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How To Stop the Next WikiLeaks

samzenpus posted more than 2 years ago | from the plugging-the-holes dept.

Security 191

Hugh Pickens writes "Eli Lake reports that the U.S.'s 16 intelligence agencies are using a program called SureView that makes it easier to spy on the spies and catch whistleblowers early in the act. SureView is a type of auditing software that specializes in 'behavior-based internal monitoring' that monitors the intelligence officer's computer activity. If the officer acts like a potential leaker, sending an encrypted email or using an unregistered thumb drive, the analyst might push a button and watch a screen video of the officer's last hour of work. Once a case is made that a leak might be imminent, it is checkmate: the agent is thwarted. 'Had SureView been on Bradley Manning's machine, no one would know who Bradley Manning is today,' says Ryan Szedelo, manager for Raytheon's SureView software. The intelligence community has had auditing software for years. SureView came on the market in 2002. But the programs were buggy and often prone to false positives, alerting a network administrator too often to routine behavior. 'The technology has gotten substantially better in the last year,' says Jeffrey Harris, a former head of the National Reconnaissance Office. 'The problem with audit files was it took an army of people to understand them. Now we have rule-driven systems and expert systems that help us reason through the data.'"

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191 comments

What if... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789556)

What if I send only encrypted mail, and use only encrypted drives? Are they going to watch my screen the whole time?

Re:What if... (2)

masternerdguy (2468142) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789660)

They'll just take you to Guantanamo and beat you until you decrypt them.

Re:What if... (1)

Riceballsan (816702) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789748)

Well considering it looks for things to flag people as "suspicious", I would say only sending encrypted e-mail, counts as suspicious.

Re:What if... (1)

arkenian (1560563) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789818)

I feel obliged to note that on most of the systems likely to have this sort of thing attached, encryption is nearly the default setting for e-mail, and is basically never considered a bad thing. This program isn't about e-mails and outbound comms so much as it is about what you access internally, and media writes etc.

Re:What if... (1)

l00sr (266426) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790132)

I actually find it hilarious that the three-letter agencies regard sending encrypted email as 'suspicious', and then wonder why how security breaches happen...

Re:What if... (3, Informative)

durrr (1316311) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789928)

Use a VGA/DVI interception hardware device to save to external storage. People will be stuck thinking in the box so you'll have no problems whatsoever as long as you don't save or move any data "in-system".

Please don't forget to mention how SureView is awsome and ensures 100% data security while at it to keep the blinders on.

Re:What if... (1)

bberens (965711) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790298)

od -c /opt/supersecretprogram/binarydatafile

Re:What if... (1)

Larryish (1215510) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790496)

And what about the analog hole?

If eyes can see it, cameras can film it.

If ears can hear it, recording devices can record it.

Re:What if... (1)

Jiro (131519) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790758)

This isn't going to be practical for thousands of pages of documents, that would take hours of filming rather than a few seconds to copy.

Stay classy! (5, Insightful)

lisaparratt (752068) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789562)

'Had SureView been on Bradley Manning's machine, no one would know who Bradley Manning is today,'

They say that like it's a good thing...

Re:Stay classy! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789674)

From the perspective of a person who makes security software, yes, it would probably be considered a good thing that their security software stops security breaches. Undoubtedly this thread will derail into endless rants from the tinfoil hat wearers about how the evil military industrial complex is brainwashing us all, but the fact is, if you think it's a good thing for any asshole in the military to be able to walk out the door with classified information, you're an idiot. Yes, this will potentially stop whistleblower leaks, but it will also help prevent spies in our military selling secrets to the North Koreans.

Re:Stay classy! (1)

datavirtue (1104259) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789732)

No it will not.

Re:Stay classy! (2)

lisaparratt (752068) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789744)

I read the rather more sinister implication into the statement that he would have been permanently "disappeared".

When it comes to leaks, it's all a matter of perspective, one that Yes Minister got down pat: "That's another of those irregular verbs, isn't it? I give confidential press briefings; you leak; he's being charged under section 2A of the Official Secrets Act."

