? (4, Funny)

Spy Handler (822350) | about 3 years ago | (#37765498)

but then the Germans can sue Lucas for infringing on their trademark, Stormtrooper

Re:R2D2? (1)

ogdenk (712300) | about 3 years ago | (#37766310)

And the empire is obviously a derivative work from copyrighted Nazi documents and patented Nazi methodology and procedures. I would love to see Lucas just absolutely ass-raped in court. George is a douchenozzle.

That fact that more people in the past haven't told Lucas to go get f**ked and stand their ground is why things are as ridiculous as they are. When you can copyright object shapes and terms such as "Droid" and win in court, all hope is lost. It's gotten to the point where it's so insane, I just generally ignore modern copyright law. Doesn't mean I don't have morals and pirate everything I feel like however but in no way should stuff written over 30-40 years ago still be covered under copyright and the definition of "derivative work" should be looser and less vague. Technically EVERYTHING is a derivative work of SOMETHING.

Cool (1)

EvilBudMan (588716) | about 3 years ago | (#37766398)

Where can I download this app?

Re:Cool (1)

ista (71787) | about 3 years ago | (#37805494)

The original press release from chaos computer club at http://www.ccc.de/de/updates/2011/staatstrojaner [www.ccc.de]

points to

http://www.ccc.de/system/uploads/77/original/0zapftis-release.tgz [www.ccc.de]

Feel free to do your own analysis :-)

However, AV software now does have at lease one more symptom to watch out for possible malware: the trojan included a couple of .DLLs, who didn't export any kind of function.

Re:Cool (1)

EvilBudMan (588716) | more than 2 years ago | (#37836236)

Cool and Thx, It's just something else to look out for. Privacy musta died at least 10 years ago.

German Surveillance: "No Linux support plans" (4, Funny)

Shompol (1690084) | about 3 years ago | (#37766916)

In an interview the Sekret German Surveillance rep said: "Ve dont haf planz to releze a Linukz verson of SpyMaster 2000".
He cited multiple problems, including lack of support for MS Trojan API's on non-Windows platforms. While there is [not] an emulator, called Bier, it it not powerful enough to support full Trojan functionality suit.

Many Germans complained that this is the last reason that keeps them from switching to Linux. One of the interviewers complained: "They are using our Steuergeldern, there should be Chancengleichheit for all Trojans, not just Microsoft!"

Re:German Surveillance: "No Linux support plans" (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 3 years ago | (#37768898)

If you have wireless, think of a fed with a laptop in the street - that will get into most OS X, Linux people of interest enjoying modern ethernet free computing.
If your a Mac or Linux setup is wired, the feds might chat with your isp and go direct down your isp network next time you connect.
Windows is well understood from a security admin ~ protective tools view. Its wide open and easy to slip something in on most versions.
Some new, unknown, different, exotic outgoing Mac/Linux software firewall/log might just alert the user, then they ring smart friends.. the press...
http://arstechnica.com/apple/news/2011/09/mac-trojan-pretends-to-be-flash-player-installer-to-get-in-the-door.ars [arstechnica.com]
Its wonderful if the users enters their "Unix" pw for you and you can alter all you need.

Re:German Surveillance: "No Linux support plans" (1)

ista (71787) | about 3 years ago | (#37806506)

Legal representatives of the trojan-authoring company "DigiTask" actually stated to german press that "basically DigiTask were able to supply software for other operating systems as well - if the contract tells them to do so."
So your attempt to be funny does point in a completely wrong direction: those guys who wrote this "legal interception" piece of spyware are clearly "dangerous" to non-Windows platforms as well.

On a sidenote, for at least 30 years or so german students in school classes after elementary school do attend 4-6 years of english language courses, usually a couple of hours per week. Some german politicians (usually those who can't speak their own language without using a dialect or at lease some very "unique" accent) publicly also suppose that toddlers in Kindergarten or pupils entering elementary school should start learning either mandarin chinese or english. English language and pop culture also do have quite a strong impact in Germany as well; for example, clearance sale isn't advertised with "Schlussverkauf" anymore but with large "SALE" signs. And 20 years ago, most germans didn't have an idea of halloween, but today, german kids can't wait to carve pumpkins and ask for a german version of "trick or treat".

