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770 comments

what's the obsession with the latest version (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855446)

if a device works on a given version of the OS, leave it the hell alone

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (1)

somersault (912633) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855478)

Amen. Don't buy it if you aren't happy with it the way it is, or it's a flagship model that is basically guaranteed to get the updates you're hoping for. Updates are a bonus, not a guarantee.

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (1, Troll)

mcvos (645701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855730)

Then TFA is definitely informative, because it points out that Android phones don't get the bonuses that iPhones do. It's valuable information.

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855748)

Amen. Don't buy it if you aren't happy with it the way it is, or it's a flagship model that is basically guaranteed to get the updates you're hoping for. Updates are a bonus, not a guarantee.

The original Motorola Droid was precisely that: a flagship model. Last major update was in 2010. Last security update a few months later. Not a peep out of Verizon since then. Not sure if I could update it via Google.

The device does what I bought it for, so I'm not terribly angry about it, but I'm still annoyed that I can't even try to upgrade it. (If the upgraded OS eats too much battery because the hardware's too old/slow, that should be my call, not the carrier's - if it were the equivalent PC, I could always wipe Win8Beta and reinstall XP SP3. But it's not.)

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (1)

h4rr4r (612664) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855890)

Mine is running 2.3.7, last updated a week or two ago.

CM7.1 FTW!

If there are no more apps for your device (5, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855496)

Applications designed for newer APIs won't run on devices whose operating system doesn't support those APIs. And as applications get updated to correct security problems and add features, some of them also get updated to use the new APIs.

Re:If there are no more apps for your device (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855624)

Applications designed for newer APIs won't run on devices whose operating system doesn't support those APIs. And as applications get updated to correct security problems and add features, some of them also get updated to use the new APIs.

It's so weird... why, it's almost as though the responsible thing to do is to settle on a stable API and then not change it.

Re:If there are no more apps for your device (2)

mcvos (645701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855788)

No, that's an easy thing to do, but not necessarily responsible. If your goal is to provide users the best possible experience, then you do want to give them access to new features, but in a way that keeps everything working as smoothly as you originally intended. Apple does this, Android manufacturers don't.

Re:If there are no more apps for your device (1)

johnlcallaway (165670) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855688)

So the the real study would be what is the demand for apps on the current OS that aren't available for a prior OS, and a break down of the demand by phone. Other than that, the study is an Apple fanboy propaganda piece that is just like the Apple phone, overrated and not really of much value when compared to other studies.

Re:If there are no more apps for your device (1)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855784)

Can you give an example where an Android phone was unable to run any modern apps because its OS was outdated?

I sincerely doubt it. There are tons of apps that work just fine on Froyo or Eclair, just as most programs work just fine on Windows XP. You don't need to update to Vista or 7, and you don't need to update to ICS.

This is a fictional problem, invented by Apple fanbois trying to convince themselves that their choice was the "right" one. The notion that both products can be good, and that not everything comes down to good vs bad eludes them.

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (4, Insightful)

TheRaven64 (641858) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855514)

Because old versions often have bugs, some of which are security holes. Given the frequency with which remotely exploitable bugs appear in the Linux kernel, leaving a large number of devices with an unpatched two-year-old kernel is just asking for someone to build a botnet out of them. A very lucractive botnet, as all it needs to do is make all of the phones make one spurious call to a premium rate number for a minute and the botnet author can retire.

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855534)

I don't think that Google ever unlocked the last functionality built into the Nexus One handset. I haven't run stock firmware for a while because Google wasn't providing support for hardware that I paid for. It took them quite a while to provide the color notifications, and ultimately didn't provide the user with a way of changing the colors, and I'm not sure that stock firmware allows the user to use the built in FM receiver.

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (1)

Gideon Wells (1412675) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855536)

My Android phone was more than capable of handling the new OS when I began getting cross at my provider and HTC. I know, I rooted it. I rooted the next and had some minor root issues. My issue was my phone's internal memory was squat for apps. The Kindle app filled it up to the point of headache. All I wanted was the ability to run my apps off of my SD card, but my phone was deemed obsolete to encourage new model buying.

This is why I went to the iPhone. Say what you will about Apple and their closed garden. They are updating phones far older than my "obsolete" 'droid.

Security? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855568)

So I assume you never patch your OS with security updates, then. Would you mind posting the IP address of a few computers you use?