Re:Stay classy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790004)

No, just tried by the military, convicted, dishonourably discharged, fined (back when I signed the paperwork for my security clearance it was ``up to $20,000'') and sent to a federal penitentiary for up to 20 years. While the evidence would have been classified, the basic facts of the case would all have been properly on file w/ the public courts.

Re:Stay classy! (1)

thesh0ck (1983948) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789834)

There are no secrets. Nothing is so important everyone shouldnt know it.You drank the cool aid.

Re:Stay classy! (1)

Hazel Bergeron (2015538) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789866)

Please respond with your full name, address, date of birth, SSN, bank details and credit and debit card details, a summary of your medical conditions, the themes of your last five masturbatory fantasies, and what you had for breakfast.

Nothing is so important...

Re:Stay classy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789896)

Neither of those items were bought and paid for with your tax money. There's a difference.

Re:Stay classy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790472)

government secrets, you obtuse ass clown

Re:Stay classy! (1)

lisaparratt (752068) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790714)

Now *that* sounds like my sort of come-on! Wouldn't want a prospective dominatrix to be ill prepared!

help prevent..selling secrets to the North Koreans (1)

fredrated (639554) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790030)

And there you have it: the North Koreans represent such a definitive immenent high level threat that we must be prepared to destroy the earth to stop them!!! By the way, where is this 'North Korea' that you speak of?

Re:Stay classy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790846)

Undoubtedly this thread will derail into endless rants from the tinfoil hat wearers about how [...]

I'm going to tell you something that is so amazing, it will change your life! Here it is: You can disagree with people without depositing your mental faculties in a kindergarten! Even though you don't like what someone is saying, you don't have to make a complete ass of yourself! Strange but true!

Re:Stay classy! (3, Interesting)

kilfarsnar (561956) | more than 2 years ago | (#37791058)

From a security perspective, yes it is a good thing. But at the same time the level of secrecy and classification has become absurd. It is undermining our democracy because the citizenry cannot find out some basic stuff that their government is doing. It is (or should be) common knowledge that the three letter agencies (and a bunch you've never heard of) spy on Americans on an ongoing basis. We can't find out just what they are doing because it is classified, and if we try to sue we have no standing because we can't prove we were spied upon because it's classified. That is absurd and Kafkaesque. These days leakers are the only way we find out about the shenanigans our agencies pull.

On a side note "senior white house officials speaking on the condition of anonymity" leak classified material all the time. But they are never prosecuted. I wonder why.

Re:Stay classy! (1)

tbannist (230135) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789690)

Indeed. They might as well say "If it had been on Bradley Manning's machines, no one would know about some of the crimes we've been covering up."

Re:Stay classy! (1)

Gideon Wells (1412675) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789766)

A good thing is relative.

For example, Harrisburg was just assigned to be in control of an appointed person by the Governor. Powers include being able to sign the city to contracts and sell what he/she chooses.

The idea of a governor declaring they can pick a person to be a dictator to our state capital seems bad to me. My relatives of his party see it is a good and needed thing to fight the corruption there.

Re:Stay classy! (2)

beh (4759) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789792)

From the article:

the analyst might push a button and watch a screen video of the officer's last hour of work

Hmmm, so it would need 'cleverness' like a closed shell window:

$ sleep 3600 ; cp /path/to/secret.file /mnt/thumbdrive

Then wait half an hour, insert your thumbdrive to be mounted to the proper location; open a completely harmless (but non-work document) from it, say - an invitation to a garden party, and print it -- all the while leaving the thumbdrive mounted, so that the sleep-job can write the document in the background after in the next hour...

Then ensure the thumbdrive is only ejected once more than an hour has passed and the file has been written.

Nothing untoward will ever have been on your screen in the half hour before the thumb-drive access. The worst they'll see on screen is you opening a private garden party invitation to print it at the office...

Stupid system...

Re:Stay classy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789958)

That's why I thought the summary reads like one of those dime-a-dozen "hackers" movies... Push a button, see a video of the user's activity, yeah, 'cause that's really efficient and time-effective...

