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354 comments

RIP and thank you for AI (1)

noobermin (1950642) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829734)

How different the world of IT would be without these computer giants. Farewell and thank you!

Re:RIP and thank you for AI (-1, Flamebait)

durrr (1316311) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829948)

He probably did a lot of good things. LISP however is a nightmarish construct made to entertain academics with academic constructs, which it may do exceedingly well, but for practical real-world applications the usefulness of LISP is long gone if it ever existed beyond a rudimentary level.

Re:RIP and thank you for AI (4, Informative)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830068)

Re:RIP and thank you for AI (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830110)

I know the temptation is strong, but don't feed the trolls, please.

Re:RIP and thank you for AI (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830136)

I am not certain that it was a troll. For some reason, a lot of people seem to view Lisp the way the poster described: an academic language that does not live up to its promise in the real world.

Or maybe I was trolled so hard that I do not know what hit me.

Re:RIP and thank you for AI (2)

johnjaydk (584895) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830186)

LISP however is a nightmarish construct made to entertain academics with academic constructs, which it may do exceedingly well, but for practical real-world applications the usefulness of LISP is long gone if it ever existed beyond a rudimentary level.

I steadfastly held the same view that only academic wienies had any use for Lisp or even worse Scheme. It took me some 15 years to see the light but now I work exclusive in Lisp and Scheme.

Languages are NOT created equal and the challenges we face now needs more powerful languages. That is where Lisp and Scheme come into their own. I think, I'll look into Haskell next. Another language that I previously wouldn't touch with a ten-foot pole.

Time is a great teacher although it tends to kill all it's students

Re:RIP and thank you for AI (2, Funny)

sycodon (149926) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830200)

Well, to be fair he only "Discovered" it, he apparently didn't create it. I wonder who actually created it and then just left it lying around for him to "discover"?

let this be a lesson to you (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829736)

lisp will reduce your life expectancy.

Re:let this be a lesson to you (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829820)

He was 84. The life expectancy for US males is 76.

Re:let this be a lesson to you (1)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829900)

He was 84. The life expectancy for US males is 76.

And dropping.

Re:let this be a lesson to you (3, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830006)

lisp will reduce your life expectancy.

Nothing will reduce your life expectancy more than doing template metaprogramming in c++.
LISP is the king of all computer languages. Its influence is still being felt 50 years after its creation, and people are rediscovering features that good ol' lisp has had since the begining.

Discoverer or Lisp? (4, Insightful)

agentgonzo (1026204) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829740)

I think you mean creator or inventor. It's not like the Lisp programming language was just sat out in the wilds of Chile under a rock waiting to be found by an archaeologist.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

davidbrit2 (775091) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829794)

The way some Lisp programmers gush over the language, you might get that impression. (Not that I have anything against Lisp or John.)

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (4, Funny)

erroneus (253617) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829812)

Yes, discoverer. Lisp is programming. And programming is math. Math is all around us... in the tree, the rock. Math surrounds us and binds us all together. Does this mean Lisp obeys the programmer? Partially, but the will of the math works through the programmer as well.

So death to software patents.

(how's that for an incomprehensible morning hours post?)

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

moderatorrater (1095745) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829854)

You discover new math. You invent notation. Programming languages are the latter.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

Sique (173459) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830346)

You can also invent mathematics.

For instance, to describe how the real numbers are somehow "complete" and contain not only algebraically calculable numbers but also transcendent numbers, there were different ideas floating around, which lead different mathematicians to invent different approaches to describe this "completeness". We have Bolzano's and Weierstrass' approach (bounded sequences and convergent sub-sequences), we have Cauchy-sequences and we have Dedekind cuts. All three were not discovered, but invented to describe real numbers as a super-set of the rational and algebraic numbers. It was later discovered that all three approaches are equivalent, e.g. if you use one approach as axiom, you can fairly easily prove the other two.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

dorre (1731288) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830400)

You design notation....

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (5, Funny)

sapphire wyvern (1153271) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829822)

Actually, the natives of Lisp already knew all about it. McCarthy was just the first person to show up with a flag, guns, germs & steel to claim Lisp for his homeland's empire.

So you're quite right... discoverer is a very patriarchal, hegemonic colonialist way of describing McCarthy. /leftist historian mode :P

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (3, Funny)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829938)

Discover, v., "To visit while white."