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855604)

Newer versions mean more features and software developers try to focus on only a few versions (either because they want to use newer APIs or less versions to test against)...

So, yeah, OS version is important.

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (2, Insightful)

Fallingcow (213461) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855770)

A fractured platform is hell for developers and hell for security. By all means, don't worry about it if you don't care about developer relations, having nice apps on your platform, having consistently-behaving apps on your platform, or not giving your CC info to Russian hackers.

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (1)

tommy8 (2434564) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855796)

So big security holes shouldn't be fixed?! Most updates are to fix security vulnerabilities.

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855886)

Android has had a large number of security problems so not patching isn't an option for people that care about security. Unfortunately, if you want any semblance of security on Android, you have to "jailbreak" the phone because the carriers either don't offer updates in a timely manner or they don't provide them at all. This has caused the vast majority of Android phones to be left entirely vulnerable to several widely known vulnerabilities.

This isn't the case with iOS or BlackBerry.

Re:what's the obsession with the latest version (1)

alen (225700) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855914)

apple actually gives you a lot of value with new versions of iOS. iOS 4 was a huge camera improvement. iOS 5 is free texting to any iOS device.

the free 3GS phones have iOS 5 so that a family can buy the good ones for mom and dad and the cheapo ones for the kids and kill the texting plan

Buy Apple (0, Troll)

Hatta (162192) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855450)

This is the most convincing case to buy Apple products I've ever seen.

Re:Buy Apple (2, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855518)

With iOS there's also the $99 per year tax to run applications from outside the App Store. So why switch to iOS when installing CyanogenMod is just as easy?

Re:Buy Apple (1)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855620)

With iOS there's also the $99 per year tax to run applications from outside the App Store.

Don't forget the 90 day limit before you have to repackage and re-upload the application!

Re:Buy Apple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855746)

The 90 day limit can be extended to a year with some extra effort.

Re:Buy Apple (4, Interesting)

GauteL (29207) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855700)

It is a fair point about the walled garden of the Apple ecosystem, but I'm willing to bet that at least 90% of all Android phone users will never install an App from outside the Android marketplace and will never, ever consider installing CyanogenMod or even know what it is.

Re:Buy Apple (5, Insightful)

maxdread (1769548) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855810)

That same 90% won't care about upgrading to the next version of Android and may not even know it exists.

Re:Buy Apple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855714)

What the hell are you even talking about?

Re:Buy Apple (0)

smash (1351) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855734)

As opposed to buying new hardware every time a new Android release comes out, and putting up with shitty feeling handsets to boot?

Re:Buy Apple (1)

MightyYar (622222) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855814)

With iOS there's also the $99 per year tax to run applications from outside the App Store.

Google for Cydia.

Re:Buy Apple (1)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855566)

Only if you were dumb enough to buy a locked phone, the rest of us unlocked our phones when we got them and installed CyanogenMod or something similar. And those that were dumb enough to get a locked down phone are still in a better position than with the iPhone as once they do jailbreak it, they can install one of several custom firmwares.

Re:Buy Apple (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855648)

Neither Google nor CyanogenMod are going to blow you, no matter how much you fanboy for them.

Re:Buy Apple (0, Redundant)

GauteL (29207) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855642)

Note to moderators: Do not mod something down simply because you disagree with it.

Apple HAVE been much better and more consistent at supporting software updates on their phones years after release than what any major Android handset maker has been. This is not me being a fanboy, this is true, and something the Android handset makers (and the networks) should learn from.

Not everyone has time to fiddle with CyanogenMod and are ok with going an unsupported way on their phone. I personally want my handset maker to provide me with automatic updates in a timely manner.

Re:Buy Apple (0, Redundant)

GauteL (29207) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855660)

Note to moderators: Do not mod something down simply because you disagree with it. It is somewhat outrageous to mod the parent down simply because you don't like Apple.

Apple HAVE been much better and more consistent at supporting software updates on their phones years after release than what any major Android handset maker has been. This is not me being a fanboy, this is true, and something the Android handset makers (and the networks) should learn from.

Not everyone has time to fiddle with CyanogenMod and are ok with going an unsupported way on their phone. I personally want my handset maker to provide me with automatic updates in a timely manner.

No, this does not mean Apple are great at everything. But please give some credit where it is due.