Re:Stay classy! (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789986)

A thought: just because it only logs one hour of screen captures doesn't mean that it only logs one hour of "events".

Re:Stay classy! (1)

starcraftsicko (647070) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789900)

Bradley Manning's life (for one) has been destroyed by his naivete in his participation in this activity. You can not think that he really got into all of this with his eyes open.

Had this security system been in place, Manning would have probably done a couple of years in military prison (for attempt, and for stupidity) and then been booted to civilian life. Because it was not he will spend decades in the worse conditions allowed by military law.

Re:Stay classy! (4, Insightful)

mjr167 (2477430) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789984)

Manning knew the consequences of leaking classified information. They make it very clear to you when you get access. It's not just a form you sign, but an hour long meeting where they go into explicit details about duties, responsibilities, and consequences. They then repeat this training on an annual basis. He may have believed he wouldn't get caught, but he had no reason to not know the seriousness of what getting caught would mean.

Re:Stay classy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789990)

Bradley Manning's life (for one) has been destroyed by his naivete in his participation in this activity. You can not think that he really got into all of this with his eyes open.

Bradley Manning's life has been destroyed by secrecy scum who don't want the shit they do to be seen. There is no good reason for his activities to have been made illegal; he has fallen fowl of a fucking mess of a law.

Re:Stay classy! (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790110)

From the chat logs released he seems like a really emotionally unstable guy. Kind of like someone with borderline, or some other serious problem. IANAP, at all, but he doesn't come off as "normal".

Re:Stay classy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790414)

His conditions are actually standard and take his mental state into consideration. Not that they want his mental state to get better, but he's being held in such a way to keep him alive.

Re:Stay classy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790952)

It is a good thing. SPC Manning broke the law and every oath he gave as a servicemember in order to do as much damage as he could possibly do to a country he swore to defend. He didn't do it out of a higher calling in order to reveal some great cover up. No, he dump vast amounts of classified data onto a CD, snuck it out of his work area, and gave it to his friends to show how much smarter he was that the government. He did it purely out of ego.

Re:Stay classy! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37791080)

What do you expect? It's Raytheon. They're the scum of the earth. They're in the murder, destruction, corruption and opression business.

Detection and rules (1, Interesting)

skgrey (1412883) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789568)

The problem is that the system is only as good as the ruleset and detection; it's the same theory behind antivirus. If you have a zero-day exploit that acts differently it's going to get through, and if you have someone that figures out a different way to capture data then the leak will happen. Can the software detect someone taking a picture of a document on the screen with their camera? Can it detect getting booted from an OS CD? Can it stop a person from telling someone what they read? This is just more window-dressing to make the people in charge feel a little safer.

Re:Detection and rules (1)

Securityemo (1407943) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789848)

Yeah, but far from all people who leak data can be assumed to have technical competence. Mounting a forensics dist and just reading the data off a laptops drive is easy, but not for everyone. Also, connecting to stuff on the company intranet (by stealing the vpn key off the drive and logging in via another computer or live cd) would be mighty suspicious? And any attack where you (say) connect to the presumed VPN with a computer placed in front of the monitored one, letting it transparently forward the "legit" data back home while you connect to internal services from the one in front would also presumably be detected, unless this system doesn't correlate activity on the internal protected services also?

Recursion (4, Funny)

GhigoRenzulli (1687590) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789570)

If a spy spies a spy who spies, who spies the spy who spies the spy?

In italian is funnier because both "spy" and "spies" translate into "spia".

Se una spia spia una spia che spia, chi spia la spia che spia la spia?

Re:Recursion (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790506)

The spies that spy spy spying spies, of course.

New Release from Kevin J. Anderson (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789572)

Brian Herbert and Kevin J. Anderson return to the world of Dune with Sisterhood of Dune. Years after the Battle of Corrin, the Butlerian movement continues its opposition to "dangerous technology." Meanwhile, a diverse cast of characters, from war hero Vorian Atreides to rogue Mentat trainer Gilbertus Albans, join the contest between Reason and Faith, and the struggle for humanity's future.

