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Why So Many Crashes of Bee-Carrying Trucks?

Unknown Lamer posted more than 2 years ago | from the bees-are-good-people dept.

Biotech 255

Hugh Pickens writes "Interstate 15 in southern Utah has been reopened and officials say 25 million bees that closed the road have been accounted for after a flatbed truck heading for California carrying 460 beehives overturned near a construction zone. The bees were on their way to Bakersfield, California for almond pollination next spring. 'The driver lost control, hit the concrete barrier and rolled over,' says Corporal Todd Johnson with the Utah Highway Patrol. 'Of course we then had bees everywhere.' But a similar incident happened in July, when 14 million bees, as well as a river of honey, flowed out of a wrecked semi in Idaho; and 17 million bees escaped a fatal truck crash in Minnesota last year. Why so many highway accidents involving bees? The uptick results from more and more honey bee colonies being transported around the country via highways in recent years. Local bee populations are rapidly dying off from a little-understood disease called 'colony collapse disorder': 'The number of managed honey bee colonies [in the U.S.] has dropped from 5 million in the 1940s to only 2.5 million today,' says the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Unfortunately, some honey bee scientists suspect that the rise of migratory beekeeping may be contributing to the species' decline as transporting hives from farm to farm spreads pathogens to local bee populations."

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255 comments

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I can't believe (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37828990)

the stories about John McCarthy's death are being ignored to post... something or other about Nic Cage's acting career...

Re:I can't believe (1, Offtopic)

Cyko_01 (1092499) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829728)

I can't bee-lieve....

there, fixed that for ya, but you are still offtopic

Flight (1)

Mike Mentalist (544984) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829006)

With all the little hairy fellows flying around, the truck loses it's grip on the road.

Maybe it's like that scene in Finding Nemo where all the fish swim in the same direction to break free of the net. Except it's the other way around.

Flight of the bumblebee (4, Funny)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829020)

It's well known that when half the bees are flying, the truck weighs half as much. I think Mythbusters proved it.

Re:Flight of the bumblebee (1)

hawkbat05 (1952326) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829438)

Re:Flight of the bumblebee (1)

FatLittleMonkey (1341387) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829482)

<Sigh> Joke, dude. Stupid Poe's law.

Re:Flight (1)

Fusselwurm (1033286) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829080)

Well, a bee weighs between 90 and 180mg [answers.com] , I'll just assume 100mg on average. That makes for a combined weight of 25M*0.1g = 2.5Mg = 2.5t

When all 25 million bees take of, they reduce the lorry's weight by 2.5 tonnes? Whoa.

But wait! The lorry is closed at the bottom, /me guesses. Air cant escape downward (maybe to the sides or upward?). -- So, no.
No change in weight after all, as the downward pressure from their wings should equal their mass as they hover around

Re:Flight (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829180)

the downward pressure from their wings should equal their mass

One, learn what dimensional analysis is. Two, whoooooosh - and that wasn't a bee.

Re:Flight (1)

Fusselwurm (1033286) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829662)

yah yah yah. you're right. I was in a hurry, and all the unit juggling I once knew is now *woosh* gone from my brain. feel free to add proper terms and units :D

Re:Flight (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830008)

You assume the bees are shipped in AIR-TIGHT containers? That would pretty much rule out any of your other arguments, just by association.

(Hint: Bees do breathe)

Evolution in action, or the bees' revenge... (3, Funny)

Mathinker (909784) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829254)

We all know that this Colony Collapse Syndrome is caused by evil cell-phone radiation. Well, the bees have evolved a defense mechanism which can sabotage electronics in their vicinity, thereby giving the truck drivers' GPS devices "Bee Jamming Syndrome" and causing a sharp rise in these kinds of accidents...

Re:Evolution in action, or the bees' revenge... (1)

ynp7 (1786468) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829350)

No, we all know it's from systemic pesticides in the plants that they're pollinating. Otherwise they'd have just equipped the bees with tinfoil hats and solved this a long time ago.