Re:Buy Apple (0, Troll)

mcvos (645701) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855894)

This doesn't deserve to be modded Troll, because it's true. Apple's software support is obviously far, far better than that of any Android manufacturer, Google included (though they are easily the best in the Android crowd). Noting that does not make you a troll, nor even a fanboy. I don't like Apple's walled garden, and really prefer the openness of Android, but manufacturers seem dedicated to destroy their own market, and that pisses me off.

Like PC's (3, Insightful)

mehrotra.akash (1539473) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855472)

Why is it that unlike desktops and laptops, mobiles are locked down so tight
I can install virtually any OS on my PC, why cant the same be done with mobiles?

No standard boot process on ARM (5, Insightful)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855554)

The real reason: Because unlike Intel and IBM, ARM never managed to specify one standard boot process. Nearly x86 PC since the 1980s has supported BIOS, but every ARM platform has something different.

Re:Like PC's (3, Informative)

BasilBrush (643681) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855560)

Because the PC was designed in the early days of micro-computers and IBM made a couple of mistakes.

Re:Like PC's (2)

somersault (912633) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855576)

Ahem [xda-developers.com].

Mobiles are often locked down, similar to consoles. Both can be cracked. Of course, depending on the competence of the security and the competence of any crackers who want to open up the platform, not all will be.

Re:Like PC's (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855702)

Ahem [xda-developers.com].

Mobiles are often locked down, similar to consoles. Both can be cracked. Of course, depending on the competence of the security and the competence of any crackers who want to open up the platform, not all will be.

He wasn't asking how to pick the lock. He was asking why the door has a lock in the first place.

Reading comprehension: it's great!

Re:Like PC's (5, Insightful)

Microlith (54737) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855598)

Because every ARM board is unique, and there is no universal means for an OS to determine hardware capabilities and peripherals.

On the PC we have the BIOS, PCI, ACPI, and a number of other facilities that work well enough that the OS can automatically enumerate the hardware and configure itself to operate on the platform. With ARM devices, even between two boards with the same SoC you'll have peripherals connected via different GPIOs, interrupts on different pins, a wide array of voltage regulators (some more, some less, all connected differently.)

And since everything is stored in a flash chip at a custom location, working with the kernel and bootloader is a lot like working with the BIOS on your pc- if you mess it up, your device is screwed (unless it can cold flash, has a hard ROM for flashing, or accessible JTAG, all of which are extremely rare on consumer level devices.)

But even if you have all of the above taken care of, the complete lack of effort on behalf of Google and the hardware vendors to getting their changes upstream in the kernel generally means that porting newer versions of Android to older devices is a pain in the ass due to needing to rework or sometimes rewrite the drivers. Normally they would be updated and tested by people as the kernel moved forward, but instead they rot in tarballs and zip files out on vendor websites.

Never mind Google's wacky reworking of the file system. I'm sure devices like the Nexus One have plenty of space to store ICS. But their broken layout and insistence on storing applications on that NAND instead of having a higher capacity internal NAND or only storing applications on the SD card is a large part of this problem as well.

Re:Like PC's (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855874)

Because at a fundamental level, every PC is the same machine (hence "PC clone") - you can install one of a variety of operating systems on a variety of machines, all of which are designed to appear the same.

Contrast this with mobiles where there is no common hardware platform/reference design, and therefore each machine is an almost unique blend of various hardware options.

If they would publish the damned source (-1, Troll)

Tsingi (870990) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855476)

If they would publish the source, it wouldn't matter. But they don't.

And yes, that IS evil.

Re:If they would publish the damned source (3, Insightful)

SiChemist (575005) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855616)

What source have "they" (I presume you mean Google) not published? No phone running ICS has been released. Google has explained why they didn't release Honeycomb and they've committed to releasing the source for ICS soon after phones running ICS have been released. Ignorant troll is Ignorant.

What? (4, Insightful)

iONiUM (530420) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855482)

I'm so confused. First of all, this doesn't list the Samsung Galaxy, which has stayed updated. Or the S2 for that matter. Did they specifically pick Android devices that are not being updated (there are many, I don't deny that)?

Second of all, the original iPhone 2G, which I have, is definitely not supported by iOS5, or even iOS4 for that matter. What are they smoking?

I can't help but think this is intentionally skewed for Apple...