Re:New Release from Kevin J. Anderson (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789826)

couldn't get thru the books, couldn't get thru ur post

The real purpose (4, Insightful)

dkleinsc (563838) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789580)

'Had SureView been on Bradley Manning's machine, no one would know who Bradley Manning is today,' says Ryan Szedelo, manager for Raytheon's SureView software.

And nobody would have evidence of the serious crimes he told the world about. That's what they're really worried about.

Re:The real purpose (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789706)

Good, we have the evidence, and what have we done with it?

Nothing, of course.

Re:The real purpose (1)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789884)

Good, we have the evidence, and what have we done with it?

Nothing, of course.

At least we can point at it and call it bullshit. They'll still deny it, but we "know" that it is. That is worth something.

Re:The real purpose (2)

should_be_linear (779431) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789782)

And Gaddafi would be probably just fine right now, in his palace. Thats awesome technology!

Re:The real purpose (1)

starcraftsicko (647070) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789946)

And nobody would have evidence of the serious crimes he told the world about. That's what they're really worried about.

Manning just copied everything and Wikileaks spewed it all over. The noise to signal ratio is so high in that mess that it's hard to say he told the world anything...

Re:Noise and Signals (1)

TaoPhoenix (980487) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790652)

Absolutely not true in the modern age of computers.

Given a juicy chunk of data, a smart guy with a few software tricks will dig that info out. The power of the internet is it only takes ONE smart guy, (or gal!) and then the results are rebroadcast in sound bite form.

Hello Big Brother (1)

forgot_my_username (1553781) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789590)

Why are we just making it easier for skynet to take over?

What many people know is no secret (1)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789600)

Don't give millions of government employees access to confidential documents. The Manning documents were likely already in the possession of all major powers.

Re:What many people know is no secret (2)

Dcnjoe60 (682885) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789912)

Don't give millions of government employees access to confidential documents. The Manning documents were likely already in the possession of all major powers.

That may very well be true. However, that isn't what he is really in trouble about. He's in trouble because he was instrumental in the documents being released to the public !

Re:What many people know is no secret (1)

Hentes (2461350) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790338)

True, I get the feeling that leaks are only a problem when they are to the public.

Whatever..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789604)

They can stop all the leaks they want, but whatever happens in the World, I'm beginning to think my Government instigated some how - so I don't need to see any leaks: we're at fault.

It has some to the point that when I see aggressive action taken against the US by some group or country, aside from North Korea, I just wonder WTF did our Government do to them to instigate it - or who did we support that did the deed *cough*Israel*cough*.

And more than likely that whatever our Government did was to support oil or banking interests or some other multinational corporate (read billionaire's) interests.

We the US don't stand for Truth, Justice, and Freedom.

Re:Whatever..... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789650)

Well we do stand for truth, justice and freedom... only for US citizens... only if our corporate masters agree.

Re:Whatever..... (1)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789908)

+1

Another solution (4, Insightful)

Kidbro (80868) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789616)

Or, you could stop committing and covering up crimes and routinely classify any and all information regardless if it's needed or not. Then nobody would feel the need to leak the things that are rightfully secret.

Just a thought.

Re:Another solution (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789778)

agreed! i don't think he leaked anything that should not have been leaked. Government should not act above the law. I think if a spy finds something questionable and makes the information public. A court of law should then look at the information. Whistles should be blown and if they are against the government then the government has to fess up to it.

Hmmm (1)

Zouden (232738) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789636)

"Had SureView been on Bradley Manning's machine, no one would know who Bradley Manning is today,"
This quote sends shivers down my spine.

Imagine if King George III had had this kind of technology. Then no one would know who George Washington is today. Why would anybody think this is a bad thing?

Re:Hmmm (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789728)

George Washington and the other Founders were not employees of the British government at the time of the Revolution, so this particular technology would have had no impact on them whatsoever if it was in the hands of George III.