As a german, I did learn english and french at school but haven't been using french for close to 20 years. My school grades in french have never been fairly well, but a few months ago, I've been waiting in line at an amusement park located in germany, but close to the french border. A french mum and her four-year-old kid were waiting behind me, and the girl wanted to ride a roller coaster, but was smaller than the usually asked 120 centimeters. My "rusty" french was still good enough to understand most of their conversation, to introduce myself and give them a hint on a close "youngster" roller coaster which may also be used by smaller kids.

Of course, those language courses in school are far from being perfect and without frequent use, people do tend both to forget words and not to be self-confident enough to use a language learned years ago - but those language courses still do enable people to communicate with each other. This is especially important in Europe, where you can't move any further than a few hundred miles without at least being able to barely understand a completely different language. I also do know that german is quite a hard language to learn, so I don't expect any foreigners to speak german. If someone tries to do so, I see this as a very honorable attempt to accommodate himself to the country he is in - so in fact, a kind of compliment.

If some word is unknown in such a situation, most people also tend to describe a word either using known, assumed-to-be-simpler words or even yet another, third language rather than using a word of their own (hey, they know that their language is not understood, so there's no use for their language's vocabulary). Yet another point where your joke fails.

So maybe now you should start poking fun at those U.S. citizens, who do try to find a job in Miami and have a hard time doing so without speaking spanish. It's about the same level of "assuming to be funny at the expense of an unknown situation".

Re:German Surveillance: "No Linux support plans" (1)

Shompol (1690084) | more than 2 years ago | (#37817840)

I am sorry you took offense, but the joke was not aimed at Germans at all. The target was Windows and Netflix, although I don't name them directly. In fact, the title was ripped off from an article about Netflix :)

I am not a security expert, but highly doubt this Trojan could be created for Linux. Which distribution would it target? How would it gain access to root to install the Trojan? I am sure there are loopholes, and suppose they exploited one; the very moment someone finds it, that loophole is getting patched. What does MS do? They send law enforcement to arrest yet another "malware crime ring". See the problem here?

On a sidenote, for at least 30 years or so german students in school classes after elementary school do attend 4-6 years of english language courses, usually a couple of hours per week.

East or West Germany? Something tells me that East Germany had a different education system. Again, the joke is not about them. I myself have an accent when speaking Americano.

Re:German Surveillance: "No Linux support plans" (1)

ista (71787) | more than 2 years ago | (#37875352)

No offense taken - I do see the whole trojan surveillance issue as being a very important issue for multiple reasons.

For example, many people are having their laughs on the low level of technical expertise being used in this trojan. A few ones are also laughing about how these trojans have been installed (e.g. in one case, a customs officer at an airport wanted to do some extensive checks on one suspect's notebook; the suspect handed them the notebook, the officer left for a few minutes into another room and returned the notebook).

A different, but very worrying view are the legal issues and the tendencies of politicians. A few politicians do want this kind of spyware for years. A few years ago, the constitutional court did decide on exactly what kinds of actions may be exercised by such a surveillance software and what actions are clearly forbidden. However, exactly the same government who triggered this court decision did ignore those decisions. The Chaos Computer Club has been checking multiple versions of the same spyware, and all of them do completely ignore any court decisions.

Merely a little more than just a year ago, Germany's federal president resigned after an unlucky notion in a radio interview, which doesn't exactly match the ideas of the constitution and the rule of the german defence-only army. A few weeks later, the minister of defence Guttenberg states an even bolder statement of the same issue and is being applauded for this. However, plagiarism in his doctorate thesis effectively makes him resign a few months later: at first, the minister strictly denies everything, later choses to "temporarily" no longer use his doctorate title, then asks the university to withdraw the title. In the end, he's asking the chancellor to accept his resignment.

With the trojan spyware issue, about every state and federal politician did deny usage of this software, then denied the results of the analysis, later somehow acknowledged the results and even later acknowledged that this software has actively been used by more government agencies than estimated. The scheme of answers is the very same like with Guttenberg's doctorate plagiarism, but the actual crime strictly is a violation of a constitutional court's decision. Nobody resigned.

Back in 2008, the constitutional court also decided federal election laws to be flawed and gave politicians three years to resolve those issues. The deadline for this expired this summer. So the very next federal elections may easily be revoked. What does it tell you when a government does ignore multiple decisions of its highest courts and as such, ignoring certain ideas and aspects of their own constitution?