Re:What? (1, Insightful)

hedwards (940851) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855602)

Probably just another pro-Apple troll post. By the time a handset is truly no longer being supported by Android, chances are good that it's out of warranty and you may as well just unlock it and install a custom firmware.

Unless you were dumb enough to get a phone that was tightly locked down with a custom UI, in which case it kind of serves you right.

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855680)

I agree. This article is complete non-sense. How many devices does Apple iOS support? 1 the iPhone by... Apple!
Google has no control on how phone makers support/update their versions of Android. It's like blaming Microsoft because a software vendor does not support the latest Windows version.

Re:What? (1)

nbetcher (973062) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855684)

It does seem a bit skewed towards Apple with the exclusion of the Samsung Galaxy.
As for the iPhone 2G, the graph clearly does not indicate that it has current support updates. This is NOT a timeline, it is a bar graph, so read it appropriately. The support was terminated shortly after the second year, which was early 2010. It is now late 2011 - so support updates for it have been missing for over a year and a half.

Re:What? (4, Informative)

benjymous (69893) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855686)

I think it should read "highest available version at that time" rather than "current major version" - i.e. for the first three years of the original iPhone's life, it was possible to run what was, at the time, the highest available version of iOS on it.

Re:What? (4, Informative)

GauteL (29207) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855732)

"Second of all, the original iPhone 2G, which I have, is definitely not supported by iOS5, or even iOS4 for that matter. What are they smoking?"

They are simply stating that the iPhone 2G was supported and up to date for the first three years of its life. This is true. Support was dropped with iOS 4.0 which came out nearly exactly three years after the original iPhone.

The same goes for the iPhone 3G. Support and updates was dropped three years after it came out.

Re:What? (1)

iCEBaLM (34905) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855750)

The chart stops at June 2010 and it follows phones for the first three years of their life, so an IP2G had the latest OS three years after its release.

Perhaps you should read the chart?

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855850)

The iPhone 2G is called the 3G, iPhone release went like this iPhone, iPhone 3G, iPhone 3GS, iPhone 4, iPhone 4s.

The 3G is listed in the report, he has every iPhone on there except for the 4s, just released.

I think what you can take away from this though is the fact that Android devices for the most part are not updated and maintained by the hardware manufacturers either through the carrier or some other means like tethering through your PC while iPhones are for about 3 years after initial release which is over the normal 2 year contract.

Re:What? (1)

MochaMan (30021) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855878)

Not to mention they don't cover the fact that while the 3G was updated, the updates (particularly iOS4) left it barely useable. Tap camera... wait 30s... shutter opens. Tap Maps... wait 1 min... maps crashes. Tap it again... another crash... phone starting to heat up now. At first I thought it was faulty hardware, but my wife's had essentially the same problems.

Re:What? (1)

Archangel Michael (180766) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855882)

I smell Troll (article) just as you did. I did some quick research and one of the "worst" Android phones on the list, the HTC Hero, and checked Cyanogen Mod for compatibility, and guess what, it runs the current CM 7.1 just fine. While it is true that HTC and/or Sprint won't maintain it, doesn't mean it isn't supported.

http://download.cyanogenmod.com/?type=stable&device=heroc [cyanogenmod.com]

Yes, you have to "root" your phone, yes it isn't "supported" by HTC or Sprint, but so freakin what.

And if you HTC, Motorola or Samsung (who might actually be "getting it" and the carriers hand off support to CM when they don't want to support their phones any longer?

Re:What? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855888)

I'm so confused. First of all, this doesn't list the Samsung Galaxy, which has stayed updated. Or the S2 for that matter. Did they specifically pick Android devices that are not being updated (there are many, I don't deny that)?

Second of all, the original iPhone 2G, which I have, is definitely not supported by iOS5, or even iOS4 for that matter. What are they smoking?

I can't help but think this is intentionally skewed for Apple...

The chart reflects years of support. The 2G received update to 2.0 and then to 3.0 on the third year.
The Samsung Galaxy started receiving 2.2 many months after the Froyo was released and it was a "It will get an update", then "No, it won't" and then back to "There will be an update".
And Motorola Droid and the Froyo saga? Not to mention the Xperia X10 wich launched with fuckin' 1.6, received an update to 2.1 half a year after the release of 2.2 and finally after imense pressure from the community got the 2.3 (being on the bottom of the list of manufacturers helped that, otherwise it would have been Eclair forever).