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830108)

^^ Mod up. That's one of the most insightful and funny things that I've heard in quite a few months!

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829824)

I have an impression that some of the modern languages might have been found in that way...

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (5, Interesting)

vlm (69642) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829832)

I think you mean creator or inventor. It's not like the Lisp programming language was just sat out in the wilds of Chile under a rock waiting to be found by an archaeologist.

He was an old time computer scientist, publications with titles like "A basis for a mathematical theory of computation". Hard core math.

Philosophically, you don't "create" or "invent" math you discover it. Logical concepts exist independent of who wrote a paper about them first. Take two 256 bit random prime numbers, multiply them, and you have not "created" or "invented" the result but merely discovered it, or rephrased discovered its two factors.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (2, Insightful)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829972)

Arguably math consists of both invention and discovery:

You invent the axioms; but you then discover the necessary implications of those axioms.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830196)

You invent the axioms

Maybe, but I do not think that Euclid sat down and invented his postulates. More likely he sat down and observed various shapes and geometric properties in the world around him, and then formalized what he had observed (or perhaps many people had done so over a period of time, and Euclid wrote down the formal notions that had developed).

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

emilper (826945) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829984)

so, philosophy no longer studied for a science diploma ?

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (2)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830078)

Philosophically, you don't "create" or "invent" math you discover it.

That is not universally agreed upon by philosophers:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy_of_mathematics [wikipedia.org]

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830138)

I'm a philosopher---by education and in my current job, not self-proclaimed or as a dubious honorary title---and I can hardly imagine anything philosophers could ever universally agree upon.

Perhaps you ought to relax your criterion a bit?

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830164)

Fair enough, but the post I was replying to seemed to claim as a matter of fact that mathematics is discovered. I was merely pointing out that the debate is still active, and that defending the "McCarthy invented Lisp!" statement needs to be backed up by more than "Philosophers say that math is discovered!"

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

Arlet (29997) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830224)

If people could agree on it, it would be science, not philosophy.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

elsurexiste (1758620) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830356)

Not quite... just looking at wikipedia for interpretations of quantum physics will give you an idea of how much disagreement can be between scientists. Or on how the little world really is: I have an acquaintance whose wet dream is busting string theory, something he says is "delusional". All science because they have scientific knowledge, yet they all disagree :) .

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830308)

I'm a philosopher---by education and in my current job

So you're the one, huh?

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

corbettw (214229) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830232)

Take two 256 bit random prime numbers, multiply them, and you have not "created" or "invented" the result but merely discovered it, or rephrased discovered its two factors.

Ah, but if you come up with a novel way to generate those random numbers, along with a novel way to store their representations for future use, then you've invented something and not merely discovered it.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830298)

Ah, but if you come up with a novel way to generate those random numbers, along with a novel way to store their representations for future use, then you've invented something and not merely discovered it.

Consider, as a counterexample, the FFT multiplication algorithm. It is based on the observation that integer multiplication involves computing a convolution, and that the pointwise product in the frequency domain is equal to convolution in the "time" domain. The algorithm is only an "invention" if the mathematics the underlie it were "invented," and so this just returns to the question of whether or not mathematics itself is invented or discovered.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (3, Interesting)

theVarangian (1948970) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829880)

I think you mean creator or inventor. It's not like the Lisp programming language was just sat out in the wilds of Chile under a rock waiting to be found by an archaeologist.

Actually Lisp is just one of the many languages heavily influenced by Lambda calculus [wikipedia.org] which was introduced by Alonzo Church back in the 1930s and 40s. Back then Lamda calculus it was just another system in mathematical logic that only a few mathematicians and logicians knew or cared about. So in a sense John McCarthy did find it under a rock although not in the wilds of Chile but rather in a scientific paper.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (2)

tuffy (10202) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829894)

The idea is that he discovered Lisp could be assembled from seven primitive operators [paulgraham.com] , from which the rest of the language could be built. Though I agree that "discoverer" is a bit of a stretch.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829904)

Agreed. The lambda calculus was discovered. Lisp was created.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829922)

Fingernail clippings have existed for ages. He was the first to discover that they were actually software.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829936)

Didn't you know that Lisp has been around? They even found some ancient tables saying (cons nil (cons 'light (cons 'world 'good))).

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (3, Funny)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829976)

I think you mean creator or inventor. It's not like the Lisp programming language was just sat out in the wilds of Chile under a rock waiting to be found by an archaeologist.