Re:Evolution in action, or the bees' revenge... (1)

19thNervousBreakdown (768619) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829666)

So when you expose bees to cell phone radiation near a GPS, you get BJS? Sweet!

Re:Flight (2)

fuzzyfuzzyfungus (1223518) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829566)

Didn't some slashdotter confess to having developed UV-vision bee powers not too long ago?

Have we ruled out the possibility that he is systematically eradicating the non-aligned colonies in order to cement his grip on power?

Goldfingerism (4, Funny)

martijnd (148684) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829014)

Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. The third time it's enemy action.

Re:Goldfingerism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829096)

Moscow rules.

Re:Goldfingerism (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829158)

Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. The third time it's enemy action.

Nope, Occam's razor - the truck drivers smoke crystal meth to stay up driving, and tweak out with a truckload of bees. Ultimately they either flip their truck over swatting at non-existent bees, or some very bad decisions lead to actual bees getting into the cab.

Re:Goldfingerism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829258)

Yes, William of Occam always introduced a random element of crystal meth smoking into his explanations, because "simple" just isn't good enough for that guy.

Re:Goldfingerism (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829354)

Yes, William of Occam always introduced a random element of crystal meth smoking into his explanations, because "simple" just isn't good enough for that guy.

It's not random, it's a well known fact: most semi-truck drivers smoke a lot of crystal meth.

Re:Goldfingerism (1)

JustOK (667959) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829414)

But Occam never drove a truck, so how would he know?

I thought Occam's razor (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829516)

Is what truck drivers use to make their lines of coke on a mirror

Re:Goldfingerism (2)

Spazztastic (814296) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829680)

That's a really poor stereotype. The number of truckers who actually account for the drug using ones is a very small percentage, you just don't hear about your average Joe Sixpack driving his truck from point A to point B without incident because it doesn't make headlines.

Re:Goldfingerism (1)

Oxford_Comma_Lover (1679530) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829968)

That's a really poor stereotype. The number of truckers who actually account for the drug using ones is a very small percentage, you just don't hear about your average Joe Sixpack driving his truck from point A to point B without incident because it doesn't make headlines.

This. Truckers spend all their time driving, and people don't trust you with millions in cargo if you're regularly drunk or high.

Actually, my favorite trucking+drugs story has nothing to do with the driver being high--it involves the guy who took a semi full of pot on the lower (cars only) level of the George Washington Bridge...

Re:Goldfingerism (2)

Magic5Ball (188725) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829218)

The important questions to ask are: What are the expected rates of accidents involving lorries? What has been the change in the number of bee lorrie miles travelled or bee lorrie hours on highways? and does this apparent cluster violate expectations based on those numbers?

I would first guess that this is explained better by cognitive biases relating to our casual misunderstanding of statistics than by statistics on a handful of cases. This time last year, everyone thought there was a pattern when several mass bird deaths were both noticed and reported within a short period. However, there was no underlying cause or connection among them.

Re:Goldfingerism (1)

JustOK (667959) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829524)

How many trucks carrying Safe Driving instruction manuals crashed?
And the bird deaths are still happening: thousands of birds wash up along Georgian Bay [winnipegfreepress.com]

Re:Goldfingerism (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829712)

There are no lorries in Utah, ya silly Brit.

Re:Goldfingerism (1)

Arancaytar (966377) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829244)

Maybe a supervillain is attempting to corner the world's honey supply.

Re:Goldfingerism (1)

thomst (1640045) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829356)

Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. The third time it's enemy action.

Er .. not a Goldfingerism. The quote is from Marc-Ange Draco, a Mafia don, and the father of Contessa Teresa di Vicenzo, Bond's love interest (and, briefly, spouse) in the novel On Her Majesty's Secret Service.

"No, Mr. Bond. I expect you to die." - Auric Goldfinger.