Re:Hmmm (1)

Domini Canes (797151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789886)

You are thinking in terms of current epoch..... employees shmemployees.
Yes they were not employees, but they were subjects of the crown, and that is stronger binding that some eeezy peeezy work agreement.

Re:Hmmm (1)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790930)

Yes, but since they were not employees of the crown, they would not have been working on computers with this technology. I did not read the article, but from the summary (and my understanding of such software) putting this software on private computers would yield way too many false positives.

Re:Hmmm (1)

starcraftsicko (647070) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789964)

Which secret documents did George Washington steal and / or publish?

Re:Hmmm (1)

denis-The-menace (471988) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790598)

None but he helped "rebel" against the king.
In those days that was treason.

But thanks to SureView, all his plans and "accomplices" were "dealt with"...

Awe, cute (1)

ludomancer (921940) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789654)

Another fly-by-night software developer conned some tech-ignorant government institute into buying their shit-software under the guise that it would stop their latest .

Go America! I'm sure this will work out just fine for everyone.

Re:Awe, cute (1)

NJRoadfan (1254248) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790064)

Raytheon is fly-by-night?

Re:Awe, cute (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790344)

You're fully aware that Raytheon is a multi-trillion dollar defense contractor..... aren't you?

Re:Awe, cute (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37791008)

Is this a result of CINDER? The weakness is that one to several documents can still be downloaded or captured and not set off any alarms. Something as a simple as a wearable hidden camera can still capture information. What's next, naked analysts? They needed to encrypt the damn files he dl'ed!

Pretty cool instrument...for leaking data! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789678)

If the officer acts like a potential leaker, sending an encrypted email or using an unregistered thumb drive, the analyst might push a button and watch a screen video of the officer's last hour of work.

...of course, this system is totally secure and cannot be abused in any way...

I think Dr Seuss said it best (4, Informative)

Rogerborg (306625) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789700)

Oh, the jobs people work at!
Out west, near Hawtch-Hawtch,
there's a Hawtch-Hawtcher Bee-Watcher.
His job is to watch...
is to keep both his eyes on the lazy town bee.
A bee that is watched will work harder, you see.

Well... he watched and he watched.
But, in spite of his watch,
that bee didn't work any harder. Not Mawtch.

So somebody said,
"Our old-bee-watching man
just isn't bee-watching as hard as he can.
He ought to be watched by another Hawtch-Hawtcher!
The thing that we need
is a Bee-Watcher-Watcher!"

WELL...

The Bee-Watcher-Watcher watched the Bee-Watcher.
He didn't watch well. So another Hawtch-Hawtcher
had to come in as a Watch-Watcher-Watcher!
And today all the Hawtchers who live in Hawtch-Hawtch
are watching on Watch-Watcher-Watchering-Watch,
Watch-Watching the Watcher who's watching the bee.
You're not a Hawtch-Watcher. You're lucky, you see!

Re:I think Dr Seuss said it best (1)

kibbey (96367) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789940)

Bravo!

Simple... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789702)

Lemmiwinks

Coming soon (1)

anti-pop-frustration (814358) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789704)

Coming soon to a corporate network near you : SureView Enterprise.

If a worker acts like a potential human, sending a personal email, visiting an unregistered website or trying to conduct union activities on site, the analyst might push a button and watch a screen video of the officer's last hour of work. Once a case is made that something might be imminent, it is checkmate: the worker is thwarted.

Re:Coming soon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789736)

Coming soon to a corporate network near you : SureView Enterprise.

"No company can afford it, and no company can survive without it."

Oops, sorry, forgot the (tm) on that statement.

Re:Coming soon (2)

thesh0ck (1983948) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789904)

Most of corporate america has had this for about 10 years. I found out my old boss was using similar software like this to spy on us one day when he called me into his office with screen shots from my computer showing me looking at a tech news site and asking why I wasny working for those 5 minutes. I said, "well I am entitled 1 hour of break time per day. I never use this break time, eat lunch while working and answeing phone to be more efficient so I figured 5 minutes of looking at a job related news website would be okay." He shut up but I was horrified that hewas so paranoid. He only had 3 employees. He then installed cameras everywhere too so he could not only see what you were doing on your computer but what you were doing at your computer. This was a small comapny and we had this.. imagine what large companies have.