And now even the original Nexus One won't get the ICS 4.0, while the Nexus S would get it. Same CPU, same RAM, a minor revision differences of GPUs, bu "It's simply too old" as they tell us.

Re:What? (1)

BasilBrush (643681) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855908)

I'm so confused. First of all, this doesn't list the Samsung Galaxy, which has stayed updated.

Looking for information on the Samsung Galaxy S, it doesn't seem to be that straight forward, according to Wikipedia.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samsung_Galaxy_S [wikipedia.org]

Depending on what carrier your on, and what country you're in, it might arrive at different times, via different processes. And this is a phone only 18 months old. iPhone updates all arrive the same day of release, and carry on for at least 3 years.

Why I Don't Buy Android: This (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855522)

Some will say "buy apple" some will bash Microsoft. The truth is they all have downsides, but a device that's got out of date software before my contract is up is a deal breaker.

And no "if it ain't broke don't fix it" does not apply. No phone that I know of is Orange Book A or B [wikipedia.org] certified, so they're all pretty guaranteed to have security flaws at the very minimum, and probably missing features I'd like as well.

Android is just another feature to buy (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855540)

This is news? I thought everyone knew this.

Seriously though, after Froyo I haven't gotten a single Android update. HTC swears up and down that their phones will get Android updates, but as I've said, this has only happened once. Why? As TFA mentions, manufacturers have a hand in this -- but only so far as they keep making better phones. This is creating a very fractured platform that pretty much ensures that what works on one phone doesn't work on the others. There's a reason Apple is sticking to a slow, slow release schedule and not letting anyone else make its phones.

The other half of the blame rests squarely on the carriers. Absurdly, they still, still , to this day try to lock down features on phones for a variety of lame-ass reasons. And they have to do this with every version of Android that comes out. Expecting a carrier to update something is like waiting for an ice age to end. So rather than approve OTA updates, they instead turn around and... start selling updated versions of Android as a goddamn feature in new phones. It's getting absurd.

Thank god for nokia... (1)

UngodAus (198713) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855546)

Like Apple, we care about legacy handsets. There are still updates coming out for Symbian 9.5 handsets.

Re:Thank god for nokia... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855840)

Not so much for Maemo. Each generation was abandoned shortly after they went to market. Even when the next version of the os would support current devices, they did not handle support well. The Nokia developers were already immersed and excited about the next version and showed little interest for bugs and features for the version users were stuck with.

Still, they were/are great devices. I would have preferred to see them engage the community more and open up the dev model a bit rather than switch to windows.

Hacking community (1)

Daniel_is_Legnd (1447519) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855548)

That's the beauty of the hacking community. Even with a locked bootloader, my Droid X is running the latest version of Android. (2.3.7)

This ignores hobbiest support (1, Informative)

mknewman (557587) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855550)

There are tons of good builds out there for almost every platform. http://www.xda-developers.com/ [xda-developers.com] is a prime spot to start looking. Heck, my phone started as a Windows Mobile 6.5 and I'm running Android on it. http://www.cyanogenmod.com/ [cyanogenmod.com] runs on a large number of platforms also. Who cares if the vendor continues to support it, most people wipe the stock image as soon as they get it home and put a better build on it. Nothing better than free support.

If by most people you mean 1% (5, Informative)

Brannon (221550) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855692)

But that would be a non-traditional usage of the word "most".

Re:This ignores hobbiest support (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855754)

...most people wipe the stock image as soon as they get it home... Android is the most common smartphone OS purchased in the last 2 years (at least in the US). Am I really to believe that "most" people do (or could, or should) be wiping those devices with new firmware/OS? If that's true, I despair for the long term future of Android. Or, maybe you're wrong.

Re:This ignores hobbiest support (5, Insightful)

seandiggity (992657) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855768)

most people wipe the stock image as soon as they get it home and put a better build on it.

I do this, you do this, most people do not.

Silly fanboys. (5, Insightful)

0100010001010011 (652467) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855556)

Look at Apple just releasing new hardware to force you to update! You sheep. Android is a FREE and OPEN platform. Why would anyone be locked down by iOS is beyond me. Keep it up Android and Android hardware suppliers, eventually you'll overrun the dark walled garden that is Apple.
</sarcasm>
(anything else I missed out on the typical Apple Bashing?)
-
My Optimus V doesn't technically have the latest released for it but Cyanogenmod and a root (Mind you rooting it took much longer than jailbreaking my iPod Touch) took care of that. But not everyone is this tech savvy, my girlfriend is still waiting on her update. And this is why people buy iOS devices for themselves, friends or family.