Not goldfingerism, it's because I have a BIG KOQUE (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829448)

Want to smell any of my fingers? Including the big one?

Re:Goldfingerism (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829522)

Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. The third time it's...

Terrorism.
We will need to promote legislation that limits citizen's rights. The honey must flow.

Re:Goldfingerism (1)

PopeRatzo (965947) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829670)

Once is happenstance. Twice is coincidence. The third time it's enemy action

I guess nobody saw M. Night Shyamalan's excellent documentary, The Happening.

Which is quite possible, considering the box office receipts.

Re:Goldfingerism (1)

boethius78 (1002975) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829864)

God-damned communist bees.

Re:Goldfingerism (1)

DigiShaman (671371) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829946)

Sure. If you count the bees as the enemy. I often wondered if any of these truck drivers got spooked by a bee sting (or several) enough to take their attention off the road.

What is amazing (2)

WindBourne (631190) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829016)

is that bee keepers continue to transport them all over. It seems like the smart thing is to require that at the least they be in only one state. IOW, no transportation over state lines.

Re:What is amazing (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829116)

Bee: I swear officer, I don't know how that pollen got there.....*licks his appendages*
Officer: HEY!
Bee: Sorry!

Re:What is amazing (2)

drinkypoo (153816) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829208)

Bees fly across state lines, so that probably wouldn't help.

It's *still* not known *For sure* what *causes* colony collapse disorder, there's only the condition they always find when it happens. Is it really just one or two factors, or a combination of everything?

Re:What is amazing (3, Interesting)

pinfall (2430412) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829268)

The problem is persistent pesticides not directly transportation per se. Colony collapse was happening in other countries and populations recovered after Bayer's gaucho was pulled from pollinating farms.

Re:What is amazing (1)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829432)

The problem is persistent pesticides not directly transportation per se. Colony collapse was happening in other countries and populations recovered after Bayer's gaucho was pulled from pollinating farms.

I made a presentation to the Pesticide Advisory Committee of Prince Edward Island regarding the use of imidacloprid on potato fields here and it gathered a lot of media coverage. It was the first story on our local news on TV, and both radio stations mentioned it throughout the day in their newscasts. I had produced a graphStan.gif (7651 bytes) which showed use and accumulation on PEI and held it up under my head throughout the whole news interview after my presentation, but it was NOT shown on TV because the lawyers at CBC (our national public television station) head office did not stand up to the lawyers from the Bayer company. Our newspaper has said that it will publish the graph. I will ask Allen if he might put it on his wonderful imidacloprid website.

Free trade probably prohibits any action that may harm Bayers profits in the US an the UK, even though it will decimate our food production.

Canada sells Asbestos, even though it's illegal here. When companies complain, we invoke free trade laws. Damned if I know why it's still illegal here, other than the fact that it kills people.

My theory on the truck crashes is that they all happened while trying to sneak past BP stations.

Re:What is amazing (1)

AlecC (512609) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829336)

But the whole point of the transportation is to move bees to the different orchard areas at the times that they are in flower. The routine trading involved with fixed bee colonies would be tiny. What they are doing is moving bees from California's early flowering orchards to Oregon's later ones and then Washington's even later one, then perhaps over to Florida for a bit of subtropical winter pollination. Limiting to one state would remove the reason for moving them, and require major changes to farming practice (which, maybe, are needed).

Re:What is amazing (1)

RogerWilco (99615) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829830)

My guess is that the bees are needed in different states during the season as different plants need to be pollinated. When a certain crop or fruit tree blooms will will depend a lot on location.

Re:What is amazing (1)

JoeMerchant (803320) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829994)

There's at least one movie about it:

http://movies.netflix.com/WiMovie/Vanishing-of-the-Bees/70166291?trkid=438403 [netflix.com]

More bee transport is leading to more bee crashes, but the root cause of increased transport (including flying bees in from Australia to the USA) is colony collapse disorder. And, if the conclusions drawn in the movie are correct, CCD stems from the use of persistent pesticides in the growing of corn, soy, cotton, wheat, etc. They go on to describe bans on these pesticides in Europe and how the bees have bounced back there.