Re:Coming soon (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789974)

What do you mean 'coming soon'? Look around you. We are already in 1984 v 2.3. When the job of the government became to keep information from its own people then the government should have been abolished. When the government assumes all of it's citizens are out to destroy it and uses that assumption for illegal searches, property seizures, and spying then the government should be abolished.
Kinda what that whole Declaration thingy is about when you get right down to it.

Re:Coming soon (1)

LurkerXXX (667952) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790208)

I work at a major hospital. Remote software commonly used for remote troubleshooting fires off quite regularly. I expect every workstation in the place has screen-shots taken. It's not an hour of video, but probably because that would be too expensive.

Was wikileaks a leak at all? (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789752)

I have not read most of it, but I closely followed for a while the WL releases for the countries I am familiar with. The "leaks" were basically the reports of the embassy intelligence figurehead, and consisted exclusively of two things -- translations of rumors and newspaper articles, dutifully translated to English by hired locals, and some general political commentary, which usually closely echoed the pro-American media on the ground. Actually, considering the report dates, it seems the other way around -- the pro-US media on the ground closely echoed the points of the reports. Not a single instance of really secret, juicy information has been leaked so far, for a total of four countries, two of which are rather important.

At the beginning, there was a lot of brouhaha about Assange and what not, so I entertained the idea that this was a real leak. But as it turned out that WL was mostly regurgitation of local news and political commentary, I am starting to seriously consider the possibility it was a controlled operation. I think that Assange and Mannings believed they were leaking important stuff, but is that all the story?

The timing of the leaks, the amazing and sudden "galvanizing" effect they allegedly had in Africa and the Middle East, the timings of the spyops that raised the "revolutions" and the subsequent NATO military operations, etc. all seem too smooth for coincidences. I doubt WL will be the last leak of this kind we see.

Re:Was wikileaks a leak at all? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37791162)

Yeah, you sound like quite an analyst.

If you don't want the world to know... (2)

vpaul (473197) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789760)

...that you are a murderer, stop murdering.

Re:If you don't want the world to know... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790060)

Or get a boat and lots and lots of plastic wrap. (glass slide box optional)

To stop "the next Wikileaks" (1)

porter235 (413926) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789772)

Minimize access to sensitive docs, keep those with access happy, and most importantly, always be ethical.

In the land of the "free"... (1)

Errol backfiring (1280012) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789802)

Big Brother is watching you!

I wonder when they make this compulsory for civilians as well?

Or we could stop doing bad stuff (1)

assemblerex (1275164) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789814)

You know, all that war, killing and hiding the truth could just end. Nah.

Re:Or we could stop doing bad stuff (1)

inviolet (797804) | more than 2 years ago | (#37791154)

You know, all that war, killing and hiding the truth could just end. Nah.

I think the problem here is that other countries intend to continue with the dirty deeds. If we intend to fight back (i.e. the CIA), our activities must remain secret, simply because most American's cannot handle the cognitive dissonance of "there are no good guys, not even us".

stop right there criminal scum (1)

garlicbready (846542) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789836)

A new counter-counter-counter intelligence method is devised
set your wallpaper to goatse people

Its easy to stop the next wikileaks (1)

Snaller (147050) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789850)

Just act like a decent moral human being. If you do "because" someone is going to blow the whistle on you.

Re:Its easy to stop the next wikileaks (1)

couchslug (175151) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790986)

"Just act like a decent moral human being."

History suggests doing that isn't globally competitive, however much idealists wish it were.

Who watches the Watchers? (1)

Maximum Prophet (716608) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789854)

If the officer acts like a potential leaker, sending an encrypted email or using an unregistered thumb drive, the analyst might push a button and watch a screen video of the officer's last hour of work.