Re:Silly fanboys. (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855824)

Why would anyone be locked down by iOS is beyond me.

Because Jobs sold his soul to gain the power to control lesser minds. Even from the grave his power lingers.

Re:Silly fanboys. (2)

artor3 (1344997) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855896)

People buy iPhones because they don't want to wait for OS updates? Bullshit. Most people think ICS is something in their freezer. OS updates only matter to tech savvy users, and they can root and install a new version if it's really bothering them.

iOS5 won't run on iPhone 1st gen or 3G (0, Troll)

Flipao (903929) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855570)

So that chart lies from the get go. Plus, Android being Open Source allows users to port newer versions to older devices as long as they're powerful enough to run them.

Re:iOS5 won't run on iPhone 1st gen or 3G (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855630)

...being Open Source allows _users_ to port newer versions to older devices...

You're kidding right? You mean the 1% of the Users that are even capable or have the time or energy to port.

Re:iOS5 won't run on iPhone 1st gen or 3G (1)

smash (1351) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855806)

Sure, all you need is 16 gigs of ram in your workstation, a few hours of time, and access to source that doesn't currently exist and you're good.

Re:iOS5 won't run on iPhone 1st gen or 3G (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855640)

The chart doesn't allege that iOS5 will run on the original iPhone. Perhaps you should read it more carefully before you rush to attack any criticism of your cherished platform.

Re:iOS5 won't run on iPhone 1st gen or 3G (2)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855646)

The chart is for only the first three years that a device has been available. How long did it take between availability of the iPhone 1 and availability of iOS 4, or between availability of the iPhone 3G and availability of iOS 4.2 or 4.3 (the first to require a 3GS, I forget which)?

Or maybe you are IQ-limited in a way that prevents (0)

Brannon (221550) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855744)

you from understanding the chart. The x-axis is "time beyond introduction date of the phone".

Re:iOS5 won't run on iPhone 1st gen or 3G (5, Informative)

Sez Zero (586611) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855758)

The chart doesn't lie; you're failing to read it. The original iPhone and 3G were all able to use the most recent OS release three years after their release date, which is what the chart clearly shows.

iPhone 3G: on sale 7/11/08. Plus 3 years = 7/11/11. At that time, the 3G could use the latest iOS version, 4.2.1.

There is certainly a bias by omission. I would like to see more of the high-profile phones included (like the Galaxy mentioned above). But what I don't understand is this: why are phones being sold new that are already one or two OS versions behind?

Re:iOS5 won't run on iPhone 1st gen or 3G (1)

GauteL (29207) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855774)

RTFA again. The article simply shows that the iPhone and the iPhone 3G was supported and were given updates for three years after they were released. This is true.

Re:iOS5 won't run on iPhone 1st gen or 3G (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855778)

The chart is misleading, but if read closely: it's not saying the the original iPhone still runs the current OS, but that the original iPhone was able to run the most recent release of the OS from June, 2007 to June, 2010 (when the iPhone 4 was released with iOS 4 and the original iPhone was put out to pasture).

Well imagine that (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855600)

No wireless, out of date OS, less space than a Nomad. Lame.

Android is a fucking mess. Ridiculous nonsensical names. I mean, Froyo. Honeycomb? Really? Who came up with this shit?

How about version numbers so I know that this version is more or less recent than that version. Is that really asking so much?

And then on top of that the user or potential buyer needs to wade through all of the version restrictions on the various handsets. Oh no, you can't use Nutcracker on the Droid Extreme Elvis, that phone will only run Chicken Sandwich. To run Nutcracker you need the Droid Incredible.

And they wonder why the iPhone still sells by the millions

Android desserts vs. Mac OS X big cats (1, Informative)

tepples (727027) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855764)

Android is a fucking mess. Ridiculous nonsensical names. I mean, Froyo. Honeycomb? Really? Who came up with this shit?

Dessert makers. Doughnut, eclair, frozen yogurt, gingerbread, honey, and ice cream sandwiches are all sweet items associated with dessert. Is it any stranger than naming Mac OS X versions after big cats?