Someone had to ... (0, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829022)

Bees you say?

http://www.apathymachine.com/gallery/d/1973-1/oprah-bees.gif

Fear of bees? (1)

Coisiche (2000870) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829024)

If trucks transporting bees are statistically more likely to crash than other trucks (although an example of two doesn't suggest so) then you'd have to consider what might cause that and maybe it's drivers being just a little bit nervous about there being a few million bees just a few feet away.

Re:Fear of bees? (2)

delinear (991444) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829200)

More likely there's only the perception that bee trucks are crashing more often because the media pick up on the slightly more interesting cargo. I'm sure trucks full of salt or beans or cushions crash all the time, they just don't stick in the mind or get the same media focus as "25 million bees loosed by crash!!". If anything, I'd say the crashes are suggestive that the drivers aren't nervous of their cargo - if they were they'd probably take more care (it's rare to hear of cargos of toxic chemicals or nuclear waste crashing, probably because the people driving them around are terrified and extra careful).

Oh come on (2)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829232)

You don't think the media can make something out a truck full of CUSHION's crashing?

As for beans... those jokes just write themselves.

This is the media, low standards are to them a challenge.

Re:Oh come on (1)

Riceballsan (816702) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829366)

Oh absolutely, it will make the local headlines every time, and if worded right someone might send it in to Leno to get some attention there. However the bean jokes won't really make it past the local news.

Sounds like... (1)

Kagetsuki (1620613) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829036)

the start of a Hitchcock movie.

Recount (2)

JustOK (667959) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829038)

They accounted for ALL 25 000 000 bees? Were any hurt in the accident? Did any die?
A suspiciously round number. too.

Re:Recount (3, Insightful)

Arlet (29997) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829068)

The article mentions 25 million, not 25000000.

You're adding 6 extra significant digits that weren't there, and then joke about it.

Re:Recount (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829082)

erm... what?

Re:Recount (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829086)

Except they didn't add six extra significant digits but I will. Beware the suspiciously round 2.5000000 * 10^7 bees!

Re:Recount (0)

tgd (2822) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829592)

There are 10 types of bees in the world. Those that can be counted in binary, and those that can't.

Re:Recount (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830026)

The article mentions 25 million, not 25000000.

You're adding 6 extra significant digits that weren't there, and then joke about it.

Actually, Arlet, 25 million is 25000000. Just saying.

Re:Recount (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829094)

Its really not that hard,Its really quite simple, all you gotta do is find the queen and the rest will attack you, then you put yourself or some gullible participant inside a cage, then put the queen down, and then they leave you alone.

Just like geeks and coffee beans, or boys and video games, or men and cars/women.

Re:Recount (2, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829190)

Half a bee is unaccounted for. Eric is said to be distraught.

Lost moon of Posh? Spice? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829042)

Someone! The Doctor wont listen to me. The bees are disappearing!

Re:Lost moon of Posh? Spice? (0)

wed128 (722152) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829930)

This is exactly what i thought of...I'm surprised this comment is so far down!

IT'S A CONSPIRACY!!! (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829044)

Clearly an EVIL conspiracy of some sort - we just have to figure out what and who?

AREA 51 is not far from there, could this be related to the UFO they have hidden???

Re:IT'S A CONSPIRACY!!! (2)

Neil Boekend (1854906) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829076)

The magnetic field of the UFO disturbes the sense of direction of the bees and thus they collectively bash their heads in against the board separating them from the driver. As the driver is stung by the surviving bees it fails to controll the truck and thus the truck crashes.

The conspiracy is that they claim they have found all the bees (who counted them? It must be a lie!) in order to be able to "disprove" the truth, since the thruth could not have happend if the bees survived.
Thus the existence of the UFO's has been covered up.