Actually it was found in a cave in the Pyranees. LISP originally stood for Lost In Spanish Passageways. It was used by early cave men for catching fish. They drew it on the walls carefully concealing the syntax in pictures of Auroks and it remained totally undeciphered for approximately 200,000 years. John McCarthy wandered into a cave after having eaten some soup made from a prehistoric fungus that grows in the area. He was found days later practising tai chi in a nearby stream and went on to write the first modern day LISP interpreter.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830124)

LISP was found under a parenthesis left in a storeroom.

Re:Discoverer or Lisp? (1)

jellomizer (103300) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830328)

It was found buried in millions of years of parentheses. and CAR and CDR actually did something useful.

Discoverer of Lisp? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829742)

Where did he discover it? Who actually invented it?

Re:Discoverer of Lisp? (1)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830088)

I think the submitter means nobody invented it; that LISP is closer to an universal concept than an invention.

See also http://xkcd.com/224/ [xkcd.com]

Obligatory (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829744)

Thith thuckth. :(

He 'discovered' Lisp? (1)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829748)

Waqs it lying somewhere fully formed and he sort of stumbled upon it? Enquiring minds want to know...

Re:He 'discovered' Lisp? (1)

kiehlster (844523) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829826)

Didn't you know? Lisp came about much the same way the Queen's English came about in Great Britain. Soon after, everyone was mandated to take a course on Lisp, further separating us from those people who argue against it's usefulness in the computing world.

Re:He 'discovered' Lisp? (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830112)

Lisp can be viewed as a fancy variant of combinator logic, which is a mathematical model of computation. If you believe that mathematics is discovered, then in some sense Lisp was discovered. This may seem a a bit contrived, since one could argue that a C program is a fancy way of expressing a Turing Machine, although Lisp is a little closer to its theoretical underpinnings than C is.

I hear that the greats die in threes (1)

Megaweapon (25185) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829750)

So Dennis Ritchie and now John McCarthy....

Re:I hear that the greats die in threes (5, Funny)

Nerdfest (867930) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829810)

The universe must be kept in balance. Ritchie and McCarthy were to offset Gaddafi and Jobs.

Re:I hear that the greats die in threes (-1, Troll)

catmistake (814204) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830274)

Fucking Hell. Hilarious equating Steve Jobs to a ruthless murdering dictator. Unfortunately, the comparison doesn't even remotely make sense. Had Gadaffi never existed, the world would hardly be different. But if not for Steve Jobs, you'd be posting from some shitty descendant of Windows 3.1, and not the awesome eye candy interface that was clearly inspired by work at R&D South.

Ritchie and McCarthy are important. Steve Jobs' importance to the world is in a class of its own. Without Ritchie and McCarthy, the tech world would be pretty different. Without Jobs, the whole world would be unrecognizable.

Just give it up, troll. Apple, from humble beginnings, with the leadership of Steve Jobs, finally, kicked the shit out of IBM and Microsoft, lived to fight another day, out maneuvered them and ultimately won the PC and OS war. IBM and Microsoft aren't even a concern for Apple any more — not even remotely competitors anymore — as Apple has moved on to bigger fish (and become the biggest, yet most nimble fish) while IBM left the space and Microsoft has been running on momentum alone since Win2K, even after the new Coke success that Vista was, their momentum, which is clearly slowing, no where near what it was in 1998, comes from their early successes and no where else.

Consider this: as it always has been, so it will always be. Anything Apple does, Microsoft and others will attempt to duplicate. Apple drives today's consumer technology forward, again and again, and has been the only one doing so for 30 years. You know this is true, and I know it pisses you off. Enjoy Windows 8 you flat, uncreative, borderline retarded troll.

Thanks (5, Informative)

V!NCENT (1105021) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829752)

(print "World says goodbye")

Re:Thanks (1)

thomst (1640045) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830222)

Weep, and you weep alone. Laugh, and the world laughs at you.

FTFY

Re:Thanks (1)

betterunixthanunix (980855) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830234)

I think you meant (format t "~a" "World says goodbye")

/pedantic

Re:Thanks (1)

V!NCENT (1105021) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830362)

Thanks :)

Bad Slashdot, bad. (-1, Offtopic)

bmo (77928) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829754)

It should not have taken this long to make it to the front page.

This is inexcusable.

Stop using the firehose as an excuse to be lazy.