During the past 30 years or so, the Chaos Computer Club also became a very valuable, non-biased and honored source in expertise on IT security for media, politics, regular and highest courts, but exactly once their analysis on "governmental spyware" appeared, quite a few politicians cried that you can't trust those ideas and fantasys of some weird kind of club who do claim chaos in their title. So actually, those politicians are actually trying to defame the Chaos Computer Club.

I am not a security expert, but highly doubt this Trojan could be created for Linux. Which distribution would it target? How would it gain access to root to install the Trojan? I am sure there are loopholes, and suppose they exploited one; the very moment someone finds it, that loophole is getting patched. What does MS do? They send law enforcement to arrest yet another "malware crime ring". See the problem here?

One of the samples of the current surveillance software has been retrieved from a notebook; the software has been installed by customs officers at an airport, who did some "extensive checks" in another room. To me, this reads like the owner handed his notebook to those customs officers and they've been using some kind of bootable USB stick or the like to install into the Trojan into the likely non-encrypted filesystem.

A similar linux version wouldn't have to target a specific distro, a security issue or a loophole. So when someone gets physical access to your notebook, he could easily boot the box off a CD to replace /sbin/init by some kind of statically linked rootkit - there's no need for a root password, exploit or loophole once you already do have physical access and may simply mount the filesystem. And while they're at it, they may mess around with the rpm or dpkg database in order to correct any MD5 checksums and tagging /sbin/init as being a part of sysvinit or upstart release 66.6, so you likely won't receive any distro-updates to those packages for ages. I guess average linux users wouldn't notice a trojan installed that way and "only" during some major distro upgrade, things may break.

Another way were to replace the kernel binary on hard disk with a specific rootkit-kernel. This way, one might also access encrypted blockdevices or filesystems.

So probably about the only ways to protect from such threats were to strictly use encrypted blockdevices on hard disk and load the system kernel from a USB stick. The USB stick is only required for booting and may be removed after boot. So if some customs officer wants to take a closer look at your notebook, you may hand them the notebook - it isn't able to boot and its encrypted drive won't enable them to install a rootkit.

On a sidenote, for at least 30 years or so german students in school classes after elementary school do attend 4-6 years of english language courses, usually a couple of hours per week.

East or West Germany? Something tells me that East Germany had a different education system. Again, the joke is not about them. I myself have an accent when speaking Americano.

Until 20 years ago, students in West Germany have been learning English, while students in East Germany have been learning Russian. After Germany has been united, schools in East Germany pretty soon started offering English courses. However, I've been in West-German schools and back in 1989, my school also started offering russian language courses. I guess this is linked to Russia's era of Perestroika/Glasnost.

A co-worker of mine came from East Germany and did only attend two years or so of english lessons at school. He also attended the "business english" courses being offered in the office, but still was somehow uncomfortable actually speaking English. Nevertheless, he didn't have much trouble resolving technical and work-related issues with colleagues from the U.S. via email or ticketing systems.
On the other hand, he was fluently speaking in russian with another co-worker who came to Germany from the country of Ukraine and who has been about the same level of being uncomfortable in speaking german than he was with speaking English. In terms of business and economy, former russian countries also do come closer to Europe, so in the end, both English and Russian have been proven to be important languages in business (at least to those Europeans who live between "western" and "eastern" Europe).

Don't blame the Germans... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37767786)

They were only following orders.

Re:Don't blame the Germans... (1)

AHuxley (892839) | about 3 years ago | (#37769844)

Independent contractor Schultz: I installed nothing, I logged nothing, I know nothing!

Missing App Names? (1)

Em Adespoton (792954) | about 3 years ago | (#37769010)

Interesting to see that pidgin.exe and chrome.exe aren't in the list....

Re:Missing App Names? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 3 years ago | (#37771998)

Interesting to see that pidgin.exe and chrome.exe aren't in the list....

What's even more interesting is that the trojan can be circumvented by renaming your application files.

Funny that... (1)

phooka.de (302970) | about 3 years ago | (#37773706)

Slashdot used to be my primary news aggregator. Well, it's stories like this that push me away. Not the story itself, mind you, I was quite interested in the comments to it. No, the fact that all there was was "funny" jokes about Germans and their bad English. If I want that, I can watch fawlty towers on youtube, it's way more funny (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IngEMj4krpA [youtube.com] ).

Bye (for now?).

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