How about version numbers so I know that this version is more or less recent than that version

Alphabetical order. Donut is 1.6, Eclair is 2.0 and 2.1, FroYo is 2.2, Gingerbread is 2.3, Honeycomb is 3.0 and 3.1, and Ice Cream Sandwich is 4.0. It's better than Cheetah (10.0), Puma (10.1), Jaguar (10.2), Panther (10.3), Tiger (10.4), Leopard (10.5), Snow Leopard (10.6), and Lion (10.7), which show no alphabetical progression.

Oh no, you can't use Nutcracker on the Droid Extreme Elvis, that phone will only run Chicken Sandwich. To run Nutcracker you need the Droid Incredible.

Oh no, you can't run iOS 5 on an iPhone 1 or iPhone 3G; you need a 3GS, 4, or 4S.

Re:Well imagine that (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855798)

They do have version numbers. The naming scheme is alphabetical - 1.5 Cupcake, 1.6 Donut, 2.0 Eclair, 2.2 Froyo, 2.3 Gingerbread, 3.0 Honeycomb, 4.0 Ice Cream Sandwich.

You may as well ask why Linux versions use different names for each version, or why you have OSX Leopard, Lion and Tiger.

Engage

umm, Apple isn't current....see support list (1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855612)

I don't get the chart, the 1st Gen iPhone is stuck @ iOS 3.1.3 - TWO full iOS behind, yet shows current? It can't even run most of the new iOS 4 only apps, much less iOS 5, simply because Apple abandoned it.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_iOS_devices#iPhone

Re:umm, Apple isn't current....see support list (1)

smash (1351) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855834)

news flash: the first gen iPhone is significantly older than ANY android handset.

What a stupid us of statistics (2)

johnlcallaway (165670) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855628)

My wife has never upgraded her HTC Aria to the current OS, while I have. Why hasn't she??? THERE WAS NO NEED TO. Jeez people, get over it. Why did I upgrade?? Because I'm a geek and wanted to. I also had a memory issue with the HTC email program, and I was hoping it would resolve it, which it did. My wife doesn't use her HTC for email. In fact, she hardly uses it for anything except text message, phone calls, and the odd games here and there. Why the hell would she want to upgrade???

Now, if this guy weren't such an obvious Apple fanboy and decided to do some real work instead of just one that shows what he wants it to show, he would track down a sample population and find out how many actually give a fuck.

Re:What a stupid us of statistics (5, Insightful)

Astatine (179864) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855876)

She might not want to upgrade, but she *needs* to upgrade, to fix security vulnerabilities.

That's the #1 problem here.

Google needs to make this happen right now (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855652)

Now that Android has some traction, Google needs to forbid all manufacturer/carrier UI modifications or at least give customers the option of choosing unmodified Android when they first turn on the phone. Yes, every phone will look the same but so what? It will be a standardized user experience, with fast updates straight from Google.

Given HTC/Samsung's/etc track record of supporting their phones it is the only sensible way of creating the ultimate user experience.

* Owner of a Nexus S who has tried all manufacturer UIs like Sense, Touchwiz, MOTOBLUR, etc.

Re:Google needs to make this happen right now (1)

smash (1351) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855868)

the phone manufacturers will never go for that idea.

How about warranty support? (4, Interesting)

hawguy (1600213) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855690)

I don't care about having the latest/greatest Android OS, but I wish the carriers were required to provide warranty support for the full 2 year term of your contract.

My droid 1 stopped working 19 months into my contract. I had bought the WPP wireless protection plan and figured it would have me covered, but when I called Verizon, they said that it only covered accidental damage and that I wouldn't be covered. They did offer to sell me a refurb phone for $150 or something like that, and offered me an early upgrade with a new 2 year contract term. I thought about "accidentally" dropping the phone into the sink and then making a damage claim with WPP, but I found a used one on eBay for a bit less than the WPP deductable.

If the carriers are going to lock me into a 2 year contract that I can't cancel, why aren't they required to make sure that the equipment they sold me works throughout the entire contract?

At the very least, carriers should be required to let me drop the voice/data contract and pay only the phone subsidy ($15 - $20/mo?) if I want to end the contract.

but... (1)

smash (1351) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855694)

... android is open source though, port it yourself? this is why google is good and apple/IOS is bad - because with apple you're at the mercy of them making your handset obsolete.