--
BMO

Re:Bad Slashdot, bad. (1)

suso (153703) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829970)

Calm down. It took overnight for the news of Ritchie's death to make the front page too. If anything it needs to be verified first. Long time Slashdot readers may remember some of the hoaxes over people's deaths that made it to the front page immediately, but then had to be retracted. Jamie W. Zawinski dying in a motorcycle crash in the late 90s was one of them. If you want immediate unverified news, use social media.

Re:Bad Slashdot, bad. (1)

bmo (77928) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830038)

>It took overnight for the news of Ritchie's death to make the front page too.

And that was just as wrong, too.

>Rumors

When TechCrunch posted it 16 hours ago, it's not fucking rumor.

--
BMO

At first I just typed: :( :( :( (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829760)

.. but then I realized I was missing something.)))

Re:At first I just typed: :( :( :( (1)

camperdave (969942) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830040)

I was wondering how long it would take to get a closing parenthesis joke. I'm surprised it took this long, and saddened that there was a speech impediment joke before this.

Re:At first I just typed: :( :( :( (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830398)

Well played, fellow AC

I wath having a better life... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829772)

without anyone notithing!

Out of Their Minds (2)

ath0mic (519762) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829792)

If you get a chance, I recommend Out of Their Minds http://cs.nyu.edu/shasha/outofmind.html [nyu.edu] which details some of the amazing feats of McCarthy and some of his contemporaries.

Re:Out of Their Minds (2)

White Flame (1074973) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830000)

Some other blog also pointed out that one of the big "modern" features tons of people rely on was invented in 1959: Garbage collection.

Say what you will about Lisp (and I'll say lots of good things about it), but practical GC has tremendous impact. Now, we just have to wait for everything else to catch up to all the other 1960s feature sets (both software & hardware). :-)

Re:Out of Their Minds (1)

tuffy (10202) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830098)

Don't forget the even bigger "modern" feature people rely on: if-then-else structures.

Such a trivial thing we all take for granted, but Lisp invented the "if" expression as a more specialized version of "cond". Algol copied it and the rest is history.

Where did he find it? (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829802)

Discoverer of Lisp

Who writes these headlines?

"Inventor", please. Not "Discoverer".

"Discoverer"? (1)

broginator (1955750) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829808)

Was it just, like, lying on the ground where he could trip on it, or did it fall from a tree and hit him on the head or something?

god wrote in Lisp code. (2, Informative)

Inf0phreak (627499) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829848)

Obligatory xkcd link [xkcd.com] .

And of course "Eternal Flame" [gnu.org] .

Yes, the capitalisation of my comment's subject is deliberate.

Re:god wrote in Lisp code. (1)

ice3 (1305003) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830042)

Eternal Flame [youtube.com]

(quit) (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829852)

(quit)

Lisp is a fascinating language with honored histor (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829874)

Lisp is a fascinating language with honored history in AI, but let me ask you this: is it used now in some important applications? Does modern AI software use Lisp a lot? I am under impression that it is more used in theory than in applications.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (3, Informative)

CRCulver (715279) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829898)

Lisp is a fascinating language with honored history in AI, but let me ask you this: is it used now in some important applications?

Emacs not important for you? Except for a small C core, everything is written in Lisp.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829966)

It is important. I did not know that.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (1)

clickclickdrone (964164) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830316)

Emacs not important for you? Except for a small C core, everything is written in Lisp

Well, actually EMACS Lisp, which is significantly different to your standard Lisp.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (1)

A12m0v (1315511) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830338)

Hence the backronym Eight Megabytes And Constantly Swapping

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (2)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830376)

Emacs not important for you?

Not really. I long ago shunned Emacs' overly complex Ctrl-Meta-dgh-Shift-Y-u-F12 for Vi's much simpler y$12jll:%s/off/on/gkp in order to brew my morning tea, walk my dog, open 38 tabs to my morning news sources, and fetch me my pink bunny slippers.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830412)

Lisp is a fascinating language with honored history in AI, but let me ask you this: is it used now in some important applications?

Emacs not important for you? Except for a small C core, everything is written in Lisp.

Emacs, you say? Well, that settles it. Not at all important to a vimmer.

Emacs, really? Someone wrote a flight sim in LISP!?

But seriously, retht in peath, JM. (What? not that kind of lisp?)

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830426)

no, not really.
I have an OS, thanks. Mine even has a decent text editor!