Re:IT'S A CONSPIRACY!!! (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829746)

I thought it was the bees from the x-files movie.

I for one think that they easily found all of the bees. I mean when you have ufos it is easy to track down and beam all of the bees back into a hive.

IT REALLY MUST BE A CONSPIRACY!!!! (0)

pearl298 (1585049) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829052)

Clearly an EVIL conspiracy of some sort - we just have to figure out what and who? AREA 51 is not far from there, could this be related to the UFO they have hidden???

I've heard of bean counters, but ... (1)

narcc (412956) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829104)

25 million bees that closed the road have been accounted for

So ... who counted them all?

Re:I've heard of bean counters, but ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829164)

The important question is not who counted them, but how did they get the bees to stay still and not get out of order while they were being counted. This question is far more interesting than why so many bee trucks overturn.

Re:I've heard of bean counters, but ... (1)

delinear (991444) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829214)

That's simple, you just paint a number on the back of each one with a tiny little paintbrush to make sure you don't count any twice.

Re:I've heard of bean counters, but ... (1)

Hognoxious (631665) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829636)

Or attach an RFID tag to each one. That's the solution to everything these days, isn't it?

Re:I've heard of bean counters, but ... (1)

Kaenneth (82978) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829648)

Rainman.

Definently 25,000,000 bees, Definently... time for Wapner.

Vanishing of the Bees (1)

BlahSnarto (45250) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829118)

There is a really good documentary about why this is happening. It has a lot to do with the pesticides we use and the monoculture we are moving to in planting crops.

If you are truly interested please check out the website (http://www.vanishingbees.com/). I think netflix also has this as a streaming feature also, not sure now since i canceled my netflix :P

Re:Vanishing of the Bees (1)

EdZ (755139) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829192)

Last I heard, CCD was linked pretty strongly to a combination of a fungus and a virus, occurring in every colony affected in the study (but individually not accounting for the effect).

Re:Vanishing of the Bees (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829396)

Last I heard, CCD was linked pretty strongly to a combination of a fungus and a virus, occurring in every colony affected in the study (but individually not accounting for the effect).

Oh, damn, now you did it.

You crushed a "Humanity is teh EVIL!!!!" fantasy with actual facts.

How dare you.

Re:Vanishing of the Bees (1)

Cwix (1671282) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829964)

Lol an unsubstantiated claim crushes all opposition?

Fungus/virus may very well be the problem, but you cant claim that the other viewpoints are wrong based upon something someone heard once.

Re:Vanishing of the Bees (2)

Attila Dimedici (1036002) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829800)

Last I heard, CCD was linked pretty strongly to a combination of a fungus and a virus, occurring in every colony affected in the study (but individually not accounting for the effect).

With the rise of migratory bee-keeping (as mentioned in the summary) suspected of being the factor that has lead to the increased spread of these issues in bee colonies. My understanding was the key insight that led them to do this study was that someone correlated the increased incidence of bee colony die off with the increase in migratory bee-keeping. Migratory bee-keeping allowed for an explanation of the, relatively, recent increase in the incidence of bee colonies being infected with both the virus and the fungus.

Re:Vanishing of the Bees (1)

socrplayr813 (1372733) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829460)

I think netflix also has this as a streaming feature also, not sure now since i canceled my netflix :P

Yup, it's on there. We watched it last week. Surprisingly, it was fairly interesting.

I wonder... (0, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829120)

When the majority of the population will realize just how truely FUCKED the world would be without bees...

never?

Best DUI excuse ever. (1)

outsider007 (115534) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829122)

With something like that in your pocket, you just pound the brewskies going down the road without a care in the world.

Why so many wrecks. (2)

SeaFox (739806) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829198)

Obviously the killer bees are lying in wait, to ambush the semis as they come around the corner on the highway in an effort to free their cousins.