Original iPhone (1)

C_Kode (102755) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855698)

An original iPhone with iOS4 was slow as hell. An original iPhone with iOS5? I don't even want to think about that.

The Nexus One isn't getting Android 4, because the hardware is too slow for it. While I would love to have Android 4, I don't want it on my Nexus One. I would rather my Nexus One (while I still have it anyway) to actually be reasonably functional.

Nothing new (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855752)

Phone manufacturers really suck when it comes to floating upgrades then later not actually providing them. Blackberry is really bad about it.

Never buy a phone expecting it will be upgradeable to the new version.

Supported but nearly unusable (1)

crafoo (591629) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855792)

First hand experience: iPhone 3G running iOS 3.3x is SLOW. Running iOS 4 it's nearly unusable. So while technically newer versions may be supported I would not recommend it. The first couple of releases of iOS 3 is probably where you should stay if you own a 3G.

HTC Dream G1 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855802)

"The" Google phone. The only Android designed by Google. Also known as "The Developer Phone" (due to being the main development platform sent to partners). Had a vibrant community, with the Cyanogen mod team it had some of the best Roms (read OS versions) available.
 
  But now Google has released a patch to break it so you can't install a new operating system (which is too bad because 2.3.7 roms were just becoming available) and breaking all existing non-standard installations.
 
  Google is attacking their more experienced users, which is REALLY sad because Android is probably the most hacker, advanced users, best, platform available. Two weeks ago I would have whole heartedly suggested you go out and buy an Android phone with a physical keyboard to ANYONE, it was simply the best in every way.
Now, however, if the person wants real freedom I have to tell them to consider Nokia handsets with Linux distros, or OpenMoko.
 
  They've made it so that well designed Android phones won't have longevity... sad really sad.

Android dissatisfaction (1)

Curunir_wolf (588405) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855842)

FTFA:

apparently Android phone makers think they can get you to buy a new phone by making you really unhappy with your current one.

Well I was fairly satisfied with my Motorola phone, which came with 2.1. They were very slow getting updates out, so when 2.2 was finally available I loaded it as part of the early "smoke test" group. Motorola and AT&T both included so much useless bloatware as part of the OS update (locked and unable to be removed, of course), that it essentially has no room left for any other apps. So their update left me even LESS happy with the phone, and just 9 months after purchase (and 15 until the contract ends). So, yea, I want another phone, but I'll never buy another from Motorola.

Disturbing and possibly misleading metric (2)

Sam H (3979) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855844)

I know it's hard to get a meaningful metric, but this chart makes me wonder about the trustworthiness of the study. There are approximately two major Android releases per year whereas there is only one major iOS upgrade per year. Thus "two major releases behind" means an average of 15 months late for an Android device, whereas "one major release behind" means an average of 18 months late for an iOS device. Yet by the look of the legend, the first one is supposed to be worse than the second one.

False comparison (2)

geekoid (135745) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855854)

and a stupid one as well. It shows a fundamental lack of understanding Apple and Android.

Android is an OS. Different compnais put it on different phones. Thnis means different capabilities and corporate plansd

Apple is the entire chain.

SO you can only compare phones running android individually, and not group them as 'Android'.

The advantage of Androids hardware diversity is that competition can happen, and they aren't locked into a 'box' form 3 years ago.
The advantage of Apple is that they will update it even if the update isn't needed for your phone.

The fact that he marks out yellow sections between green sections shows his agenda.

Updates are Android's weak point (1)

zerojoker (812874) | more than 2 years ago | (#37855856)

The sad fact is that while of course, the iPhone 3G won't get iOS5, you can roughly expect at least 2 years of updates for an iPhone. Whereas some (but not all) Android devices are given up much quicker.

Steve Ballmer's FUD is insofar correct in that if you want to update your Android-phone after the maker and/or carrier abandoned you, you indeed almost need a CS degree to update it on yourself.

The update process is indeed quite well-done on WP7

But Android is Open Therefore it's Better (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855864)

But Android is open! Open = good, closed = bad, therefore android is better! Idiot freetards.

My Motorola DEXT is rooted and happily running (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 2 years ago | (#37855872)

after a year of no sign of an update and I rooted the DEXT with http://www.cyanogenmod.com/ [cyanogenmod.com]
works perfectly.

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