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (4, Informative)

icebraining (1313345) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830060)

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830202)

Thanks, but I would be more impressed by the list of things familiar to everyone, like somebody pointed in the other comment - EMACS.

EMACS and autoCAD. I find it interesting that in the latter, Lisp is offered as language of extension and customization. Is this the common trend of Lisp usage: language of extension and customization?

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (1)

aaaaaaargh! (1150173) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830370)

Is this the common trend of Lisp usage: language of extension and customization?

No, Lua, Scheme, and probably also Javascript have become more popular for that purpose over the years. LISP is mostly CommonLisp nowadays. It's very complete, standardized, and some CL implementations like SBCL are very fast, but CL is not very well-suited for extension and customization (at least not for lightweight one). It depends on how you define it, of course; if you include all Scheme dialects and non-standard LISPs out there LISP is definitely alive and used a lot.

The main problem of CommonLisp is the lack of a truly portable, cross-platform, free, and cross-implementation GUI library. There are some libraries and standards out there but most CL implementations don't fully support them, and nothing is worse than half-backed glue code with improper documentation. Moreover, commercial CL implementations are expensive and tend to lock their customers in by introducing small incompatibilities or extensions to standards.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830382)

Fairly commonly, scheme particularly is widely used as such.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (1)

CODiNE (27417) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830072)

There's game engines written in it. I can't remember right now but there's been a few big ones that used it for their assets and scripts, you could mod them easily.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (1)

mapkinase (958129) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830146)

That's how I think the creator of Lisp could be honored: by posting a list of stuff that matters that runs on Lisp.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830368)

Here's one: Abuse - http://lispgames.org/index.php/Abuse [lispgames.org] . There is also at least one mud codebase that makes use of lisp.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (2)

robbrit (1408421) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830258)

It's not just the language that is important, it's the contributions Lisp made to programming language theory: "if", higher order functions, garbage collection to name a few things. See here [paulgraham.com] for a list of things that the language pioneered.

Re:Lisp is a fascinating language with honored his (1)

GreatBunzinni (642500) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830294)

Lisp is a fascinating language with honored history in AI, but let me ask you this: is it used now in some important applications? Does modern AI software use Lisp a lot? I am under impression that it is more used in theory than in applications.

Autodesk's AutoCAD [wikipedia.org] relies on AutoLisp [wikipedia.org] for a lot of it's features, and also employs it as a scripting language.

As for AutoCAD being considered an "important application", it is the de facto standard for CAD work in engineering, particularly in civil/structural engineering.

What's going on?! (2)

dzfoo (772245) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829892)

Another one gone!

I once created a variant of BASIC to run on the C=64 when I was a kid... OMG! Could I be next??

        -dZ.

Re:What's going on?! (1)

dingen (958134) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830148)

What is going on is that the time IT has been around is now starting to exceed the average life expectancy minus the age people usually start their careers.

Re:What's going on?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830212)

I once created a variant of BASIC to run on the C=64 when I was a kid... OMG! Could I be next??

We can only hope.

Re:What's going on?! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830250)

With posts as unfunny as that, we can only answer "hopefully".

Yours, /.

I think you mean... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829950)

(((John) (McCarthy)), ((Discoverer) (of) (Lisp)), ((Has) (Passed) (Away)))

In memoriam (1)

White Flame (1074973) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829978)

*closes a Lisp paren (in a real, commercial Lisp application no less) in honor of McCarthy*

Discoverer? (1)

Corson (746347) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830014)

"Discoverer of Lisp" -- you mean, Lisp was already invented when he "discovered" it?

That's a sad day... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830128)

and slashdot refuses an all closing parenthesis comment: "Filter error: Please use fewer 'junk' characters."
Damn you to Hell, filter!

Now what do I do? (1)

alispguru (72689) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830220)

I've had this picture [catonmat.net] on my office door for ages.

How can I put a black border around that?

Lisp programmers never die... (4, Funny)

Bill_the_Engineer (772575) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830246)

... they just close their last parenthesis.

Why so many language creators die? (1)

Arrepiadd (688829) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830264)

Soon in Slashdot, and following the previous topic of why so many bee trucks crashing or whatever:
Why so many programming language creators are dying these days?

I never understood Lisp... (1)

halivar (535827) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830336)

I mean, shouldn't it be called Lithp?

RIP (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830386)

He will be mithed....

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