Obligatory (0)

antifoidulus (807088) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829242)

I for one welcome our new truck-crashing bee overlords.

It should be obvious (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829264)

"Why So Many Crashes of Bee-Carrying Trucks?"

Because bees are crappy drivers?

They could not reach the pedals... (0)

fotoguzzi (230256) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829286)

...with their tiny little legs.

France knows about colony collapse disorder (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829324)

Colony collapse disorder is caused by the pesticides we put on our grain seed. Scientists figured out how to make the whole plant resistant to pests. Our EPA / FDA tested the stuff with adult bees and approved it. They didn't check to see what happens to the bee larvae - the new bees (as opposed to nubies) have no sense of direction and can't survive outside the colony for more than 24 hours.

France knows this. France has banned the pesticides. The USA needs more proof.

Why so many? (1)

Lumpy (12016) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829352)

It seems that the skill of Semi truck drivers have went from skilled professionals to "i can drive a truck" idiots. you used to feel somewhat safe around semi trucks, now mostly idiots drive them that in order to drive 0.5mph faster than the one in front of them they cut hard into passing traffic, many times causing accidents so they can drive 0.5mph faster than the other truck that they were getting a drafting effect from and saving fuel.

in the past 4 years we have had 5 semis drop off of an overpass because it seems they cant read the big yellow sign that says, "25mph ramp speed"

it's just idiots driving big rigs.

Re:Why so many? (2)

HBI (604924) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829532)

With self-insured big trucking outfits having a one strike rule for their drivers, does this surprise you? A single ticket or accident ends your career with any big outfit. At that point, you can't get hired in the industry unless you can pony up the cash for your own private tractor. Anecdotal story: I once saved a driver's job by getting a ticket issued for backing up into a telephone pole overturned in NYC traffic court. If the ticket had stood, he'd have been unemployed the next day.

Never mind the GPS tracking of their rigs...true story, I got a call in 1992 or 3 to drive to a shopping mall in Brielle, NJ. There was a JB Hunt rig sitting there parked. I was told to take pictures of it, leave, then send them to the safety department. It seems the driver had gone to visit his girlfriend there with his rig. They saw the transponder there and wanted documentation so that he could be fired when he showed up at his terminal in Ohio or somewhere. Mind you, he was going to show up on time at the terminal, but that didn't matter, he'd diverted from their mandated route.

Policies like this create a lot of churn in the industry. Who would want to work for these people long term?

The end result is that the quality of long haul drivers declines over time. It also means they pay less to drivers over time. I think that's the objective.

How many? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829380)

25 million bees that closed the road have been accounted for? How did they do that? One at a time?

Are there 'so many'? (4, Insightful)

mccalli (323026) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829498)

How many bee transport journeys were made? What percentage of those journeys resulted in accidents? How does that compare as a percentage to the transportation of other goods?

It's not a possible question to answer without a lot more data. It's not even possible to determine the question has a valid premise as yet.

Cheers,
Ian

Had to read the article... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829560)

...to see what all the buzz was about.

Terrorist using Bees? (1)

Danathar (267989) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829658)

What a nightmare....a bunch of Terrorists hijack 4 or 5 mega trucks full of bees into Times square and then crash the trucks into the median releasing them. Now THAT would be horrific.

Covered in BEES... (0)

EnsignCrusher (2464930) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829668)

Surely there's an Eddie Izzard joke in here somewhere.

Really? They are *all* accounted for? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829672)

"...and officials say 25 million bees that closed the road have been accounted for..."

"1,234,112, 1,234,113, 1,234,114, 1,234,115... damnit, will you all stop flying around, I have to account for you all!"
 

Honey Has Become Very Expensive (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37829724)

At least here in Germany, a glass of pure (unblended) honey costs about €10, that's about US$15. Bee populations have been dying off over here as well.