So, then, the analyst becomes the leaker. (Or the spy that a 3rd party hires)

A more likely senario, is that the "officer" (who is an analyst himself), plays it safe, and doesn't gather enough intel together to actually figure out what the real bad guys are doing.

doomed to fail (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789892)

The gov has proven themselves incapable of properly deploying large scale software projects similar to this.

Mediocrity rules the military, some officer will quickly get annoyed with any smart folks you put on the project, and they will be quickly replaced by some yes-man lackey with little experience or creativity.

Everyone knows how to stop Wikileaks. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37789894)

You sic Lemmiwinks on it.

Mislieading title (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 2 years ago | (#37789934)

Summary is actually about stopping leaks and the latter existed long before Assange's website. Inasmuch I am glad Manning's load became public, but for a security agency any leak-preventing policy seems a reasonable and logical step.

The risk an insider takes to publicize the data that is prohibited from publicizing by law should be compensated for the society in case the activity he is publicizing is criminal (that is breaking other laws).

Now, there are probably internal rules on how to fight crime inside the walls of security agency, but I am pretty sure they are not covering a lot of real situations that are not only real but actually already happened in the past.

Don't even need wikileaks to see righ through this (2)

roman_mir (125474) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790130)

At the age when US president openly murders US citizens on a hunch and starts whatever war he wants, like a Boss (like a King) and the rest of the government doesn't stop him in his tracks.

At the age when US Supreme Court doesn't see anything wrong with the federal government going way beyond its authority on pretty much every issue, every law, every regulation, every tax.

At the age when Congress and Senate bail out banks and companies and vote to increase debt limit without ever considering the consequences.

At the age when Federal Reserve is counterfeiting currency left right and center.

At the age of fascism/corporatism on the top and Marxism/communism on the bottom.

What do you need wikileaks for? Are you blind?

--

Of-course they want the specifics of their secrets to remain secrets, they are now your rulers, not your servants.

Re:Don't even need wikileaks to see righ through t (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37791152)

At the age of fascism/corporatism on the top and Marxism/communism on the bottom.

The first points were on the mark, but you lost me there. Are you trying to say things were better when the free market was in effect and Communism was an actual competitor to our semi-democracy?

Or are you one of those loons who think Communism is actually a good idea? Pretty sure Poland, for example, didn't work so damned hard to drive out the Reds because it was all shits and well-stocked grocery stores.

Sounds like a job for Lemmiwinks! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790144)

Have they considered sending Lemmiwinks into epic battle against Wikileaks?

Encrypted email == warning sign (1)

Sloppy (14984) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790206)

You know you've hopelessly fucked up, when the one guy who sends an encrypted email is suspected of being the leak.

Lemmiwinks! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790376)

South park has the answer -- just bring back Lemmiwinks [wikipedia.org] for a fight to the death!

Re:Lemmiwinks! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790626)

I was gonna say that!!

Military folks aren't exactly the brightest (1)

AdamJS (2466928) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790556)

Most of their leaks could probably be stopped with a very small script or service that sends out a very bright warning whenever a large file or amount of files are copied or generated.

How to stop what? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37790602)

Wiki-huh? Oh, that thing trumped up to sell books by that loser, Asslang or whatever.

Scary (1)

shawnhcorey (1315781) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790746)

With Halloween coming, I should expect scary things but this, "'Had SureView been on Bradley Manning's machine, no one would know who Bradley Manning is today,' says Ryan Szedelo,..." is probably the scariest thing I'll read all month.

Ooh! And Then... "The Accident"? (1)

Greyfox (87712) | more than 2 years ago | (#37790866)

Finding your leak isn't the fun part! It's arranging the "accident" afterwards! And then telling his parents, "We regret to inform you that your son has been killed in a FREAK AUTOEROTIC ASPHYXIATION accident, involving an inflatable goat, a tub of lube and an electric toaster! Here are what we could find of his remains..." (Delivers right nipple).

Does SureView have a plug-in for that?

The Borg (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37791062)

We are becoming The Borg. Machines are increasing controlling us via high level puppetmasters. Is there any difference between this and slavery?

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