Just BEE more careful when driving (0)

TheFakeMcCoy (1485631) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829766)

Really all there is too it

Keep the bees at home (1)

GordoTheGeek (608960) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829862)

Not to lend credence to anything that one might read on about.com, but it's not just "bee researchers" that are starting to look at migratory beekeeping with a jaundiced eye. Inspectors are looking more carefully at the truckloads as they cross state lines as well. Trucking them all over the country not only spreads pathogens, but exposes the colony to a witches brew of agricultural chemicals and pesticides. CCD-affected hives tend to exhibit symptoms of any number of bee diseases and parasites, but also residue of dozens of pesticides.

Pesticide Pollen (1)

randomErr (172078) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829870)

One of the more interesting theories is that many GMO crops now produce a pesticide to kill off the wrong bugs. The idea is two fold:
  • - The pesticide builds up in adults and the hive and cause infertility
  • - The honey becomes unappetizing and the bees stave

Why Migratory Beekeeping? (1)

Dr. Hok (702268) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829906)

AFAICT migratory beekeeping is unheard of in other parts of the world. Why does the US do it? Does it have any benefit over stationary bees?

Re:Why Migratory Beekeeping? (1)

GordoTheGeek (608960) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829974)

It's of no benefit to the bees, but the $100/hive that the beekeepers get to truck the hives around the country often forms a large portion of their income. The California almond industry is the biggest user if migratory hives and that won't change any time soon. The San Joaquin valley is is heavily loaded with almond trees that any resident bees would starve after the blooms drop. There's nothing else for miles around.

Re:Why Migratory Beekeeping? (1)

Skinkie (815924) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829980)

It is not unheard. It is even very common in China. The benefit for bee's: there is none. The benefit for the farmer: he gets his fruit, or more general in the USA: almond tree's pollinated. The benefit for the commercial beekeeper: more money with fewer bee's. The benefit for the bees? None, they even feed bee's antibiotics. And bee's like any animal needs a diversity of pollen, not only pollen from the same flowers. Because proteins are different in different flowers. (Don't fall in the trap that bee's only need nectar, nectar is energy, pollen is nutrition.)

Another unsustainable farming practice (1)

AttillaTheNun (618721) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829924)

I'm not saying it's the cause of CCD, but trucking bees across the continent and working them year round doesn't mimic their natural cycles, not to mention the heavy dependence on fossil fuels for all the transportation. Just my gut feeling, but I get the sense we're pushing things a bit too far here.

Hauling bees (5, Interesting)

Charliemopps (1157495) | more than 2 years ago | (#37829952)

My family farms cranberries, so I get to haul bees all the time. This doesn't have anything to do with missing honey bees. There are plenty of them where we're at. This is more like "Fertilizing" the bees. Farmers want more than natural usually provides. If they miss a season, it's no big deal. This is just the latest fad in "How to get more yield" In fact, most people near me are using bumble bees, which to my knowledge aren't having the problems honey bees are. Farmers share them around here. One sends his bees over, while you let him borrow a tractor, etc...

also, more accidents hauling bees? Yea... try hauling a couple hundred hives on a flatbed and it becomes obvious why there are so many crashes. They get into the cab... no mater how tight you've got the windows shut. We've taken to wearing bee suits while we drive. Then you have all the other people on the road that seem to drive differently, especially when they are on motorcycles or convertibles, when you pull up next to them with a couple million bees in tow.

You're asking us?! (1)

SpaghettiPattern (609814) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830012)

There's no plausible hypotheses let alone an answer in the summary. So we're asked to provide them?! A bunch of unwashed geeks that avoid fresh air like the plague? Gimme a break.

simple explanation (1)

burris (122191) | more than 2 years ago | (#37830016)

The mysterious force that causes truckloads of bees to overturn also causes wild car chases to overturn a fruit vendors stall or strike an old flatbed truck carrying four dozen chicken coops.

BEEEES! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37830030)

I like my women like I like my coffee.

COVERED IN BEES.

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